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Duluth Campus

Teaching Social Studies B.A.A.

Education
College of Education and Human Service Professions
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2019
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 123 to 129
  • Required credits within the major: 110 to 112
  • Degree: Bachelor of Applied Arts
The BAA in teaching social studies prepares students to teach grades 5 through 12. Social studies is an interdisciplinary major that requires lower division coursework in each of seven areas: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Students then select one of eight discipline areas as their sub-plan specialization and complete upper division course in that areas: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, sociology or women's studies. Students complete professional preparation coursework in education.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 45 credits before admission to the program.
Freshman and transfer students are usually admitted to pre-major status before admission to this major.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
Students entering the Secondary (5-12) & K-12 licensure programs are bound by the policies in effect at the time of application; admission is based on criteria established by the Dept. of Educ., consistent with MN policies as established by the MN Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board (PELSB). Students must meet the admission requirements to the blocks. They can be found online at: https://z.umn.edu/stepapplication.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introductory Course (1 cr)
This course will be waived for transfer students with 24 credits taken post high school or students who change to CEHSP from a collegiate unit where it is not required. Register course for one credit.
UST 1000 - UMD Seminar (1.0-2.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Admissions Requirement (3 cr)
EDUC 1101 - Education in Modern Society [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
General Requirements
The Board of Regents, on recommendation of the faculty, grants degrees from the University of Minnesota. Requirements for an undergraduate degree from University of Minnesota Duluth include the following:
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits.
  4. At least 30 of the last 60 degree credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. Students must complete at least half of their courses at the 3xxx-level and higher at UMD. Study-abroad credits earned through courses taught by UM faculty and at institutions with which UMD has international exchange programs may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. The minimum cumulative UM GPA required for graduation will be 2.00 and will include only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UM GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major and minor. No academic unit may impose higher grade point standards to graduate.
  8. Diploma, transcripts, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
1. Compliance with general regulations governing granting of degrees. Students are required to review their degree status in the CEHSP Advising & Academic Services Office early in their senior year. 2. Degree candidates must complete at least 20 of the last 30 degree credits immediately before graduation at University of Minnesota, Duluth. 3. Make satisfactory academic progress and demonstrate acceptable professional performance in field experiences. 4. Students are expected to: a) make satisfactory progress each semester, including grades of C- or better in all courses required in the major; b) demonstrate acceptable professional performance in applied learning settings (e.g., laboratory, field experiences, clinical experiences); and c) obtain an approved background check before being placed in clinical, field, intern, or student teaching experiences. Students who do not meet program expectations can be dismissed from the major. Details on these requirements are available from the department office.
Lower Division Requirements (36 cr)
Anthropology
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
Economics
ECON 1003 - Economics and Society [LE CAT8, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
Geography
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 1414 - Physical Geography [LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
History
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
Political Science
POL 1011 - American Government and Politics [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
POL 1050 - International Relations [LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
Psychology
PSY 1003 - General Psychology [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
Sociology
SOC 1101 - Introduction to Sociology [LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Requirements (12 cr)
Students choosing to double major in History and Teaching Social Studies do not need advanced writing as this requirement is fulfilled through the History major.
EDUC 3412 - The Computer in Education (4.0 cr)
EDUC 4234 - Science, Technology, and Society [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
HLTH 3202 - Drug Education (2.0 cr)
WRIT 3140 - Advanced Writing: Human Services (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences (3.0 cr)
Non-Western History Requirement (3 - 4 cr)
Non-Western History requirement is not required of teaching social studies majors with history sub plan or double major.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Culture [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3616 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [LEIP CAT07] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3570 - Politics of Developing Nations (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Block Requirements (38 cr)
Application for admission to the blocks must be submitted by the 6th Friday of the spring semester. Applications are available from the Department of Education website. Application for admission must be completed spring semester for fall entry.
Block 1 (12 cr)
All courses must be taken concurrently.
EDSE 4204 - Designing Learning Environments and Lessons (3.0 cr)
EDSE 4100 - Teaching in a Diverse Society (3.0 cr)
EDSE 4501 - Adolescent/Adult Development and Learning Theory (3.0 cr)
SPED 3415 - Special Education in the Secondary School (3.0 cr)
Block 2 (13 cr)
All courses must be taken concurrently. Application for student teaching must be made by the 4th Friday of the semester before student teaching. Applications are available from the Department of Education website.
EDSE 3206 - Apprenticeship: Secondary School (2.0 cr)
EDSE 4214 - Teaching Content-Area Reading (2.0 cr)
EDSE 4244 - Teaching Social Studies: Grades 5-12 (3.0 cr)
EDSE 4525 - Assessment for Secondary Education (3.0 cr)
EDUC 4381 - Teaching Indigenous Students (3.0 cr)
Block 3 (13 cr)
All courses must be taken concurrently. Registration for student teaching in the senior year requires grades of C- or better in all courses in teaching major(s) and minor; graded completion of all education block courses; completion of at least 85% of teaching major courses. Students must have personal liability insurance while they are working in field placement settings. EDSE 4600 - register for 12 credits. EDUC 4990 must be taken concurrently with EDSE 4600.
EDSE 4600 - Student Teaching (3.0-12.0 cr)
EDUC 4500 - Professional Issues and Ethics (1.0 cr)
EDUC 4990 - Education Teacher Performance Assessment (0.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Anthropology
Anthropology Sub-Plan (18 cr)
Students who select this sub-plan must take both ANTH 1602 and 1604; one course will count under the lower division anthropology requirement and the other will count toward the sub-plan requirement.
