Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Animal Science B.S.

Animal Science
College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 66 to 87
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The animal science major prepares students for veterinary school, work as managers or technical advisors for animal production systems, various careers in animal industries or biotechnology, or graduate study in animal-related specializations. Areas of emphasis include industry and business, production, companion animal, equine, or pre-veterinary science. In addition, depending on the area of emphasis, students may select from the following areas of study: dairy, beef, sheep, swine, equine, companion animal, or poultry.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All major requirements must be taken A-F (unless only offered S-N), and students must earn a grade of at least C-.
Foundation Courses
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus [MATH] (5.0 cr)
Professional Courses
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science (4.0 cr)
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition (3.0 cr)
ANSC 3221 - Animal Breeding (4.0 cr)
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology (3.0 cr)
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory (1.0 cr)
Choose at least 1 course or course grouping:
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· Approved course from Midwest Poultry Consortium
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
Students must take a minimum of 3 credits of an internship or a minimum of 6 credits of a senior thesis.
ANSC 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship (1.0-3.0 cr)
or ANSC 4009W - Undergraduate Research Thesis [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
Interdisciplinary Learning
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3575 - Wetlands (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes (3.0 cr)
· PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3017 - Grand Challenge: World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3006 - Grand Challenge: Climate Change - Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3009 - Grand Challenge: Rivers and Cities - Meeting Future Demands on Urban Water Systems [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3001 - Grand Challenge: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5001 - Grand Challenge: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge – Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3013 - Grand Challenge: Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5013 - Grand Challenge: Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
Upper-division writing intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper-division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4009W - Undergraduate Research Thesis [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)
· APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4821W - Business Economics and Strategy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change [WI] (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Industry and Business
Industry and Business Core Courses
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3002 - Applied Microeconomics: Managerial Economics (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3501 - Agribusiness Finance (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4821W - Business Economics and Strategy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 1001 - Introduction to Mass Communication [SOCS, TS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3751 - New Media and Culture [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
Animal Science Electives
Courses cannot fulfill two areas unless they are also a liberal education requirement.
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques (1.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Midwest Poultry Consortium Summer Courses - Madison, WI
· Any CFANS Major Study/Learning Abroad Course
Production
Production Core Courses
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
Animal Science Electives
Courses cannot fulfill two areas unless they are also a liberal education requirement. Students should choose a concentration area in at least one species. Consult an advisor with questions.
Take 18 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques (1.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Midwest Poultry Consortium Summer Courses - Madison, WI
· Any CFANS Major Study/Learning Abroad Course
Companion Animal
Companion Animal Core Courses
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
Animal Science Electives
Courses cannot fulfill two areas unless they are also also a liberal education requirement.
Take 11 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques (1.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Midwest Poultry Consortium Summer Courses - Madison, WI
· Study/Learning Abroad Course
Equine
Equine Core Courses
Students in this emphasis are encouraged to take ANSC 2055 Horse Management and ANSC 2056 Horse Management Practicum to meet the management course requirement.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
or HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
Animal Science Electives
Courses cannot fulfill two areas unless they are also a liberal education requirement.
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques (1.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Midwest Poultry Consortium Summer Courses - Madison, WI
· Any CFANS Major Study/Learning Abroad Course
Pre-Vet/Science
Pre-veterinarian students should/must account for the course requirements of the respective College of Veterinary Medicine Schools they hope to apply to when choosing other electives.
Pre-Vet/ Science Core Courses
Chemistry
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
or Chemistry for the Life Sciences
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1107 - Introductory Physics Online I (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1108 - Introductory Physics Online II (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
or FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
Animal Science Electives
Courses cannot fulfill two areas unless they are also a liberal education requirement.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies (3.0 cr)
· CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment [TS] (3.0 cr)
· AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology [BIOL, TS] (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management (3.0 cr)
· ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology (3.0 cr)
· VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques (1.0 cr)
· ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 2055 - Horse Management (2.0 cr)
· ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction (2.0 cr)
· APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology (4.0 cr)
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice (3.0 cr)
· FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science (1.0-4.0 cr)
· CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Midwest Poultry Consortium Summer Courses - Madison, WI
· Any CFANS Major Study/Learning Abroad Course
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· Industry and Business
· Production (Beef Focus)
· Production (Dairy Focus)
· Companion Animal
· Equine
· Pre-Vet/Science

View checkpoint chart:
· Animal Science B.S.
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BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus (MATH)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graphs of equations and functions; polynomial and rational functions; inverses and composition of functions; exponentials and logarithms; trig functions, graphs, identities; polar coordinates; complex numbers; systems of linear equations; arithmetic, geometric sequences, series; applications. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732]
ANSC 1101 - Introductory Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental concepts of animal breeding, physiology, nutrition, and management as they apply to the production of beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and other livestock. Fall term class open only to ANSC majors. Spring term class open to all majors.
