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Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences B.A.Sc.

D Applied Human Sciences
College of Education and Human Service Professions
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 73 to 75
  • Degree: Bachelor of Applied Science
The B.A.Sc. offers preparation for graduate school and a sound basis for professional training in the exercise and health sciences. The faculty in exercise science encourages students to develop as active scholars and to participate in undergraduate research. Abilities in math, science, and critical thinking are required for matriculation and graduation. Most upper level EXSC courses have a graded laboratory component. Students work under supervision in the Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Biomechanics Laboratory, and Motor Learning Laboratory. Students combine theoretical knowledge with practical experience in electrocardiography, exercise testing, exercise supervision, and strength and conditioning procedures in a managed learning environment. They monitor and mentor students involved in exercise programs. Labs and other physical facilities allow learning via student research and activity. Substantial opportunities exist for interested students to conduct independent research under the guidance of faculty mentors. Such projects have the potential to be presented at the local, state, and national professional meetings. This provides students with an unparalleled opportunity for professional development and personal growth.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Learning in Community (1 cr)
Requirement will be waived for transfer students with at least 30 credits taken post high school, for UMD students who started in a UMD collegiate unit where this is not required, and upon request for first-year students with 30 PSEO credits.
UST 1000 - Learning in Community (1.0-2.0 cr)
or EHS 1000 - Into the World [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
General Requirements
The Board of Regents, on recommendation of the faculty, grants degrees from the University of Minnesota. Requirements for an undergraduate degree from University of Minnesota Duluth include the following:
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits.
  4. At least 30 semester credits must be earned through UMD, and 15 of the last 30 degree credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. Students must complete at least half of their courses at the 3xxx-level and higher at UMD. Study-abroad credits earned through courses taught by UM faculty and at institutions with which UMD has international exchange programs may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. For certificate programs, at least 3 upper-division credits that satisfy requirements for the certificate must be taken through UMD. If the program does not require upper division credits students must take at least one course from the certificate program from UMD.
  8. The minimum cumulative UM GPA required for graduation will be 2.00 and will include only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UM GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major and minor. No academic unit may impose higher grade point standards to graduate.
  9. Diploma, transcripts, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
Foundational Sciences (26 - 28 cr)
First biology, chemistry and mathematics course is determined by ACT mathematics score. This program supposes placement directly in each required course.
Biology
BIOL 1011 - General Biology I [LE CAT, NAT SCI] (5.0 cr)
or BIOL 1170 - Human Biology [NAT SCI] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry
CHEM 1113 - Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I [LE CAT4, NAT SCI] (5.0 cr)
or CHEM 1153 - General Chemistry I [LE CAT, NAT SCI] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1154 - General Chemistry Lab I [LE CAT, NAT SCI] (1.0 cr)
Mathematics
MATH 1005 - College Algebra (5.0 cr)
or MATH 1160 - Finite Mathematics and Introduction to Calculus [LE CAT, LOGIC & QR] (5.0 cr)
or MATH 1250 - Precalculus Analysis [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1290 - Calculus for the Natural Sciences [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (5.0 cr)
or MATH 1296 - Calculus I [LE CAT, LOGIC & QR] (5.0 cr)
Physics
PHYS 1001 - Introduction to Physics I [LE CAT4, NAT SCI] (5.0 cr)
Anatomy & Physiology
HLTH 2030 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I with lab (4.0 cr)
HLTH 2040 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab (4.0 cr)
Advanced Writing (3 cr)
WRIT 3150 - Advanced Writing: Science (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences (3.0 cr)
EXSC Core (43 cr)
Lower Division
EXSC 1000 - Introduction to Exercise Science Foundations and Exploration for Allied Health Professions (2.0 cr)
EXSC 2420 - Aerobic and Fitness Assessment Techniques in Exercise Science (1.0 cr)
EXSC 2430 - Resistance Training Techniques in Exercise Science (1.0 cr)
Upper Division
EXSC 3200 - Motor Learning and Control (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3210 - Exercise Adherence (3.0 cr)
EXSC 3300 - Human Biomechanics (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3400 - Exercise Physiology (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3410 - Exercise Metabolism and Nutrition (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3420 - Exercise Testing and Prescription (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3430 - Principles of Strength and Conditioning Programs (4.0 cr)
EXSC 3440 - Clinical Exercise Physiology (4.0 cr)
EXSC 4700 - Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise Science (4.0 cr)
EXSC 4710 - Applied and Experimental Exercise Science (4.0 cr)
 
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· Exercise Rehab Sci B.S.Sc. Sample Plan

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· Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences B.A.Sc.
