Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Human Rights M.H.R.

Global Studies Department
Graduate School
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 301 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (612-624-3800; fax: 612-626-0002)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits: 45
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Human Rights
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The master's of human rights is a two-year interdisciplinary professional master's degree to prepare students to work in the field of human rights or to advance their knowledge and skills in the field. This degree equips graduate students with core professional and conceptual knowledge and analytical tools necessary to operate on the professional level in the field of human rights, along with the in-depth academic and professional training needed for the specific human rights area in which they practice or intend to practice. Students follow a core curriculum that includes the study of human rights norms and law, methodology, critical views of human rights, and human rights policy that will equip them with the skills needed to address the problems.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Complete application will include a University of Minnesota application, personal statement, resume or C.V., transcripts, GRE scores, TOEFL scores (if applicable), at least three letters of recommendation, and an optional diversity statement.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 100
    • Paper Based - Total Score: 600
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, TOEFL).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 45 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project: Students will participate in a three-credit capstone seminar rather than a thesis. The capstone seminar is one of the required core courses.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses toward program requirements is permitted under certain conditions with adviser approval.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 1 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
In addition to course requirements, a non-credit professional internship of 400 hours, supervised by the Human Rights Program, is required. Ideally, it will be completed during the summer after the first year. 4xxx-level courses are limited to language courses; other subjects allowed only with DGS approval.
Human Rights Core
PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors (3.0 cr)
PA 5886 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I (1.0 cr)
PA 5887 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II (1.0 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights (3.0 cr)
Professional Core
Minimum 12 credits
Quantitative
Higher-level options available for students with strong statistical background, with DGS approval.
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 5031 - Empirical Analysis I (4.0 cr)
· PA 5032 - Regression Analysis (2.0 cr)
· PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
· PA 5044 - Regression Analysis, Accelerated (2.0 cr)
· SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
Qualitative
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
· OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8852 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods: Ethnographic Practicum {Proposal} (3.0 cr)
Management
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 5011 - Management of Organizations (3.0 cr)
· PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (3.0 cr)
· PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
Policy and Economic Analysis
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis (1.5 cr)
· PA 5021 - Economics For Policy Analysis and Planning I (3.0 cr)
· PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
Capstone or Professional Paper
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop (3.0 cr)
· PA 8082 - Working Group (3.0 cr)
· PA 8921 - Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option) (1.0-3.0 cr)
Concentration and Electives
Concentration (12 credits) plus electives to bring total credits to 45.
Concentrations: Pre-Designed
Students complete 12 credits in a pre-designed or self-designed concentration. Pre-designed concentrations are listed below. Consult the program or adviser for courses which do not appear but which may be eligible with consent of adviser.
Human Rights, Race, and Ethnicity
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
· PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis (1.5 cr)
· PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· PA 5422 - Diversity and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
· PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination (4.0 cr)
· PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights, Gender, and Sexuality
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 8101 - Intellectual History of Feminism (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 8103 - Feminist Theories of Knowledge (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights (2.0 cr)
· PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6675 - Women's Health (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights in the Arts and Humanities
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ARTS 5710 - Advanced Photography (4.0 cr)
· ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5102 - Advanced Fiction Writing (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5106 - Advanced Literary Nonfiction Writing (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights, NGO Leadership, and Management Course
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations (3.0 cr)
· PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5108 - Board leadership development (1.0 cr)
· PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
· PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends (3.0 cr)
· PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena (1.5 cr)
· PA 5144 - Social Entrepreneurship (3.0 cr)
· PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
· PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
· PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
· PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations (1.5 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Project/Policy Evaluation
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PA 5311 - Program Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· PA 5103 - Leadership and Change in an Innovation Society (3.0 cr)
· PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership Seminar (3.0 cr)
· PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs (3.0 cr)
· PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (2.0 cr)
· SW 8602 - Direct Practice Evaluation (2.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Development
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 5121 - Educational Reform in International Context (3.0 cr)
· PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
· PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation (3.0 cr)
· PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5503 - Economics of Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
· PA 5522 - International Development Policy, Families, and Health (3.0 cr)
· PA 5561 - Gender and International Development (3.0 cr)
· PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights, Conflict and International Security
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAW 6027 - Seminar: Law of Piracy, Security, and Maritime Spaces (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6889 - Laws of War (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6918 - Rule of Law (2.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: The Institutional Basis (3.0 cr)
· PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners (3.0 cr)
· PA 8821 - National Security Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 5885 - International Conflict and Security (3.0 cr)
· POL 5465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Migration
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South (3.0 cr)
· PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6027 - Seminar: Law of Piracy, Security, and Maritime Spaces (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6872 - Immigration Law (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights: Crime, Law, and Justice
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6893 - Seminar: Transitional Justice (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6918 - Rule of Law (2.0 cr)
· POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (3.0 cr)
· POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5170 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights, Trafficking, and Business Regulation [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Humanitarianism
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance (3.0 cr)
· PA 5801 - Global Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners (3.0 cr)
· PA 5824 - International Humanitarian Crisis Simulation (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Research Methods (Qualitative and/or Quantitative)
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· PA 5031 - Empirical Analysis I (4.0 cr)
· PA 5032 - Regression Analysis (2.0 cr)
· PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
· PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts (4.0 cr)
· PA 5044 - Regression Analysis, Accelerated (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews (1.0 cr)
· SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Area Studies (Latin America, Asia, Middle East, Africa, etc.)
The potential area studies courses offered at the University are vast. Students will work with their advisor to select at least 12 credits for an area studies concentration.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
-OR-
Human Rights and Public Health
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health (2.0 cr)
· PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy (3.0-4.0 cr)
· PUBH 6034 - Evaluation (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law (1.0 cr)
· PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6606 - Children's Health: Issues, Programs, and Policies (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6804 - Community Mental Health (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Human Rights and Environment
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6215 - Environmental Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6400 - International Environmental Law (2.0 cr)
· LAW 7012 - CL: Environment and Energy Law (3.0 cr)
· PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making (3.0 cr)
· PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5722 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5723 - Water Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy (3.0 cr)
· PA 5752 - Material-Energy Flows for a Sustainable Society (3.0 cr)
· PA 5721 - Energy and Environmental Policy (3.0 cr)
 
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PA 5885 - Human Rights Policy: Issues and Actors
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00864
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics of human rights issue emergence; relevant international, regional, and domestic norms; correlates of state repression; measurement of human rights abuse and remedies; human rights promotion by states, political parties, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, faith-based organizations, and providers of international development assistance.
PA 5886 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar I
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken before, PA 5887. prereq: First-year MHR
PA 5887 - Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar II
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Master of Human Rights Cohort Seminar is a required course for all first-year MHR students. The course is intended to create a cohort group and ensure that all MHR students have an opportunity to work together to explore current issues related to human rights practice, focusing on emerging events or crises, and debates over policy, practice, or theory and for direct contact with and networking particularly with counterparts in the Global South. This course is in a series with, and taken after, PA 5886.
LAW 6886 - International Human Rights Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of lawyers using procedures of the United Nations, Organization of American States, State Department, Congress, U.S. Courts, and nongovernmental organizations to address international human rights problems. Is there a law of international human rights? How is that law made, changed, and invoked? Problem method used.
GLOS 5403 - Human Rights Advocacy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01513
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical basis of human rights movement. Organizations, strategies, tactics, programs. Advocacy: fact-finding, documentation, campaigns, trial observations. Forensic science. Human rights education, medical/psychological treatment. Research project or background for case study. prereq: Grad student
SOC 8171 - Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives in Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will approach human rights issues from a variety of "disciplinary" perspectives, including history, the arts, law, the social sciences, and praxis. Empirical work in the social sciences will receive somewhat greater emphasis. One key focus will be the unique advantages (and disadvantages) of the different perspectives and fruitful ways to combine them to strengthen action that improves human rights situations in countries around the world, including the United States. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5031 - Empirical Analysis I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
PA 5032 - Regression Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met. prereq: [5031 or equiv] or instr consent
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PA 5044 - Regression Analysis, Accelerated
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but uses more mathematical notation/delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: [5031 or equiv} or instr consent
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 3011; College algebra or instr consent; Stat course recommended
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice in aspects of field methodology below the level of full field study; detailed reading; analysis of studies in anthropology and education for methodological content.