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
SOC 3156 - Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis (4.0 cr)
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3xxx
· ANTH 4xxx
Economics
Students with an economics sub plan must take ECON 1003 as their lower division ECON course. ECON 1022 or ECON 1023 can count as a lower division course or count toward the sub plan. Students should select ECON 1022 or ECON 1023 as their lower division requirement and the other for the Economic sub plan requirement.
Economics Sub-plan (18 cr)
ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
Statistics
ECON 2030 - Applied Statistics for Business and Economics [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3020 - Statistical Methods (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3155 - Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis (4.0 cr)
or STAT 1411 - Introduction to Statistics [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or STAT 3611 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
Upper Division
ECON 3022 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (3.0 cr)
or ECON 3023 - Intermediate Microeconomics (3.0 cr)
or ECON 3402 - Global Economic Issues (3.0 cr)
ECON courses 3xxx or higher so total equals minimum 18 credits.
Take 5 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ECON 3xxx
· ECON 4xxx
Geography
Geography Sub-Plan (18 cr)
ES 2005 - Environment and Sustainability [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
ES or GEOG 1xxx - 2xxx
GEOG 1205 and GEOG 1414 may not be applied.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ES 1xxx
· ES 2xxx
· GEOG 1xxx
· GEOG 2xxx
Highly recommended courses include: ES 3100, GEOG 3401, GEOG 3411, GEOG 4393 and GEOG 4393.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ES 3xxx
· ES 4xxx
· ES 5xxx
· GEOG 3xxx
· GEOG 4xxx
· GEOG 5xxx
History
History Sub-plan (20 cr)
Take no more than 8 credits in any one sub-requirement group. Non-Western History requirement is not required for the History sub-plan or double major. Other electives may be approved.
Take 20 or more credit(s) from the following:
Subrequirement I : United States History
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 4 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 3310 - Colonial America: The American Revolution (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War (4.0 cr)
· Subrequirement II: European History
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 4 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689 (4.0 cr)
· Subrequirement III: Asian, African, Non-U.S., Non-European
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 4 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 2325 - Muslim Societies [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3615 - Modern Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3616 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [LEIP CAT07] (4.0 cr)
· Special Topics
A Special Topics course may fulfill a category requirement; advisor prior approval for intended category required.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned) (3.0 cr)
Political Science
Political Science Sub-Plan (18 cr)
Take 18 or more credit(s) from the following:
Category I: United States Politics
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· POL 3001 - American Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3015 - State and Local Government (4.0 cr)
· POL 3040 - Women and Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3080 - Environment and Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3120 - Congress and the Presidency (4.0 cr)
· POL 3150 - American Constitutional Law I (3.0 cr)
· POL 3151 - American Constitutional Law II (3.0 cr)
· POL 3170 - Political Interest Groups and Individuals (3.0 cr)
· Category II: International Politics
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· POL 3400 - Contemporary Issues in World Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 3403 - American Foreign Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3420 - International Organization and Global Governance (3.0 cr)
· Category III: Comparative Politics
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia (4.0 cr)
· POL 3515 - Theories of Comparative Politics (4.0 cr)
· POL 3517 - Western European Political Systems (4.0 cr)
· POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3525 - African Politics (3.0 cr)
· POL 3570 - Politics of Developing Nations (3.0 cr)
· POL 3580 - Central American Politics (4.0 cr)
· Category IV: Political Theory
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· POL 3600 - Political Concepts (4.0 cr)
· POL 3610 - Political Economy: An Introduction (3.0 cr)
· POL 3651 - Classical Political Thought (4.0 cr)
· POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought (4.0 cr)
Psychology
Psychology Sub-Plan (18 cr)
Students who select the psychology sub plan follow the guidelines for the psychology minor. EDSE 4501 credits count as an elective course in the psychology minor. Students who select the psychology sub plan should register with the psychology department as a psychology minor.
Take 18 or more credit(s) from the following:
Psychology minor course
· CSD 3010 - Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (3.0 cr)
or ECON 2030 - Applied Statistics for Business and Economics [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or EXSC 4700 - Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise Science (4.0 cr)
or PSY 2020 - Introduction to Statistics and Research Methods (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3020 - Statistical Methods (4.0 cr)
or SOC 2155 - Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2411 - Statistical Methods [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or Other approved course
· Group I
· PSY 2021 - Developmental Psychology [LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3081 - History and Systems of Psychology (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3111 - Theories of Personality (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3121 - Abnormal Psychology (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3201 - Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
· Group II
· PSY 3061 - Physiological Psychology (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3611 - Learning and Behavior (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3613 - Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Change (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3621 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
or PSY 3697 - Sensation and Perception (4.0 cr)
· Psychology Elective Courses
PSY courses 2xxx or higher so total equals minimum 18 credits.
