Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Product Design B.S.

DHA Product Design
College of Design
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 89 to 91
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The Product Design program is a creative, interdisciplinary major that blends elements of design, engineering, business, and humanities. This program provides methods and tools for inventing our future in the form of innovative objects, systems, and services. In addition to design fundamentals, this program is strengthened by the sciences. Combining these disciplines allows students to design desirable products and services (both physical and digital) that are also functional, marketable, and human-centered. This program enables students to take ideas from concept to reality and succeed in market.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Freshman and transfer students are usually admitted to pre-major status before admission to this major.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Pre-major coursework
Courses to be completed prior to portfolio review to attain full major status.
PDES 2701 - Creative Design Methods (3.0 cr)
PDES 2702 - Concept Sketching (3.0 cr)
PDES 2703 - Concept Visualization and Presentation 1 (3.0 cr)
PDES 2777 - Product Form and Model Making (3.0 cr)
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Admission to the full major status program is determined by a competitive holistic review, which includes an interview, GPA, and a portfolio review after completion of pre-major coursework.
Product Design Core
DES 3131 - User Experience in Design (4.0 cr)
DES 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation for Design (1.0 cr)
ME 2011 - Introduction to Engineering (4.0 cr)
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
PDES 2704 - Concept Visualization and Presentation 2 (3.0 cr)
PDES 2771 - Product Design Studio 1 (4.0 cr)
PDES 2772 - Product Design Studio 2 (4.0 cr)
PDES 3704 - Computer-Aided Design 1: Solid Modeling and Rendering (3.0 cr)
PDES 3706 - Designing for Manufacture (4.0 cr)
PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab (4.0 cr)
PDES 3771 - Product Design Studio 3 (4.0 cr)
PDES 4701W - Capstone Research Studio [WI] (4.0 cr)
PDES 4702W - Capstone Design Studio [WI] (4.0 cr)
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
Internships
Students perform two separate internships, one credit each term.
PDES 3196 - Product Design Internship (1.0-2.0 cr)
Electives
Take 2 - 3 course(s) totaling 6 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
Interaction and Service
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 4611 - Programming Interactive Computer Graphics and Games (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 5127W - Embodied Computing: Design & Prototyping [WI] (3.0 cr)
· DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design (3.0 cr)
· DES 5185 - Human Factors in Design (3.0 cr)
· GDES 2342 - Web Design (3.0 cr)
· GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display (3.0 cr)
· GDES 5341 - Interaction Design (3.0 cr)
· GDES 5386 - Fundamentals of Game Design (3.0 cr)
· HUMF 5001 - Foundations of Human Factors/Ergonomics (3.0 cr)
· HUMF 5874 - Human Centered Design to Improve Complex Systems (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3051 - Service Management (2.0 cr)
or Entrepreneurship
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4050 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4170W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II (4.0 cr)
or Sustainability
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· CEGE 5571 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· CEGE 5572 {Inactive} (1.0-2.0 cr)
· CEGE 5573 {Inactive} (1.0-5.0 cr)
· ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World [GP] (3.0 cr)
· MM 4311 - Sustainable Lean Manufacturing: Eliminating the Waste (3.0 cr)
or Design as Craft
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 1802 - Introduction to Sculpture: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Practice of Sculpture [AH] (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 1801 - Introduction to Ceramics: Wheel-Throwing and Hand-Building Techniques [AH] (4.0 cr)
· DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design (3.0 cr)
· DES 3321 - Furniture Design: Exploration (3.0 cr)
· DES 3322 - Furniture Design, Practice (4.0 cr)
· DES 3341 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display (3.0 cr)
· MM 3305 - Advanced 3D Printing for Innovative Business Practices (3.0 cr)
· PDES 3705 - History and Future of Product Design (3.0 cr)
· PDES 3715 - Design and Food (4.0 cr)
or Marketing and Merchandising
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ADES 3217 - Fashion: Trends and Communication (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture (3.0 cr)
· DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design (3.0 cr)
· GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display (3.0 cr)
· MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
· MKTG 3010 - Marketing Research (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 3040 - Buyer Behavior (4.0 cr)
· RM 2215 - Introduction to Retail Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· RM 3243 - Visual Merchandising (2.0 cr)
or Production
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· MM 3001W - Manufacturing in the Global Economy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· MM 4039 - The Science of Sourcing: Partnerships for Success (3.0 cr)
· MM 4201 -  Quality Engineering and Management (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4170W - New Business Feasibility and Planning [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PDES 4701W - Capstone Research Studio [WI] (4.0 cr)
 
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· College of Design

View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2021
· Fall 2020
· Fall 2019
· Fall 2018

View sample plan(s):
· Product Design BS Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Product Design B.S.