PA 5011 - Management of Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Challenges facing higher-level managers in public and nonprofit organizations in mixed economy and democratic republic. Distinctive features of public and nonprofit management, skills necessary for effective management, manager's role as creator of public value. Lectures, case discussions.
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
PA 5021 - Economics For Policy Analysis and Planning I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to tools useful for public policy. Intermediate microeconomics, macroeconomics, and concepts of international trade. prereq: [Econ 1101 or equiv] or instr consent
PA 5012 - The Politics of Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Stages of policy making from agenda setting to implementation. Role and behavior of political institutions, citizens, social movements, and interest groups. Concepts of political philosophy. Theories of state. Team taught, interdisciplinary course. Small discussion sections.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 8081 - Capstone Workshop
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project for external client on issue agreed upon by student, client, and instructor. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives from core courses. Written report with analysis and policy recommendations. Oral presentation. Topics vary by term. prereq: completion of core courses or instr consent
PA 8082 - Working Group
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates completion of research paper on current issue in public policy and management. Students apply interdisciplinary methods, approaches, and perspectives studied in core courses. Written report includes analysis of issue, policy recommendations. Concentration/topic vary term-to-term. prereq: completion of core courses, or instr consent
PA 8921 - Master's: Professional Paper (Individual Option)
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work under guidance of paper adviser and committee members to complete their Professional Paper (individual option). prereq: instr consent
AFRO 5866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/5866
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The "second reconstruction." Failure of Reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Post-1945 assault on white supremacy via courts/state, grass-roots southern movement in 1950s/1960s. Black struggle in north and west, emphasis on Black Power by new organizations/ideologies/leaders. Ascendancy of Reagan, conservative assault on movement.
AFRO 8202 - Seminar: Intellectual History of Race
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Shifting and contested meanings of "race" from the "Age of Conquest" to the present. Starting from the proposition that race is not a fixed or stable category of social thought or being, the seminar seeks to ascertain how and why Western ideas about race have changed.
AFRO 8554 - Seminar: Gender, Race, Nation, and Policy--Perspectives from Within the African Diaspora
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. domestic and foreign policies as they affect Africans and peoples of African descent in the diaspora. Intersections of gender, race, nation, and class. prereq: instr consent
PA 5002 - Introduction to Policy Analysis
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Process of public policy analysis from problem structuring to communication of findings. Commonly used analytical methods. Alternative models of analytical problem resolution.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5422 - Diversity and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Economics of diversity. Business/public administration cases for workplace diversity. Value of cultural competency in public/nonprofit organizations. Current policy debates on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and disability. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5421 - Racial Inequality and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical roots of racial inequality in American society. Contemporary economic consequences. Public policy responses to racial inequality. Emphasizes thinking/analysis that is critical of strategies offered for reducing racism and racial economic inequality. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
PA 8312 - Analysis of Discrimination
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Policy analysis/other applied social sciences as tools for measuring/detecting discrimination in market/nonmarket contexts. Application of modern tools of labor econometrics/race relations research to specific problems of market/nonmarket discrimination.
PSY 8210 - Law, Race, and Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01341
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Scientific foundations for and legal implications of implicit (vs explicit) racial or gender bias in four socio-legal domains: criminal law, affirmative action, employment discrimination, and legislative redistricting. prereq: 2nd or 3rd yr law student or PhD student in social science doctoral program
GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Third World and transnational feminisms. Interrogating the categories of "women," "feminism," and "Third World." Varieties of power/oppression that women have endured/resisted, including colonization, nationalism, globalization, and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
GWSS 8101 - Intellectual History of Feminism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major trends in feminist intellectual history from 14th century to the present, especially in the United States and Europe.
