Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Human Rights M.H.R.

Global Studies Department
Graduate School
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-3800; fax: 612-626-0002)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 45
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Human Rights
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The master's of human rights is a two-year interdisciplinary professional master's degree to prepare students to work in the field of human rights or to advance their knowledge and skills in the field. This degree equips graduate students with core professional and conceptual knowledge and analytical tools necessary to operate on the professional level in the field of human rights, along with the in-depth academic and professional training needed for the specific human rights area in which they practice or intend to practice. Students follow a core curriculum that includes the study of human rights norms and law, methodology, critical views of human rights, and human rights policy that will equip them with the skills needed to address the problems.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Complete application will include a University of Minnesota application, personal statement, resume or C.V., transcripts, GRE scores, TOEFL scores (if applicable), at least three letters of recommendation, and an optional diversity statement.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 100
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 600
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 45 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project: Students will participate in a three-credit capstone seminar rather than a thesis. The capstone seminar is one of the required core courses.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 1 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
A 400-hour, non-credit professional internship, supervised by the Human Rights program, is required. Completion of the internship during the summer after the first year is expected. 4xxx-level coursework is limited to language courses unless approved by the director of graduate studies. Excluding electives, all courses offered on both the A-F and S/N grading basis must be taken A-F.
Human Rights Core
PA 5886 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I (1.0 cr)
PA 5887 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II (1.0 cr)
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· HIST 8245 - Human Rights: A Global History (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law (3.0 cr)
· PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights (3.0 cr)
Professional Core (12 credits)
Select credits from each of the following 4 professional core areas, in consultation with the advisor, to satisfy the 12-credit professional core minimum:
Quantitative
Higher-level options available for students with strong statistical background, with director of graduate studies approval.
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs (4.0 cr)
PA 5032 - Applied Regression (2.0 cr)
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated (2.0 cr)
PA 5045 - Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated (4.0 cr)
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
Qualitative
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
Management
PA 5011 - Management of Organizations (3.0 cr)
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (3.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
Policy and Economic Analysis
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis (1.5 cr)
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5021 - Microeconomics for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
Capstone or Professional Paper
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop (3.0 cr)
· PA 8082 - Professional Paper-Writing Seminar (3.0 cr)
· PA 8921 - Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (1.0-3.0 cr)
Electives
Select elective credits as needed, in consultation with the advisor, to meet the 45-credit minimum.
Concentrations: Pre-Designed
Students complete 12 credits in a pre-designed or self-designed concentration. Pre-designed concentrations are listed below. Consult the program or adviser for courses which do not appear but which may be eligible with consent of adviser.
Arts and Humanities
This concentration is meant to prepare students in the understanding of the role of artistic, literary and cultural practices in the promotion of cultures that support and respect human rights. Students will work with their faculty advisor to choose 12 credits from the following or other courses appropriate to their particular arts and humanities focus.
ARTS 5710 - Advanced Photography and Moving Image Projects (4.0 cr)
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing (4.0 cr)
ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Conflict, Security, and Diplomacy
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6027 - Law of the Sea (2.0 cr)
LAW 6071 - International Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6708 - Terrorism, Counter-Terrorism, and International Law (2.0 cr)
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations (2.0 cr)
LAW 6889 - Laws of War (3.0 cr)
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law (2.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions (3.0 cr)
PA 5814 - Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners (1.0 cr)
PA 5825 - Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs (1.5 cr)
PA 5826 - National Security Policy (3.0 cr)
POL 8401 - International Relations (3.0 cr)
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions (3.0 cr)
POL 8402 - International Security (3.0 cr)
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Crime, Law, and Justice
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration (2.0 cr)
LAW 6893 - Transitional Justice (2.0 cr)
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law (2.0 cr)
PHIL 5321 - Theories of Justice (3.0 cr)
POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law (3.0 cr)
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 8111 - Criminology (3.0 cr)
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance (3.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Development
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5041 - Transition to a Sustainable World: Can Psychology Help Facilitate Global Sustainability? [ENV] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6879 - Poverty and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5121 - Educational Reform in International Context (3.0 cr)
OLPD 8022 - Education and Globalization: Anthropological Perspectives (3.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5503 - Economics of Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners (1.0 cr)
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Environment
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
ESPM 5202 - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy (3.0 cr)
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy [TS] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5027 - Power Systems Journey: Making the Invisible Visible and Actionable [TS] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5032 - Ecosystems Health: Leadership at the intersection of humans, animals and the environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6062 - Energy Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6215 - Environmental Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6234 - Public Lands and Natural Resources (3.0 cr)
LAW 6400 - International Environmental Law (2.0 cr)
LAW 6709 - Agriculture and the Environment (2.0 cr)
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use (1.5 cr)
PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (3.0 cr)
PA 5243 - Environmental Justice in Urban Planning & Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5721 -  Energy Systems and Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5722 - Economics of Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5723 - Water Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Gender and Sexuality
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5690 and select either "Gender and Electoral Politics in Global Perspective" or "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights". Students may take PA 5890 and select, either "Women's Human Rights in Practice" or "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
BTHX 5510 - Gender and the Politics of Health (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 5503 - Queering Theory (3.0 cr)
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance (3.0 cr)
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses (3.0 cr)
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights (3.0 cr)
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6862 - Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (3.0 cr)
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PHIL 5622 - Philosophy and Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health (2.0 cr)
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 5221 - Sociology of Gender (3.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Migration
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
LAW 6027 - Law of the Sea (2.0 cr)
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration (2.0 cr)
LAW 6719 - Immigration Reforms through History: An Ongoing Racial Narrative (2.0 cr)
LAW 6872 - Immigration Law (3.0 cr)
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law (2.0 cr)
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners (1.0 cr)
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective (3.0 cr)
-OR-
NGO Leadership and Management
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
LAW 6637 - Business and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5048 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Leadership (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development (1.0-3.0 cr)
OLPD 5607 - Organization Development (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5611 - Facilitation and Meeting Skills (1.0 cr)
PA 5051 - Leadership Foundations (2.0 cr)
PA 5052 - Public Affairs Leadership (2.0 cr)
PA 5081 - Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference (0.5 cr)
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (3.0 cr)
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (3.0 cr)
PA 5108 - Board leadership development (1.0 cr)
PA 5114 - Budget Analysis in Public and Nonprofit Orgs (1.5 cr)
PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5135 - Managing Conflict: Negotiation (3.0 cr)
PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena (1.5 cr)
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
-OR-
Project and Policy Evaluation
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select the topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights".
OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5502 - Comparative evaluation theory for practice (3.0 cr)
OLPD 8502 - Advanced Evaluation Theory and Theory crafting (3.0 cr)
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change (1.5-3.0 cr)
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges (3.0 cr)
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Public Health
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select, “Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights” must be chosen. Students may take SOC 8090 and select, “Global Health Data Analysis”.
BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics (3.0 cr)
BTHX 5510 - Gender and the Politics of Health (3.0 cr)
BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics (3.0 cr)
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse [TS] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5022 - The Human Experience of Sensory Loss: Seeking Equitable and Effective Solutions [TS] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6879 - Poverty and Human Rights (2.0 cr)
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6108 - Foundations of Global Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6182 - Emerging Infectious Disease: Current Issues, Policies, and Controversies (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6390 - Topics: Epidemiology (0.5-4.0 cr)
PUBH 6613 - Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6735 - Principles of Health Policy (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Race and Ethnicity
Select 12 credits from the following in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5490 and select topic, “Reparations: Policy, History & Theory and the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement 1954-1984” must be chosen. Students may take PA 5890 and select topic, “Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights” must be chosen.
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory (3.0 cr)
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5036 - Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Lands and Languages [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
GCC 5042 - Just Education: The Role of Higher Education in Disrupting Mass Incarceration [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
LAW 6084 - Equal Protection and Civil Rights Acts (3.0 cr)
LAW 6236 - Indian Law (3.0 cr)
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis (1.5 cr)
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (3.0 cr)
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs (0.5-5.0 cr)
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination (4.0 cr)
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Research Methods
Select 12 credits from the following, in consultation with the advisor. Students may take PA 5890 and select topic, "Fact-finding Investigations on Human Rights" must be chosen.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
LAW 6867 - Practice Ready International Legal Research (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5056 - Case Studies for Policy Research (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs (4.0 cr)
PA 5032 - Applied Regression (2.0 cr)
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated (2.0 cr)
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups (3.0 cr)
PA 5929 - Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers (2.0 cr)
PA 5932 - Working with Data: Finding, Managing, and Using Data (1.5 cr)
PA 5933 - Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum (3.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Concentration: Self-Designed
Select 12 credits, in consultation with the advisor, to meet academic and professional goals. Other courses can be chosen in consultation with advisor and director of graduate studies approval.
Joint- or Dual-degree Coursework:
MHR/MPH-Public Health Practice Students may take a total of 14 credits in common among the academic programs.
 
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PA 5886 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken before, PA 5887. prereq: First-year MHR
PA 5887 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken after, PA 5886.
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 5403/Law 6058
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
HIST 8245 - Human Rights: A Global History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will focus on debates and social movements concerning human rights in the broadest sense, beginning with the seventeenth century and ending in the 1950s. Topics include colonization, slavery, torture, war crimes, rights to land, women's rights, sexual rights, and indigenous self-determination. The seminar will require a research or historiographical paper.
LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of lawyers using procedures of the United Nations, Organization of American States, State Department, Congress, U.S. Courts, and nongovernmental organizations to address international human rights problems. Is there a law of international human rights? How is that law made, changed, and invoked? Problem method used.