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PDES 2701 - Creative Design Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class is an introduction to a variety of tools and methods used in developing new product concepts. The focus of the class is on the early stage of product development which includes user research, market research, idea generation methods, concept evaluation, concept selection, intellectual property, and idea presentation. Students work individually applying the content taught in lecture to a semester-long design project. Students meet in teams bi-weekly to present and critique their work.
PDES 2702 - Concept Sketching
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class is an introduction to manual sketching techniques, specifically for the communication of conceptual product ideas. The focus of this class is on free-hand perspective drawing. Students begin with basic principles, simple shapes, light and shadow, and later learn how to combine forms to create conceptual objects with realistic perspective. In this class, there are weekly drawing assignments and presentations.
PDES 2703 - Concept Visualization and Presentation 1
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class builds upon the fundamentals taught in PDES 2702 Concept Sketching. Students learn to draw complex geometries and organic forms and how to add shading, shadow, text and backgrounds to enhance their drawings. Markers and other physical tools are introduced in this class as a means of further refining a sketch. In the second half of the semester, students learn to digitally improve their sketches and are introduced to the fundamentals of digital sketching with a drawing tablet and digital sketching software. As this class is taught in smaller sections, there are many opportunities for students to present and critique work. The basics of design portfolios are covered at the end of this class.
PDES 2777 - Product Form and Model Making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class is a hands-on introduction to prototyping tools, materials, and techniques for product design. Students learn the basics of working with foam-board, foam, and wood to create physical models and will be introduced to different surface treatments and finishes. Assignments are designed to build a sense of craftsmanship and attention to detail. There are multiple individual projects focusing on different materials and techniques. Each project involves practicing oral presentation and group critique.
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
DES 3131 - User Experience in Design
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to theories/principles of human interaction with designed objects. Focuses on affect/emotional quality of designs. Objects, interfaces, environments. Digitally mediated experiences.
DES 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation for Design
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research career opportunities and organizations related to industry. Set career goals based on skills and interests. Identify job search skills to secure internships, implement transition from college to employment. prereq: Pre-graphic design or graphic design or pre-interior design or interior design or pre-apparel design or apparel design or environmental design or architecture or product design
ME 2011 - Introduction to Engineering
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Skills critical for practicing engineers. Mechanical engineering, engineering design. Visual, written, and oral communication forms. Computer-based design tools. Substantial design projects, including prototype construction. prereq: CSE lower div
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBUS 3010/Mgmt 3010
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
PDES 2704 - Concept Visualization and Presentation 2
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Building upon the principles taught in PDES 2703 Concept Visualization and Presentation 1, this course covers advanced digital sketching and 2D rendering techniques for product designers. The emphasis of this class is placed on refining sketches for professional presentation. As this class is a co-requisite with PDES 2771 Product Design Studio 1, some assignments will compliment projects assigned in studio.
PDES 2771 - Product Design Studio 1
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is the first design studio for product design majors. It is an introduction to user-centered design using industry-standard practices. Students will apply skills learned in their prior core classes towards a semester-long individual product design challenge. The deliverables focus on user research, market research, concept development, lo-fidelity prototyping, and concept presentation.
PDES 2772 - Product Design Studio 2
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This is the second studio course for product design majors. This studio explores physical prototype development using industry-standard practices. Students will apply skills learned in their prior core classes towards several individual product design challenges. The deliverables cover human factors & ergonomics, prototype crafsmanship, aesthetics, form giving, functionality, design for manufacture, and presentation skills.