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
ANSC 2401 - Animal Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classification/function of nutrients. Use of nutrients for body maintenance, growth, egg production, gestation, and lactation. Comparative study of digestive systems of farm animal species.
ANSC 3221 - Animal Breeding
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of qualitative and quantitative genetics to animal breeding. Concepts of livestock improvement through selection and mating programs.
ANSC 3301 - Human and Animal Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Functions of major systems in mammals. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular system, respiration, renal system. Endocrinology/metabolism. Blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: Must have taken a Biology and Chemistry course.
ANSC 3302 - Human and Animal Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Companion course to 3301. Physiological principles are demonstrated using active learning approaches. Nervous system, muscles, cardiovascular, respiration, renal, endocrinology/metabolism, blood, immunology, reproduction. prereq: 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3301
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 4096 - Professional Experience Program: Internship
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised professional experience in animal industries and farm enterprise systems. Various aspects of the industry and related fields. Evaluative reports. Consultations with faculty advisers and employers. prereq: CFANS undergrad, instr consent, agreement form
ANSC 4009W - Undergraduate Research Thesis (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Usually one full year. Research/thesis experience under supervision of CFANS faculty member. Written bound thesis, oral presentation of research results. prereq: Jr or sr major in AnSc, instr consent
APEC 3202 - An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
CFAN 2333 - Insects, Microbes and Plants: Ecology of Pest Management (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts of ecology/evolution to address challenges in managing insects/microbes. Grapple with real problems/debate current controversies.
ESPM 1011 - Issues in the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary survey of environmental issues. Interrelationships between environment and human society. Roles of science, technology, and policy in meeting environmental challenges. Lecture, discussion. Students evaluate social, ethical, political, and economic factors.
ESPM 3575 - Wetlands
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3575/5575
Typically offered: Every Spring
Freshwater wetland classification, wetland biota, current/historic status of wetlands, value of wetlands. National, regional, Minnesota wetlands conservation strategies, ecological principles used in wetland management.
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FW 2001W - Introduction to Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fish, wildlife, and other forms of biodiversity. Single species, populations, ecosystem, and landscape approaches. Experiential/interactive course. Decision-case studies. prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009
HORT 4850 - Pollinator Protection in Managed Landscapes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Importance of pollinators in agricultural/other natural landscapes. Risks to pollinators. Ways risks can be reduced, minimized, or overcome. Ways public policy has impacted pollinators/how future policy decisions will affect pollinator protection efforts. prereq: [1001 or AGRO 1101 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1001 or ENT 1001 or PLPA 1005], 30 credits completed (non-freshman status)
PLPA 2003 - Plague, Famine, and Beer: The Impact of Microscopic Organisms on Human Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impacts that microbes have made on course of human civilization. Negative influences of major human/plant infectious disease. Positive benefits attained by harnessing power of microbes. Scale of history includes prehistoric to present day. Projected future impacts.
GCC 3017 - Grand Challenge: World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00136
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by an agronomist (Porter) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester.
GCC 3006 - Grand Challenge: Climate Change - Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02319
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Climate variations are the norm; not the exception. The geological and archaeological records are rich with evidence of a climate system that is dynamic and non-steady state. Yet we face the challenges of understanding the complexities of this system in order to manage our resources and to prepare wisely for the future. This class examines the theory behind the atmospheric greenhouse effect and radiative forcings in the climate system, and the consequences of anthropogenic climate change for present and future societies. It also explores environmental signals that are used to diagnose climate variability. The Myths, Mysteries, and Uncertainties about the climate record and the biophysical feedback processes operating in the Earth-Atmosphere system will be examined. After firmly establishing the scientific basis for climate change, the remainder of the class will focus on intersections between climate change and society. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 3009 - Grand Challenge: Rivers and Cities - Meeting Future Demands on Urban Water Systems (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Ensuring access to sufficient and safe water is one of the grand challenges of the 21st century. As the world’s population urbanizes, cities are at the leading edge of conflicts over water. We will evaluate changing demands on urban rivers, tracing this evolution as a hallmark of global urbanization, and challenge students to articulate their understanding of water management to local citizens and devise creative visions for better management of water. “Rivers and Cities” will examine urban water challenges by exploring four critical ways cities engage their river systems. This exploration will trace the evolution of urban water systems as they have been engineered to deliver drinking water, to provide power and transportation, to protect people living nearby, and to ensure a steady supply of food. Student learning will be interdisciplinary, place-based, and will engage with the community. Students will learn how and why managing water is a necessity and a challenge in Minnesota, the U.S., and the world. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5008 - Grand Challenge: Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00766 - EEB 5146/FNRM 5146/GCC 5008/P
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
GCC 3001 - Grand Challenge: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02310 - GCC 3001/GCC 5001/HCol 3803H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In this course, we will seek solutions to the challenge of achieving global food security and sustainability. Together, we will work to answer the question, "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" The course begins with lectures and skills workshops, followed by a series of interactive panels with guest experts. We will also prepare group projects that are focused on finding innovative solutions to this grand challenge. We will learn about the fundamental changes occurring in the global food system, the environment, and our civilization as a whole. We will explore how to approach inherently interdisciplinary problems, how to identify solutions that are truly sustainable in the long term, and how science and technology can inform decision-making.
