Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Conservation Sciences Ph.D.

Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, 135 B Skok Hall, 2003 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612-624-7751)
  • Program Type: Doctorate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits: 48
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Doctor of Philosophy
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The conservation sciences (CS) program has two complementary objectives leading to a unique multidisciplinary program. The first is to provide students with sound graduate training in the biological sciences relevant to the global conservation of plants, animals, and ecosystems. The second objective promotes the study of social, political, and economic sciences that relate to recognition and solution of conservation problems. Students may select one of three tracks, conservation science track or fisheries and aquatic biology track or wildlife ecology and management track. Students may also pursue a joint degree in law and conservation sciences through the joint law degree program. The overall goal of the program is to prepare students to develop solutions or approaches to address problems that are scientifically and environmentally sound and likely to be acted upon or implemented within their social and political context.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.50.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
A BS/BA degree in biology or a closely related field is preferred. Applicants with a baccalaureate degree in another field are accepted, but these individuals may be required to take selected courses in biology. In general, PhD applicants holding a baccalaureate degree are first expected to complete a master's degree.
Special Application Requirements:
A statement of career goals and three letters of recommendation evaluating the applicant's potential for graduate study are required. Three letters of recommendation are required. Scores less than five years old from the General Test of the GRE are required. TOEFL is required for applicants who speak English as a second language. Applicants to the joint law degree program must also apply to the Law School. Application deadline is January 1. Typically, students are admitted only for fall semester.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 79
    • Internet Based - Writing Score: 21
    • Internet Based - Reading Score: 19
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 550
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 6.5
  • MELAB
    • Final score: 80
The preferred English language test is Test of English as Foreign Language.
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
12 credits are required in the major.
12 credits are required outside the major.
24 thesis credits are required.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 3.00 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 1 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
PhD students complete 48 credits, 24 credits in courses and 24 thesis credits. Students are expected to show competency in both the biological and social sciences. With their advisory committee, students develop a program that emphasizes the ecological and social aspects of conservation. Dissertation research may require proficiency in supporting areas (e.g., statistics, computing, communications).
Core Courses
All PhD students are required to take following core courses
FW 8452 - Conservation Biology (3.0 cr)
CONS 8095 - Contemporary Problems in Conservation Biology (1.0 cr)
Seminar Requirement
PhD students are required to take 3 semesters of conservation biology seminar, CBIO 8001. FAB track PhD students may substitute 1-2 semesters of FW 8200 to meet 3 semester conservation biology seminar requirement.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CONS 8001 - Conservation Biology Seminar (1.0 cr)
· FW 8200 - Seminar (1.0-4.0 cr)
Statistics Requirement
PhD students should take one statistics course (minimum of 3 semester credits) from the following list, or choose from 5- or 8-xxx level courses in other departments in consultation with the advisor and/or SAC.
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
· FW 8051 - Statistical Modeling of Ecological Data using R and WinBugs/JAGS (4.0 cr)
· PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods (3.0 cr)
Thesis
All PhD students are required to take 24 thesis semester credits
CONS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral (1.0-24.0 cr)
Joint- or Dual-degree Coursework:
Joint degree in conservation sciences and law Students may take a total of 12 credits in common among the academic programs.
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Students may not complete the program with more than one sub-plan.
Conservation Science
Conservation science track is available for MS, PhD, and joint degree students wishing to emphasize this concentration within a conservation sciences. This track name will be indicated on the student's transcript. This track provides structure and oversight for students interested in the interface of population, species, and ecosystem biology with disciplines of social sciences, education, economics.
Conservation Science - Electives
Doctoral students should take a minimum of 14 credits from the following list, or choose 5- or 8-xxx level courses from other departments in consultation with SAC to meet minimum credit requirements.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household (3.0 cr)
· APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 8550 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management (2.0 cr)
· GEOG 8280 - Biogeography (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes (3.0 cr)
· ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum (1.0 cr)
· LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop (1.0 cr)
· LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology (3.0 cr)
· PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes (3.0 cr)
· PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5511 - Community Economic Development (3.0 cr)
· VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
Fisheries and Aquatic Biology
Three-quarters of the global ecosystem is water and most is a global commons. Many biologists and economists argue that freshwater is one of the most critical global resources and that the functional integrity and biodiversity within freshwater and marine ecosystems are highly threatened. The fisheries and aquatic biology (FAB) track is available for MS, PhD, and joint degree students wishing to emphasize this concentration within a CS major. The track name will be indicated on the student's transcript and may be useful to the graduate for obtaining jobs with many federal and state agencies where such expertise is specified in job announcements or hiring criteria. The track designation clearly indicates that the student has specialized coursework and research or project experience leading to expertise in fisheries or aquatic biology. Combined with a typical undergraduate degree in biology or natural resource science, careful selection of courses in the graduate program will satisfy the educational requirements for professional certification by the American Fisheries Society.