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UST 1000 - Learning in Community
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
EHS 1000 - Into the World (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitates the transition into college learning and student life at UMD and the College of Education and Human Service Professions. Introduces the promise and peril of global challenges in the 21st century and relates these challenges to local communities. pre-req: 1st semester CEHSP student
ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. This course explores the global cultural context of sustainability while facilitating the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Examine the topic of environmental sustainability through the context of global culture and affairs. Explore different cultural approaches to solving environmental issues, compare and contrast these approaches with those taken in the US. Investigate the concept of outsourcing with respect to the peoples and ecosystems that are impacted by the practice. pre-req: less than 30 credits earned
LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitate the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD while simultaneously fulfilling other core requirements. Examine the topic of Cultural Diversity in the US through the context of language and dialect in American. Explore the impact language as on the broad spectrum of American culture, and conversely, the ways in which various American cultures and their diverse heritages have influenced the many ways language is spoken in the United States., Investigate concepts of linguistic competency, perceptions and biases toward language, power structures manifested in language, and influences of class, rae, ethnicity, and heritage on spoken language. Pre-req: less than 30 credits
PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitate the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD; applications of positive psychology across cultures and positive behavior change; the examination of diverse perspectives in positive psychology; the promotion of student well-being, community and inclusivity, and time- and stress-management techniques. pre-req: less than 30 credits
BIOL 1011 - General Biology I (LE CAT, NAT SCI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: BIOL 1011/BIOL 1013
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of biology, including chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, energy transformations, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, molecular biology, DNA technology, development, origin of life, and evolution. (4 hrs lect, 2.5 hrs lab) prereq: 1 yr high school Chem or 1 semester college Chem, Math ACT 21 or higher or MATH 1005 or higher; credit will not be granted if already received for BIOL 1013
BIOL 1170 - Human Biology (NAT SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course offers an exploration of biological principles through the study of the structure, function, and heredity of the human body. Primarily we will cover basic cell structure, gene expression, organ systems, basic principles of heredity and inheritance of human traits. To understand these topics the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry will be included. Through this course students with a basic science background will be able to expand their understanding of biology. Students will actively learn concepts with the laboratory component.
CHEM 1113 - Introduction to General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I (LE CAT4, NAT SCI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical principles and their applications: atomic and molecular structure, solutions, acids, bases, salts, equilibria. prereq: ACT of 21 or higher or MATH 1005; for students terminating study of chem with no more than 10 cr; credit will not be granted if already received for 1151, 1153/1154, 1161, 1173/74 or 2172
CHEM 1153 - General Chemistry I (LE CAT, NAT SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CHEM 1173/CHEM 1153/CHEM 1161
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of chemistry exemplified by study of elements, compounds, and their reactions. Covers fundamental concepts of the atom, molecule, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, gas laws, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, and other selected topics. The companion laboratory, CHEM 1154, should be taken concurrently. The combination of CHEM 1153 and CHEM 1154 meets the lab component of NAT SCI, LE CAT 4. prereq: One year high school chem, Math ACT 24 or higher or a grade of least C- in Math 1005, Credit will not be granted if already received for 1151 or 1161 or 1173. Fall semester, SCSE majors only.
CHEM 1154 - General Chemistry Lab I (LE CAT, NAT SCI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: CHEM 1174/CHEM 1154
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating the fundamental principles of chemistry. Covers fundamental concepts of the atom and molecule, stoichiometry, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, thermochemistry, characteristic properties of anions, gas laws and spectrophotometry. This laboratory accompanies lecture CHEM 1153. The combination of CHEM 1153 and CHEM 1154 meets liberal education category 4 requirements. prereq: Previous or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1153 or 1173; credit will not be granted if already received for CHEM 1151, 1161 or 1174.
MATH 1005 - College Algebra
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Computer based, on site course with students working at a semi-self pace taking notes in a guided notebook and completing online homework while asking the instructor questions as needed. Course topics include basic concepts of solving equations and inequalities as well as an introduction to function concepts and graphing for polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions. prereq: Math ACT 21 or higher or MATH 0103 or department consent
MATH 1160 - Finite Mathematics and Introduction to Calculus (LE CAT, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Elementary functions, matrices, graphical and algebraic methods for solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, introduction to linear programming, and abbreviated treatment of calculus with emphasis on business and social science applications. prereq: Math ACT 24 or higher or a grade of at least C- in Math 1005 or department consent; if you have received credit for 1290 or 1296 or 1596, you will not receive credit for Math 1160.