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will approach human rights issues from a variety of "disciplinary" perspectives, including history, the arts, law, the social sciences, and praxis. Empirical work in the social sciences will receive somewhat greater emphasis. One key focus will be the unique advantages (and disadvantages) of the different perspectives and fruitful ways to combine them to strengthen action that improves human rights situations in countries around the world, including the United States. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
PA 5032 - Applied Regression
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but uses more mathematical notation/delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: [5031 or equiv} or instr consent
PA 5045 - Statistics for Public Affairs, Accelerated
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces a range of quantitative tools that are commonly used to inform issues in public affairs. The course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference, with an emphasis on the ways in which quantitative tools are applied to a diverse range of practical policy questions. PA 5045 is an accelerated treatment of applied statistics for public affairs and serves as a more mathematically and conceptually rigorous alternative to PA 5031.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve, and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering. pre-req: STAT 3032 or 3301 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Although not a formal prerequisite of this course, students are encouraged to have familiarity with linear algebra prior to enrolling. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to knowledge and skills appropriate for the conduct of ethnographic research. Underlying purposes, assumptions, and distinctive characteristics of ethnographic methods will be examined as well as appropriate exemplars. Accordingly, the course emphasizes links between research purposes, the conceptualization of ethnographic projects and the development of researchable questions. The course also takes up a variety of ethical and political issues related to working with participants during the research process, as well as contemporary trustworthiness criteria for ethnographic written accounts. The bulk of the course is given to training in observation, generating field notes, developing interview questions, interviewing, collecting material cultural artifacts, using surveys, and analyzing, interpreting, and writing up ethnographic data. The first part of the course focuses on a critical discussion of ethnographic research purposes, epistemological assumptions, and essential features. Students choose and explore a published ethnographic study from their field of interest. The second part of the course is devoted to a very small scale ethnographic project which students design and carry out themselves. This project is supported by relevant readings and in-class activities (including peer review) related to the actual conduct of ethnographic research.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
PA 5011 - Management of Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
PA 5021 - Microeconomics for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
PA 8082 - Professional Paper-Writing Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates completion of research paper on current issues in public policy, management, and science, technology and environment. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives studied in core courses. Written report includes analysis of issue, policy recommendations. All topics accepted. Plan A students welcome. prereq: completion of core courses, or instr consent
PA 8921 - Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option)
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
ARTS 5710 - Advanced Photography and Moving Image Projects
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design/implementation of individual advanced projects. Demonstrations, lectures, critique. Reading, writing, discussion of related articles/exhibitions. prereq: previously completed a 3XXX course in Photography or Moving Images and Art major
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: ARTS major
ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing fiction.
ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing literary nonfiction.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
LAW 6027 - Law of the Sea
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). UNCLOS has been established as arguably the most comprehensive expression of multilateral treaty negotiation and practical application since it entered into force in 1994. The Convention is the definitive word on articulating the use by nation states of the world?s seas and oceans and the concomitant rights and responsibilities arising there from. The course will examine the historical perspective of the use of seas and oceans and the evolution of this body of international law. The course also address older regimes of the sea as well as the innovations that UNCLOS has ushered in, which include: the territorial sea, contiguous zone, and rights of innocent passage; archipelagic states; the exclusive economic zone; the continental shelf; access by landlocked sates to the resources of the sea; geographically disadvantaged states; protection of the environment; the high seas and the resources thereof for the common heritage of mankind; the international seabed authority; maritime delimitation and the dispute settlement arrangements through the International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea, among others. The course will also study the wealth of case law mapping the development of international law of the sea. The course will adopt a practical approach to enhance skills in the drafting of treaties pursuant to UNCLOS, such as arrangements between coastal states and landlocked states for the sharing of EEZ resources. Students will be exposed to ?mock? maritime boundary delimitations and guest lecturers/visiting professors will facilitate this simulation.
LAW 6071 - International Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6011/Law 6071
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course is an introduction to public international law. It will examine the sources and history of the law of nations and how international law is formed, interpreted, and (sometimes) enforced. It will also provide a brief introduction to the law of international organizations (specifically the United Nations), concepts of jurisdiction and conflicts of jurisdiction among nation states, international protection of human rights, the law of war, international criminal law, and the control of the use of force (including peacekeeping and related topics). prereq: Upper division students only
LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will cover developments in the prosecution of mass atrocity by international and hybrid criminal tribunals. It will discuss the history and development of the field of international criminal law from Nuremberg to the ICC; the sources of international criminal law; and jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of international crimes. The course will examine the elements of the international crimes of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and aggression. It will also analyze recent developments in international criminal justice, including victim participation, sentencing, and reparations.
LAW 6708 - Terrorism, Counter-Terrorism, and International Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Terrorism claims an increasing number of fatalities each year, indiscriminately affecting a broad range of countries and societies, whether developed or developing, warn-torn or at peace and has, in past years, dominated security discourse at domestic, regional and international levels. The 9/11 attacks represented a watershed moment in counter-terrorism regulation, resulting in the United Nations Security Council declaring the phenomenon of international terrorism a ?threat to international peace and security? and the adoption of extensive measures aimed at addressing relevant regulatory gaps at the level of the United Nations, regional organizations and individual states. This regulatory trend has not significantly dwindled since and has in fact seen a boost with the rise of Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and the so-called foreign fighters phenomenon, with every new incident prompting states and international organizations to contemplate additional legal and policy responses. Consequently, measures aimed at preventing and countering terrorism have now seeped into almost every aspect of domestic, regional or international policies and regulation, including education, banking and finances, immigration and asylum, Internet and communication technologies, the functioning of civil society, charitable and humanitarian organizations, etc. Against this background, the seminar aims to give students an overview of the international legal framework on terrorism and counter-terrorism. It will address the United Nations counter-terrorism architecture and the counter-terrorism response at the level of the United Nations as well as selected regional and domestic initiatives. Discussion will cover a wide range of topics, spanning from the definition of terrorism and the conditions conducive to its spread, to a broad spectrum of counter-terrorism measures, including criminalization of terrorist acts, investigating and prosecuting such acts and relevant fair trial issues, use of force against (suspected) terrorists, preventing terrorist use of the Internet and communication technologies, the foreign fighters phenomenon, etc. Counter-terrorism measures will consistently be analyzed against their compliance with international human rights law. The seminar will further examine the interplay between counter-terrorism regulation and the law governing armed conflict as well as international criminal law. Students will study and discuss primary sources, such as international and regional treaties and conventions, United Nations Security Council and General Assembly resolutions, as well as policy documents and academic literature. Students will finish the seminar equipped with a working knowledge of the global legal regime against terrorism, including the main challenges faced in this area and current trends in regulation.
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will examine the principal issues regarding organizations whose membership is that of states. This examination will scrutinize the legal personality and powers of such institutions; the manner in which the states parties as members participate; enforce decisions through mechanisms; dispute settlement; peace and security undertakings.
LAW 6889 - Laws of War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on two interrelated bodies of law: rules pertaining to the use of force in international law (known as the jus ad bellum) and rules regulating the conduct of hostilities under the laws of international and non-international armed conflict (known as international humanitarian law, the laws of armed conflict, or the jus in bello). The course will cover such issues as the “Just War” theory, its history and its relevance in the modern world; the general prohibition on the use of force under Article 2(4) of the UN Charter; use of force by the UN: collective security and law enforcement actions; individual and collective self-defense; humanitarian intervention; and nuclear weapons in international law. The course will also consider regulation of the means and methods of warfare focusing on the Geneva and Hague laws: the four Geneva conventions protecting the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians; the means and methods of war, including lawful and unlawful weapons and targets; the law of internal armed conflicts; and asymmetric warfare.
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will examine the concepts and core principles of the Rule of Law. Seminar sessions will be devoted to identifying the meaning of the terms “rule of law” and “independence of the judiciary.” The importance of a strong and independent legal profession to the rule of law will be discussed. Seminar sessions will focus on such issues as the problem of corruption and the rule of law, the relationship between human rights law and the rule of law, and the challenges of war crimes and genocide. The seminar will explore the relationship between the rule of law and economic development and alleviation of poverty. The seminar will include a discussion of the responsibility of lawyers to support and promote the rule of law within their own country and in other developing countries.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: Issues and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught by the Humphrey School diplomat in residence, this course helps students develop a deep understanding of how US foreign policy institutions function, how that is being challenged, and the broader global implications of those changes. Through readings, class discussions, and guest lectures, we look at the institutions and processes involved in developing and managing US foreign policy, and use case studies to advance students? knowledge, including of how the Department of State works, and the expanding role of the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, and intelligence agencies. We examine how economic instruments like sanctions are used to advance policy; and how American citizens, lobbyists, and foreign governments influence policy. We incorporate discussions of current events into each class. Students develop writing and presentation skills critical to foreign policy careers.
PA 5814 - Global Diplomacy in a Time of Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Taught by the Humphrey School?s diplomat in residence, this course examines the changing world of twenty-first century global diplomacy and how state and nonstate actors are challenging the status quo. We look at the dynamics behind major international developments?with case studies including BREXIT, the Iran Agreement, climate negotiations, and China?s global initiatives?placed in the context of an examination of how states operate in the international diplomatic sphere and how multilateral organizations enhance or challenge the concept of state sovereignty. Students gain knowledge about the complexities of diplomacy and negotiation through readings, classroom discussions, and guest speakers and develop professional skills through writing and presentation assignments.
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, the Middle East region, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
PA 5825 - Crisis Management in Foreign Affairs
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Crisis decision making in foreign policy. Examination of the organization and structure of crisis decision-making within U.S. national security apparatus. Analysis of in-depth four foreign policy crises (Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam – Tet, Iraq, and a current crisis). Crisis simulation with students in the role of national security leaders.
PA 5826 - National Security Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5826/PA 8821
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will analyze U.S. national security policy and process from the viewpoint of the National Security Council staff. Students will examine the organization and structure of the U.S. national security apparatus and the national security decision-making process, including individual and political factors; assess central threats to U.S. and international security and develop and discuss policy options to deal with those threats; undertake a major policy review on a specific national security challenge facing the United States, including analysis and recommendations; produce products, both written and oral, crucial to national security policy making (e.g., concise information and action memorandum), and put themselves in the position of national security leaders as part of a policy simulation. Grades will be based on oral participation, papers, and class reports.
POL 8401 - International Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic theories/approaches to study of international politics. Surveys representative work/central issues of scholarship. prereq: Grad pol sci major or dept consent
POL 8403 - International Norms and Institutions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Origins, roles, and effectiveness of international norms and institutions; theoretical explanations and debates. Institution of sovereignty; rational choice versus constructivist perspectives; role of international law, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations; and international society and transnational cultural norms. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
POL 8402 - International Security
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduction to contending theories of international conflict/security. prereq: Grad pol sci major or instr consent
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: Graduate student or instructor consent
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores an emerging, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that focuses on the relationships between Civil Rights Law in the United States and International Human Rights Law in the global context. Although the two areas represent distinct bodies of law, they also share many important features, objectives, and impediments. By examining the historical emergence of (1) Civil Rights Law in the United States, and (2) International Human Rights Law in the global context, students will gain a better understanding of the critical relationships and intersections between these two important areas of public law. Through an examination of the seminal cases and controversies in these areas, this course will explore the differences between various categories of rights; America’s “exceptionalism” why the United States pursues a strong human rights agenda abroad that is rarely applied in the domestic context; the gains (and losses) that the domestic civil rights movement has experienced in recent decades, among other topics.
LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will cover developments in the prosecution of mass atrocity by international and hybrid criminal tribunals. It will discuss the history and development of the field of international criminal law from Nuremberg to the ICC; the sources of international criminal law; and jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of international crimes. The course will examine the elements of the international crimes of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and aggression. It will also analyze recent developments in international criminal justice, including victim participation, sentencing, and reparations.
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In the last decade, there has been an increased emphasis on using the criminal justice system to help determine who is and who is not suitable to live and work in the United States. This phenomenon has had some increasingly interesting effects as the immigration apparatus has been for most of the history of the United States a civil and agency system. The increased reliance on the criminal justice system has caused some overlap of criminal justice norms- including concepts of right to counsel, detention and detainers and warrants. At the same time, the prosecution of federal migration crimes has skyrocketed in the same period to the point where the majority of all federal prisoners are imprisoned because of migration crimes.
LAW 6893 - Transitional Justice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar explores many of the real-life dilemmas negotiated around the world in countries emerging from dictatorship and conflict.
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will examine the concepts and core principles of the Rule of Law. Seminar sessions will be devoted to identifying the meaning of the terms “rule of law” and “independence of the judiciary.” The importance of a strong and independent legal profession to the rule of law will be discussed. Seminar sessions will focus on such issues as the problem of corruption and the rule of law, the relationship between human rights law and the rule of law, and the challenges of war crimes and genocide. The seminar will explore the relationship between the rule of law and economic development and alleviation of poverty. The seminar will include a discussion of the responsibility of lawyers to support and promote the rule of law within their own country and in other developing countries.
PHIL 5321 - Theories of Justice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4321W/Phil 5321
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What is justice, understood as a central virtue of our social (e.g., political and legal) institutions? What does justice require in the political realm and what kind of state is best suited to achieve it? Ideally, what image of the just state should regulate our behavior? How do the requirements of justice change, if they do, in non-ideal circumstances, such as in cases of noncompliance with the law or in the context of violent conflict (e.g., in war)? This course is intended to provide upper-level undergraduates and philosophy graduate students with a selective survey of important work in contemporary theory of justice that addresses such questions. prereq: 1003 or 1004 or grad student or instr consent
POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4492/Pol 5492
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: graduate student
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: Graduate student or instructor consent
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 8111 - Criminology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of theoretical developments and empirical research. Underlying assumptions, empirical generalizations, and current controversies in criminological research.
SOC 8190 - Topics in Law, Crime, and Deviance
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced topics in law, crime, and deviance. Social underpinnings of legal/illegal behavior and of legal systems.
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
DSSC 8111 - Approaches to Knowledge and Truth: Ways of Knowing in Development Studies and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Grad DSSC minor or #
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches practiced by physical, biological, social science, and humanities scholars. "Ways of knowing" in different cultures/groups. Issues/methodological challenges facing interdisciplinary/international studies. Taught by faculty from biological, social sciences, and humanities. prereq: Grad DSSC minor or instr consent
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Often, the most progress on challenging issues such as health and equity is made when you apply an interdisciplinary perspective. The same is true for global health issues. Whether responding to emerging pandemics, food insecurity, maternal mortality, or civil society collapse during conflict, solutions often lie at the intersection of animal, environmental, and human health. In this course, students will work in teams to examine the fundamental challenges to addressing complex global health problems in East Africa and East African refugee communities here in the Twin Cities. Together we will seek practical solutions that take culture, equity, and sustainability into account. In-field professionals and experts will be available to mentor each team, including professionals based in Uganda and Somalia. This exploration will help students propose realistic actions that could be taken to resolve these issues. This course will help students gain the understanding and skills necessary for beginning to develop solutions to global health issues. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5005 - Innovation for Changemakers: Design for a Disrupted World (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CEGE 5571/GCC 3005/GCC 5005
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
Do you want to make a difference? We live at the intersection of COVID-19, racism, economic recession, and environmental collapse. Now is the time to make an impact. In this project-based course, you will develop effective and sustainable responses to current social and environmental problems. You'll learn about tools, mindsets, and skills that will help you to address any complex grand challenge. Your project may address food insecurity, unemployment, housing, environmental impacts, equity, or other issues. Proposed designs for how you might have a impact can take many forms (student group, program intervention with an existing organization, public policy strategy, or for-profit or non-profit venture) but must have ideas for how to be financially sustainable. A primary focus of the course is how to identify the ?right? problem to solve. You will use a discovery process, design thinking, and input from field research to addressing the challenge you choose. You will build a model around the community?s culture, needs, and wants. Community members, locally and globally, will serve as mentors and research consultants to teams. Weekly speakers will share their innovative efforts to serve the common good. The course will be primarily ?flipped? so that students will have time to work on their projects in class. Students enrolled in GCC 3005 will work in interdisciplinary teams on problems identified by community mentors, students in GCC 5005 can propose a problem to work on individually or choose to work in teams. After the class, there is an opportunity to compete for funding through the Acara program. By the end of the class, you will have a well-designed plan to turn your project into an actionable solution if that is of interest.
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5041 - Transition to a Sustainable World: Can Psychology Help Facilitate Global Sustainability? (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Despite understanding the consequences of not acting to curb unsustainability, why do people fail to act? Human?s behavioral apathy toward sustainability may be due to an inaccurate characterization of sustainability and/or a lack of understanding of cultural diversity and behavior. Therefore, an understanding of the human behavior will contribute greatly to (i) decipher human actions that negatively impact global ecosystems, (ii) slowdown or stop human ecologically destructive trajectory, and (iii) promote sustainable alternatives. The problem is that environmental issues are not generally included in psychology programs, and psychology is not often represented in environmental programs. In the United Nation?s (UN) Sustainable Development goals 2030 (UN SDG 2030), psychological indices have been conspicuously absent (except for mental health in general terms) even though environmental degradation, social or economic inequity, all are implicated by human behavior. The UN SDG 2030 is based on the unproven concept that sustainability is an intersection of social, economic and environmental factors, the key pillars of sustainability. Since economic activity and society are subsets of human behavior, psychology should be considered central to unsustainability and/or sustainability. Therefore, we hypothesize that behavioral psychology has a critical role to play in creating a sustainable society. The aim of the proposed GCC is to discuss (un)sustainability using this new paradigm that will allow new approaches to achieve transition from unsustainability to sustainability worldwide. The specific aims of the proposed GCC are following: (i) Describe interaction between sustainability and behavioral psychology as the 4th pillar of sustainability. (ii) Explain the behavioral correlates of cultural differences in terms of transition to sustainability. (iii) Explain the consumption (related to unsustainability) and conservation (related to sustainability) behavior. (iv) Determine the place of Psychology in the UN?s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that are mostly based on Sociology, Economy and Environment. (v) Describe humanity?s transition from unsustainable to sustainable development.
LAW 6879 - Poverty and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on how the international human rights legal framework addresses the symptoms and causes of systemic poverty with an emphasis on the practical application of those norms to real-life situations. We will explore what a rights-based approach to poverty eradication means for governments and other development actors and learn how communities and advocates are leveraging human rights law to combat poverty in a variety of contexts. The class will consider a wide range of topics spanning domestic and global poverty; urban and rural contexts; the gendered dimensions of poverty; environmental justice; privatization of public services; threats to the rights to food, water, education, and housing; collective rights of indigenous peoples and peasants; the situation of human rights defenders; and reparations. Students will study primary documents and interact with practitioners working in the U.S. and abroad on litigation, policy advocacy, mobilization, and governance. The coursework consists of simulated advocacy and advisory reports. Students will finish the seminar equipped to bring a working knowledge of the international human rights system to their future roles.
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will examine the principal issues regarding organizations whose membership is that of states. This examination will scrutinize the legal personality and powers of such institutions; the manner in which the states parties as members participate; enforce decisions through mechanisms; dispute settlement; peace and security undertakings.
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a critical analysis of strategies used to improve educational outcomes worldwide. This course examines contemporary trends in educational policy, development, and practice, focusing on how?s and why?s of educational change. Empirical studies, organizational reports, and student experiences all inform class discussion. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of gender/gender relations in international development/education. Interdisciplinary body of literature from development studies, political science, economics, anthropology, cultural studies, gender/women's studies.
OLPD 5121 - Educational Reform in International Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critical policy analysis of educational innovation and reform in selected countries. Use theoretical perspectives and a variety of policy analysis approaches to examine actual educational reforms and their implementation.
OLPD 8022 - Education and Globalization: Anthropological Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Contemporary educational institutions are characterized by rapid movements of people, knowledge, ideologies, and media, and are increasingly shaped by market-based reforms. Populism and stricter migration controls further prompt a rethinking of globalization and its effects on formal and non-formal education. This course enhances students' theoretical and contextual knowledge of globalization and demonstrates the advantages of a translocal view of educational processes and problems.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5503 - Economics of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic growth, inequality, poverty, rural/urban labor markets, risk/insurance. Investments in human capital, credit markets, gender/household economics, governance/institutional issues. Microfinance, conditional cash transfers, labor/education policies. prereq: PA 5501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PA 5501
PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, the Middle East region, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of globalization on social/sustainable development. Population, war, economics, urbanization, environment, water/sanitation, communicable/non-communicable conditions. New infectious/chronic diseases, food security/environmental health. prereq: Credit will not be granted if received for 6100 or 6365
ESPM 5202 - Environmental Conflict Management, Leadership, and Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3202WESPM /5202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Negotiation of natural resource management issues. Use of collaborative planning. Case study approach to conflict management, strategic planning, and building leadership qualities. Emphasizes analytical concepts, techniques, and skills.
ESPM 5242 - Methods for Environmental and Natural Resource Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 4242/ESPM 5242
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Methods, formal and informal, for analyzing environmental and natural resource policies. How to critically evaluate policies, using economic and non-economic decision-making criteria. Application of policy analysis principles/concepts to environmental/natural resource problems. Recognizing politically-charged environment in which decisions over use, management, and protection of these resources often occur. prereq: grad student
ESPM 5245 - Sustainable Land Use Planning and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3245/ESPM 5245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Planning theories, concepts, and constructs. Policies, processes, and tools for sustainable land use planning. Scientific/technical literature related to land use planning. Skills needed to participate in sustainable land use planning.