Students in the track must be advised or co-advised by a faculty member affiliated with the track. Request for admission to the track may be made during the application process or any time after the student is admitted to the CS graduate program. Students in the track must meet all requirements for the PhD in CS. Students who designate this track will be expected to work closely with their Student Advisory Committee (SAC) to develop an appropriate course of study. The track coordinator will review each student's academic program to examine how track expectations are met and forward it with a recommendation to the director of graduate studies for approval.
Fisheries and Aquatic Biology - Required Courses
In addition to course requirements for the conservation sciences major, PhD students in fisheries and aquatic biology track are required to take minimum of 8 semester credits from following list. Other advanced courses or colloquia on fisheries or aquatic biology that are not listed here may also satisfy needs of students in the track. Please check with FAB track coordinator to add other courses.
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5605 - Limnology Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· EEB 8601 - Introduction to Stream Restoration (3.0 cr)
· EEB 8602 - Stream Restoration Practice (2.0 cr)
· ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry (3.0 cr)
· FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· FW 5136 - Ichthyology (4.0 cr)
· FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis (3.0 cr)
· FW 8459 - Stream and River Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FW 8465 - Fish Habitats and Restoration (3.0 cr)
Fisheries and Aquatic Biology - Electives
PhD students should take a minimum of 6 semester credits either from the following list, or choose 5- or 8-xxxx courses from other departments in consultation with the advisor and/or SAC.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household (3.0 cr)
· APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 8550 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management (2.0 cr)
· GEOG 8280 - Biogeography (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes (3.0 cr)
· ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum (1.0 cr)
· LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop (1.0 cr)
· LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology (3.0 cr)
· PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes (3.0 cr)
· PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5511 - Community Economic Development (3.0 cr)
· VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
Wildlife Ecology and Management
The Wildlife Ecology and Management track is available for students wishing to emphasize this concentration within the conservation sciences degree. The track provides structure and oversight for students interested in the interface of population, species, and ecosystem biology with the disciplines of social sciences, education, and economics. The track name will be posted to the transcript, and may be useful to the graduate for obtaining jobs with many federal and state agencies where such expertise is specified in job announcements or hiring criteria. The track designation clearly indicates that the student has specialized coursework and research or project experience leading to expertise in wildlife ecology and management.
Students in the track must be advised or co-advised by a faculty member affiliated with the track. Requests for admission to the track may be made during the application process or at any time after the student is admitted to conservation sciences. Students in the track must meet all MS degree requirements. Students who designate this track will be expected to work closely with their Student Advisory Committee (SAC) to develop an appropriate course of study. The track coordinator will review each student's academic program to examine how track expectations are met and forward it with a recommendation to the director of graduate studies for approval.
Wildlife Ecology & Management - Electives
Doctoral students should take a minimum of 14 credits from the following list, or choose 5- or 8-xxx level courses from other departments in consultation with SAC to meet minimum credit requirements.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household (3.0 cr)
· APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4129 - Mammalogy (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5409 - Evolution (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5601 - Limnology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 8550 {Inactive} (1.0 cr)
· ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies (3.0 cr)
· ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior (3.0 cr)
· ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function (4.0 cr)
· ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation (3.0 cr)
· FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations (4.0 cr)
· FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management (2.0 cr)
· GEOG 8280 - Biogeography (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
· GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty (3.0 cr)
· HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration (4.0 cr)
· ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes (3.0 cr)
· ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes (1.0 cr)
· ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum (1.0 cr)
· LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop (1.0 cr)
· LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology (3.0 cr)
· PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes (3.0 cr)
· PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5511 - Community Economic Development (3.0 cr)
· VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences


View checkpoint chart:
· Conservation Sciences Ph.D.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

Graduate Admissions

Graduate School Fellowships

Graduate Assistantships

Colleges and Schools

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
FW 8452 - Conservation Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Seminar examining population- to system-level biological issues (genetics; demographic processes; community, ecosystem, and landscape scale interaction; restoration ecology; ex situ strategies for restoration and recovery) and societal issues (social, economic, cultural perspectives; sustainable development strategies; roles of institutions; international and U.S. policies).