GCC 5001 - Grand Challenge: Can We Feed the World Without Destroying It? (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02310 - GCC 3001/GCC 5001/HCol 3803H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
In this course, we will seek solutions to the challenge of achieving global food security and sustainability. Together, we will work to answer the question, "Can we feed the world without destroying it?" The course begins with lectures and skills workshops, followed by a series of interactive panels with guest experts. We will also prepare group projects that are focused on finding innovative solutions to this grand challenge. We will learn about the fundamental changes occurring in the global food system, the environment, and our civilization as a whole. We will explore how to approach inherently interdisciplinary problems, how to identify solutions that are truly sustainable in the long term, and how science and technology can inform decision-making.
GCC 3007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02320
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen---vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02320 - GCC 3007/GCC 5007
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen---vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
GCC 3010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge – Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02373
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. prereq:soph,jr,sr
GCC 5010 - Grand Challenge: The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02373
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. For:so,jr,sr,grad
GCC 3013 - Grand Challenge: Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the “purposive” disciplines—arts and humanities—that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forest, farms, and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators in our community and Place. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their work, to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, we have the unique opportunity to create a collaborative public art project that will become part of the Northern Spark festival, an all-night art festival. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5013 - Grand Challenge: Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the “purposive” disciplines—arts and humanities—that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forest, farms, and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators in our community and Place. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their work, to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, we have the unique opportunity to create a collaborative public art project that will become part of the Northern Spark festival, an all-night art festival. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 4009W - Undergraduate Research Thesis (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Usually one full year. Research/thesis experience under supervision of CFANS faculty member. Written bound thesis, oral presentation of research results. prereq: Jr or sr major in AnSc, instr consent
APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00385 - ApEc 4451W/ApEc 5451
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economics of food marketing in the United States. Food consumption trends, consumer food behavior, marketing strategies, consumer survey methodology, food distribution/retailing system. Policy issues related to food marketing. Individual/group projects. prereq: [[1101 or Econ 1101], [1101H or Econ 1101H], SCO 2550 or STAT 3011 or equiv, 60 cr] or instr consent
APEC 4821W - Business Economics and Strategy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02511 - ApEc 4821W/ApEc 5821
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic management for production, processing, wholesaling, retailing, and service. Strategy formulation, implementation, and control. Business plans. Case study analysis. prereq: 3002, [3501 or FINA 3001], and [ACCT 3001 or MGMT 3001 or MKTG 3001]
ESPM 4021W - Problem Solving: Environmental Review (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roles of governmental agencies, consultants, and private citizens in EIS process. Students read EIS/EAW, analyze their content/scope, and prepare an EAW and EIS according to Minnesota EQB guidelines. prereq: ESPM 2021 and jr or sr
ESPM 4041W - Problem Solving for Environmental Change (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Capstone course. Students working with a team on a real world project related to selected track, gather/analyze data relevant to client's objectives, and make recommendations for future use. Students produce a final written report and formal presentation, and present findings to client group.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00323 - ApEc 1102ApEc 1102H/Econ 1102
Typically offered: Every Spring
Unemployment/inflation, measures of national income, macro models, fiscal policy/problems. Taxes and the national debt. Money/banking, monetary policy/problems. Poverty and income distribution. International trade and exchange rates. Economic growth/development. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/3101H/3105/ApEc 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consumer/producer decisions. Theory of supply/demand. Markets, pricing, investment, effect regulation, market failures. prereq: [[1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271]] or instr consent; intended for undergrads in [Ag/Food Bus Mgmt, Appl Econ]
APEC 3002 - Applied Microeconomics: Managerial Economics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Microeconomic theory, its application to managerial problems. Introduction to regression analysis, demand analysis, demand function estimation, forecasting, cost function estimation, resource allocation decisions, linear programming, market structure, pricing policy, risk analysis, investment analysis. prereq - ApEc 3001 or Econ 3101 AND SCO 2550 or Stat 3011
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3501 - Agribusiness Finance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00196
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of financing and investment strategies for agribusiness firms and their effects on liquidity, solvency, and profitability. Analysis of financial institutions, markets, and instruments. Management problems, issues facing financial intermediaries serving agriculture. prereq: [[1251 or Acct 2050], 60 cr] or instr consent
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of garden centers, grocery stores, and other retail units selling perishable agricultural products. prereq: [1101 or Econ 1101], [1251 or Acct 2050]
APEC 4451W - Food Marketing Economics (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00385 - ApEc 4451W/ApEc 5451
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economics of food marketing in the United States. Food consumption trends, consumer food behavior, marketing strategies, consumer survey methodology, food distribution/retailing system. Policy issues related to food marketing. Individual/group projects. prereq: [[1101 or Econ 1101], [1101H or Econ 1101H], SCO 2550 or STAT 3011 or equiv, 60 cr] or instr consent
APEC 4821W - Business Economics and Strategy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02511 - ApEc 4821W/ApEc 5821
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic management for production, processing, wholesaling, retailing, and service. Strategy formulation, implementation, and control. Business plans. Case study analysis. prereq: 3002, [3501 or FINA 3001], and [ACCT 3001 or MGMT 3001 or MKTG 3001]
COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cooperative thinking in task-oriented groups. Planning, preparing for, and participating in small groups in private and public contexts.