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 5146/FNRM 5146/GCC 5008/P
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3011/GCC 5011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This interdisciplinary course will examine obstacles to energy transitions at different scales. It will explore the role of energy in society, the physics of energy, how energy systems were created and how they function, and how the markets, policies, and regulatory frameworks for energy systems in the US developed. The course will closely examine the Realpolitik of energy and the technical, legal, regulatory, and policy underpinnings of renewable energy in the US and Minnesota. Students will learn the drivers that can lead global systems to change despite powerful constraints and how local and institutional action enables broader reform. Students will put their learning into action by developing a proposal and then working on a project to accelerate the energy transition and to ensure that the energy transition benefits people in a just and equitable way. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3013/GCC 5013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5027 - Power Systems Journey: Making the Invisible Visible and Actionable (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3027/GCC 5027
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
An energy revolution is underway, and needs to accelerate to support climate and economic goals. But the general citizenry does not understand our current energy systems, particularly the seemingly invisible phenomena of electricity, and its generation, distribution, and use. Technical knowledge is only half the solution, however. It is through human decisions and behaviors that technical solutions get applied and adopted, and the importance of communication and storytelling is being recognized for its relevance to making change. How can science literacy and behavior-motivating engagement and storytelling be combined to help make systemic change? This course explores the integration of science-based environmental education, with art-led, place-based exploration of landscapes and creative map-making to address this challenge. How do we make electricity visible, understandable, and interesting--so we can engage citizens in energy conservation with basic literacy about the electric power system so that they can be informed voters, policy advocates, and consumers. In this class, you will take on this challenge, first learning about the electric power systems you use, their cultural and technical history, systems thinking, design thinking, and prior examples of communication and education efforts. With this foundation, you will then apply your learning to create a public education project delivered via online GIS Story maps that use a combination of data, art, and story to help others understand, and act on the power journey we are all on. All will share the common exploration of power systems through field trips, and contribute to a multi-faceted story of power, presented in a group map and individual GIS Story maps. No prior knowledge of GIS story maps or electricity issues is needed. The study of power systems can be a model for learning and communicating about other topics that explore the interaction of technology and society toward sustainability.
GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3031/GCC 5031
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. For: so, jr, sr, grad
GCC 5032 - Ecosystems Health: Leadership at the intersection of humans, animals and the environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3032/GCC 5032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What are the effects of climate change, disease emergence, food and water security, gender, conflict and poverty, and sustainability of ecosystem services on health? Unfortunately, these large-scale problems often become overwhelming, making single solution-based progress seem daunting and difficult to implement in policy. Fortunately, the emerging discipline of ecosystem health provides an approach to these problems grounded in trans-disciplinary science. Ecosystem health recognizes the interdependence of human, animal and environmental health, and merges theories and methods of ecological, health and political sciences. It poses that health threats can be prevented, monitored and controlled via a variety of approaches and technologies that guide management action as well as policy. Thus, balancing human and animal health with management of our ecosystems. In this class, we will focus on the emerging discipline of ecosystem health, and how these theories, methods and computational technologies set the stage for solutions to grand challenges of health at the interface of humans, animals and the environment. We will focus not only on the creation and evaluation of solutions, but on their feasibility and implementation in the real world through policy and real time decision making. This will be taught in the active learning style classroom, requiring pre class readings to support didactic theory and case-based learning in class. Participation and both individual and group projects (written and oral presentation) will comprise most of the student evaluation. These projects may reflect innovative solutions, discoveries about unknowns, or development of methods useful for ecosystem health challenges. We envision that some of them will lead to peer-review publications, technical reports or other forms of publication. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
LAW 6062 - Energy Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 5062/Law 6062
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introduction to U.S. energy law. The first portion of the course introduces the nation's sources of energy: coal, oil, biofuels, natural gas, hydropower, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal energy, and energy efficiency. In doing so, it explores the physical, market, and legal structures within which these energy sources are extracted, transported, and converted into energy. The second portion of the course turns to the two major sectors of our energy economy--electricity and transportation--and the full range of federal and state regulation of each sector. The third portion of the course explores case studies of hot topics in energy law and policy that highlight the complex transitions taking place in the energy system. These topics include electric grid modernization, electric vehicles, risks and benefits associated with hydraulic fracturing and deepwater drilling for oil and gas, the development of offshore wind energy, and the continued role of nuclear energy. In addition to traditional textbook reading and class discussion, the course will include industry, government, and nonprofit guest speaker presentations. Grading will be based on a final exam given at the end of the semester as well as class discussion and weekly written postings on Canvas for the course.
LAW 6215 - Environmental Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Legal aspects of major environmental problems with emphasis on issues that appear in various regulatory contexts, such as the degree to which environmental quality should be protected; who should bear the cost of enhancing environmental quality; allocation of responsibilities among courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies; the role of citizens. groups; and environmental litigation.
LAW 6234 - Public Lands and Natural Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Public Lands and Natural Resources studies the expansive body of federal and state constitutional provisions, statutes, rules, customs, and processes that govern the ways individuals, corporations, and federal, state, and local governments interact with federal public lands, state lands, private lands, water, air, wildlife, minerals, and other natural resources. We will study: (1) the history and statutes of U.S. federal public lands, and the past and present conflicts governing those lands; (2) the laws and regulations governing national parks, national monuments, national forests, grazing lands, energy resources, wildlife, and other natural resources; and (3) ownership interests and rights relating to public and private lands and resources. The course will help students gain an appreciation of our relationship with the natural environmental from cultural, historical, and economic perspectives, in addition to a legal perspective.
LAW 6400 - International Environmental Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will examine issues of international environmental law. Although there is a limited body of older law, most of the topic has emerged during the past half century.
LAW 6709 - Agriculture and the Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Land based food and fiber production and processing is the largest segment of the global and national economy. These activities raise increasingly fundamental environmental questions for every level of government and sector of society. This seminar will address selected environmental issues related to agriculture, including crop production and conservation, irrigation, drainage, pesticides, and nutrients; livestock operations and soil/water/air quality; open space/habitat preservation; design of federal farm programs; biofuel initiatives; public land utilization; biodiversity; and globalization. Attorneys, scholars, and public officials will be invited classroom guests. Students will prepare papers and may present their topics to the class. Readings will be selected portions of texts, articles & cases.
PA 5013 - Law and Urban Land Use
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of law in regulating/shaping urban development, land use, environmental quality, local/regional governmental services. Interface between public/private sector. prereq: Major or minor in urban/regional planning or instr consent
PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5243 - Environmental Justice in Urban Planning & Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Environmental racism can be defined as policies and practices that result in communities of Black, Indigenous and other people of color (BIPoC communities) being overexposed to environmental harms and being denied access to environmental goods. The environmental justice (EJ) movement in the United States was birthed in the 1980s with the aim of ending environmental racism. Early EJ activism was led by Black rural communities protesting the disproportionate presence of toxic waste facilities in their neighborhoods and Latinx migrant farmworkers who were overexposed to harmful pesticides. Central to the course is the understanding that structural racism, in the form of social, political, and economic forces, has denied BIPoC individuals and communities their rights to live in clean environments and access natural resources that allow communities to build and maintain their physical, mental, emotion, and fiscal health. Although the course focuses on race and racism, it takes as axiomatic that racism is intertwined with other systems of oppression including, but not limited to, sexism, classism, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia. The course begins by tracing the history of the EJ movement and unpacking the terms ?racism? and ?justice.? The main body of the course will focus on a series of issues that EJ scholars and activists address including pollution, greening, transportation, disasters, and climate change. The course ends with discussions and reflections on our roles, responsibilities and possibilities as public policy and planning scholars, researchers and practitioners to work towards ending environmental racism and achieving EJ for all. The required ?readings? for the course will include academic journal articles, news stories, governmental policies, podcasts, videos, poetry, and short stories. This will allow us to understand the theoretical and methodological approaches to EJ activism and research and explore popular and creative forms of knowledge about EJ which will add depth to our understanding and analysis of relevant plans and policies. Our time together in the classroom will primarily be a mix of lectures, group discussions, in-class exercises, and occasionally guest speakers. While we will reflect on some international issues and materials, we will largely focus on EJ in the United States.
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
PA 5721 - Energy Systems and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them.
PA 5722 - Economics of Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to economic principles and methods as they apply to environmental issues such as climate change, biodiversity conservation, and water quality. Course will cover benefit-cost analysis, methods of environmental valuation, as well as critiques of market-based solutions to environmental challenges.
PA 5723 - Water Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5723/WRS 5101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural, legal, economic, and environmental forces affecting supply/use of water by individuals, sectors, and governance institutions. Historical trends; water laws in United States and internationally. Institutional structures for managing water at federal, state, and local levels. Current water-related issues/policies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues related to providing adequate levels of clean air/water. Local water quantity/quality, air quality in developed/developing world, global air/water quality, policies meant to protect these resources.
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interconnected relationships between global climate change/human health. Develop computer models to predict climate change from natural/anthropogenic forces, predict human health outcomes as result of changing climate. prereq: Students must have elementary computer skills.
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3409/AmIn 5409
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
BTHX 5510 - Gender and the Politics of Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Significance of gender to health and health care. Feminist analysis regarding moral/political importance of gender, possibly including contemporary western medicine?s understanding of the body, childbirth, and reproductive technologies; cosmetic surgery; chronic illness; disability; participation in research; gender and classification of disease. Care work, paid/non-paid. Readings from feminist theory, history, social science, bioethics, and moral philosophy.
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 5503 - Queering Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GWSS 4403/GWSS 5503/GLBT 4403
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will give you a solid theoretical foundation in the field of queer studies in addition to explaining its relation to other scholarly traditions, including (but not limited to) feminist theory, GLBT studies, literary studies, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism. Over the course of the semester you will examine the historical forces that birthed queer politics and theory, become conversant in its conceptual basis, interrogate and analyze its various uses and applications, and finally apply it in your own arguments. prereq: Any GWSS or GLBT course
GWSS 8260 - Seminar: Race, Representation and Resistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Race, racialization, racial justice as related to representation/struggles for social/economic justice. Intersectional analysis of power, politics, ideology/identity. Queer of color critique, women of color feminisms, critical sex/body positive approaches. prereq: Grad student
HSEX 6011 - Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Policy in Human Sexuality: Cutting Edge Analyses offers an overview of United States and international policy related to gender and sexuality. The course will present the content and impact of such policies across human life stages, from youth reproductive health to aging LGBTQ folks; and a variety of contexts including education, military service, employment, and criminal legal systems. Using readings, multimedia sources, discussion forums, peer review, and an applied final project, students will understand the theory, process, and central actors in policy development and implementation, and the real-world effects of these processes.