CONS 8095 - Contemporary Problems in Conservation Biology
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comprehensive review of conservation biology issue. Written exam. prereq: 8004, FW 8452, instr consent
CONS 8001 - Conservation Biology Seminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. prereq: instr consent
FW 8200 - Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral and written student reports on selected topics from current literature in fisheries biology and management and wildlife. Lectures by and discussions with faculty and visiting specialists.
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: One semester of college-level [[calculus or statistics or computer programming], general biology]
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02313
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02314
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
FW 8051 - Statistical Modeling of Ecological Data using R and WinBugs/JAGS
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: Graduate-level statistics class, [working knowledge of program R or #]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regression methods for modeling ecological data. Real world examples from ecology, as well as environmental/natural resource sciences/management. Computer-based solutions using R/Bayesian modeling software. prereq: Graduate-level statistics class, [working knowledge of program R or instr consent]
PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate seminar in subject of current interest in psychology. prereq: Psychology grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 3011; College algebra or instr consent; Stat course recommended
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of variance. Multiple comparisons. Variance-stabilizing transformations. Contrasts. Construction/analysis of complete/incomplete block designs. Fractional factorial designs. Confounding split plots. Response surface design. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models.
STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Order statistics. Classical rank-based procedures (e.g., Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis). Goodness of fit. Topics may include smoothing, bootstrap, and generalized linear models. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
CONS 8888 - Thesis Credit: Doctoral
Credits: 1.0 -24.0 [max 100.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Doctoral thesis credit. prereq: Max 18 cr per semester or summer; 24 cr required; prior to passing written and oral prelims, must have: 1 yr coursework in program; approval on a degree program; 1-2 pg research proposal (approved by adviser) to DGS asst
APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quantitative techniques for analysis of economic problems of firms and households. Links between quantitative tools and economic analysis Regression analysis, mathematical programming, and present value analysis. prereq: 3001 or or Math 1271 or Math 2243 or equiv or grad student or instr consent
APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01860 - ApEc 5651/PA 5722
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economic analyses, including project evaluation of current natural resource/environmental issues. Intertemporal use of natural resources, natural resource scarcity/adequacy, environmental quality, and mechanisms for pollution control and their implications for public policy. prereq: [[3001 or ECON 3101], [3611 or ECON 3611 or ESPM 3261]] or instr consent
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation. prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics is recommended
EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Evolutionary principles applied to aggressive competition, mate choice, cooperation, and parental investment. Optimization models used to examine foraging strategies, predator/prey interactions, and territoriality. Evolution of sex, sexual selection, dispersal. Evolutionary game theory. prereq: Biol 3411 or instr consent
EEB 5409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: [Biol 3407 or Biol 5407] or instr consent
ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Natural history, identification, and behavior of honey bees and other social insects. Evolution of social behavior, pheromones and communication, organization and division of labor, social parasitism. Lab with honey bee management and maintenance of other social bees for pollination. prereq: Biol 1009 or instr consent
ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Diversity of behavior in insects. Modes of perception, ways in which stimuli are translated into behavior. Genetic basis of behavior. Behavioral traits with Mendelian and more complex modes of inheritance. Natural history of insect behavior. Emphasizes how evolution has shaped diversity of behaviors. Movement/dispersal, feeding, defense/escape, mating/reproduction, sociality. Case studies. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent; [3005 or EEB 3111] recommended
ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Comparative study of insect structures/functions from evolutionary perspective. Introduction to physiology of digestion, respiration, other organ systems. prereq: 3005 or instr consent
ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Synthetic analysis of the causes of insect diversity and of fluctuations in insect abundance. Focus on abiotic, biotic, and evolutionary mechanisms influencing insect populations and communities. prereq: Biol 5041 or EBB 5122 or instr consent
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts, principles, and methods in educational/psychological measurement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, score reports (e.g., grades). Modern measurement theories, including item response theory and generalizability theory. Emphasizes construction, interpretation, use, and evaluation of assessments regarding achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes, personality, and exceptionality.
