Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Digital Media Studies Minor

School of Journalism & Mass Communication
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 15
This interdisciplinary minor explores multiple perspectives of how information or content is created and shaped in digital media, as well as the role and impact of those media on human communication. Students will have an understanding of how digital media change the ways in which various types of content can be created, managed, and distributed and, in doing so, potentially change the content itself.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Minor Requirements
No more than one 1xxx-level course (4 credits) may count towards the minor. No more than 8 credits may be earned from a single department. Students completing a Journalism major may only count one JOUR course (3 credits) towards the digital media studies minor. As a result, journalism majors must complete four elective courses (12 credits) to complete the required minimum of 15 credits for the minor.
Media Studies/Journalism Core
Journalism majors may only count one JOUR course (3 credits) towards the digital media studies minor.
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 3 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· JOUR 1501 - Digital Games and Society [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation [TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3552 - Internet and Global Society [GP] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media (3.0 cr)
Electives
Other electives may be chosen only if they represent new courses offered that are similar to those on the approved list. Approval of alternative electives for the minor is done by submitting a petition to 110 Murphy Hall. Journalism majors must complete four elective courses (12 credits) to complete the required minimum of 15 credits for the minor.
Take 3 - 4 course(s) totaling 9 - 12 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 3240 - Making Art Interactive (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies (3.0 cr)
· COMM 4291 - New Telecommunication Media (3.0 cr)
· COMM 5231 - Media Outlaws (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3221 - On Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3334 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· DES 3131 - User Experience in Design (4.0 cr)
· DES 3141 - Technology, Design, and Society [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3521 {Inactive} [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3523 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture [HIS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web [HIS, TS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines (3.0 cr)
· SCMC 3001W - History of Cinema and Media Culture [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3202 - Intermediate Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· TH 4555 - Audio Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 4556 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3371W - Technology, Self, and Society [TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet [TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4501 - Usability and Human Factors in Technical Communication (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 4662W - Writing With Digital Technologies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 5611 - Design in the Digital Age (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 3770 - Animation (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 5770 - Animation (4.0 cr)
· HSCI 4321 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CSCI 4921 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 1842 - The Digital Revolution: Computers in the Making of the Contemporary World (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3842 - The Digital Revolution: Computers in the Making of the Contemporary World (3.0 cr)
 
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JOUR 1501 - Digital Games and Society (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Digital games have a wide-ranging impact on our culture and society and are one of the fastest-growing sectors of the entertainment media industry, generating enormous profits for the game companies. In this course, you will: (1) be introduced to the academic study of video games; (2) examine digital games as forms of communication and interactive storytelling, as well as games of entertainment, commerce, social activism, professional training, and education; (3) consider the impact of mobile media, particularly for games and gameplay; (4) discuss next-generation virtual reality technology that may change the way we think about immersive media experiences; and (5) study the history, ethics, and socio-cultural impact of digital games and related technologies.
JOUR 3551 - The Business of Digital Media: Innovation, Disruption, and Adaptation (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Digital media enterprises have uprooted many established industries and continue to be among the most important factors shaping our economy and society today. Where do these innovations come from? Why do some startups prosper while others fail? How do legacy firms respond to disruptions to their business models? What makes adaptations possible? What makes them risky? Learn to analyze and evaluate the economic strategies of existing digital media firms across various sectors of society including news, entertainment, social media, mobile, and retail. Assess their impacts on cultural and civic life for better and for worse. Use these skills to incubate your own ideas for the next great media innovations of the future.
JOUR 3552 - Internet and Global Society (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structure/processes of Internet/global society in comparative context. Internet, via World Wide Web, as ideal site to explore how/why societies come to see world/issues.
JOUR 4272 - Digital Advertising: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course introduces you to the fascinating and ever-changing world of digital advertising and marketing. Learn its history and evolution, current trends, future possibilities and legal/ethical issues. We'll study the innovative research and theories explaining the practice and effects of various forms, including social media, search marketing, gaming, native, viral, online video advertising, online behavioral advertising, and mobile. Through a combination of lectures, in-class discussions, and guest presentations by industry professionals, you'll learn the basic theories for developing effective and socially-responsible digital advertising campaigns in the increasingly diverse and global media environment. prereq: Jour major or Mass Comm minor or Digital Media Studies minor or approved BIS/IDIM/ICP program
JOUR 3751 - Digital Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How have digital media innovations like social media, mobile phones, artificial intelligence, drones and games shaped and been shaped by a culture and society globally? Learn to critically examine the function of digital media in your life. Take away a socio-historical understanding of digital media innovation, and the social, political, and economical impact of new media in creativity, industry, and culture from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Topics range from the concept of branding in an online context, to the varied uses of digital media in the context of journalism, social mobilization, law and privacy, business, globalization, content creation, and beyond. You will read, discuss, and debate cutting edge material from documentaries, podcasts, popular press, and academic literature. This course balances local contexts with global perspectives, and provides details into the practicalities of working and living in a new media environment.