LAW 6036 - Reproductive Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The age-old debate on the rights of individuals to sexual determination and reproductive autonomy rages on. It grows more contentious as new technology and heated political confrontations alter the playing field. This course, using cases, statutes, and ancient and contemporary critical writings, examines the legal foundations and social implications of regulating contraception, abortion, pregnancy, childbirth, and assisted reproduction. It addresses access, funding, the rights of men, women, minors, fetuses, and government. It also explores ethical considerations and international perspectives.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of women’s human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
LAW 6862 - Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Few areas of law have changed as quickly or as dramatically as those regulating the rights of members of the LGBTQ community. This is true in Minnesota, nationally, in foreign jurisdictions, and at the international level. These evolving debates span numerous areas of law, including criminal, asylum, family, employment, civil rights, and human rights. This course will critically review the history and broader context of these legal developments to ask: where should we go from here? Through the lens of paradigmatic cases and events, we will examine local, national, and international advocacy approaches to a wide range of human rights issues affecting LGBTQ people: criminalization, violence, stigma, forced migration, marriage, family, housing, health, employment, and freedom of speech and association. The course will analyze how factors like race and class have shaped the LGBTQ rights movement in the US and beyond, with an emphasis on how laws and policies that appear neutral on their face can nevertheless have a disparate impact on members of the LGBTQ community. Students will study primary and scholarly sources, supplemented by narrative and other artistic material. Through focused interactions with guest speakers, students will have the opportunity to learn from practitioners working on litigation, advocacy, and mobilization in Minnesota, the US, and abroad. Coursework consists of independent research projects informed by students? interests. Students will finish the seminar with a better understanding of the relevant law and the choices and challenges faced by human rights advocates in a rapidly changing field.
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of gender/gender relations in international development/education. Interdisciplinary body of literature from development studies, political science, economics, anthropology, cultural studies, gender/women's studies.
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies of sex trafficking, housing, and youth work to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PHIL 5622 - Philosophy and Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4622/5622, GWSS 4122/5122
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Encounters between philosophy/feminism. Gender's influence in traditional philosophical problems/methods. Social role of theorist/theorizing as they relate to politics of feminism. This course surveys central debates in feminist philosophy, with a focus on the methods and virtues of resistance. Along the way, we will consider the question of how we should live in an oppressive society. Topics may include intimidation, gaslighting, silencing, epistemic injustice, emotional labor, intersectionality, resistance, anger and violence. prereq: 8 crs in [philosophy or women's studies] or instr consent
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate-level class for students preparing for careers in public health research and practice where sex, sexuality, and sexual health are key components. It is a highly applied, highly interactive course focused on developing skills needed in sex research and sexual health practice. The teaching pedagogical approach is a "flipped classroom" where students are expected to learn the content from the assigned audiotaped lectures, movies and readings, and to come to class ready to participate in exercises, discuss case studies, complete assignments and immerse themselves in public health practice and research focused on sex, sexuality, and sexual health. The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare health professionals for a professional career addressing community and population sexual health concerns by deepening their knowledge of and exposure to research practice in the field, increasing comfort familiarity and ability to speak on sexual health topics, and by practicing their skills. The assignments focus on hot topics in sex and sexual health, and are designed to increase knowledge of the field of sexual health, while developing skills in conceptualization, measurement, intervention design, and evaluation. Please note this course addresses the greatest challenges in sexual health facing our world, including such hot topics as the zika virus and HIV prevention, clergy sexual abuse, campus sexual climate, sexual harassment, LGBT health disparities, contraception, abortion, women's rights, teen sex, and unplanned pregnancy.
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programs, services, and policies that affect women's health in the United States. Methodological issues in research. Emphasizes social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors. Measurement/interpretation of factors, how they translate into interventions, programs, and policies.
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: Graduate student or instructor consent
SOC 5221 - Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3221/Soc 5221
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Gender is something so fundamental to our lives, to our identities, and how we interact with others that we often take it for granted. However, understandings of gender vary across time and place, and even within cultures, making it clear that our understandings of gender are not universal or timeless. In this class, we will examine how gender intersects with race and sexuality, as well as how it impacts areas of our lives such as child socialization, family structure, the media, intimate relationships, and the workplace.
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative frameworks, related theories, and pivotal texts in study of Africa and African Diaspora.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
LAW 6027 - Law of the Sea
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). UNCLOS has been established as arguably the most comprehensive expression of multilateral treaty negotiation and practical application since it entered into force in 1994. The Convention is the definitive word on articulating the use by nation states of the world?s seas and oceans and the concomitant rights and responsibilities arising there from. The course will examine the historical perspective of the use of seas and oceans and the evolution of this body of international law. The course also address older regimes of the sea as well as the innovations that UNCLOS has ushered in, which include: the territorial sea, contiguous zone, and rights of innocent passage; archipelagic states; the exclusive economic zone; the continental shelf; access by landlocked sates to the resources of the sea; geographically disadvantaged states; protection of the environment; the high seas and the resources thereof for the common heritage of mankind; the international seabed authority; maritime delimitation and the dispute settlement arrangements through the International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea, among others. The course will also study the wealth of case law mapping the development of international law of the sea. The course will adopt a practical approach to enhance skills in the drafting of treaties pursuant to UNCLOS, such as arrangements between coastal states and landlocked states for the sharing of EEZ resources. Students will be exposed to ?mock? maritime boundary delimitations and guest lecturers/visiting professors will facilitate this simulation.
LAW 6621 - Rights in Conflict: Citizenship and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores an emerging, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that focuses on the relationships between Civil Rights Law in the United States and International Human Rights Law in the global context. Although the two areas represent distinct bodies of law, they also share many important features, objectives, and impediments. By examining the historical emergence of (1) Civil Rights Law in the United States, and (2) International Human Rights Law in the global context, students will gain a better understanding of the critical relationships and intersections between these two important areas of public law. Through an examination of the seminal cases and controversies in these areas, this course will explore the differences between various categories of rights; America’s “exceptionalism” why the United States pursues a strong human rights agenda abroad that is rarely applied in the domestic context; the gains (and losses) that the domestic civil rights movement has experienced in recent decades, among other topics.
LAW 6718 - Immigration and Criminal Law: Immigration Consequences of Crimes and Criminalizing Migration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In the last decade, there has been an increased emphasis on using the criminal justice system to help determine who is and who is not suitable to live and work in the United States. This phenomenon has had some increasingly interesting effects as the immigration apparatus has been for most of the history of the United States a civil and agency system. The increased reliance on the criminal justice system has caused some overlap of criminal justice norms- including concepts of right to counsel, detention and detainers and warrants. At the same time, the prosecution of federal migration crimes has skyrocketed in the same period to the point where the majority of all federal prisoners are imprisoned because of migration crimes.
LAW 6719 - Immigration Reforms through History: An Ongoing Racial Narrative
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Students will learn about major immigration reforms through the lens of the social, political, economic, and cultural context that ushered their passage. Students will be presented with a mosaic of information to place them in the place and time of the respective era to facilitate a deeper understanding of the immigration law narrative and how perceptions of race and identity result in policy and legal reform. The course will examine important portions of each reform bill including the intended goals of legislators and other influential factors such as demographic, economic, and political data. The class will explore societal perceptions of race and immigration in primary source documents and multimedia from each reform period including film, music, art, and news stories. This seminar is structured around major immigration reforms and the seminar will highlight the the Immigration Act of 1924, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 and post-9/11 terrorism related immigration reforms in the 2000?s. The course will be divided into two to three seminar sessions per reform period and for each era the seminar will examine the societal context that led to the legislation, the language of law, case law and the broader policies and assumptions that it reflects. Seminar discussions will also cover how portions of the law currently operate and fit into a historical immigration law narrative.
LAW 6872 - Immigration Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course deals with the history of immigration to the United States, the role of the federal government in regulating immigration, visas for non-immigrants and immigrants, procedures and grounds for removal, asylum refugee status, citizenship, discrimination against aliens, the intersection between criminal law and immigration law, and ethical issues facing immigration lawyers. The course includes in-class lawyering skill exercises such as client interviewing and counseling, participating in an immigration court hearing, and legislative advocacy on immigration reform measures. These exercises are designed to train students in the skills necessary to become successful immigration lawyers.
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will examine the concepts and core principles of the Rule of Law. Seminar sessions will be devoted to identifying the meaning of the terms “rule of law” and “independence of the judiciary.” The importance of a strong and independent legal profession to the rule of law will be discussed. Seminar sessions will focus on such issues as the problem of corruption and the rule of law, the relationship between human rights law and the rule of law, and the challenges of war crimes and genocide. The seminar will explore the relationship between the rule of law and economic development and alleviation of poverty. The seminar will include a discussion of the responsibility of lawyers to support and promote the rule of law within their own country and in other developing countries.
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, political, economic experiences of contemporary U.S. immigrants. Draws from sociology, economics, demography, political science, public affairs. Local government policies/plans. Cities/suburbs as contexts for immigrants. Interactions between immigrant communities/urban planners/policymakers. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5301/Soc 5511
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5823 - Managing Humanitarian and Refugee Crises: Challenges for Policymakers & Practitioners
Credits: 1.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines response of governments, international organizations, NGOs, and others to global humanitarian and human rights challenges posed by civil conflict and other complex emergencies in places such as Syria, the Middle East region, South Sudan, Somalia, Burma, and elsewhere. Course will also consider and assess UN and other institutions established to address these issues (like UNOCHA and UNHCR). In addition, course will examine US policy toward humanitarian issues and refugees (including US refugee admissions).
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: Graduate student or instructor consent
SOC 8607 - Migration & Migrants in Demographic Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
With fertility and mortality, migration is one of three core population processes. This course provides a graduate-level treatment of major theoretical and empirical debates in demographic/population research on migration and migrants. It examines topics like why and how people migrate, who migrates and who does not, and the effects of migration in migrant-receiving and migrant-sending areas. Along the way, it links to a number of related topics, including the impacts of migration on migrants themselves, the role of the state and policies governing migration and incorporation, and transnationalism. A common thread throughout is connecting these topics to issues of population size, composition, and change. While this course contains ?demographic? in the title and fulfills requirements for graduate trainees and the population studies minor in the Minnesota Population Center, it is necessarily interdisciplinary in scope and draws from research in economics, demography/population studies, human geography, history, political science, population health, public policy, and sociology. Credit will not be granted if the student has already completed a Soc 8090 topics course with the same title.