GWSS 8103 - Feminist Theories of Knowledge
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Interdisciplinary seminar. Feminist approaches to knowledge and to criticism of paradigms of knowledge operative in the disciplines. Feminist use of concepts of subjectivity, objectivity, and intersubjectivity. Feminist empiricism, standpoint theory, and contextualism. Postmodern and postcolonial theorizing.
LAW 6827 - Women's International Human Rights
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar addresses the history and legal context of women’s human rights; the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and its impact; gender and human rights in the international system; specific topics such as property and other economic rights, reproductive rights, and violence against women; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in making CEDAW work for women.
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
PUBH 6675 - Women's Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Programs, services, and policies that affect women's health in the United States. Methodological issues in research. Emphasizes social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors. Measurement/interpretation of factors, how they translate into interventions, programs, and policies.
ARTS 5710 - Advanced Photography
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design/implementation of individual advanced projects. Demonstrations, lectures, critique. Reading, writing, discussion of related articles/exhibitions. prereq: Two semesters of 3xxx photography or instr consent
ARTS 5760 - Experimental Film and Video
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02483 - ArtS 3760/ArtS 5760
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental approaches in producing digital video within a contemporary art context. Using digital media technologies in installation, performance, and interactive video art. Emphasizes expanding personal artistic development. Theoretical issues, critical/historical readings/writings in media arts. prereq: 3760
ENGW 5102 - Advanced Fiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing fiction.
ENGW 5106 - Advanced Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing literary nonfiction.
PA 5101 - Management and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, concepts, and real world examples of managerial challenges. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of funding environments, management of multiple constituencies. Types of nonprofits using economic/behavioral approaches. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources to improve culture/outcomes of nonprofit/public organizations. HR strategy, individual diversity, leadership, selection, training, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, future HR practices. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5108 - Board leadership development
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofit board governance. Governance models, roles/responsibilities, ethics/dynamics. Current research/concepts along with students' current board experiences to illuminate challenges/explore solutions that build board leadership competencies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5116 - Financing Public and Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
Typically offered: Every Spring
Financial resource management for public and nonprofit organizations. Short-term and long-term debt management, retirement financing, and endowment investing. Conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques applied to real-world problems. Financial management in context of national and regional economies. prereq: PA 5003; credit will not be granted if credit already received for: PA 5111
PA 5123 - Philanthropy in America: History, Practice, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theory/practice of philanthropy. Foundation/corporate/ individual giving. History/economic structure/dynamics. Models of philanthropy, components of grant making/seeking. Current debates, career options. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5137 - Project Management in the Public Arena
Credits: 1.5 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Project management and leadership strategies for implementing public policy, including new or revised government programs, public works, and regulations. Use of project management concepts, principles, and tools, including project definition, scoping, planning, scheduling (using the critical path method), budgeting, monitoring, staffing, and managing project teams. Application of "agile" and "extreme" project management in situations of complexity and uncertainty, including those due to the scrutiny and expectations of elected officials, the media, citizens, and other stakeholders.
PA 5144 - Social Entrepreneurship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to field of social entrepreneurship. Prepares current/future managers/leaders to create, develop, lead socially entrepreneurial organizations/initiatives. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5927 - Effective Grantwriting for Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Grantwriting skills, processes, problem,s and resources for nonprofit organizations. Researching and seeking grants. Communication with potential funders and generating financial support. Collaborating effectively with the organization and clients to create substantive, fundable proposals.