JOUR 5501 - Communication, Public Opinion, and Social Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Sharpen your understanding of public opinion and its role in political and civic life: What does it mean? Where does it come from? How is it measured? What impact does it have? How are the public?s preferences shaped by the larger communications environment and the strategic messages of politicians, interest groups, and other actors in society? What are polls really measuring, and why do they seem so unreliable sometimes? How are social media technologies giving voice to new segments and dimensions of public opinion? But how are they vulnerable to manipulation from bots and other efforts designed to alter perceptions of collective opinions? Examine the theories of communication, psychology, political science, and sociology that underlie these dynamic questions. We?ll consider cutting edge approaches used by market researchers, political analysts, and data scientists to harness new forms of data about what the public thinks. We investigate theories that explain how people form their opinions, deliberate with others, change their minds, and reveal their preferences, and we apply these frameworks to understand contemporary public opinion issues and campaigns.
ARTS 3240 - Making Art Interactive
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Conceptual/aesthetic development with digital, interactive art. Experimental approaches to interactive technologies. Responsive, tangible media. Critical theory/history of new media. prereq: 1704
COMM 3211 - Introduction to Media Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Historical development and current issues in electronic media technologies and programming. Effects of governmental, industrial, and public organizations on message content. Problem areas of electronic media.
COMM 4291 - New Telecommunication Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Development and current status of new telecommunication media such as cable TV, satellites, DBS, MDS, and video disk/cassettes. Technology, historical development, regulation, and programming of these media and their influence on individuals, organizations, and society. prereq: 3211 or instr consent
COMM 5231 - Media Outlaws
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
People working outside of mainstream media institutions who find creative/provocative ways to use media as space for cultural, political, or economic critique/resistance.
CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impact of computers on society. Computer science perspective of ethical, legal, social, philosophical, political, and economic aspects of computing. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
CSCL 3221 - On Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02705
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Key debates in the history, theory, and criticism of television. Focuses on critical/creative "readings" of television's past/present forms. TV's influence on film, music, and digital media.
CSCL 3334 - Monsters, Robots, Cyborgs (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical/critical reading of figures (e.g., uncanny double, monstrous aberration, technological hybrid) in mythology, literature, and film, from classical epic to sci-fi, cyberpunk, and Web. (previously 3461)
DES 3131 - User Experience in Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theories/principles of human interaction with designed objects. Focuses on affect/emotional quality of designs. Objects, interfaces, environments. Digitally mediated experiences.
DES 3141 - Technology, Design, and Society (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore/evaluate impact of technology/design on humans, societies. How design innovation shapes cultures. How people use technology to shape design, adoption, use of designed products/environments through consumerism/ethical values.
ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Equivocal relation of memory and writing. Literacy, power, control. Secrecy and publicity. Alphabetization and other ways of ordering world. Material bases of writing. Typographical design/expression. Theories of technological determinism.
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contemporary condition of global connectedness. Ways our habits, tastes, and experiences involve a stream of encounters with the global. Terrains of interconnection, including tourism, music, the Internet, and mass culture.
HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The From Consumers to Creators course is a critical exploration of the role of storytelling and media in social change efforts. In this course will examine the ways that story is both a lens through which one understand the world and a tool which can be used to shape it. Students will have the opportunity to learn about and evaluate media-based activist strategies in the context of competing theoretical perspectives on media and society. Students will use theory and field experiences to reflect upon and hone their own digital practices as an effective agent of social change. This course is one of two required linked courses taken concurrently which make up the Making Media, Making Change Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA and their community partner, the Twin Cities public access media powerhouse St Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), which provides technical training, equipment, and video production support. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3556 Digital Laboratory and have the opportunity to register for an optional internship the following semester or summer at SPNN, where students can strengthen relationships with the diverse set of actors in the Twin Cities committed to using digital media to share their voices and build community. Interns contribute to public access and nonprofit programming and create professional quality video for community organizations in the Twin Cities. prereq: Departmental Consent Required.
HSCI 3331 - Technology and American Culture (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3331/5331
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American culture(s) and technology, pre-Columbian times to present. Artisanal, biological, chemical, communications, energy, environment, electronic, industrial, military, space and transportation technologies explained in terms of economic, social, political and scientific causes/effects.
HSCI 3715 - History of Modern Technology: Waterwheels to the Web (HIS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00420 - HSci 1715/3715
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores the many technological systems that have come to span our globe, alongside the widespread persistence of traditional technologies. We start with the earliest glimmerings of modernity and industrialization, and move on in time to the building of global technological networks. How have people changed their worlds through technologies like steam engines and electronics? Is it a paradox that many traditional agricultural and household technologies have persisted? How have technologies of war remade the global landscape? We ask how business and government have affected technological entrepreneurs, from railroads to technologies of global finance. We end by considering the tension between technologies that threaten our global environment and technologies that offer us hopes of a new world.