LAW 6637 - Business and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will explore the growing area of law and advocacy around corporate accountability and corporate social responsibility related to international human rights standards. The course has several goals: 1) We will examine the development and content of international human rights standards pertaining to corporations and corporate officers, including state, national and international and regional laws and principles including the UN Guiding Principles on Human Rights and Business. 2) We will next focus on levels of implementation and varying points of intervention on BHR issues: a) internal corporate policies, b) socially responsible investment shareholder advocacy and divestment, c) disclosure and anti-corruption laws and sanctions, d) trade policies, e) civil litigation, criminal prosecution and internal grievance mechanisms, f) reporting and documentation by human rights organizations, g) international standard-setting mechanisms. To examine these questions, we will use case studies across various industries including supply chains and labor conditions, environmental practices, and violations by security forces employed by multinational corporations. 3) The readings and seminars will encourage students to explore the debates about the most effective ways for businesses to protect and advance respect for human rights, prevent violations, and provide redress to victims of violations that occur as a result of their actions/inaction, and defend themselves when they are falsely accused. 4) Three papers throughout the semester will encourage students to integrate different arguments and course materials, conduct related independent research and develop their own arguments.
LAW 6887 - Law of International Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will examine the principal issues regarding organizations whose membership is that of states. This examination will scrutinize the legal personality and powers of such institutions; the manner in which the states parties as members participate; enforce decisions through mechanisms; dispute settlement; peace and security undertakings.
OLPD 5048 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to cultural variables of leadership that influence functioning of cross-cultural groups. Lectures, case studies, discussion, problem-solving, simulations. Intensive workshop.
OLPD 5095 - Problems: Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 24.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Course or independent study on specific topic within department program emphasis.
OLPD 5607 - Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to major concepts, skills, and techniques for organization development/change. prereq: Grad student only
OLPD 5611 - Facilitation and Meeting Skills
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to the disciplines of planning and running effective meetings. Tools and methods for meeting management and evaluation are presented within the context of organization development.
PA 5051 - Leadership Foundations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in a personal, community, and organizational context for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
PA 5052 - Public Affairs Leadership
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continues 5051. Leadership concepts, tools, and strategies in diverse settings for mid-career students. prereq: Major in public affairs (cohort) or public affairs certificate (cohort); 5051-5052 must be taken in same academic yr
PA 5081 - Working in Teams: Crossing Disciplines and Learning from Difference
Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles and skills necessary to create high-performing multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Models of change/leadership. How leaders can promote personal, organizational, and societal change. Case studies, action research. Framework for leadership and change.
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6623/Mgmt 6402/OLPD 6402/P
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Are you interested in working across government, business, and the non-profit sector for public good? Are you wondering how you can create sustainable shared leadership on challenges that can best be addressed together? This course explores multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges from a variety of perspectives and provides an opportunity for students to work together to apply what they are learning individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. The course is taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms, and specific examples of multisector leadership that can enable transformative action to tackle a significant societal issue and achieve lasting change. Credit will be not be granted if credit has been received for GCC 5023, OLPD 6402, PUBH 6702, MGMT 6402, PA 5130, LAW 6623.
PA 5108 - Board leadership development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofit board governance. Governance models, roles/responsibilities, ethics/dynamics. Current research/concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges/explore solutions that build board leadership competencies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5114 - Budget Analysis in Public and Nonprofit Orgs
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5111/PA 5114
Prerequisites: PA 5003
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques, terminology, concepts and skills for developing and analyzing operating and capital budgets in public and nonprofit organizations. Budget analysis using case studies, problem sets, and spreadsheets. Time value of money, cost-benefit analysis, break-even analysis, sensitivity analysis, and fiscal analysis. prereq: PA 5003
PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
Typically offered: Every Spring
Financial resource management for public and nonprofit organizations. Short-term and long-term debt management, retirement financing, and endowment investing. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques applied to real-world problems. Financial management in context of national and regional economies. prereq: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options.
PA 5135 - Managing Conflict: Negotiation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and frameworks used in negotiations. Navigating diverse audiences and an increasingly complex world. Negotiation in various arenas. Opportunities to practice skills and learn from experts. Structured exercises on issues such as compensation, union conflicts and international development. Culture, emotions, gender and ethics in negotiation.
PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Project management and leadership strategies for implementing public policy, including new or revised government programs, public works, and regulations. Use of project management concepts, principles, and tools, including project definition, scoping, planning, scheduling (using the critical path method), budgeting, monitoring, staffing, and managing project teams. Application of "agile" and "extreme" project management in situations of complexity and uncertainty, including those due to the scrutiny and expectations of elected officials, the media, citizens, and other stakeholders.
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
OLPD 5501 - Principles and Methods of Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: OLPD 5501/EPsy 5243
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to program evaluation. Planning an evaluation study, collecting and analyzing information, reporting results; evaluation strategies; overview of the field of program evaluation.
OLPD 5502 - Comparative evaluation theory for practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This class will give students the foundation in evaluation theory necessary for high-quality and ethical practice in evaluation, consulting, or other forms of organizational change Recommend 5501 or equivalent (can be taken concurrently)
OLPD 8502 - Advanced Evaluation Theory and Theory crafting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This advanced course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of major evaluation theories, systems for organizing evaluation theories, and propose ways of expanding current theory. prereq: Doctoral standing OR instructor?s permission (enforced) Recommend OLPD 5502 (can be taken concurrently)
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change
Credits: 1.5 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Models of change/leadership. How leaders can promote personal, organizational, and societal change. Case studies, action research. Framework for leadership and change.
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership: Leading Across Sectors to Address Grand Challenges
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6623/Mgmt 6402/OLPD 6402/P
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Are you interested in working across government, business, and the non-profit sector for public good? Are you wondering how you can create sustainable shared leadership on challenges that can best be addressed together? This course explores multi-sector leadership and related governance and management challenges from a variety of perspectives and provides an opportunity for students to work together to apply what they are learning individually and in teams through in-class exercises and a final team project. The course is taught by a team of interdisciplinary faculty and considers different contexts, forms, and specific examples of multisector leadership that can enable transformative action to tackle a significant societal issue and achieve lasting change. Credit will be not be granted if credit has been received for GCC 5023, OLPD 6402, PUBH 6702, MGMT 6402, PA 5130, LAW 6623.
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process.
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation I: Concepts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing useful program evaluations. Emphasizes skills for program administrators, planners. Needs assessments. Assessment of program design, implementation, impact. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Ethical considerations.
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Understanding an evaluation study. Program evaluation. Applications to health and mental health settings. emphasizes public health.
BTHX 5325 - Biomedical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Bthx 5325/Phil 5325
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course, delivered entirely online, examines issues in bioethics spanning clinical ethics, public health ethics, and research ethics. The course also introduces conceptual frameworks and methods that can be used to analyze these issues. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
BTHX 5510 - Gender and the Politics of Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Significance of gender to health and health care. Feminist analysis regarding moral/political importance of gender, possibly including contemporary western medicine?s understanding of the body, childbirth, and reproductive technologies; cosmetic surgery; chronic illness; disability; participation in research; gender and classification of disease. Care work, paid/non-paid. Readings from feminist theory, history, social science, bioethics, and moral philosophy.
BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course explores matters of social justice related to health. Readings from multiple disciplinary perspectives ground examination of how to understand social justice in this context. Class sessions will predominantly focus on specific practical issues such as health disparities, the politics of inclusion and exclusion in clinical research, resource allocation in resource poor settings, and health professional roles during war. Discussions incorporate consideration of these issues’ institutional and broader social contexts. This course is appropriate for a wide audience including students from the health professions, philosophy, social science, and law.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is your opportunity to examine, challenge, and critically reflect upon your thinking about health. ?Micro-immersion experience? offers you an opportunity to explore different understandings of health through interactions with cultural communities. The brief immersions facilitate experiential glimpses into fundamentally different worldviews and systems of thought that are often excluded by the scientific/professional models emphasized on campus. Critical thinking, critical reflection, and supplemental readings support your effort to step into culturally different knowledge systems and mental models of health and well-being. Confronting cultural difference in this way offers a powerful mirror through which your own tacit perspective, thinking and assumptions of health become more visible and explicit. You are asked to challenge your own thinking as you attempt to inhabit different cognitive worlds. We will do our best to create a space that encourages us to share with sincerity our thoughts and emerging insights with one another in class de-briefing conversations. These de-briefings allow you benefit from each other?s take on the immersion experiences as you develop your own personal philosophy, narrative, and understanding of health. prereq: jr, sr, grad, or instr consent
GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Often, the most progress on challenging issues such as health and equity is made when you apply an interdisciplinary perspective. The same is true for global health issues. Whether responding to emerging pandemics, food insecurity, maternal mortality, or civil society collapse during conflict, solutions often lie at the intersection of animal, environmental, and human health. In this course, students will work in teams to examine the fundamental challenges to addressing complex global health problems in East Africa and East African refugee communities here in the Twin Cities. Together we will seek practical solutions that take culture, equity, and sustainability into account. In-field professionals and experts will be available to mentor each team, including professionals based in Uganda and Somalia. This exploration will help students propose realistic actions that could be taken to resolve these issues. This course will help students gain the understanding and skills necessary for beginning to develop solutions to global health issues. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3016/GCC 5016
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid "antibiotic apocalypse." The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5022 - The Human Experience of Sensory Loss: Seeking Equitable and Effective Solutions (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the visual, auditory, and other sensory pathways that convey information about the world to mind and brain. Millions of people worldwide experience deficits in sensory function that affect their quality of life. We will focus on the characteristics of healthy sensory functioning as well as how sensory disorders can affect personal identity, impede information processing, and alter brain structure and function. The course will address the demographics and risk factors for sensory disabilities, the implications of these disabilities for activities of daily living, the history of society's response to sensory disability, as well as societal, ethical, and personal attitudes toward sensory disabilities. The course will also explore translational and applied approaches for addressing sensory disabilities. Each class session will be co-taught by a pair of instructors, representing multiple scientific and social perspectives. A major goal of the course is to view sensory function and impairment from multiple perspectives cognitive science, neuroscience, medicine, engineering, society, consumers, ethics and social justice. The course will combine lectures, discussions, and student-led presentations of research papers. The course will include hands-on demonstrations of assistive technology and panel discussions with people with visual and hearing disabilities. During the semester, each student (or pairs of students) will develop a mini research proposal to address a real-world issue related to sensory impairment. The proposal must be translational in nature, and must include consultation with consumers of the proposed project. The final class session will be devoted to poster presentations of the mini proposals. The proposal report must include consideration of potentially opposing viewpoints about the proposed research. This course addresses two of our University's grand challenges: Advancing Health Through Tailored Solutions, and Just and Equitable Communities. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
LAW 6879 - Poverty and Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on how the international human rights legal framework addresses the symptoms and causes of systemic poverty with an emphasis on the practical application of those norms to real-life situations. We will explore what a rights-based approach to poverty eradication means for governments and other development actors and learn how communities and advocates are leveraging human rights law to combat poverty in a variety of contexts. The class will consider a wide range of topics spanning domestic and global poverty; urban and rural contexts; the gendered dimensions of poverty; environmental justice; privatization of public services; threats to the rights to food, water, education, and housing; collective rights of indigenous peoples and peasants; the situation of human rights defenders; and reparations. Students will study primary documents and interact with practitioners working in the U.S. and abroad on litigation, policy advocacy, mobilization, and governance. The coursework consists of simulated advocacy and advisory reports. Students will finish the seminar equipped to bring a working knowledge of the international human rights system to their future roles.