MATH 1250 - Precalculus Analysis (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces the concepts of analytical geometry, relations, functions, and graphs. It includes exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions as well as conic sections, sequences and series, and systems of linear equations. prereq: Math ACT 24 or higher or a grade of at least C- in Math 1005 or department consent
MATH 1290 - Calculus for the Natural Sciences (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math1290/1296/1596
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential and integral calculus needed for modeling in earth and life sciences. Computational software. Not intended for students in mathematics, engineering, or physical sciences. prereq: Math ACT 27 or higher or a grade of at least C- in Math 1250 or department consent
MATH 1296 - Calculus I (LE CAT, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math1290/1296/1596
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
First part of a standard introduction to calculus of functions of a single variable. Limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and their applications. prereq: Math ACT 27 or higher or a grade of at least C- in Math 1250 or department consent
PHYS 1001 - Introduction to Physics I (LE CAT4, NAT SCI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Noncalculus general physics course primarily for certain preprofessional fields. Topics in mechanics, heat, and sound. prereq: Algebra, trig
HLTH 2030 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I with lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human anatomy and physiology are studied together using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. Homeostasis is an integrating theme throughout this course. Subjects considered include fundamental concepts and principles of cell physiology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems. This course is intended for anyone interested in gaining a better understanding of the anatomy and functioning of the human body. Lab components mirror course subjects. pre-req: BIOL 1001 or 1011 or 1170 and CHEM 1103 or 1113 or 1153
HLTH 2040 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
HLTH 2040 builds on HLTH 2030. Anatomy and physiology will be studied together using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. Subjects considered include digestive, endocrine, nervous, and circulatory systems. Lab components mirror course subjects. pre-req: HLTH 2030
WRIT 3150 - Advanced Writing: Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of writing for those invested in the disciplines of mathematics and life and physical sciences. Exploration of academic and professional rhetorical situations. Practice with research methods, document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. prereq: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC or AA completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of writing for those invested in the disciplines of social sciences and related fields. Exploration of academic and professional rhetorical situations. Practice with research methods, document design, editing, effective collaboration, and ethical issues in the production of documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC or AA completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
EXSC 1000 - Introduction to Exercise Science Foundations and Exploration for Allied Health Professions
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to Exercise Science teaches students about various fields of exercise science and related areas, such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, personal training, exercise physiology, athletic training and sports medicine. Students will learn about diverse areas of exercise science through career exploration as well as receive an overview of evidence- based practice, critical thinking and practical application of each topic in the curriculum to coursework and future career opportunities.
EXSC 2420 - Aerobic and Fitness Assessment Techniques in Exercise Science
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This laboratory-based course teaches students how to properly assess aerobic fitness levels. Students will develop precise health and fitness assessment skills required by the American College of Sports Medicine under supervision with instruction for proper technique. Students will learn about giving feedback for each skill. pre-req: EXEC 1000 and minimum 30 credits
EXSC 2430 - Resistance Training Techniques in Exercise Science
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This lab-based course will introduce resistance training techniques that address the major muscle groups and movement patterns in the human body. Students will learn fundamental body weight, free weight, and machine-based exercises that may be applied in rehabilitation, general health & fitness, and sports performance populations. General safety practices including spotting techniques and contraindications to exercise will also be addressed. pre-req: EXSC 1000, minimum 30 credits; transfer students may concurrently enroll in EXCS 1000 and EXSC 2430 with instructor consent
EXSC 3200 - Motor Learning and Control
Credits: 4.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classification of motor skills and principles and theories of human motor learning and control sports, exercise and rehabilitation setting. Motor control theories and principles of effective trainings such as practice condition, verbal instructions and demonstrations will be covered. prereq: Minimum 60 credits, Athletic training or Exercise Science or Physical Education major or instructor consent
EXSC 3210 - Exercise Adherence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of exercise psychology. Physical activity models of involvement; exercise determinates and correlates; exercise interventions. prereq: Minimum 60 credits, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 3300 - Human Biomechanics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of physical laws to human movement. Laws of mechanics and tissue biomechanics concepts are applied to human motor function. (3 hr lect, 1 hr lab) prereq: HLTH 2030, PHYS 1001, minimum 60 credits, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 3400 - Exercise Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physiological responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise. (3 hrs lect, 1.25 hrs lab) prereq: HLTH 2040 or PHSL 3011, minimum 60 credits, Exercise Science major, or instructor consent
EXSC 3410 - Exercise Metabolism and Nutrition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physiology of metabolism and nutrients in humans undertaking intentional physical activity in rehabilitation, recreation, exercise, sport and competition. prereq: Hlth 2040, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 3420 - Exercise Testing and Prescription
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical fitness programming for adults; principles of exercise testing and prescription. prereq: 3400, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 3430 - Principles of Strength and Conditioning Programs
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory and practice of developing and implementing strength training and conditioning programs; emphasis on technique analysis and instructional methods. prereq: 3400, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 3440 - Clinical Exercise Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of the use of physiological principles and relationships in clinical situations where exercise is used for prevention or alleviation of disease. prereq: 3420, Exercise Science major or instructor consent
EXSC 4700 - Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Descriptive and inferential statistical procedures and research design in exercise science. Prepares students to conduct and analyze research projects in exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, and/or the psychological factors that influence exercise. prereq: 12 cr from 3200, 3300, 3400, 3410, Exercise Science major, no grad credit
EXSC 4710 - Applied and Experimental Exercise Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study and research in exercise science; methods of quantifying exercise responses and adaptations; basic research design. prereq: 3200, 3300, 3400, 3410, 4700, Exercise Science major or instructor consent; no grad credit