PHIL 4615 - Minds, Bodies, and Machines
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Mind-body problem. Philosophical relevance of cybernetics, artificial intelligence, computer simulation. prereq: one course in philosophy or instr consent
SCMC 3001W - History of Cinema and Media Culture (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genealogy of cinema in relation to other media, notably photography, radio, television/video, and the Internet. Representative films from decisive moments in global development of cinema. Rise/fall of Hollywood studio system, establishment of different national cinemas, cinematic challenges to cultural imperialism, emergence of post-cinematic technologies.
SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Practice of digital filmmaking. Digital techniques, practical tools required to produce films. Optical/digital devices as artistic tools. Historical/theoretical issues of cinema, its relation to other art forms.
SCMC 3202 - Intermediate Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students complete a film of any length, 24 frames or feature-length. Emphasizes formal analysis of frames, shots, sequences, and relations of unit (frame or shot) to whole. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
TH 4555 - Audio Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sound as science. Technology to create/manipulate sound. Recording techniques. Effects/signal processing. Microphone/mixing techniques. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
WRIT 3371W - Technology, Self, and Society (TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural history of American technology. Social values that technology represents in shifts from handicraft to mass production/consumption, in modern transportation, communication, bioengineering. Ethical issues in power, work, identity, our relation to nature.
WRIT 3381W - Writing and Modern Cultural Movements (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How written texts contribute to movements in art and culture. How such texts are written with particular audiences, purposes, styles, and forms. Readings, lectures, discussions, analysis of texts.
WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet (TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How persuasive communication is tailored to the Internet; how Internet technologies enable/limit persuasion; how to adapt rhetorical theory to 21st century digital writing; ethical issues, including free speech, copyright, fair use, privacy; rhetorics of social networks. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or instr consent
WRIT 4501 - Usability and Human Factors in Technical Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles/concepts of human factors/usability testing. Developing objectives, criteria, and measures. Conducting tests in lab, field, and virtual environments. Using software programs to analyze qualitative/quantitative data.
WRIT 4662W - Writing With Digital Technologies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02724
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
WRIT 4662W is an advanced level Writing Studies course that explores various digital writing technologies and provides multiple opportunities to assess writing situations and make appropriate decisions about digital form and production. Students will learn the basic building blocks of writing in Internet environments (text, sound, images, video) as well as the vocabularies, functionalities, and organizing structures of Web 2.0 environments, how these impact understanding and use of information, and how to produce these environments (i.e., multimedia internet documents) for interactivity and use. This course includes design projects and practice with apps, markup language, content management systems, video, and social media. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ARCH 3611 - Design in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01278
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to design, design process. Developing/understanding ways of seeing, thinking, and acting as a designer. Changes in design being wrought by digital technology. Team design project.
ARCH 5611 - Design in the Digital Age
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01278 - Arch 3611/Arch 5611
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to design, design process. Developing/understanding ways of seeing, thinking, and acting as a designer. Changes in design being wrought by digital technology. Team design project. prereq: Grad student or upper level undergrad student
ARTS 3760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02483 - ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within contemporary art context. Digital media technologies in installation, performance, interactive video art. Emphasizes development of personal, creative projects. Theoretical issues. Critical/historical readings. prereq: 1704
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02483 - ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: 3760
ARTS 3770 - Animation
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02478
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Creating ideas visually with 2- and 3-dimensional animation technologies. Vector- and layer-based raster animation. Modeling objects and spaces, creating textures, lighting, movement, sound track. prereq: 1704
ARTS 5770 - Animation
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02478 - ArtS 3770/ArtS 5770
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Creating ideas visually with 2- and 3-dimensional animation technologies. Vector- and layer-based raster animation. Modeling objects and spaces, creating textures, lighting, movement, sound track. prereq: 3770
HSCI 4321 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00497 - CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
CSCI 4921 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00497 - CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Developments in last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other businesses; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00847
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00847
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
HIST 1842 - The Digital Revolution: Computers in the Making of the Contemporary World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02041
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical examination of birth of computer. Global transformations after 1945. History of technology/how technology transforms cultural life. United States history integrated with global history to show how technology, capitalism, politics, culture, environment, conspired to make computer an agent of revolutionary change.
HIST 3842 - The Digital Revolution: Computers in the Making of the Contemporary World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical examination of birth of computer. Global transformations after 1945. History of technology/how culture shapes technological change. United States history integrated with global history to show how technology, capitalism, politics, culture, environment conspired to make computer agent of revolutionary change.