PA 8461 - Global and U.S. Perspectives on Health and Mortality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The health of populations in developing and developed countries is very different. Within countries, great health disparities exist between more advantaged and more disadvantaged populations. When crafting policies that aim to improve population health, it is crucial to know how to measure health and how to think about the health needs of the specific population in question. This course will provide an overview to the factors driving health, mortality, and aging across different populations. In addition, students will learn the best sources of data and measures to use to describe the health status of a population. They will also be able to assess policy options that address the health of their population.
PUBH 6011 - Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3011/6011
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of public health approaches to AIDS epidemic. Epidemiological/clinical features of HIV infection. Impact of AIDS on certain communities/populations. Behavior change principles as they apply to AIDS interventions. prereq: Grad student or professional school student or instr consent
PUBH 6055 - Social Inequalities in Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Extent and causes of social inequalities in health. Degree to which understanding of these inequalities is hampered by methodological limitations in health research. Focuses on individual, community, and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.
PUBH 6066 - Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for Community Health Work
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Taught with Powderhorn-Phillips Cultural Wellness Center. Introduction to community building/organizing. Using culture as a resource for health, reducing barriers, identifying community assets, planning organizing strategy, understanding the impact of history. Emphasizes self-reflection and skill-building for authentic, grassroots community work.
PUBH 6081 - Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is a graduate-level class for students preparing for careers in public health research and practice where sex, sexuality, and sexual health are key components. It is a highly applied, highly interactive course focused on developing skills needed in sex research and sexual health practice. The teaching pedagogical approach is a "flipped classroom" where students are expected to learn the content from the assigned audiotaped lectures, movies and readings, and to come to class ready to participate in exercises, discuss case studies, complete assignments and immerse themselves in public health practice and research focused on sex, sexuality, and sexual health. The purpose of this graduate level course is to prepare health professionals for a professional career addressing community and population sexual health concerns by deepening their knowledge of and exposure to research practice in the field, increasing comfort familiarity and ability to speak on sexual health topics, and by practicing their skills. The assignments focus on hot topics in sex and sexual health, and are designed to increase knowledge of the field of sexual health, while developing skills in conceptualization, measurement, intervention design, and evaluation. Please note this course addresses the greatest challenges in sexual health facing our world, including such hot topics as the zika virus and HIV prevention, clergy sexual abuse, campus sexual climate, sexual harassment, LGBT health disparities, contraception, abortion, women's rights, teen sex, and unplanned pregnancy.
PUBH 6108 - Foundations of Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introduction to key principles and topics in global health including measures of global burden of disease, identification of key health problems around the world and the main determinants, health systems and international public health organizations. In addition, we will discuss cross-cutting and timely issues in health promotion, disease control programs, and operational research in international settings. Class exercises and discussions will focus on challenging global health problems, and strategies to address them. This course is required for those students enrolled in the School of Public Health Global Health Certificate program, and is also open to other qualified students (see Course Prerequisites). Examples of diseases and illustrations of global health problems in this class will include both infectious and non-infectious diseases and should be of interest to students in various programs.
PUBH 6131 - Working in Global Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to key issues in global health. Global burden of disease. Cultural issues/health. Nutrition. Infectious diseases. Environmental problems. Women/children. Prereq Grad student.
PUBH 6132 - Air, Water, and Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues related to providing adequate levels of clean air/water. Local water quantity/quality, air quality in developed/developing world, global air/water quality, policies meant to protect these resources.
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of globalization on social/sustainable development. Population, war, economics, urbanization, environment, water/sanitation, communicable/non-communicable conditions. New infectious/chronic diseases, food security/environmental health. prereq: Credit will not be granted if received for 6100 or 6365
PUBH 6154 - Climate Change and Global Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interconnected relationships between global climate change/human health. Develop computer models to predict climate change from natural/anthropogenic forces, predict human health outcomes as result of changing climate. prereq: Students must have elementary computer skills.
PUBH 6182 - Emerging Infectious Disease: Current Issues, Policies, and Controversies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Issues/controversies surrounding emerging infectious diseases. Framework for considering realistic/innovative policies. Bioterrorism, public health preparedness. Pandemic influenza preparedness, smallpox vaccination, antibiotic resistance. prereq: AHC student, instr consent
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their respective tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulations, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants, and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local governments, county and state health departments. This course provides a general basis for understanding American Indian public health and wellness. Central to this area of study, is an appreciation to understand the unique governmental relationship based on how the federal government relates to tribal nations as distinct sovereign political entities, not as a racial classification. The trust responsibility is a government to government relationship as established in the U.S. Constitution. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 574 federally recognized tribes, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations, and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. This is a required course for those seeking a certificate or minor. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health services and implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. While this course focuses on American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration, there are many parallels that can be made by students related to other governance structures from around the world. The lessons can help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors.
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities. The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional?s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services. The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6370 - Social Epidemiology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
How a society's social interactions, past and present, yield differential exposures and differences in health outcomes between persons who make up populations. New disease-specific risk factors. How well-known exposures emerge and are maintained by social system.
PUBH 6390 - Topics: Epidemiology
Credits: 0.5 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
New course offerings or topics of interest in epidemiology.
PUBH 6613 - Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles, programs, policies, and practices for identifying/meeting needs of children/youth with special health care needs in the United States. Epidemiology, historic/current legislation, organization/delivery. Readings, online discussions, written assignments. prereq: Graduate-level student in [AHC programs or education or social work or psychology]
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programs, services, and policies that affect women's health in the United States. Methodological issues in research. Emphasizes social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors. Measurement/interpretation of factors, how they translate into interventions, programs, and policies.
PUBH 6735 - Principles of Health Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 6735/PubH 6835.
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the policy environment that influences and shapes public health and the provision of health care services, to enhance understanding of the historical and political context of health policy, to develop strategies for analysis of health policy issues, and to communicate effectively in the policy environment. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for PubH 6835.
AFRO 5101 - Seminar: Introduction to Africa and the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative frameworks, related theories, and pivotal texts in study of Africa and African Diaspora.
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Shifting and contested meanings of "race" from the "Age of Conquest" to the present. Starting from the proposition that race is not a fixed or stable category of social thought or being, the seminar seeks to ascertain how and why Western ideas about race have changed.
AMIN 5409 - American Indian Women: Ethnographic and Ethnohistorical Perspectives (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3409/AmIn 5409
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical writings by/about American Indian women.
AMIN 8301 - Critical Indigenous Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course covers the "critical turn" in American Indian and Native or Indigenous Studies as evident in the emergence of three overlapping threads or intellectual/political genealogies: critiques of Indigeneity (the claims and conditions of nativeness to specific places), Indigenous Feminist (which foregrounds the salience of gender in indigenous critiques of power structures), and Indigenous Queer, sometimes labeled "Two-Spirit" (which foregrounds sexuality). What are the analytical, political and cultural backgrounds and what are their purchases for theory, critique, and practice? For interrogating academic and non-academic (including Indigenous) forms of inquiry and knowledge production and being in the world?
AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 5412/Chic 3412/GWSS 3515/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will examine the relationship between Western feminism and indigenous feminism as well as the interconnections between women of color feminism and indigenous feminism. In addition to exploring how indigenous feminists have theorized from 'the flesh' of their embodied experience of colonialism, the course will also consider how indigenous women are articulating decolonization and the embodiment of autonomy through scholarship, cultural revitalization, and activism.
GCC 5036 - Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Lands and Languages (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Languages and Place-Based Knowledge in the Face of Racism How has unequal distribution of power resulted in the decline in Indigenous language and the loss of societal connections to the land? How might we all, from different positionalities, revitalize our relationships to indigenous land and languages, in the face of racism and attempts to perpetuate colonization? In this course students will grapple with ideological roots of the ongoing decline in Indigenous language and place-based knowledge and how their decline has implications for all peoples. To understand the connections, students will participate in Indigenous language learning (Dakota and Ojibwe) as acts of cultural production. Discussion and reading will be supplemented with visits to local sites, for example, Medicine Gardens, Bell Museum, Gibbs Farm, and Bdote to directly interact with the land as pedagogy. Through the course themes, students will experience the interconnectedness of place-based knowledge, language and human identity, while also seeing the importance of understanding the lands on which one resides and the power of indigenous languages in re-imagining those relationships. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum (GCC) course.
GCC 5042 - Just Education: The Role of Higher Education in Disrupting Mass Incarceration (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world. We have just 5% of the world?s population, but 25% of its prisoners. Since 1970, the number of incarcerated persons in this country has increased by 700%. Of the 2.3 million people currently in prison or jail, however, just 6 percent have access to higher education. Indeed, contemporary higher education policy and infrastructure disregards incarcerated individuals as potential postsecondary students. Even as colleges and universities across the country champion diversity-driven and inclusivity-oriented mission statements, and look to create viable postsecondary pathways for systemically underserved students, only a handful include incarcerated and justice-impacted individuals in these efforts. The University of Minnesota is not currently among them. This course will explore the intersection of higher education and mass incarceration in the United States with a focus on the role of higher education in disrupting the collateral consequences of incarceration and justice involvement. In particular, we will examine the potential for the University of Minnesota to play a pivotal role in disrupting what we call the ?ripple effect? of incarceration and justice involvement on individuals and communities in Minnesota. Students will have an opportunity to tour local correctional facilities and both hear from and present to experts in the field, including formerly incarcerated people. In addition, students? ideas will directly inform a ?college in prisons? program that is being developed by Professors Moriearty and Shlafer, in collaboration with other University scholars and administrators, and the Minnesota Department of Corrections. In this way, students? work in this class and their projects will directly and meaningfully inform the real world and the development of the college in prisons program in ?real time.? As a teaching team with expertise in law, juvenile justice, criminal justice, child welfare, psychology, and public health, Professors Moriearty and Shlafer will highlight examples of successful interdisciplinary collaborations from their own research and practice experience. In addition, students will hear from guest lecturers from multiple disciplines and affiliations (including an Assistant Commissioner and educational expert at the Minnesota Department of Corrections and law, public heath, arts, information technology and sociology instructors from the University) and panels of stakeholders, policy-makers and formerly incarcerated/justice impacted individuals. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
LAW 6084 - Equal Protection and Civil Rights Acts
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will cover the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment and the three major civil rights acts passed in the 1960s to give content to that clause. The Choper casebook will be used for the equal protection clause and provide materials about the legislative histories and regulatory and statutory constructions of the major provisions of the 1964, 65, and 68 Civil Rights Acts.