PDES 3704 - Computer-Aided Design 1: Solid Modeling and Rendering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class provides an overview of computer-aided design (CAD) methods for product designers. The primary software covered in this course include Solidworks and Keyshot. These programs are used to make three-dimensional computer generated models of product concepts and render the models to appear photo-realistic. This class may also cover additional 2D and interaction design software.
PDES 3706 - Designing for Manufacture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class is a hands-on overview of common manufacturing methods, tools, and considerations for product designers. The focus is placed on plastic and metal related processes specifically machining, forming, casting, and molding. Throughout the course students apply the theory of design for manufacturing (DFM) and design for assembly (DFA) to a series of design projects. This course also covers related topics such as material identification, bill of material, cost estimation, part drawings, tolerances, fasteners, part finishing, and sourcing parts.
PDES 3711 - Product Innovation Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: PDes 3711/PDes 5711
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A hands-on experience in integrated product design and development processes. Elements of industrial design, engineering, business, and humanities are applied to a semester-long product design project. Cross-functional teams of students in different majors work together to design and develop new consumer product concepts with guidance from a community of industry mentors. prereq: PDes 2772 OR Junior/Senior (any major) or permission from instructor
PDES 3771 - Product Design Studio 3
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is the third studio course for product design majors in which students will further develop skills specific to their selected track/sub-plan. Students will apply skills learned in their prior core classes towards several individual product design challenges. Students in the user experience section may explore topics in service design, immersive environments, IoT, digital/physical integration, or smart products. Students in the integrated product development section may explore topics in furniture, medical devices, electromechanical products, consumer electronics, digital/physical integration, or smart products. Both sections will further develop presentation skills.
PDES 4701W - Capstone Research Studio (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students synthesize and apply design and research techniques to a senior capstone project. Projects can be student-directed or client-sponsored and are intended to demonstrate competency in fundamental design skills, communicating and documenting design processes, and the ability to apply design processes to develop new products and services while addressing real-world constraints. The first course of the two-course sequence focuses on problem/opportunity identification, user research methodologies, ideation and conceptual design, and early stage prototyping.
PDES 4702W - Capstone Design Studio (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students synthesize and apply design and research techniques to a senior capstone project. Projects can be student-directed or client-sponsored and are intended to demonstrate competency in fundamental design skills, communicating and documenting design processes, and the ability to apply design processes to develop new products and services while addressing real-world constraints. The second course of the two-course sequence focuses on concept refinement, advanced prototyping, detailed design and engineering, user testing, manufacturing, and business and distribution considerations.
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
PDES 3196 - Product Design Internship
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised work experience relating activity in business, industry, or government to the student's area of study. Integrative paper or project may be required. prereq: PDes major
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
CSCI 4611 - Programming Interactive Computer Graphics and Games
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tools/techniques for programming games/interactive computer graphics. Event loops, rendering/animation, polygonal models, texturing, physical simulation. Modern graphics toolkits. History/future of computer games technology. Social impact of interactive computer graphics. prereq: 2021 or instr consent
CSCI 5127W - Embodied Computing: Design & Prototyping (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
In this course, you will learn and apply the principles of embodied computing to human-centered challenges. Through a semester-long team project, you will learn and demonstrate mastery of human-centered embodied computing through two phases: (1) investigating human needs and current embodied practices and (2) rapidly prototyping and iterating embodied computing solutions. One of the ways you will demonstrate this mastery is through the collaborative creation of a written document and project capstone video describing your process and prototype. prereq: CSci 4041, upper division or graduate student, or instructor permission; CSci 5115 or equivalent recommended.
DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will uncover elements of storytelling within the design process and investigate different modes of shaping narrative. We will be experimenting with various media, including 2D design and mapping, audio, video, social platforms, augmented reality, and online environments.
DES 5185 - Human Factors in Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories/methods that influence the assessment of physical, social, and psychological human factors. Development of user needs with application to designed products that interact with human body. prereq: Grad student or sr or instr consent
GDES 2342 - Web Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graphic design elements/principles applied to website design. HTML, CSS. Working with interactive media and file formats.
GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of graphic design principles to three-dimensional projects. Principles of three-dimensional design/space applied to labeling, packaging, and display.
GDES 5341 - Interaction Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: DHA 4384/GDES 5341
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design of interactive multimedia projects. Interactive presentations and electronic publishing. Software includes hypermedia, scripting, digital output. prereq: [[2334 or 2342], design minor] or graphic design major or grad student or instr consent
GDES 5386 - Fundamentals of Game Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Games of all kinds. Theoretical/practical aspects of making games. Investigation of design process. Rules, strategies, methodologies. Interactivity, choice, action, outcome, rules in game design. Social interaction, story telling, meaning/ideology, semiotics. Signs, cultural meaning. prereq: [[2334 or 2342], design minor] or [[4384 or DHA 4384 or 5341 or DHA 5341], [graphic design major or sr or grad student]] or instr consent
HUMF 5001 - Foundations of Human Factors/Ergonomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HumF/Kin 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Variability in human performance influenced by interaction with designs of machines/tools, computers/software, complex technological systems, jobs/working conditions, organizations, sociotechnical institutions. Conceptual, empirical, practical aspects of human factors/ergonomics. prereq: Grad HumF major or minor or instr consent
HUMF 5874 - Human Centered Design to Improve Complex Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Class participants will work together using design thinking frameworks to discover, define, develop, and propose solutions to help solve complex system problems. The class will use cognitive design methods and research to guide in developing prototypes that foster improved experiences in information delivery, processes of systems, and technology. Teams, will tackle complex real-world problems. Projects may focus on a variety of areas ranging from retail to health care. Coursework will primarily focus on team-based projects. Participants will immerse themselves the following activities while working towards remediating their chosen problems. ? insights gathering/research methods ? cognitive design methods and principles ? identifying strengths/weaknesses in actual vs. proposed systems ? implementation (prototyping) considerations/strategies The course will be highly interactive with little lecture. It will strive to foster critical thinking and will offer an environment where creativity can thrive. Students are expected to come to class fully prepared to interact during class time with the readings and research consumed outside class. Material from course readings will focus on cognitive design, systems thinking principles and will be interwoven during the discussions and class activities. This course is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds and programs, including students from Human Factors, the Academic Health Center, Graphic Design, Product Design, Retail, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and the Carlson School. Human Factors students working toward a Plan C Master?s degree may use this course as one of the two courses required to be 50% project-based.
PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3031/Psy 3031
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychological, biological, and physical bases of sensory experience in humans and animals. Emphasizes senses of vision/hearing. prereq: PSY 1001
SCO 3051 - Service Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues unique to managing service processes. Identifying service needs, designing services, and managing services. prereq: 3001
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
MGMT 4008 - Entrepreneurial Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management of a new venture after founding. Internal/external challenges of managing a startup organization. Working with resource constraints and understanding how business models may change over time. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in [3010 or IBUS 3010]
MGMT 4050 - Managing Innovation and Change In Action
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: IBus 4050/Mgmt 4055
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on how entrepreneurs create new businesses and how organizations innovate and change. Special emphasis is given to understanding the sequences of events that typically unfold in individuals, groups, organizations, and industries as innovations develop from concept to implementation. The course relies heavily on the concepts and findings from the Minnesota Innovation Research Program, as well as other studies. The course focuses on how the innovation journey unfolds in the creation of a wide variety of new businesses, technologies, products, programs, and services, and what paths along this journey are likely to lead to success and failure. The course emphasizes building diagnostic skills and developing useful principles that may increase the odds of maneuvering organizational innovation and change journeys. prereq: Mgmt 1001, 3001 or 3010
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4170W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
New-business-opportunity identification/development. Students conduct feasibility analysis, create formal business plan, gather feasibility data, and contact potential customers, suppliers, and other primary sources. prereq: 3010
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
MGMT 4172 - Entrepreneurship in Action II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Second of two-semester sequence. In fall, students identify business opportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch business. In spring, students implement busienss plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 4171
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 3605 - Recycling: Extending Raw Materials (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3605/ESPM 5605
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic principles of recycling and its role in raw materials utilization, energy, and the environment. Recycling processes for commonly recycled materials, products, and their properties and environmental implications of recycling.