PA 5311 - Program Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Principal methods, primary applications of evaluation research as applied to policies/programs in health/human services, education, or the environment. Conducting evaluations. Becoming a critical consumer of studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5103 - Leadership and Change in an Innovation Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Models of change/leadership. How leaders can promote personal, organizational, and societal change. Case studies, action research. Framework for leadership/change in an innovation society. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5104 - Strategic Human Resource Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory/practice of developing, utilizing, and aligning human resources to improve culture/outcomes of nonprofit/public organizations. HR strategy, individual diversity, leadership, selection, training, compensation, classification, performance appraisal, future HR practices. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5105 - Integrative Leadership Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01753 - Mgmt 6402/PA 5105/OLPD 6402
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic concepts, practices, people, and organizations associated with integrative leadership. Case materials, related readings, presentations, and interactive discussion. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5145 - Civic Participation in Public Affairs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critique/learn various approaches to civic participation in defining/addressing public issues. Readings, cases, classroom discussion, facilitating/experiencing engagement techniques. Examine work of practitioner, design engagement process. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5251 - Strategic Planning and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations and networks. Strategic planning process, management systems; stakeholder analyses. Tools and techniques such as purpose expansions, SWOT analyses, oval mapping, portfolio analyses, and logic models.
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PUBH 6852 - Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Understanding an evaluation study. Program evaluation. Applications to health and mental health settings. emphasizes public health.
SW 8602 - Direct Practice Evaluation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Students design evaluations that incorporate current evaluation methods and principles derived from research, theory, practice wisdom, their own experience. Evaluation methods include single-system designs, client- focused evaluations, practitioner-focused evaluations, and use of event analyses, standardized instruments, self-constructed instruments. prereq: 8601 or equiv or instr consent
AFEE 5361 - World Development Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01778
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development in Third World countries. Examples of First World development problems. Population, health and disease, education, agriculture, industry, finance, politics, and human rights. prereq: Grad students only
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
OLPD 5104 - Strategies for International Development of Education Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Strategies for improving quality/efficiency of schooling in developing countries. Introduction to current research on what policy/programmatic interventions have proven most successful in increasing access, raising quality, and improving efficiency of education in developing countries. prereq: Grad student
OLPD 5107 - Gender, Education, and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of gender/gender relations in international development/education. Interdisciplinary body of literature from development studies, political science, economics, anthropology, cultural studies, gender/women's studies.
OLPD 5121 - Educational Reform in International Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Critical policy analysis of educational innovation and reform in selected countries. Use theoretical perspectives and a variety of policy analysis approaches to examine actual educational reforms and their implementation.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5405 - Public Policy Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, tools, and practice of the implementation of public policy, particularly in areas involving public, private, and nonprofit organizations. Analytical approach focuses on multiple levels in policy fields to pinpoint and assess implementation challenges and levers for improvement.
PA 5501 - Theories and Policies of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
What makes some countries wealthier than others, one group of people healthier and more educated than another? How does the behavior of rich nations affect poor nations? Origins of development thought, contemporary frameworks and policy debates. Economic, human, and sustainable development. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5503 - Economics of Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic growth, inequality, poverty, rural/urban labor markets, risk/insurance. Investments in human capital, credit markets, gender/household economics, governance/institutional issues. Microfinance, conditional cash transfers, labor/education policies. prereq: PA 5501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PA 5501
PA 5521 - Development Planning and Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of development planning/policy analysis at national, regional, and project levels. Effects of external shocks and government interventions on national/regional economies. Macroeconomic modeling, input-output analysis, social accounting matrices/multipliers, project evaluation. prereq: 5031 or equiv recommended or instr consent
PA 5522 - International Development Policy, Families, and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Implications of paid/unpaid labor for development policy, using household as prism. Legal/cultural use of property rights. Financial effects of ill health. Caregiving. Work-family conflict, policies that alleviate it. Role of gender. Qualitativequantitative methods. Readings, lectures, discussions. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5561 - Gender and International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Women and men are affected differently by development and participate differently in policy formulation and implementation. Gender-sensitive perspective. Historical, political context. Global South. Policy, practice, and experience (theory and measurement; international, national, local stakeholders; effects of policy and practice on development). prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5601 - Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the key concepts and tools necessary for gender policy analysis. Survey of the major findings in the field of gender and public policy in policy areas such as poverty alleviation, health, international security, environment and work-family reconciliation. Scope includes local, national, and global policy arenas as well as exploration of gender and the politics of policy formulation.