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EdPA 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory course in program evaluation; planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; overview of the field of program evaluation.
FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions on research topics, exercises, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Introductory biology course recommended.
FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems.
FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00369
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographic information systems (GIS), focusing on spatial data development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Basic data structures, sources, collection, and quality; geodesy and map projections; spatial and tabular data analyses; digital elevation data and terrain analyses; cartographic modeling and layout. Lab exercises provide practical experiences complementing theory covered in lecture. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795 - FNRM 3204/FNRM 5204
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems. Characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372 - FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite and aerial imagery and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory statistics is recommended. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of social, psychological, economic, policy aspects of managing/conserving wildlife, fisheries, and related resources. prereq: [Biol 1001 or Biol 1009], Biol 3407
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical techniques to maximize human/animal safety and encourage effective operations. Preparation procedures, legal responsibilities, capture drugs/delivery systems, safety measures, ethical issues, basic veterinary procedures for handling wildlife. Field course. Uses live animals. prereq: General biology, [grad student or vet med student or FW sr]
GEOG 8280 - Biogeography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Forest dynamics, dendrochronology, tree rings and climate, environmental disturbance, paleobiogeography, field/lab methods in biogeography. prereq: instr consent
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Collegial support for teaching, faculty mentorship at regional college or university. Faculty role at various institutions. Classroom observation/feedback, preparation for academic job search. prereq: [8101 or equiv], [native English speaker or [ibTOEFL score of 27-30] or [ELP score of 1 from CTL]]
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytic-deliberative model of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA). Components of ERA. Risk characterization. Evaluation of risk management decision processes. Use-risk communication, multi-stakeholder deliberation techniques. Cases. prereq: Grad student or [sr, instr consent]
ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Four-day workshop. Role/mechanics of mathematical modeling within ecological risk assessment. Integrated exercises, cases. prereq: [5010 or equiv], instr consent
ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Forum for presentation of dissertation proposals, results from ISG practica, discussion of environmental risk assessment topics. Focuses on ongoing research or key publications on introduced species/genotypes.
ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Students address real-world problems in environmental risk analysis of introduced species and genotypes, with faculty guidance and in consultation with public/private partner, and apply societal deliberation and scientific/policy analysis. prereq: 5010, 5020
ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cooperative learning techniques. Scenario planning, decision cases. Students develop/test cooperative learning exercises for environmental risk assessment based on their research experience in 8021. Linking research to teaching. prereq: 8021
LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to field techniques for site analysis, including vegetation, soil, and landform description. One-week session, before fall term, at lake Itasca Forestry and Biological Station.
LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/principles of holistic landscape ecology. People, nature, and environmental stewardship in metropolitan landscapes. Urban areas, rural areas that provide food, water, energy, and recreation. prereq: BED accelerated status or LA grad student or instr consent
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of design, implementation, evaluation of planning/participation processes. Types of planning. Stakeholders, including underrepresented groups. Costs/benefits of participation. Participant roles. Planning/participation tools/techniques. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5511 - Community Economic Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contexts/motivations behind community economic development activities. Alternative strategies for organizing/initiating economic development projects. Tools/techniques for economic development analysis/planning (market analysis, feasibility studies, development plans). Implementation at local level. prereq: Grad or instr consent
VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial distribution of disease events. Exposures/outcomes. Factors that determine where diseases occur. Analyzing spatial disease data in public health, geography, epidemiology. Focuses on human/animal health related examples. prereq: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EEB 5605 - Limnology Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Field/lab methods to obtain information on environmental conditions in aquatic environments and measure abundance of aquatic organisms, especially plankton. Field/lab instruments, sampling devices, microscopy, water chemistry, data analysis. prereq: 3603 or instr consent
EEB 8601 - Introduction to Stream Restoration
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01305 - CE 8601/EEB 8601/Geo 8601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Science/policy behind stream restoration. How to evaluating/critiquing a stream restoration project. Assimilate geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecological data at watershed and reach scales to plan a restoration project. Developing a monitoring/assessment program for an existing or future restoration project. prereq: Grad student in [CE or GEO or EEB or WRS or FW or BAE or FR or HORT or ENR or LA or SRSE] or instr consent
EEB 8602 - Stream Restoration Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01295
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Field experience, group design project. Students provide a stream restoration context for each other's elective coursework, complete critical assessments of stream restoration projects, and design a stream restoration site. prereq: CE 8601 or GEO 8601
ENT 5361 - Aquatic Insects
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taxonomy, natural history of aquatic insects including their importance in aquatic ecology, water resource management, recreation, and conservation. Emphasizes family-level identification of immatures/adults. Field trips scheduled to local aquatic habitats. A collection is required. prereq: instr consent
FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems.