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PSY 2xxx
· PSY 3xxx
· PSY 4xxx
· EDSE 4501 - Adolescent/Adult Development and Learning Theory (3.0 cr)
Sociology
Sociology Sub-Plan (18 cr)
SOC 2155 - Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis (4.0 cr)
SOC 3945 - Social Stratification (3.0 cr)
SOC 4111 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4xxx
Women's Studies
Women's Studies Sub-Plan (18 cr)
WS 2001 - Introduction to Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Studies [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Electives (14 cr)
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
Women's Studies
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· WS 3xxx
· WS 4xxx
· Women's Studies Related Courses
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3080 - Cultural Constructions of the Body (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3628 - Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3.0 cr)
· CRIM 4323 - Women and Justice (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 2581 - Women Writers [LE CAT9, LECD CAT09, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HLTH 3118 - Women's Health Issues (3.0 cr)
· LGBT 3xxx
· LGBT 4xxx
· POL 3040 - Women and Politics (3.0 cr)
· PSY 2223 - Gender in Society [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3215 - Topics in Human Sexuality (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4925 - Sociology of Rape (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4947 - Sociology of Gender Identities and Systems (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Education and Human Service Professions

View sample plan(s):
· Anthropology Sample Plan
· Economics Sample Plan
· Geography Sample Plan
· History Sample Plan
· Political Science Sample Plan
· Psychology Sample Plan
· Sociology Sample Plan
· Women's Studies Sample Plan

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· Teaching Social Studies B.A.A.
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UST 1000 - UMD Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02403 - EHS 1000/UST 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
EDUC 1101 - Education in Modern Society (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of educational institutions and practices used in different sectors of society. Historical and philosophical foundations of American education.
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01368 - Anth 1601/1602
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Origin and development of extinct and living human forms, primatology, human biological variations, the race concept, evolution, and development of human societies up to the earliest stages of ancient civilizations.
ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to representative cultures of the world and to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, focusing on range of variation and degree of uniformity in human behavior and in cultural adaptations.
ECON 1003 - Economics and Society (LE CAT8, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
General description of U.S. economy and analysis of contemporary economic problems. Introduction to major economic issues and problems of the day, providing a simple framework used by economists for analysis. prereq: Cannot apply credit to economics major or minor or BAc or BBA majors
ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analyzing overall performance of an economic system. National income accounting and theory, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, money, monetary policy, economic growth, international trade, non-U.S. economies, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analyzing free enterprise system through study of product and resource markets. Supply and demand, utility, production and cost, market structure, resource use, market failures, regulatory role of government, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World (SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture, and politics by examining human geography in the context of global regions. This course introduces core concepts in human geography such as space, place, and scale, and globalization, and applies those concepts to understand the diversity of our globalizing world. Topics from the impact of climate change, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and ethnic and national identities are explored.
GEOG 1414 - Physical Geography (LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The environment is highly dynamic and is continually modified by human and environmental processes. This course examines these processes to better understand how the Earth's landscapes were formed and how they are currently being transformed. Specifically, students will understand the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment including Earth-sun relations, water resources, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils.
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
POL 1011 - American Government and Politics (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of American national government. Survey of American governmental system, structure, operations, and services; constitutionalism, federalism, civil liberties, parties, pressure groups, and elections.
POL 1050 - International Relations (LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to contemporary international politics: levels of analysis; the international system; nation-state behavior; foreign policy decision making; economic and defense policy issues.
POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of the politics of countries selected to reflect alternative styles of politics and forms of government; examples of Western liberal democratic, Communist and post-Communist, and Third World systems.
POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of political thought from a thematic perspective such as freedom and citizenship, democracy and its critics, political obligation and justice, diversity and inequality. Close attention to method of interpretation and argument.
PSY 1003 - General Psychology (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of behavior; current knowledge of biological, social, and cognitive areas of psychology. Assessment, research methods, human development, personality, mental disorders, and therapy.
SOC 1101 - Introduction to Sociology (LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to sociological concepts and their application.
EDUC 3412 - The Computer in Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to computer use in instructional settings. PC and Mac platforms. Develops basic skills using software commonly used by educators. Teaching strategies using computer-based instruction.
EDUC 4234 - Science, Technology, and Society (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Nontechnical study of historical and cultural impact of natural science and technology on the earth and its inhabitants. prereq: Minimum 30 credits, no grad credits
HLTH 3202 - Drug Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physiological and psychological effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. Survey of societal causes and effects of drug use and abuse. Reasons and pressures for drug use by students. Appraisal and assessment of teacher's role in education, intervention, and treatment of drug abuse. prereq: 45 credits, for students seeking and admitted to the STEP (Secondary Teaching Education program), major in health education, public health education and promotion, physical education, exercise science and communication sciences and disorders or instructor consent.
WRIT 3140 - Advanced Writing: Human Services
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study and practice of writing tasks in education as well as other fields related to the human service professions. Designed to prepare students to master their use of Edited Standard Written English while producing professional documents, including a major research project with an oral presentation. Assignments focus on audience, purpose, and the process of writing as they relate to the workplace. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
WRIT 3160 - Advanced Writing: Social Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study and practice of writing for those whose professional interests are in sociology, anthropology, geography, criminology, psychology, women's studies, history, political science, and similar fields. Assignments center on producing documents encountered in the workplace, such as career documents, proposals, research projects, oral presentations, observational studies, and position papers. pre-req: 1) WRIT 1120 or MNTC completed 2) minimum 60 credits earned
AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Culture (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2115.
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Anishinabe, Ojibwe, and Chippewa. Origins and lifestyle; relationship between traditional and contemporary times. Emphasis on Minnesota. Through spring 2015 this course will carry Liberal Education Cultural Diversity credit and effective fall 2015 it will carry Liberal Education Sustainability credit. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2115.
HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Summer Even Year
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.
HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
China's history from the Opium War to the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and Deng Xiaoping's capitalist reform.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3616 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Generational, class, and gender conflicts in the wake of European occupation, impact of colonial and neocolonial domination, and African responses to that occupation and to the world economy in the 20th century; selected films and literary sources. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3516
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course delivered partially online through MOODLE focuses on Middle Eastern history from the eighteenth century to the present. Nineteenth-century reform informs the course's major theme; the rise of the nation state in the Modern Middle East. Geographically, the course covers the Arabic-speaking regions, Turkey, Iran, and Israel.
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (LEIP CAT07)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explores topics in Middle Eastern history-religious, political, social, and cultural-from the rise of Islam to the present through film. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 4527
POL 3570 - Politics of Developing Nations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1050 or 1500 or 8 cr social sciences, 45 cr or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Nature of political development; individual and institutional causes and consequences of development; political economy of the Third World. prereq: 1050 or 1500 or 8 cr social sciences, 45 cr or instructor consent
SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The study of Latino communities in the United States, from the colonial period to the present. Topics covered include the Spanish legacy in the Southeast and Southwest, Caribbean communities on the East coast and demographic transition away from major metropolitan areas to the Midwest. Students will read travel narratives, fiction, poetry, and theater, and will have the opportunity to collect oral histories from Latinos in Minnesota. The course is open to all students and will be taught in English.
EDSE 4204 - Designing Learning Environments and Lessons
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The characteristics of effective teachers, various developmentally appropriate teaching strategies, design of lessons using Universal Backward Design framework, designing effective learning environments, goals and action plans, site data, collaboratively review of student work, collaborative planning, integrated and exploratory curriculum, content standards, teaching with technology, observation skills and teacher readiness will be presented with integration and analysis of materials. prereq: Admission to EdSe program; no grad credit
EDSE 4100 - Teaching in a Diverse Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of cultural differences; planning instruction to accommodate individual differences in race, gender, ethnic background, cultural background, and physical and mental development; Including the diverse needs of learners in middle school and secondary school settings; integrated and exploratory curriculum, utilization of technology, community resources, structured service learning and humanizing classroom environments and classroom management procedures. prereq: Admission to EdSe program
EDSE 4501 - Adolescent/Adult Development and Learning Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of psychology applied to teaching; examination of adolescent growth and development; classroom management. prereq: Admission to EdSe program; no grad credit
SPED 3415 - Special Education in the Secondary School
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exploration of topics in exceptionality for pre-service secondary education majors. Topics include universal design, instructional strategies, characteristics of students, special education law, and differentiated instruction.
EDSE 3206 - Apprenticeship: Secondary School
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fifty hours of experience in a high school, including observing, teaching, tutoring, working with individual students and small groups. Focuses on classroom management, multicultural education, and students with special needs. Weekly seminar. prereq: Admission to EdSe program, must be taken either after or concurrently with EDSE 3204
EDSE 4214 - Teaching Content-Area Reading
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00331 - EdSe 5215/4214/4212/4215
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching reading within 5-12 content-area courses as pedagogy for improving literacy. Developing an understanding of the brain, cognition, and reading. Exploration of stages of literacy, methods for promoting reading, and strategies for improving comprehension. Lesson planning for content-area reading. Diverse learners and critical literacy in the content-area classroom.
EDSE 4244 - Teaching Social Studies: Grades 5-12
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Admission to EdSe program, 3204 or instructor consent; no grad credit
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and philosophy of social studies education; social studies objectives; curriculum design; instructional planning and use of resources; evaluation procedures. prereq: Admission to EdSe program, 3204 or instructor consent; no grad credit
EDSE 4525 - Assessment for Secondary Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An exploration of topics in responsive and responsible assessment of student learning. Topics include types and appropriate uses of classroom assessment strategies, large-scale and high stakes testing, backwards design, rubrics, checklists, and other evaluative tools and techniques. prereq: instructor consent; no grad credit
EDUC 4381 - Teaching Indigenous Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: EDSE 4100; no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for EDUC 5381.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of contemporary and historical Indian education; evaluation of attitudes toward Indian students: direct interaction with Indian parents and students; development of culturally sensitive teaching plans; specific cultural characteristics of indigenous groups; examination of American Indian outcomes. prereq: EDSE 4100; no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for EDUC 5381.
EDSE 4600 - Student Teaching
Credits: 3.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Supervised practicum in secondary or middle school under direction of licensed teacher. Demonstration of subject matter, teaching competence, and potential for future improvement. prereq: 4100, 4501, appropriate methods course; no grad credit
EDUC 4500 - Professional Issues and Ethics
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Provides an overview of several topics affecting practicing teachers including: employment preparation (resume, cover letter, interviewing skills), licensure application, professional organizations, professional codes of ethics, and district procedures. Offered concurrent with student teaching in order to provide options for discussion during practica. prereq: Admission to the elementary education program, successful completion of courses in block one and block two, no grad credit
EDUC 4990 - Education Teacher Performance Assessment
Credits: 0.0 [max 0.0]
Grading Basis: No Grade
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This 0 credit course is designed to cover the expense of the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) required by the State of Minnesota Board of Teaching to be complete by Education candidates during student teaching in order to be eligible for licensure in the State of Minnesota. pre-req: taken simultaneous with one of the following student teaching courses ECH 4600 or ELED 4600 or EDSE 4600, department consent; no grad credit
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01368 - Anth 1601/1602
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Origin and development of extinct and living human forms, primatology, human biological variations, the race concept, evolution, and development of human societies up to the earliest stages of ancient civilizations.
ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to representative cultures of the world and to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, focusing on range of variation and degree of uniformity in human behavior and in cultural adaptations.
SOC 3156 - Qualitative Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of qualitative research methods to study of social structures. Emphasizes field techniques, secondary data analysis, and interpretation. Lab prereq: (2155 or anth major or urs major or cst minor), at least 60 cr or instructor consent
ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analyzing overall performance of an economic system. National income accounting and theory, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, money, monetary policy, economic growth, international trade, non-U.S. economies, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analyzing free enterprise system through study of product and resource markets. Supply and demand, utility, production and cost, market structure, resource use, market failures, regulatory role of government, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
ECON 2030 - Applied Statistics for Business and Economics (LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to modern business statistics, emphasizing problem solving applications through statistical decision making using case studies. Topics include organization and presentation of data, summary statistics, distributions, statistical inference including estimation, and hypothesis testing. prereq: minimum 30 credits, LSBE student, pre-business or pre-accounting or Econ BA major or Graphic Design and Marketing major or Graphic Design with Marketing subplan major or Econ minor or Accounting minor or Business Admin minor; credit will not be granted if already received for Econ 2020, Stat 1411, Stat 2411, Stat 3611, Soc 3151, Psy 3020
PSY 3020 - Statistical Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive statistics; introduction to correlational analysis and regression; sampling techniques and statistical inference; applications of simple and factorial design analysis of variance and other parametric and nonparametric hypothesis-test statistics in the behavioral sciences. prereq: Math ACT 21 or higher or MATH 1005
SOC 3155 - Quantitative Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency, deviation, association. Inferential statistics focusing on probability and hypothesis testing. T-tests, Chi-square tests, analysis of variance, measures of association, introduction to statistical control. Statistical software (SPSS) used to analyze sociological data. Lab. prereq: 2155, crim major or soc major or URS major, min 30 cr
STAT 1411 - Introduction to Statistics (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical ideas involved in gathering, describing, and analyzing observational and experimental data. Experimental design, descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, probabilistic models, sampling, and statistical inference. prereq: Math ACT 21 or higher or a grade of at least C- in SSP 0103 or department approval
STAT 3611 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic probability, including combinatorial methods, random variables, mathematical expectation. Binomial, normal, and other standard distributions. Moment-generating functions. Basic statistics, including descriptive statistics and sampling distributions. Estimation and statistical hypothesis testing. prereq: A grade of at least C- in Math 1290 or Math 1296
ECON 3022 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Determinants of national income, employment, and price levels with particular attention to aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and monetary and fiscal policy. prereq: 1022, 1023, Math 1160 or Math 1296, Econ major or minor or LSBE candidate
ECON 3023 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Behavior of households as consuming units and suppliers of resources; analysis of decision making by firms under various market conditions. prereq: 1022, 1023, Math 1160 or Math 1296, Econ major or minor or LSBE candidate
ECON 3402 - Global Economic Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of economic theory of markets to analyze major issues shaping the future of the world economy. Emphasizes globalization of markets and the institutions involved in coordinating economic policies among world economies prereq: LSBE candidate or Econ major or Econ minor
ES 2005 - Environment and Sustainability (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02630 - ES 1001/ES 2005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will cover human impacts on their natural environments (resource depletion and pollution) and the complex notion of Sustainable Development. Students will analyze resource depletion (i.e., fossil fuels, forests, fisheries, water and soil) and pollution (i.e., climate change, ocean acidification, and oceanic garbage patches and dead zones) trends over the past century to better understand our growing impacts on the natural environment. Students will also analyze a wide variety of solutions (i.e., local food systems, renewable energy systems and water systems) from the emerging field of Sustainable Development aimed at mitigating these alarming resources depletion and pollution trends. Finally, students will be introduced to policy considerations regarding the implementation of these solutions and new economic approaches to help transition from economic growth to Sustainable Development.
GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World (LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02628 - GIS 2552/GEOG 2552
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course starts with the definition of what a map is and considers maps as tools for communication. Students are led to explore the effects of scale, projection, cartographic symbolization and generalization on the mapping process and resulting digital databases. Students are introduced to spatial data models, types of spatial data and representation, and study alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS and Remote Sensing. The course includes hands-on map activities; map reading/interpretation, map use, and map production where students will use their laptops to create online web mapping services.
HIST 3310 - Colonial America: The American Revolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories,
HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.
HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.
HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898. prereq: students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.
HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245
HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will cover the economic, political, social and cultural changes within the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. Topics to be covered include the Russo-Japanese War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russian Civil War, Russia’s industrialization and collectivization of land, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the cold War, late Soviet culture, the collapse of the Soviet Union and Russian under Yeltsin and Putin. Throughout the semester, students will be working with a variety of primary and secondary sources in different media (textual materials, visual sources, and film). Thorough written and oral assignment, student will develop their critical reading, writing and speaking skills. credit will not be granted if already received for HIS 2265 or 2365
HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333
HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041
HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Causes, conduct, and consequences of World Wars I and II from European perspective. Offered during day school and in Individualized Learning Program.
HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The murder of six million Jews as well as hundreds of thousands of other innocent civilians by the Nazi regime during World War II remains one of the most horrific massacres in human history. This course will examine the circumstances and causes that led to the Holocaust, the mechanisms through which the genocide was carried out, and the consequences and responses to the Holocaust. We will consider the perspectives of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, collaborators and resisters, as well as the meanings of these categories themselves. Moreover, this course frames the Holocaust within the broader history of ethnic cleansing and genocide, posing important questions about modernity and threats faced by minority populations in our world today.
HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The Romanov dynasty reigned in Russia for over 300 years and, despite the Romanovs' dramatic fall from power in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, was, by many criteria, one of the most successful dynasties in European history. This course will examine the economic, cultural, political and social transformations of the Russia Empire during the epoch of the Romanovs from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. We will study the accomplishments of the dominating political figures of the period, such as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, as well as the experiences of the diverse populations who lived across the wide expanse of the empire. In doing so, we will gain insight into the causes of the downfall of the imperial regime in 1917.
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01408 - Hist 3240/3245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240
HIST 2325 - Muslim Societies (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will be delivered partially online through MOODLE. Muslim Societies is an introduction to the cultural and religious bases of the societies in which Islam is the predominant faith. It covers Islamic origins; the career of Muhammad; believes; observances; and religious and socio-political issues of the present day. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2525
HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Warfare as the unifying theme in the social and cultural analysis of the impact Alexander the Great had on eastern Mediterranean development between 323 B.C. and 631 A.D. Alexander and his world, the formation of its three great religions, and the Alexandrian legacy of his achievement. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3335 or HMCl 3335.
HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330 B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine. prereq: Minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3055 or CSt 3055
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
China's history from the Opium War to the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and Deng Xiaoping's capitalist reform.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515
HIST 3616 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Generational, class, and gender conflicts in the wake of European occupation, impact of colonial and neocolonial domination, and African responses to that occupation and to the world economy in the 20th century; selected films and literary sources. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3516
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course delivered partially online through MOODLE focuses on Middle Eastern history from the eighteenth century to the present. Nineteenth-century reform informs the course's major theme; the rise of the nation state in the Modern Middle East. Geographically, the course covers the Arabic-speaking regions, Turkey, Iran, and Israel.
HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (LEIP CAT07)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explores topics in Middle Eastern history-religious, political, social, and cultural-from the rise of Islam to the present through film. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 4527
HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Special topics in history.
POL 3001 - American Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Approaches to policy study, context of policy process, and discussion of policy issues. prereq: 1011, min 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3015 - State and Local Government
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
State and local governments in the United States; governmental institutions and processes; intergovernmental relations. Special reference to Minnesota prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for 3020
POL 3040 - Women and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Women's political status; implications of women's role in political process; women as political actors; feminist critique and vision of politics. prereq: 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3080 - Environment and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
American natural resource problems with special attention to conservation activities on national, state, and local levels; development of conservation agencies in Minnesota. prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3120 - Congress and the Presidency
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Functioning and structure of the United States Congress and Presidency. Members of Congress and the Presidency: their characteristics, their selection, roles they play, how they interact with each other as well as with others in the policy-making process. prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3150 - American Constitutional Law I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Institutional powers and civil rights: judicial review; authority of Congress and President; powers in war and foreign affairs; power of national and state governments; property rights; civil rights and equal protection (race, gender, and other groups); anti-discrimination; affirmative action. prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3151 - American Constitutional Law II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Civil liberties: incorporation of the Bill of Rights; Due Process clause; freedom of religion; freedom of speech; freedom of press; privacy rights; rights of the accused; search and seizure; rights before the Courts; cruel and unusual punishment. prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3170 - Political Interest Groups and Individuals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Role of interest groups and individuals who lobby government to influence public policy. Internal dynamics of groups; strategies of lobbying and its regulation. prereq: 1011, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3400 - Contemporary Issues in World Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Prerequisites: 1050, 45 cr; 4 cr may be applied toward political science major requirements
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Detailed examination and analysis of selected contemporary issues in world politics and international relations. Policy recommendations dealing with each issue. prereq: 1050, 45 cr; 4 cr may be applied toward political science major requirements
POL 3403 - American Foreign Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01437 - Pol 3403/3402
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Various influences on the making of American foreign policy; understanding why particular foreign policy choices are made and the effects of a changing international environment on American foreign policy. prereq: 1011 or 1050, min 45 cr
POL 3420 - International Organization and Global Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the role of international organizations in world politics and the evolution of global governance systems. Includes examinations of state sovereignty, methods for achieving cooperation, and whether international organizations are effective means for achieving global collective goods. prereq: 1050 and minimum 45 credits
POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Comparative study of five South Asian countries (namely India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal). It analyzes the history and impact of colonialism in South Asia; state formations in South Asia; and controversies in recent South Asian politics over issues like globalization, democratization, religious fundamentalism, nuclearism, and gender. Policy solutions to these problems will be considered. prereq: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
POL 3515 - Theories of Comparative Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces the theoretical, methodological, and substantive debates in the discipline of Comparative Politics. prereq: 1500, 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