GCC 5005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5571/GCC 3005/GCC 5005
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Do you want to make a difference? We live at the intersection of COVID-19, racism, economic recession, and environmental collapse. Now is the time to make an impact. In this project-based course, you will develop effective and sustainable responses to current social and environmental problems. You'll learn about tools, mindsets, and skills that will help you to address any complex grand challenge. Your project may address food insecurity, unemployment, housing, environmental impacts, equity, or other issues. Proposed designs for how you might have a impact can take many forms (student group, program intervention with an existing organization, public policy strategy, or for-profit or non-profit venture) but must have ideas for how to be financially sustainable. A primary focus of the course is how to identify the ?right? problem to solve. You will use a discovery process, design thinking, and input from field research to addressing the challenge you choose. You will build a model around the community?s culture, needs, and wants. Community members, locally and globally, will serve as mentors and research consultants to teams. Weekly speakers will share their innovative efforts to serve the common good. The course will be primarily ?flipped? so that students will have time to work on their projects in class. Students enrolled in GCC 3005 will work in interdisciplinary teams on problems identified by community mentors, students in GCC 5005 can propose a problem to work on individually or choose to work in teams. After the class, there is an opportunity to compete for funding through the Acara program. By the end of the class, you will have a well-designed plan to turn your project into an actionable solution if that is of interest.
MM 4311 - Sustainable Lean Manufacturing: Eliminating the Waste
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
One of the most important skills you can cultivate in manufacturing (or really any line of work) is the ability to clear away the clutter and streamline the process. Sustainable Lean Manufacturing teaches students three things: 1) wasted time, effort, and money exist in every process involving a product or service; 2) it?s possible to clearly see and identify where waste occurs; and 3) there?s a surefire set of tools and techniques to make a process less wasteful and more efficient. Bottom line: students leave this course viewing everyday life with a different perspective, knowing there?s always room for improvement in workflow. prereq: None
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
ARTS 1802 - Introduction to Sculpture: Understanding the Fundamentals of the Practice of Sculpture (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will help you gain an understanding of the fundamentals of sculpture through a studio practice with a variety of materials, concepts, techniques, and styles. The course is an introduction to the inherent nature of materials, the development of form in real space, and the shops and tools with which to create sculptural forms in our state-of-the-art facilities. We will focus on the foundations of sculpture through hands-on demonstrations of basic sculptural processes: for example, carving, modeling, assembling, and casting. You will also be exposed to, and experiment with, the diverse range of approaches, work methods, and topics that have occupied sculptors both past and present. Students learn the proper use and function of the wood and metal shops, as well as a variety of other tools and techniques, including new technologies such as the Laser Cutter and VR (Virtual Reality), along with more traditional techniques such as metal casting, paper folding, clay, and plaster. You will discover your individual creative process and aid the sculptural articulation of your conceptual issues through discussion and critique of your class accomplishments. Critiques will be used as a tool for developing critical thinking and project development.
ARTS 1801 - Introduction to Ceramics: Wheel-Throwing and Hand-Building Techniques (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Interested in working with a material and practice that dates back 20,000 years? Want direct engagement with creative processes and materials that correlate the hand and the eye with the mind? The course introduces an exciting hands-on experience of ceramic three-dimensional object making. The course introduces general aspects of ceramic practice in art form, based on wheel-throwing and hand-building techniques, using electric and gas firing methods. It also deals with the basic visual concepts of three-dimensional form whether utilitarian object or non-utilitarian object. The assignments in this course introduce various fundamental elements, technically and artistically, of artistic ceramic production. Students become familiar with the processes and techniques of working with and firing clay, and also the artistic formal languages and experience of externalizing inner thought. Critiques will be used as a tool for developing critical thinking and project development. Finished pieces will be produced that reflect the full ceramic production experience.
DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will uncover elements of storytelling within the design process and investigate different modes of shaping narrative. We will be experimenting with various media, including 2D design and mapping, audio, video, social platforms, augmented reality, and online environments.
DES 3321 - Furniture Design: Exploration
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Des 3321/DesI 3040
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Furniture design as discipline, not as method. Material. Objects that mediate our environment. History, design criteria, technology, craft. Group case study, research presentation, individual making/presenting of concept-prototype.
DES 3322 - Furniture Design, Practice
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The hardest things about the creative act is learning how to start something before you know what it is. The simplest objects are always more formally complex than the mind can accurately imagine. This course teaches design thinking through furniture constructed using a fast, loose & ad-hoc "children-club-fort-building" method of discovering & visualizing while making. Direct-construction design is tangibly satisfying and will provide powerful context for all other scales of creative, design and planning methods. Your results will not be conventionally good-looking, but you will make real & functioning cultural things. All exercises will be dependent on connecting to ideas beyond commonly recognized boundaries of the furniture. Think "Chair-ness, not Chair." You will be taught basic welding and wood joinery to provide fast & viable structural frames, "surfacing" methods in wood, foam and fabric composites, and an introduction to mold making and material casting. You do not need to be good at making, but you must be game to try. Craft is important so-far as basic structural usability is attained. Ideas will always trump material "correctness."
GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of graphic design principles to three-dimensional projects. Principles of three-dimensional design/space applied to labeling, packaging, and display.
MM 3305 - Advanced 3D Printing for Innovative Business Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Revolutionize your world with speed and creativity. Three-D printing and additive manufacturing are changing how we work and how manufacturing itself happens. In this course, you'll hone the ability to innovate and to lead others in discovery. The first half of the semester is spent learning how to use additive technology and the second half how it can be applied to real-world industries. By the end of the course, you'll use computer-aided design and the U of M's 3D printing lab to build your own solution to a problem. Join this community of forward-thinking makers and tap some of the most high-tech resources at the U. Prerequisites: None
PDES 3705 - History and Future of Product Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class covers critical milestones in the history, evolution, and trajectory of modern product design as well as the human relationships to consumer goods, including production and consumption. In some assignments, students have the opportunity to apply the topics discussed towards imagining the future of the product design industry.
PDES 3715 - Design and Food
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class is a hands-on introduction to principles of design applied to the food industry. Students develop new food concepts working in a kitchen classroom with regular advising from local chefs and food industry experts. The class is structured into four modules: creative design process, flavor and texture, visual aesthetics, and user experience. In each module students learn different design and food preparation methods and apply them to a design challenge. Several restaurant outings are incorporated into the curriculum.
ADES 3217 - Fashion: Trends and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relation of fashion trends to visual analysis of apparel. Application to design/retail.
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4121/Anth 5121
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
ANTH 5221 - Anthropology of Material Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The course examines material culture as a social creation, studied from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives (e.g., social anthropology, archaeology, primatology, history of science). The course examines the changing role of material culture from prehistory to the future.
DES 3309 - Storytelling and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students will uncover elements of storytelling within the design process and investigate different modes of shaping narrative. We will be experimenting with various media, including 2D design and mapping, audio, video, social platforms, augmented reality, and online environments.
GDES 3353 - Packaging and Display
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of graphic design principles to three-dimensional projects. Principles of three-dimensional design/space applied to labeling, packaging, and display.
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101
MKTG 3010 - Marketing Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on managing the entire marketing research process, which involves collecting and analyzing relevant, timely, and accurate information to gain customer insights and drive effective marketing decision making. Students learn fundamental techniques of data collection and analysis to solve specific marketing problems. The class offers hands-on learning-by-doing opportunities through group projects for students to practice every stage of marketing research. prereq: 3001 and SCO 2550 or equiv statistics course
MKTG 3040 - Buyer Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of behavioral sciences to buyer behavior. Perception, attitudes, learning, persuasion, motivation, decision-making, social/cultural influences, managerial implications. prereq: 3001
RM 2215 - Introduction to Retail Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of retailing management. Aspects of retailing management in global, multi-channel retail environment. Strategies/tactics to make decisions to operate retail business. Retail management principles covered.