FNRM 5153 - Forest Hydrology & Watershed Biogeochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This rigorous course examines hydrology and biogeochemical cycling in forested watersheds. Topics include role of forests in hydrologic processes (precipitation, runoff generation, and streamflow) and exports (sediment, carbon, and nitrogen). Readings from primary literature, active discussion participation, research/review paper. prereq: [Basic hydrology course, one course in ecology, and one course in chemistry [upper div or grad student]] or instr consent
FW 4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement. prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)
FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of social, psychological, economic, policy aspects of managing/conserving wildlife, fisheries, and related resources. prereq: [Biol 1001 or Biol 1009], Biol 3407
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5136 - Ichthyology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00888 - FW 4136/FW 5136
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and evolutionary relationships. Laboratory emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes.
FW 5601 - Fisheries Population Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theory/methods for estimating vital statistics of fish populations. Using microcomputers/statistical software to describe, analyze, model attributes of fish populations. Case studies from literature of marine/freshwater fisheries management. prereq: [4001 or Stat 5021], Biol 3407, [Math 1142 or Math 1271]
FW 8459 - Stream and River Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Structure/dynamics of running waters from ecosystem perspective. Historical perspective, basic hydrology/fluvial geomorphology, terrestrial-aquatic interactions, detrital dynamics, metabolism, drift, trophic relations, biotic/abiotic interactions, ecosystem experiments and natural alterations, stability/succession, ecosystem dynamics in a watershed. prereq: Limnology course or instr consent
FW 8465 - Fish Habitats and Restoration
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Mechanisms underlying physiology/behavior that shape fish community structure in specific north temperate habitats. Techniques and planning procedures for restoring lakes/streams. prereq: Intro ecology course or instr consent
APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quantitative techniques for analysis of economic problems of firms and households. Links between quantitative tools and economic analysis Regression analysis, mathematical programming, and present value analysis. prereq: 3001 or or Math 1271 or Math 2243 or equiv or grad student or instr consent
APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01860 - ApEc 5651/PA 5722
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economic analyses, including project evaluation of current natural resource/environmental issues. Intertemporal use of natural resources, natural resource scarcity/adequacy, environmental quality, and mechanisms for pollution control and their implications for public policy. prereq: [[3001 or ECON 3101], [3611 or ECON 3611 or ESPM 3261]] or instr consent
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation. prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics is recommended
EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Evolutionary principles applied to aggressive competition, mate choice, cooperation, and parental investment. Optimization models used to examine foraging strategies, predator/prey interactions, and territoriality. Evolution of sex, sexual selection, dispersal. Evolutionary game theory. prereq: Biol 3411 or instr consent
EEB 5409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: [Biol 3407 or Biol 5407] or instr consent
ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Diversity of behavior in insects. Modes of perception, ways in which stimuli are translated into behavior. Genetic basis of behavior. Behavioral traits with Mendelian and more complex modes of inheritance. Natural history of insect behavior. Emphasizes how evolution has shaped diversity of behaviors. Movement/dispersal, feeding, defense/escape, mating/reproduction, sociality. Case studies. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent; [3005 or EEB 3111] recommended
ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Comparative study of insect structures/functions from evolutionary perspective. Introduction to physiology of digestion, respiration, other organ systems. prereq: 3005 or instr consent
ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Synthetic analysis of the causes of insect diversity and of fluctuations in insect abundance. Focus on abiotic, biotic, and evolutionary mechanisms influencing insect populations and communities. prereq: Biol 5041 or EBB 5122 or instr consent
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts, principles, and methods in educational/psychological measurement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, score reports (e.g., grades). Modern measurement theories, including item response theory and generalizability theory. Emphasizes construction, interpretation, use, and evaluation of assessments regarding achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes, personality, and exceptionality.