JOUR 1001 - Introduction to Mass Communication (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01664 - Jour 1001/Jour 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Function of mass communication messages/industries. News, advertising, public relations, books, music, film, TV, video games. Technologies of media production. Delivery systems. Political, legal, ethical, social, global aspects of mass communication.
JOUR 3751 - New Media and Culture (AH, TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History, theories, social impact of digital/interactive media on culture. How new media, including Internet, mobile devices, websites, applications, social media, may change ways people communicate/distribute/process information.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Visual communication, audience analysis, organizing presentation, presenting complex material. Emphasizes use of computers.
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice is an online course designed to meet the needs of students interested in understanding chickens in general, and for those who engage or are planning to engage in small scale farming of chickens. This course, expanded over 6 modules; (1) Basic biology and behavior (2) Selection (3) Housing (4) Nutrition (5) Management and (6) Diseases as it relates to chickens, will help the students understand the basic science of rearing chickens. Each of the six modules encompasses pertinent short video or PowerPoint lectures that provide fundamental and applied information on backyard chicken rearing.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reproductive organ functions, fertilization, estrous cycle and endocrine control, reproductive efficiency, problems/principles of artificial insemination. Anatomy, physiology, biochemistry of mammary gland. Mammary growth, initiation/maintenance of lactation, milk synthesis, factors influencing lactation curve. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on training/techniques of artificial insemination at an off-campus laboratory setting. Techniques of AI and semen handling. Criteria for selection of bulls. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of animal growth. Interaction of nutrition, hormones, exercise, heredity, and disease in regulating growth. prereq: College-level biology course
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
Typically offered: Every Spring
Quantitative genetic principles of breeding dairy cattle. Evaluation of males, females. Systems of mating. Rates of genetic improvement with/without AI. prereq: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive review of major considerations in providing optimum, cost-effective nutrition to swine in all stages of production. prereq: 2401, 3511 recommended
ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrient requirements of ruminants, physiology of digestion in ruminants, nutrient content of feedstuffs, primarily forages; energy utilization, protein and nonprotein nitrogen utilization; nutritional disorders; formulation of adequate rations. prereq: 2401
ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of nutrition principles to dairy cow nutrition. Nutrient requirements of dairy cows, feed ingredient selection/usage, formulation/evaluation of dairy cow rations using computer programs. Case study analysis of feeding programs used on dairy farms. prereq: AnSc 4403 recommended
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Student enterprise-analysis teams evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and solve problems in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: 4603
ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical application of electronic tools for 21st century dairy consultant. Data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation of dairy production/health data. prereq: 4604
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology/management of insects, mites, ticks that affect livestock, poultry, companion animals. Emphasizes problem identification/solving. Lecture, lab.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, conventional systems. History of production systems/implications for producer lifestyles, social/natural environments, economics at local to global scales. Farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, classroom presentations.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice is an online course designed to meet the needs of students interested in understanding chickens in general, and for those who engage or are planning to engage in small scale farming of chickens. This course, expanded over 6 modules; (1) Basic biology and behavior (2) Selection (3) Housing (4) Nutrition (5) Management and (6) Diseases as it relates to chickens, will help the students understand the basic science of rearing chickens. Each of the six modules encompasses pertinent short video or PowerPoint lectures that provide fundamental and applied information on backyard chicken rearing.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reproductive organ functions, fertilization, estrous cycle and endocrine control, reproductive efficiency, problems/principles of artificial insemination. Anatomy, physiology, biochemistry of mammary gland. Mammary growth, initiation/maintenance of lactation, milk synthesis, factors influencing lactation curve. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on training/techniques of artificial insemination at an off-campus laboratory setting. Techniques of AI and semen handling. Criteria for selection of bulls. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of animal growth. Interaction of nutrition, hormones, exercise, heredity, and disease in regulating growth. prereq: College-level biology course
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
Typically offered: Every Spring
Quantitative genetic principles of breeding dairy cattle. Evaluation of males, females. Systems of mating. Rates of genetic improvement with/without AI. prereq: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive review of major considerations in providing optimum, cost-effective nutrition to swine in all stages of production. prereq: 2401, 3511 recommended
ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrient requirements of ruminants, physiology of digestion in ruminants, nutrient content of feedstuffs, primarily forages; energy utilization, protein and nonprotein nitrogen utilization; nutritional disorders; formulation of adequate rations. prereq: 2401
ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of nutrition principles to dairy cow nutrition. Nutrient requirements of dairy cows, feed ingredient selection/usage, formulation/evaluation of dairy cow rations using computer programs. Case study analysis of feeding programs used on dairy farms. prereq: AnSc 4403 recommended
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Student enterprise-analysis teams evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and solve problems in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: 4603
ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical application of electronic tools for 21st century dairy consultant. Data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation of dairy production/health data. prereq: 4604
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology/management of insects, mites, ticks that affect livestock, poultry, companion animals. Emphasizes problem identification/solving. Lecture, lab.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, conventional systems. History of production systems/implications for producer lifestyles, social/natural environments, economics at local to global scales. Farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, classroom presentations.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice is an online course designed to meet the needs of students interested in understanding chickens in general, and for those who engage or are planning to engage in small scale farming of chickens. This course, expanded over 6 modules; (1) Basic biology and behavior (2) Selection (3) Housing (4) Nutrition (5) Management and (6) Diseases as it relates to chickens, will help the students understand the basic science of rearing chickens. Each of the six modules encompasses pertinent short video or PowerPoint lectures that provide fundamental and applied information on backyard chicken rearing.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reproductive organ functions, fertilization, estrous cycle and endocrine control, reproductive efficiency, problems/principles of artificial insemination. Anatomy, physiology, biochemistry of mammary gland. Mammary growth, initiation/maintenance of lactation, milk synthesis, factors influencing lactation curve. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on training/techniques of artificial insemination at an off-campus laboratory setting. Techniques of AI and semen handling. Criteria for selection of bulls. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of animal growth. Interaction of nutrition, hormones, exercise, heredity, and disease in regulating growth. prereq: College-level biology course
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
Typically offered: Every Spring
Quantitative genetic principles of breeding dairy cattle. Evaluation of males, females. Systems of mating. Rates of genetic improvement with/without AI. prereq: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive review of major considerations in providing optimum, cost-effective nutrition to swine in all stages of production. prereq: 2401, 3511 recommended
ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrient requirements of ruminants, physiology of digestion in ruminants, nutrient content of feedstuffs, primarily forages; energy utilization, protein and nonprotein nitrogen utilization; nutritional disorders; formulation of adequate rations. prereq: 2401
ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of nutrition principles to dairy cow nutrition. Nutrient requirements of dairy cows, feed ingredient selection/usage, formulation/evaluation of dairy cow rations using computer programs. Case study analysis of feeding programs used on dairy farms. prereq: AnSc 4403 recommended
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Student enterprise-analysis teams evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and solve problems in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: 4603
ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical application of electronic tools for 21st century dairy consultant. Data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation of dairy production/health data. prereq: 4604
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology/management of insects, mites, ticks that affect livestock, poultry, companion animals. Emphasizes problem identification/solving. Lecture, lab.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, conventional systems. History of production systems/implications for producer lifestyles, social/natural environments, economics at local to global scales. Farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, classroom presentations.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving. prereq: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, high school physics recommended; Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
HORT 2100 - Agricultural Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical/biochemical foundation for agricultural disciplines. Concepts in organic, analytical and biological chemistry. Chemistry, metabolism, and development of plants. prereq: CHEM 1015/1017 or CHEM 1061 instr consent
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice is an online course designed to meet the needs of students interested in understanding chickens in general, and for those who engage or are planning to engage in small scale farming of chickens. This course, expanded over 6 modules; (1) Basic biology and behavior (2) Selection (3) Housing (4) Nutrition (5) Management and (6) Diseases as it relates to chickens, will help the students understand the basic science of rearing chickens. Each of the six modules encompasses pertinent short video or PowerPoint lectures that provide fundamental and applied information on backyard chicken rearing.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reproductive organ functions, fertilization, estrous cycle and endocrine control, reproductive efficiency, problems/principles of artificial insemination. Anatomy, physiology, biochemistry of mammary gland. Mammary growth, initiation/maintenance of lactation, milk synthesis, factors influencing lactation curve. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on training/techniques of artificial insemination at an off-campus laboratory setting. Techniques of AI and semen handling. Criteria for selection of bulls. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of animal growth. Interaction of nutrition, hormones, exercise, heredity, and disease in regulating growth. prereq: College-level biology course