RM 3243 - Visual Merchandising
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Retail store environment. Physical/psychological effects that initiate/motivate consumer behavior. Merchandise display: creativity, department layout, fixturing, lighting, cross merchandising, visual resources, signing, maintenance. prereq: 2215, [DHA major or minor or instr consent]
MM 3001W - Manufacturing in the Global Economy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this course, you'll find out just how innovative, strategic, and creative manufacturing is. The course is a great elective for students seeking a better understanding of the core sector in both U.S. and international economies. The overall objective of MM 3001W is to explore different facets of manufacturing in today's global economy, and the three dimensions of the high-performance manufacturing organization (HPMO) model--leadership, product quality, and innovation--are paramount in that exploration. You'll take a look at past and current Minnesota manufacturing companies (3M and Red Wing Shoes, for example) that are surviving and thriving in today's economy, and also learn why some of those Minnesota companies have failed. As a writing intensive course, MM 3001W also prepares students to be successful writers, both in their coursework at the University of Minnesota and in their future careers, as special attention will be paid to real-world writing applications, skills, and processes. Prerequisites: None.
MM 4039 - The Science of Sourcing: Partnerships for Success
Credits: 3.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Learn how to maneuver with ease inside the complex network of global manufacturing and outsourcing. The Science of Sourcing is all about setting up a sourcing strategy that hinges on two things: core competencies of your business and, of course, customer satisfaction. By the end of this course, you'll be able to do three things really well: 1) identify which products or processes should be outsourced, 2) perform estimates for cost and comparison of outsourcing options, and finally, 3) execute step-by-step outsourcing as you choose suppliers. You?ll also be exposed to the art of managing an outsourced manufacturer relationship, which includes contracts and performance metrics. It's all about upholding quality and value. Prerequisite: A course such as MM 3001W, or relevant manufacturing experience.
MM 4201 - Quality Engineering and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Quality makes or breaks an organization. Without continuous quality improvement, performance fails, sales drop, and organizations die. This course delves into three essential truths: 1) the customer is the ultimate judge of quality; 2) every process has variation, which must be fully understood before it can be improved; and 3) a lean, mean, structured plan will make problem solving a cinch when it comes to process improvement. Students will learn more than just the technical aspects of quality management; they will also learn the history and modern application of quality, quality management tool interfaces, and what it takes to be a leader in quality as a profession. prereq: none, but knowledge of statistics will be very helpful.
SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing the operations function within manufacturing and service organizations, and across the supply chains of these organizations. The supply chain is the set of organizations and the work that they complete to collectively create customer-valued goods and services. Course emphasizes decision making in work processes, including decision related to managing processes, quality, capacity, inventory, and supply chain activities. Quantitative and qualitative methods are used for improving management of operations.
MGMT 4080W - Applied Technology Entrepreneurship (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 4170/Mgmt 4177/Mgmt 5177
Typically offered: Every Spring
Team projects based on commercializable technologies or innovations. Teams present their ideas to investors and industry professionals. Students are encouraged to submit their business plans to Minnesota Cup.
MGMT 4170W - New Business Feasibility and Planning (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
New-business-opportunity identification/development. Students conduct feasibility analysis, create formal business plan, gather feasibility data, and contact potential customers, suppliers, and other primary sources. prereq: 3010
MGMT 4171W - Entrepreneurship in Action I (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Two-semester course. In fall, students identify a business oportunity, develop concept, determine resources required, and launch the business. In spring, students implement business plan, manage business, and determine exit strategy. prereq: 3010, [4008 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4008], completed coursework in business core, CSOM upper division, approved application
PDES 4701W - Capstone Research Studio (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students synthesize and apply design and research techniques to a senior capstone project. Projects can be student-directed or client-sponsored and are intended to demonstrate competency in fundamental design skills, communicating and documenting design processes, and the ability to apply design processes to develop new products and services while addressing real-world constraints. The first course of the two-course sequence focuses on problem/opportunity identification, user research methodologies, ideation and conceptual design, and early stage prototyping.