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EdPA 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory course in program evaluation; planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; overview of the field of program evaluation.
FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems.
FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00369
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographic information systems (GIS), focusing on spatial data development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Basic data structures, sources, collection, and quality; geodesy and map projections; spatial and tabular data analyses; digital elevation data and terrain analyses; cartographic modeling and layout. Lab exercises provide practical experiences complementing theory covered in lecture. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795 - FNRM 3204/FNRM 5204
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems. Characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372 - FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite and aerial imagery and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory statistics is recommended. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of social, psychological, economic, policy aspects of managing/conserving wildlife, fisheries, and related resources. prereq: [Biol 1001 or Biol 1009], Biol 3407
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical techniques to maximize human/animal safety and encourage effective operations. Preparation procedures, legal responsibilities, capture drugs/delivery systems, safety measures, ethical issues, basic veterinary procedures for handling wildlife. Field course. Uses live animals. prereq: General biology, [grad student or vet med student or FW sr]
GEOG 8280 - Biogeography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Forest dynamics, dendrochronology, tree rings and climate, environmental disturbance, paleobiogeography, field/lab methods in biogeography. prereq: instr consent
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Collegial support for teaching, faculty mentorship at regional college or university. Faculty role at various institutions. Classroom observation/feedback, preparation for academic job search. prereq: [8101 or equiv], [native English speaker or [ibTOEFL score of 27-30] or [ELP score of 1 from CTL]]
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytic-deliberative model of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA). Components of ERA. Risk characterization. Evaluation of risk management decision processes. Use-risk communication, multi-stakeholder deliberation techniques. Cases. prereq: Grad student or [sr, instr consent]
ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Four-day workshop. Role/mechanics of mathematical modeling within ecological risk assessment. Integrated exercises, cases. prereq: [5010 or equiv], instr consent
ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Forum for presentation of dissertation proposals, results from ISG practica, discussion of environmental risk assessment topics. Focuses on ongoing research or key publications on introduced species/genotypes.
ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Students address real-world problems in environmental risk analysis of introduced species and genotypes, with faculty guidance and in consultation with public/private partner, and apply societal deliberation and scientific/policy analysis. prereq: 5010, 5020
ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cooperative learning techniques. Scenario planning, decision cases. Students develop/test cooperative learning exercises for environmental risk assessment based on their research experience in 8021. Linking research to teaching. prereq: 8021
LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to field techniques for site analysis, including vegetation, soil, and landform description. One-week session, before fall term, at lake Itasca Forestry and Biological Station.
LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/principles of holistic landscape ecology. People, nature, and environmental stewardship in metropolitan landscapes. Urban areas, rural areas that provide food, water, energy, and recreation. prereq: BED accelerated status or LA grad student or instr consent
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of design, implementation, evaluation of planning/participation processes. Types of planning. Stakeholders, including underrepresented groups. Costs/benefits of participation. Participant roles. Planning/participation tools/techniques. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5511 - Community Economic Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contexts/motivations behind community economic development activities. Alternative strategies for organizing/initiating economic development projects. Tools/techniques for economic development analysis/planning (market analysis, feasibility studies, development plans). Implementation at local level. prereq: Grad or instr consent
VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial distribution of disease events. Exposures/outcomes. Factors that determine where diseases occur. Analyzing spatial disease data in public health, geography, epidemiology. Focuses on human/animal health related examples. prereq: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
APEC 5151 - Applied Microeconomics: Firm and Household
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quantitative techniques for analysis of economic problems of firms and households. Links between quantitative tools and economic analysis Regression analysis, mathematical programming, and present value analysis. prereq: 3001 or or Math 1271 or Math 2243 or equiv or grad student or instr consent
APEC 5651 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01860 - ApEc 5651/PA 5722
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economic analyses, including project evaluation of current natural resource/environmental issues. Intertemporal use of natural resources, natural resource scarcity/adequacy, environmental quality, and mechanisms for pollution control and their implications for public policy. prereq: [[3001 or ECON 3101], [3611 or ECON 3611 or ESPM 3261]] or instr consent