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
Typically offered: Every Spring
Quantitative genetic principles of breeding dairy cattle. Evaluation of males, females. Systems of mating. Rates of genetic improvement with/without AI. prereq: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive review of major considerations in providing optimum, cost-effective nutrition to swine in all stages of production. prereq: 2401, 3511 recommended
ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrient requirements of ruminants, physiology of digestion in ruminants, nutrient content of feedstuffs, primarily forages; energy utilization, protein and nonprotein nitrogen utilization; nutritional disorders; formulation of adequate rations. prereq: 2401
ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of nutrition principles to dairy cow nutrition. Nutrient requirements of dairy cows, feed ingredient selection/usage, formulation/evaluation of dairy cow rations using computer programs. Case study analysis of feeding programs used on dairy farms. prereq: AnSc 4403 recommended
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Student enterprise-analysis teams evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and solve problems in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: 4603
ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical application of electronic tools for 21st century dairy consultant. Data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation of dairy production/health data. prereq: 4604
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology/management of insects, mites, ticks that affect livestock, poultry, companion animals. Emphasizes problem identification/solving. Lecture, lab.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, conventional systems. History of production systems/implications for producer lifestyles, social/natural environments, economics at local to global scales. Farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, classroom presentations.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam; CBS ugrd, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab).
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required.
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab).
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required.
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1102W - Introductory College Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107
PHYS 1107 - Introductory Physics Online I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles together with quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry
PHYS 1108 - Introductory Physics Online II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in context of everyday world. Use of conservation principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture content, recitation, lab. prereq: 1101W or 1107; primarily for students interested in technical areas
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
AFEE 2051 - Current Technical Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Prepares agricultural education teachers and other agricultural professionals to use technology. Develop basic skills and knowledge to plan, implement, operate, and maintain agricultural structural and mechanical systems. Experiential learning principles and applied problem solving.
CFAN 1501 - Biotechnology, People, and the Environment (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts in genetic engineering as a foundation for studying the impact of biotechnology on agriculture, medicine, industry, and the environment. Controversial aspects of biotechnology related to public policy issues are discussed.
AGRO 1103 - Crops, Environment, and Society (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 1103/AgUM 2222
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plants that supply food, fiber, beverages, and medicine to humans. Plant identification, plant physiology, plant breeding/biotechnology, plant ecology, crop culture/management.
ANSC 1011 - Animals and Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This online course is designed for anyone interested in the ways in which we as a human society interact with, affect and are affected by non-human animals. Students will gain a broad understanding of the major ways in which humans use animals in contemporary society, including as food, as companions, as research subjects, and as entertainment. Other topics will include: social and ethical issues concerning animal use, the human-animal bond, animals in culture, and animals and the law.
ANSC 1403 - Companion Animal Nutrition and Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for individuals having no prior training with animals or nutrition but have interest in caring for and understanding the contemporary importance of companion animals. Emphasis will be on nutrition of healthy animals and the various factors that play a role in feeding an animal adequately. These factors include animal behavior, environmental conditions, food type, and availability. The course will emphasize basic principles of nutrition. The target audience of this course is all undergraduate students interested in nutrition and care of companion animals. The course will focus on companion animals, but not exclusively dogs and cats.
ANSC 1511 - Food Animal Products for Consumers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the compositional variation, processing, selection, storage, cookery, palatability, nutritional value, and safety of red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products.
ANSC 2012 - Livestock and Carcass Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evaluation of cattle, swine, and sheep. Breeding stock evaluated on live appraisal, performance records, and breeding values. Market animals evaluated, graded, and priced on physical appearance followed by evaluation and grading of their carcasses.