LAW 6027 - Seminar: Law of Piracy, Security, and Maritime Spaces
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine in particular the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
LAW 6889 - Laws of War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course focuses on two interrelated bodies of law: rules pertaining to the use of force in international law (known as the jus ad bellum) and rules regulating the conduct of hostilities under the laws of international and non-international armed conflict (known as international humanitarian law, the laws of armed conflict, or the jus in bello). The course will cover such issues as the “Just War” theory, its history and its relevance in the modern world; the general prohibition on the use of force under Article 2(4) of the UN Charter; use of force by the UN: collective security and law enforcement actions; individual and collective self-defense; humanitarian intervention; and nuclear weapons in international law. The course will also consider regulation of the means and methods of warfare focusing on the Geneva and Hague laws: the four Geneva conventions protecting the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians; the means and methods of war, including lawful and unlawful weapons and targets; the law of internal armed conflicts; and asymmetric warfare.
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will examine the concepts and core principles of the Rule of Law. Seminar sessions will be devoted to identifying the meaning of the terms “rule of law” and “independence of the judiciary.” The importance of a strong and independent legal profession to the rule of law will be discussed. Seminar sessions will focus on such issues as the problem of corruption and the rule of law, the relationship between human rights law and the rule of law, and the challenges of war crimes and genocide. The seminar will explore the relationship between the rule of law and economic development and alleviation of poverty. The seminar will include a discussion of the responsibility of lawyers to support and promote the rule of law within their own country and in other developing countries.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5813 - US Foreign Policy: The Institutional Basis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
The institutions that shape, influence and manage U.S. foreign policy including their origins and culture. Structure and function of key foreign policy institutions. Academic and policy critiques of the evolving institutional realities, including the State Department decision-making process; how institutions relate to one another, the changing role of institutions such as the Department of Defense, intelligence agencies, and the Department of Homeland Security in foreign policy. Assessment of the role played by Congress, the media, and the public, including non-governmental organizations and lobbying groups, as they seek to influence Executive Branch foreign policy institutions. Meetings virtually or in person with current or former Washington policy-makers who provide insights on real time issues and institutional realities.
PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of efforts by the international community—governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others—to respond to humanitarian, recovery and reconstruction challenges posed by civil conflict and complex emergencies. Disasters related to natural hazards, like storm surges and hurricanes. Issues and institutions related to humanitarian challenges and humanitarian suffering around the world including security, disaster response and human rights. The roles of the United States and international and non-governmental humanitarian organizations.
PA 8821 - National Security Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Politics and economics of national security policy. Defense policy, military strategy, and weapons procurement. While emphasis is on the United States, other countries also discussed.
POL 5885 - International Conflict and Security
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4885/5885
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Alternative theories of sources of militarized international conflict. Theories applied to past conflicts. Theories' relevance to present. prereq: grad student
POL 5465 - Democracy and Dictatorship in Southeast Asia (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02436
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Southeast Asia's increasingly important role in global political/economic affairs. U.S. involvement in region. Progress toward and resistance to democratic political systems. Economic development.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02142 - Soc 4411/Soc 4411H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
PA 5281 - Immigrants, Urban Planning and Policymaking in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, political, economic experiences of contemporary U.S. immigrants. Draws from sociology, economics, demography, political science, public affairs. Local government policies/plans. Cities/suburbs as contexts for immigrants. Interactions between immigrant communities/urban planners/policymakers. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5301 - Population Methods & Issues for the United States & Global South
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02021
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Basic demographic measures/methodology. Demographic transition, mortality, fertility. Perspectives on nonmarital fertility, marriage, divorce, cohabitation. Cultural differences in family structure, aging, migration, refugee movements, population policies. Discussion of readings. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00519 - PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PA 5452 - Immigration and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How to employ an analytical framework to analyze a current immigration policy proposal. Topics vary (e.g., president's guest worker proposal, democratic alternative proposals). prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
LAW 6027 - Seminar: Law of Piracy, Security, and Maritime Spaces
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine in particular the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).