EEB 4129 - Mammalogy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 4134 - Introduction to Ornithology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip. prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012
EEB 5042 - Quantitative Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation. prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics is recommended
EEB 5327 - Behavioral Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Evolutionary principles applied to aggressive competition, mate choice, cooperation, and parental investment. Optimization models used to examine foraging strategies, predator/prey interactions, and territoriality. Evolution of sex, sexual selection, dispersal. Evolutionary game theory. prereq: Biol 3411 or instr consent
EEB 5409 - Evolution
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab. prereq: One semester college biology
EEB 5601 - Limnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
EEB 5609 - Ecosystem Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems. prereq: [Biol 3407 or Biol 5407] or instr consent
ENT 4021 - Honey Bees and Insect Societies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Natural history, identification, and behavior of honey bees and other social insects. Evolution of social behavior, pheromones and communication, organization and division of labor, social parasitism. Lab with honey bee management and maintenance of other social bees for pollination. prereq: Biol 1009 or instr consent
ENT 4231 - Insect Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Diversity of behavior in insects. Modes of perception, ways in which stimuli are translated into behavior. Genetic basis of behavior. Behavioral traits with Mendelian and more complex modes of inheritance. Natural history of insect behavior. Emphasizes how evolution has shaped diversity of behaviors. Movement/dispersal, feeding, defense/escape, mating/reproduction, sociality. Case studies. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent; [3005 or EEB 3111] recommended
ENT 5011 - Insect Structure and Function
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Comparative study of insect structures/functions from evolutionary perspective. Introduction to physiology of digestion, respiration, other organ systems. prereq: 3005 or instr consent
ENT 5041 - Insect Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Synthetic analysis of the causes of insect diversity and of fluctuations in insect abundance. Focus on abiotic, biotic, and evolutionary mechanisms influencing insect populations and communities. prereq: Biol 5041 or EBB 5122 or instr consent
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts, principles, and methods in educational/psychological measurement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, score reports (e.g., grades). Modern measurement theories, including item response theory and generalizability theory. Emphasizes construction, interpretation, use, and evaluation of assessments regarding achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes, personality, and exceptionality.
EPSY 5243 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EdPA 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory course in program evaluation; planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; overview of the field of program evaluation.
FNRM 5104 - Forest Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02381 - FNRM 3104/5104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Form and function of forests as ecological systems. Characteristics and dynamics of species, populations, communities, landscapes, and ecosystem processes. Examples applying ecology to forest management. Weekly discussions on research topics, exercises, and current issues in forest resource management. Required weekend field trip. Introductory biology course recommended.
FNRM 5114 - Hydrology and Watershed Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02342
Typically offered: Every Fall
Hydrologic cycle and water processes in upland/riparian systems. Applications of hydrological concepts to evaluate impacts of forest and land management activities on water yield, streamflow, groundwater erosion, sedimentation, and water quality. Concepts, principles, and applications of riparian/watershed management. Regional/national/global examples. Forest ecosystems.
FNRM 5131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00369
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographic information systems (GIS), focusing on spatial data development and analysis in the science and management of natural resources. Basic data structures, sources, collection, and quality; geodesy and map projections; spatial and tabular data analyses; digital elevation data and terrain analyses; cartographic modeling and layout. Lab exercises provide practical experiences complementing theory covered in lecture. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5204 - Landscape Ecology and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00795 - FNRM 3204/FNRM 5204
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to landscape ecology at different scales in time/space. Development/implications of broad-scale patterns of ecological phenomena, role of disturbance in ecosystems. Characteristic spatial/temporal scales of ecological events. Principles of landscape ecology as framework for landscape research, analysis, conservation, and management. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FNRM 5262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372 - FNRM 3262/FNRM 5262
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite and aerial imagery and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory statistics is recommended. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
FW 5003 - Human Dimensions of Biological Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of social, psychological, economic, policy aspects of managing/conserving wildlife, fisheries, and related resources. prereq: [Biol 1001 or Biol 1009], Biol 3407
FW 5051 - Analysis of Populations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00648 - EEB/FW 5051
Typically offered: Every Spring
Regulation, growth, general dynamics of populations. Data needed to describe populations, population growth, population models, regulatory mechanisms. prereq: [4001 or STAT 3011 or ESPM 3012], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or BIOL 3807], Senior or grad student
FW 5401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement.