APEC 1251 - Principles of Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Financial accounting. Theory, concepts, principles, procedures. Preparation/understanding of the four financial statements.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
ANSC 3007 - Equine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of nutrition. Emphasizes unique aspects of equine nutrition. Nutritional needs of healthy animals. Factors in feeding. Animal behavior, growth/development, physiological status, environmental conditions, food type, availability. How physiology of horse's gastrointestinal tract, utilization of feedstuffs, and horse's nutritional requirements interrelate. Balanced rations, nutritional related ailments. Pasture management, forage selection, use of dietary feed additives/enhancers. prereq: 2401
ANSC 3305 - Reproductive Biology in Health and Disease
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reproductive organ functions, fertilization, estrous cycle and endocrine control, reproductive efficiency, problems/principles of artificial insemination. Anatomy, physiology, biochemistry of mammary gland. Mammary growth, initiation/maintenance of lactation, milk synthesis, factors influencing lactation curve. prereq: Biol 1009 or equiv
ANSC 3509 - Animal Biotechnology (BIOL, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
ANSC 3509 is a course for undergraduates seeking a broad understanding of animal biotechnology in a single semester. The course covers the major concepts and principles of modern animal biotechnology. Topics include: genes and genomes, recombinant DNA technology, proteins as products, DNA fingerprinting and forensic analysis, bioremediation, aquatic biotechnology, medical biotechnology, and bioethics as it pertains to biotechnology. The laboratory component will focus on teaching molecular techniques necessary to gather DNA profiling data of scarlet macaws in southwest Belize. The Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is a conservation initiative between the Wildlife Institute (WI), the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic (BWRC) and Friends for Conservation & Development (FCD). The purpose of the Scarlet Macaw Protection Program is to support a specific scarlet macaw population in the Chiquibul Forest, which is under heavy poaching threat. The conservation strategy is to remove chicks from nest sites that are under heaviest threat of poaching, and for which security provision is most prohibitive. Chicks are reared with the aim to be reintroduced into the wild. The Animal Biotechnology laboratory will use DNA isolated from feathers gathered at scarlet macaw nesting sites and housing facilities in Belize. The DNA will be used to genotype scarlet macaws to establish parentage, genealogy and nesting/breeding behavior.
ANSC 3511 - Animal Growth and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles of animal growth. Interaction of nutrition, hormones, exercise, heredity, and disease in regulating growth. prereq: College-level biology course
ANSC 4011 - Dairy Cattle Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
Typically offered: Every Spring
Quantitative genetic principles of breeding dairy cattle. Evaluation of males, females. Systems of mating. Rates of genetic improvement with/without AI. prereq: (prereq 3221, previous or current registration in 4604, at least junior status)
ANSC 4401 - Swine Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
A comprehensive review of major considerations in providing optimum, cost-effective nutrition to swine in all stages of production. prereq: 2401, 3511 recommended
ANSC 4403 - Ruminant Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrient requirements of ruminants, physiology of digestion in ruminants, nutrient content of feedstuffs, primarily forages; energy utilization, protein and nonprotein nitrogen utilization; nutritional disorders; formulation of adequate rations. prereq: 2401
ANSC 4404 - Applied Dairy Nutrition
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of nutrition principles to dairy cow nutrition. Nutrient requirements of dairy cows, feed ingredient selection/usage, formulation/evaluation of dairy cow rations using computer programs. Case study analysis of feeding programs used on dairy farms. prereq: AnSc 4403 recommended
ANSC 4601 - Pork Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interrelationships of business, marketing, and biological performance of pigs in various types of production systems. prereq: 2401; 3221 recommended
ANSC 4602 - Sheep Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition, management, genetics, reproduction, health. Application of production records, selection, and marketing technology. Current research. Social concerns, consumer affairs, industry practices. Field trips to sheep farms and related industries.
ANSC 4603 - Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to resolve problems and manage cow-calf, stocker, or feedlot operations. Segments of beef industry, challenges. Nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and health in beef cattle production. Students evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and contribute in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4613
ANSC 3609 - Business Planning for Animal Enterprises
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems approach to decision making and problem solving in production enterprises. Planning, long range goal setting, production analysis, risk analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Quality-of-life issues.
ANSC 4604 - Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical applications of principles of animal breeding, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, housing, and economics in a problem solving context. Decision-cases, farm visits, field diagnostic techniques labs. prereq: Pre-req: AnSc 1101, AnSc 2401 Concurrent registration is not allowed in 4614
ANSC 4613 - Advanced Beef Production Systems Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Half semester course. Student enterprise-analysis teams evaluate a beef cattle enterprise and solve problems in marketing, selection, reproduction, nutrition, or health management. prereq: 4603
ANSC 4614 - Advanced Dairy Production Systems Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Practical application of electronic tools for 21st century dairy consultant. Data collection, organization, analysis, interpretation of dairy production/health data. prereq: 4604
APEC 3411 - Commodity Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02506 - ApEc 3411/ApEc 5411
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic concepts related to marketing agricultural commodities. Conditions of competitive markets, historical perspectives on market institutions/policy, structural characteristics of markets, policies/regulations affecting agricultural marketing of livestock, crop, and dairy products. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3811 - Principles of Farm Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Strategic and operations aspects of farm management; financial analysis, budgeting, strategic management; marketing plan and control; enterprise and whole farm planning and control; investment analysis, quality, risk, and personnel management. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
ENT 3281 - Veterinary Entomology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Biology/management of insects, mites, ticks that affect livestock, poultry, companion animals. Emphasizes problem identification/solving. Lecture, lab.