POL 3517 - Western European Political Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Comparative analysis of development and operation of political-governmental institutions and processes in selected Western European countries: political and ideological patterns and trends; problems of democratic politics; policy issues in advanced industrial societies; and the future of the "welfare state." prereq: 45 cr including 8 cr social sciences or instructor consent
POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class is a comparative study of the states in Asia namely India, China, Japan, and others. The class will explore the historical trajectories of these states; will study how these histories have given rise to different forms of their current state formations; will explore their contemporary political systems; economies; their socio-cultural and gender dynamics; and contemporary policy issues faced by these states. The class will also analyze the geo-strategic significance of Asia to the West/United States in the contemporary eras of globalization. pre-req: POL 1500 or instructor's consent
POL 3525 - African Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
A survey of politics in Africa, with an emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. Includes discussions of pre-colonial history, colonialism and its effects, the politics of independence movements, contemporary political systems, and the forces influencing politics on the continent. prereq: 1050 or 1500, 45 cr including 8 social science credits or instructor consent
POL 3570 - Politics of Developing Nations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1050 or 1500 or 8 cr social sciences, 45 cr or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Nature of political development; individual and institutional causes and consequences of development; political economy of the Third World. prereq: 1050 or 1500 or 8 cr social sciences, 45 cr or instructor consent
POL 3580 - Central American Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1050, minimum 45 credits or instruction permission
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the history, politics, culture, and modern problems in Central America. Includes examination of the differences and similarities in colonial history among Central American countries, the role of U.S. influence on Central American politics and the economy, and legacies of civil wars. Then, it focuses on modern problems of violence against women, gangs, violent crime, and governance, and how international and local organizations and individuals can (or cannot) contribute to alleviating these problems. prereq: 1050, minimum 45 credits or instruction permission
POL 3600 - Political Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental political themes and concepts in political theory, including but not limited to justice, liberty, equality, power, democracy, political obligation, and community. Perspectives of diverse political philosophies and cultures may be addressed. prereq: 45 credits or instructor consent
POL 3610 - Political Economy: An Introduction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Relationship between politics and economics and ways they affect each other, focusing on political and economic values/goals and their role in shaping public policy; policies and policy making in selected national systems; and the international economy. prereq: minimum 45 credits or instructor consent
POL 3651 - Classical Political Thought
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1610 or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced survey of classical political thought, from ancient Greece to the rise of medieval Christianity and Islam to early Renaissance Italy. Major themes include the tensions between individuality and community, morality and politics, utopia and reality, and politics and literature. Major thinkers include Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, al-Farabi, Aquinas and Machiavelli. prereq: 1610 or instructor consent
POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced survey of political thought from Enlightenment to the present; course topic may include one or more of the following traditions of political theorizing: English (e.g. Hobbes, Locke, Burke, Bentham, Mill, Wollstonecraft), German (e.g. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Habermas) or French (e.g. Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Foucault, Derrida). prereq: 1610 or instructor consent, course is repeatable with instructor consent only.
CSD 3010 - Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics; sampling techniques and statistical inference; applications of simple and factorial design; analysis of variance; nonparametric statistics; and introductory correlational analysis used in the behavioral sciences. prereq: CSD candidate or non-CSD candidate with a minimum of 60 credits and instructor consent or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for CSD 4000
ECON 2030 - Applied Statistics for Business and Economics (LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to modern business statistics, emphasizing problem solving applications through statistical decision making using case studies. Topics include organization and presentation of data, summary statistics, distributions, statistical inference including estimation, and hypothesis testing. prereq: minimum 30 credits, LSBE student, pre-business or pre-accounting or Econ BA major or Graphic Design and Marketing major or Graphic Design with Marketing subplan major or Econ minor or Accounting minor or Business Admin minor; credit will not be granted if already received for Econ 2020, Stat 1411, Stat 2411, Stat 3611, Soc 3151, Psy 3020
EXSC 4700 - Statistics and Research Methods in Exercise Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Descriptive and inferential statistical procedures and research design in exercise science. Prepares students to conduct and analyze research projects in exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, and/or the psychological factors that influence exercise. prereq: 12 cr from 3200, 3300, 3400, 3410, Exercise Science major, no grad credit
PSY 2020 - Introduction to Statistics and Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Scientific method and designs used in published psychological research including quasi-experimental and survey designs accompanied by inferential statistics used to test research questions (including correlation and analysis of variance). prereq: psychology minor or Social Work major
PSY 3020 - Statistical Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive statistics; introduction to correlational analysis and regression; sampling techniques and statistical inference; applications of simple and factorial design analysis of variance and other parametric and nonparametric hypothesis-test statistics in the behavioral sciences. prereq: Math ACT 21 or higher or MATH 1005
SOC 2155 - Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/practice of research design, sampling, data collection including field observation/surveys. Data management, analysis, and reporting of quantitative/qualitative data. Ethics/administration in sociological research. Introduction to SPSS statistical software. Lab
STAT 2411 - Statistical Methods (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graphical and numerical descriptions of data, elementary probability, sampling distributions, estimations, confidence intervals, one-sample and two-sample t-test. prereq: Math ACT 24 or higher or a grade of at least C- in Math 1005 or higher or department approval
PSY 2021 - Developmental Psychology (LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major processes in human development, conception through lifespan; biological and cultural influences on physical-motor, cognitive, social, and emotional development; effects of diverse cultural traditions and values; social policy implications.