FW 5603W - Habitats and Regulation of Wildlife (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental interactions of wildlife at population/community levels. Environmental threats from human activities. Habitat management practices. Objectives, polices, regulations in population management. prereq: [4102 or 4103], [BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408 or BIOL 3807]
FW 5625 - Wildlife Handling and Immobilization for Research and Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical techniques to maximize human/animal safety and encourage effective operations. Preparation procedures, legal responsibilities, capture drugs/delivery systems, safety measures, ethical issues, basic veterinary procedures for handling wildlife. Field course. Uses live animals. prereq: General biology, [grad student or vet med student or FW sr]
GEOG 8280 - Biogeography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Forest dynamics, dendrochronology, tree rings and climate, environmental disturbance, paleobiogeography, field/lab methods in biogeography. prereq: instr consent
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
GRAD 8102 - Practicum for Future Faculty
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Collegial support for teaching, faculty mentorship at regional college or university. Faculty role at various institutions. Classroom observation/feedback, preparation for academic job search. prereq: [8101 or equiv], [native English speaker or [ibTOEFL score of 27-30] or [ELP score of 1 from CTL]]
HORT 5071 - Ecological Restoration
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ecological/physiological concepts for revegetation of grasslands, wetlands, forests, and landscapes. Plant selection, stand establishment/evaluation. State/federal programs that administer restoration/reclamation. Field trips. prereq: [One college course in ecology, one college course in [plant science or botany]] or instr consent
ISG 5010 - Risk Analysis for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analytic-deliberative model of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA). Components of ERA. Risk characterization. Evaluation of risk management decision processes. Use-risk communication, multi-stakeholder deliberation techniques. Cases. prereq: Grad student or [sr, instr consent]
ISG 5020 - Risk Analysis Modeling for Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Four-day workshop. Role/mechanics of mathematical modeling within ecological risk assessment. Integrated exercises, cases. prereq: [5010 or equiv], instr consent
ISG 8001 - Discussions in Introduced Species and Genotypes
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Forum for presentation of dissertation proposals, results from ISG practica, discussion of environmental risk assessment topics. Focuses on ongoing research or key publications on introduced species/genotypes.
ISG 8021 - Problem Solving Practicum in Risk Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Students address real-world problems in environmental risk analysis of introduced species and genotypes, with faculty guidance and in consultation with public/private partner, and apply societal deliberation and scientific/policy analysis. prereq: 5010, 5020
ISG 8031 - Cooperative Learning Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cooperative learning techniques. Scenario planning, decision cases. Students develop/test cooperative learning exercises for environmental risk assessment based on their research experience in 8021. Linking research to teaching. prereq: 8021
LA 5202 - Landscape Analysis Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to field techniques for site analysis, including vegetation, soil, and landform description. One-week session, before fall term, at lake Itasca Forestry and Biological Station.
LA 5204 - Metropolitan Landscape Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/principles of holistic landscape ecology. People, nature, and environmental stewardship in metropolitan landscapes. Urban areas, rural areas that provide food, water, energy, and recreation. prereq: BED accelerated status or LA grad student or instr consent
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5253 - Designing Planning and Participation Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of design, implementation, evaluation of planning/participation processes. Types of planning. Stakeholders, including underrepresented groups. Costs/benefits of participation. Participant roles. Planning/participation tools/techniques. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5511 - Community Economic Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Contexts/motivations behind community economic development activities. Alternative strategies for organizing/initiating economic development projects. Tools/techniques for economic development analysis/planning (market analysis, feasibility studies, development plans). Implementation at local level. prereq: Grad or instr consent
VMED 5181 - Spatial Analysis in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spatial distribution of disease events. Exposures/outcomes. Factors that determine where diseases occur. Analyzing spatial disease data in public health, geography, epidemiology. Focuses on human/animal health related examples. prereq: Intro to epidemiology, statistics,