VCS 4606 - Small Animal Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This online course provides an overview of small animal management. Species covered include dogs, cats, small mammals, reptiles, and birds. Course content covers public health, community education, general wellness care, and recognizing common diseases in small animals. Student learning is assessed through online quizzes, discussion participation, and group projects.
ANSC 1701 - Historical Influence of the Horse on Society (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts of historical inquiry using the powerful/changing relationship between Man and horse. Students function as historians: framing questions, searching for appropriate sources, developing explanation model with reasoned arguments, and finally, write/defend interpretation.
ANSC 3307 - Artificial Insemination Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on training/techniques of artificial insemination at an off-campus laboratory setting. Techniques of AI and semen handling. Criteria for selection of bulls. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 2056 - Horse Management Practicum
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Best management practices. Daily care (in small groups, weekends included) of horses. Volunteer day at local equine nonprofit. Applied equine management research project. Two group presentations. prereq: 2055 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2055
ANSC 3403 - Companion Animal Hot Button Issues
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Various issues that affect companion animals in our society. Students debate pros/cons of each issue and formalize their own opinions based on information presented by debate teams.
ANSC 2055 - Horse Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is offered online (semi-self paced) and provides an introduction to equine-related careers, the equine industry, and horse breeds and behavior. Current events will be discussed including topics such as horse slaughter and unwanted horses. Students will learn about the importance of bodyweight estimation, body condition scoring, hay analysis, plants poisonous to horses, liability, insurance options, as well as feeding, pasture, manure, and facility management. Equine health care will be discussed including colic, hoof care, vaccinations, deworming, and the role of genetics. Each week, students will participate in a course discussion, quiz, or exam.
ANSC 3801 - Livestock Merchandising
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Promotion/merchandising of purebred livestock. Hands-on training in advertising, livestock photography, showing/fitting, sale organization. Field trips to seed stock operations/auctions. Presentations by industry and breed association leaders. Students conduct annual sale. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
ANSC 4305 - Companion & Wild Species Reproduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reproductive physiology specific to domesticated companion canine and feline species as well as avian species. Management of breeding and reproductive diseases in companion species as well as conservation management in wild species. prereq: ANSC 3305
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
FSCN 1102 - Food: Safety, Risks, and Technology (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to inherent risks/safety of food supply. Use of public policy and food technology to reduce risks. Microbiological, chemical, and environmental hazards, government/industry controls.
FSCN 2021 - Introductory Microbiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: BIOL 1009, CHEM 1015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How microbes impact our world in deadly/life-saving ways. Roles of bacteria, fungi, and viruses as agents of human diseases; in food spoilage/food borne diseases; and in food preservation/health promotion. Preventing plant diseases, food/drug production, cleaning up oil spills. Genetic engineering.
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
VBS 2100 - Companion Animal Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop anatomical knowledge through study/dissection. Compare/contrast animal adaptations. Prereq: General Biology (e.g., BIOL 1009) is recommended
ANSC 1201 - Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Backyard Chickens - Science and Practice is an online course designed to meet the needs of students interested in understanding chickens in general, and for those who engage or are planning to engage in small scale farming of chickens. This course, expanded over 6 modules; (1) Basic biology and behavior (2) Selection (3) Housing (4) Nutrition (5) Management and (6) Diseases as it relates to chickens, will help the students understand the basic science of rearing chickens. Each of the six modules encompasses pertinent short video or PowerPoint lectures that provide fundamental and applied information on backyard chicken rearing.
FDSY 2102 - Diversity of Agricultural Production Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Examination of agricultural production systems, including organic, alternative, conventional systems. History of production systems/implications for producer lifestyles, social/natural environments, economics at local to global scales. Farm visits, producer interviews, group projects, classroom presentations.
ANSC 4092 - Special Problems in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
ANSC 4099 - Special Workshop in Animal Science
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent study in an area of animal science, under supervision of faculty member. prereq: instr consent
CFAN 3091V - Research Proposals: From Ideas to Strategic Plans (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02575 - CFAN 3091V/AnSc 5091
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
You have a great research idea, now what? How do you turn your idea into a proposal? It has been said, paraphrasing Edison, that innovation is one percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. In this course, we will start with an inspiring idea and sweat our way to develop a research proposal. The students will go through a step-by-step process that starts with choosing and defining a research idea, then proceeding to do literature reviews and to the development of a hypothesis, aims, objectives, and a research strategy. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools to understand the structure of scientific reports and proposals, literature searches, and basic data interpretation. The students will learn about different research approaches and how to achieve consistency in their research projects. We will guide students in how to begin and develop a written research proposal that will satisfy the requirements of their advisors, institution, and funding organizations. prereq: If you have less than 60 credits and are interested in this course, please contact the instructor.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.