PSY 3081 - History and Systems of Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of historical development and current status of contemporary systems and theories in psychology. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3111 - Theories of Personality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts, issues, and methods involved in study of human personality; introduction to selected theories on motives, dynamics, development, and description of human nature. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3121 - Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mental disorders, including DSM-IV classification system, etiology, and treatment. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3201 - Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
How thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals are affected by others. Social influence and interaction. Attitude measurement and change, conformity, impression formation, attribution theory, aggression, and prosocial behavior. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3061 - Physiological Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physiological basis of behavior, including central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory processes as they relate to perception, cognition, emotion, motivation, intelligence, and learning. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3611 - Learning and Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Study of basic learning and behavior processes including the evolution of behavior, pavlovian conditioning, instrumental learning, and elementary cognitive processes. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3613 - Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Change
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of diverse topics and application of the principles of the science of behavior known as behavior analysis. The philosophical system known as behaviorism that underlies this area of study will be explored, as well as the application of behavioral principles to a number of areas of society, including interpersonal relationship, parenting, clinical applications and treatments for persons with intellectual and other disabilities, business and management, animal behavior, health, sustainability, and more. Students will learn techniques for utilizing the principles of behavior in their own lives, conducting functional behavior assessments, as well as the social benefits associated with the incorporation of behavioral principles into educational, rehabilitative, organizational, and other settings. prereq: 1003
PSY 3621 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
An overview of cognitive processes, using historical, philosophical, biological, and experimental perspectives. Course topics include attention, perception, knowledge representation memory, language, thinking, reasoning, and decision-making. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
PSY 3697 - Sensation and Perception
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories, methods, and findings in study of sensory and perceptual processes; psychophysics and psychophysiology of visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, cutaneous, kinesthetic, vestibular, and pain senses; analysis of perceptions of constancy, illusion, space, time, motion, and form. pre-req: PSY 1003 or instructor consent
EDSE 4501 - Adolescent/Adult Development and Learning Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of psychology applied to teaching; examination of adolescent growth and development; classroom management. prereq: Admission to EdSe program; no grad credit
SOC 2155 - Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/practice of research design, sampling, data collection including field observation/surveys. Data management, analysis, and reporting of quantitative/qualitative data. Ethics/administration in sociological research. Introduction to SPSS statistical software. Lab
SOC 3945 - Social Stratification
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories and research about the effects of economic inequality in people's lives. Social class formation and the effects of institutionalized power structures. Intersection of social class, gender and race/ethnicity. Primary focus on the United States but with international comparisons. prereq: 1101 or CRIM 1301 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604, min 30 cr or instructor consent
SOC 4111 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of classical and contemporary sociological theory. Major theorists, including Durkheim, Weber, and Marx; major paradigms and their importance to sociological thought. prereq: 1101, 30 cr, no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for SOC 2111.
WS 2001 - Introduction to Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examines identity politics, LGBT popular media images and analysis, birth and history of LGBT social movement and intersections with other social movements, HIV/AIDS, policy/legislative issues especially immigration, marriage, adoption, and U.S. military policy; all with international comparative analysis. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for CST 2001
AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02633 - AMIN 3450/WS 3455
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
American Indian women in tribal societies before and after European contact; Indian women as stewards of knowledge, tradition, and society; impact of colonization; traditional and contemporary female leadership. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for 3250.
ANTH 3080 - Cultural Constructions of the Body
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02634 - ANTH 3080/WS 3080
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contemporary cultural constructions of the human body. How biology and culture intersect in body building, menstruation, childbirth, and tattooing. Students gain skills in reading the body as social text and learn core theoretical approaches to cultural studies of the body. prereq: Minimum 30 credits or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for CST 3080
ANTH 3628 - Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02635 - ANTH 3628/WS 3628
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cross-cultural survey of gender systems, focusing on contemporary women's lives around the world. prereq: minimum 30 credits
CRIM 4323 - Women and Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02636 - CRIM 4323/WS 4323
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's involvement in the civil and criminal justice systems, both historic and contemporary, primarily in the United States. Attention given to women as criminal and civil defendants, issues of women's civil rights, and to women practitioners within each system. Intersection of social class, gender and race/ethnicities. prereq: 1301 or SOC 1101 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604, 60 credits, or instructor consent, no grad credit
ENGL 2581 - Women Writers (LE CAT9, LECD CAT09, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Feminist reading of selected plays, poetry, prose (including critical works) written by women writers. prereq: 30 credits or instructor consent
HLTH 3118 - Women's Health Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of American women's health issues. Role of women as patients and as health care providers. Language, politics, and economics of women's health care. Comparison of American women's health status to that of women around the world. prereq: Minimum 30 credits
POL 3040 - Women and Politics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Women's political status; implications of women's role in political process; women as political actors; feminist critique and vision of politics. prereq: 45 cr or instructor consent
PSY 2223 - Gender in Society (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sociocultural, historical, and developmental formations of men's and women's roles and experiences in society. Effects on personality, interpersonal relationships, and life choices.
PSY 3215 - Topics in Human Sexuality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01438 - Psy 3215/3216
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Biological and psychosocial factors relating to human sexuality, sexual functioning, gender, and related issues. Group discussion of societal factors, values, and attitudes and their impact on behavior. prereq: 1003 or instructor consent
SOC 4925 - Sociology of Rape
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02637 - SOC 4925/WS 4925
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Social, moral, and legal definitions and implications of rape. prereq: 1101 or CRIM 1301 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604 or WS 1000, 60 cr, or instructor consent
SOC 4947 - Sociology of Gender Identities and Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02638 - SOC 4947/WS 4947
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Status and experiences in society through the exploration of gender identities, systems, and social structures. Topics include politics, discrimination, family, education, workplace, popular culture, and changing definitions of gender. Emphasis on the expectations and performance of masculinity/femininity and the intersection of gender, race, and class. Some consideration given to global explorations and international comparisons. prereq: 1101 or CRIM 1301 or CSt 1101 or Anth 1604 or WS 1000, min 60 cr, or grad student or instructor consent