LAW 6236 - Indian Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the evolution of Indian law from colonization onward as impacted by treaties, executive orders, congressional enactments, and the development of federal common law. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of one of the more particularized areas of the law, and acquire the necessary tools to become able practitioners within the field. The course will also focus upon the unique historical experience of the Midwest tribal nations.
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies of sex trafficking, housing, and youth work to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
PA 5890 - Topics in Foreign Policy and International Affairs
Credits: 0.5 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected topics.
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Policy analysis/other applied social sciences as tools for measuring/detecting discrimination in market/nonmarket contexts. Application of modern tools of labor econometrics/race relations research to specific problems of market/nonmarket discrimination.
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 6831/Psy 8210
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Scientific foundations for and legal implications of implicit (vs explicit) racial or gender bias in four socio-legal domains: criminal law, affirmative action, employment discrimination, and legislative redistricting. prereq: 2nd or 3rd yr law student or PhD student in social science doctoral program
PUBH 6241 - American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their respective tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulations, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants, and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local governments, county and state health departments. This course provides a general basis for understanding American Indian public health and wellness. Central to this area of study, is an appreciation to understand the unique governmental relationship based on how the federal government relates to tribal nations as distinct sovereign political entities, not as a racial classification. The trust responsibility is a government to government relationship as established in the U.S. Constitution. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 574 federally recognized tribes, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations, and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. This is a required course for those seeking a certificate or minor. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health services and implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians. While this course focuses on American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration, there are many parallels that can be made by students related to other governance structures from around the world. The lessons can help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors.
PUBH 6242 - Cultural Humility with American Indian Populations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities. The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional?s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services. The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
SOC 8290 - Topics in Race, Class, Gender and other forms of Durable Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Comparative perspectives on racial inequality; race, class, and gender; quantitative research on gender stratification; stratification in post-communist societies; institutional change and stratification systems; industrialization and stratification. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ANTH 8002 - Ethnography: Contemporary Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts/perspectives in anthropology. Emphasizes American cultural anthropology. Rrecent work in semiotic, psychological, and feminist anthropology.
LAW 6867 - Practice Ready International Legal Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Manual and on-line research techniques for public international law sources (e.g., treaties, decisions of international tribunals, materials issued by international organizations such as the EU), private international law sources from foreign countries, as well as research on selected topics of international interest such as GATT/trade law, human rights, environmental law, and intellectual property.
OLPD 5056 - Case Studies for Policy Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to knowledge and skills appropriate for the conduct of rigorous case study research in educational, organizational, and other social settings. Underlying purposes and assumptions of case study methods will be examined as well as a variety of methodological approaches. The course focuses on the use of qualitative and mixed-methods approaches as these are the predominant strategies employed in contemporary case study research. Accordingly, it emphasizes links between research purposes, the conceptualization of case study projects, and the development of researchable questions. It also takes up a variety of ethical and political issues related to working with participants during the research process, as well as contemporary trustworthiness criteria for case study reports. The bulk of the course is given to training in observation, generating field notes, interviewing, collecting material cultural artifacts, using surveys, and analyzing, interpreting, and writing up case study data. The first segment of the course focuses on a critical discussion of research paradigms and epistemological assumptions of a variety of case study approaches. Students choose and critique a published case study from their field of interest. The second part of the course is devoted to a very small scale case study project which students design and carry out themselves. This project is supported by relevant readings and in-class activities (including peer review) related to the actual conduct of case study research.
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to knowledge and skills appropriate for the conduct of ethnographic research. Underlying purposes, assumptions, and distinctive characteristics of ethnographic methods will be examined as well as appropriate exemplars. Accordingly, the course emphasizes links between research purposes, the conceptualization of ethnographic projects and the development of researchable questions. The course also takes up a variety of ethical and political issues related to working with participants during the research process, as well as contemporary trustworthiness criteria for ethnographic written accounts. The bulk of the course is given to training in observation, generating field notes, developing interview questions, interviewing, collecting material cultural artifacts, using surveys, and analyzing, interpreting, and writing up ethnographic data. The first part of the course focuses on a critical discussion of ethnographic research purposes, epistemological assumptions, and essential features. Students choose and explore a published ethnographic study from their field of interest. The second part of the course is devoted to a very small scale ethnographic project which students design and carry out themselves. This project is supported by relevant readings and in-class activities (including peer review) related to the actual conduct of ethnographic research.
PA 5031 - Statistics for Public Affairs
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
PA 5032 - Applied Regression
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
PA 5044 - Applied Regression, Accelerated
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but uses more mathematical notation/delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: [5031 or equiv} or instr consent
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PA 5301/Soc 5511
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5426 - Community-Engaged Research and Policy with Marginalized Groups
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Marginalized populations tend to be viewed as objects of social policy, passive victims, or a cause of social problems. Processes of marginalization we will explore in this class include: structural racism, colonization, economic exclusion and exploitation, gender bias, and more. Policy and research are typically driven by mainstream/dominant society members with little direct knowledge about the real lives of people on the margins. This can lead to misguided actions, misunderstandings, paternalism, unintended negative consequences, and further marginalization and/or stigmatization. In this course, we will learn about community-engaged research methodologies such as participatory action research (PAR) and community-based participatory research (CPBR). We will use case studies of sex trafficking, housing, and youth work to explore the challenges, rewards, and ethical implications of these community-engaged approaches to research and policy-making. Instructors and students in the course will work together on a real-world research and policy challenge so that students contribute to ongoing work in the field in real-time.
PA 5929 - Data Visualization: Telling Stories with Numbers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Tools for communicating quantitative information in an intelligent, effective and persuasive way. Topics covered include 1) writing and speaking about data; 2) data management in Excel in order to prepare data for charting; 3) understanding and ability to deploy core concepts in of design, layout, typography and color to maximize the impact of their data visualizations 4) determining which types of statistical measures are most effective for each type of data and message; 5) determining which types of design to use for communicating quantitative information; and 6) designing graphs and tables that are intelligent and compelling for communicating quantitative information.
PA 5932 - Working with Data: Finding, Managing, and Using Data
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience with common issues that arise when using secondary data sets. After successful completion of the course, students should be able to: 1. Determine where to find data and information about data (metadata) for policy-related topics. 2. Repurpose, manipulate, and/or clean data collected by someone else or for a different purpose in order to answer questions. 3. Determine appropriate units of analysis, weights, data structure, and variables of interest in order to answer policy-related questions. 4. Document workflow to allow reproducibility and protect the confidentiality of the data. 5. Conduct basic data manipulation tasks (making tables) using existing software including Excel and Stata. 6. Learn how to find answers for questions through online support. This course will focus on Excel and Stata equally. Previous experience in Stata is preferred, but the course will include a brief introduction to relevant skills.
PA 5933 - Survey Methods: Designing Effective Questionnaires
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Applied (hands-on) introduction to survey questionnaire design. Student teams design a questionnaire for a real or imaginary client, typically a non-profit/NGO or governmental agency. For example, students may draft and revise questions about respondents? demographics and employment; life histories; knowledge, use, and opinions about services; and anxiety and well-being. The class will spend two weeks on each module, actively engaging in class about draft questions, and through that practice, learning how to improve them. Survey questions will be entered into SurveyToGo, an app used offline on Windows devices to collect data, and questionnaire will be tested on a small number of volunteers. Students will learn: - The process of questionnaire design in a team - Basic pitfalls of survey design ? names, definitions, examples. - How to use Excel to track questions, coded responses, and prompts for interviewers - How to use interviewing software SurveyToGo This class is not a substitute for a comprehensive survey research class or a statistical course on sampling and weighting.
PUBH 6243 - American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations. This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community. To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations. Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms that are tailored to specific community needs and interests.
PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Project-based class to develop systematic review skills for evidence-based practice. Draws from AHRQ and Cochrane systematic review methodology; supported by examples from the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center. Use for master?s thesis, dissertation, or to support research proposals. Prereq: research study design or epidemiology.
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This introductory course is intended for junior faculty, post-docs, graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. Topics will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR's relationship to cultural knowledge systems, and funding CBPR projects. This is NOT a methodology course. CBPR is an approach to conducting research that is amenable to a variety of research designs and methodologies and will NOT cover topics such as survey design, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, focus groups, community needs assessment procedures, etc.
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How to pose researchable policy questions, locate existing data, turn data into a usable format, understand data documentation, analyze data, communicate findings according to standards of the professional policy community. Quantitative issues. prereq: [Grad level research methods course, basic statistics course] or instr consent
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ethnographic practice involves two core activities: engaging people in their own space and time, and separating yourself enough from the fieldwork site to write about observations and experiences with some degree of analytical distance and theoretical sophistication. Ethnographers are always both participant and observer, although some of them -- often those who start off as insiders at a site from the beginning -- will be more practically or emotionally enmeshed in a fieldwork site than others. This seminar emphasizes both these core activities: students develop the practice of shuttling constantly between fieldwork site and writing field notes and analysis. Complementing the field work will be reading and discussion of classic and contemporary ethnographies. Each student will undertake his or her own fieldwork project, learning how to generate field notes that include rich description and coherent, flexible analysis. These projects should generate a useful body of qualitative data, as well as an intensive, hands-on experience of the design, research process, and analysis of ethnography. Prerequisites: graduate student, and completion of SOC 8801, or instructor consent.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve, and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering. pre-req: STAT 3032 or 3301 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Although not a formal prerequisite of this course, students are encouraged to have familiarity with linear algebra prior to enrolling. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.