LAW 6872 - Immigration Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course deals with the history of immigration to the United States, the role of the federal government in regulating immigration, visas for non-immigrants and immigrants, procedures and grounds for removal, asylum refugee status, citizenship, discrimination against aliens, the intersection between criminal law and immigration law, and ethical issues facing immigration lawyers. The course includes in-class lawyering skill exercises such as client interviewing and counseling, participating in an immigration court hearing, and legislative advocacy on immigration reform measures. These exercises are designed to train students in the skills necessary to become successful immigration lawyers.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the U.S.: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
LAW 6648 - International Criminal Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will cover developments in the prosecution of mass atrocity by international and hybrid criminal tribunals. It will discuss the history and development of the field of international criminal law from Nuremberg to the ICC; the sources of international criminal law; and jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of international crimes. The course will examine the elements of the international crimes of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and aggression. It will also analyze recent developments in international criminal justice, including victim participation, sentencing, and reparations.
LAW 6893 - Seminar: Transitional Justice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This seminar explores many of the real-life dilemmas negotiated around the world in countries emerging from dictatorship and conflict.
LAW 6918 - Rule of Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This seminar will examine the concepts and core principles of the Rule of Law. Seminar sessions will be devoted to identifying the meaning of the terms “rule of law” and “independence of the judiciary.” The importance of a strong and independent legal profession to the rule of law will be discussed. Seminar sessions will focus on such issues as the problem of corruption and the rule of law, the relationship between human rights law and the rule of law, and the challenges of war crimes and genocide. The seminar will explore the relationship between the rule of law and economic development and alleviation of poverty. The seminar will include a discussion of the responsibility of lawyers to support and promote the rule of law within their own country and in other developing countries.
POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02505
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Theory/practice of constitutionalism in different countries. Conceptual/normative inquiry between constitutionalism, rule of law, and democracy. Origins/role of constitutions. Relevance of courts with constitutional review powers: U.S., Germany, Japan, Hungary, Russia, South Africa, Nigeria.
POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02449
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How law and justice function in contemporary Latin America. Similarities/differences within/between countries and issue areas. Causes behind varied outcomes. Effectiveness of different reform efforts. Transitional justice, judicial review, judicial independence, access to justice, criminal justice (police, courts, and prisons), corruption, non-state alternatives. Issues of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice.
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law. Criminalization. Impact of interventions on memories and future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, and compensation programs.
SOC 5170 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights, Trafficking, and Business Regulation (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01339
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural values and practices in a globalized world. Role of international law. Immigration, terrorism, Americanization, and structure of international legal system.
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02142 - Soc 4411/Soc 4411H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
PA 5151 - Organizational Perspectives on Global Development & Humanitarian Assistance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Organizational analysis of international development and humanitarian assistance, including perspectives from sociology, political science, psychology, public administration, and management. Examines efforts of multiple organizational players, including NGOs, governments, bi-lateral and multi-lateral organizations, corporations, foundations, and international organizations. Critical analysis of aid organizations, especially regarding ways in which they reflect and create power and privilege, the manner in which individuals’ needs and desires interact with, support, or challenge the needs of the organization, and how all of this is influenced by forces outside the boundary of the organization. Students practice developing actionable recommendations to improve the effectiveness of international aid organizations in the context of multiple (and often contested) understandings of global development needs and conflicting stakeholder demands. Readings, class discussions, mini-lectures, simulations, case analyses, group projects, oral presentations, memo writing, opinion writing.
PA 5801 - Global Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Creation of rules, norms, institutions to regulate global activities. Policy making. How global policy making regulates interstate, national, transnational activities. Creation/enforcement of global rules. Applications to international security, political economy. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5823 - Managing Global Crises: Humanitarian & Human Rights Challenges for Policy Makers & Practitioners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of efforts by the international community—governments, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others—to respond to humanitarian, recovery and reconstruction challenges posed by civil conflict and complex emergencies. Disasters related to natural hazards, like storm surges and hurricanes. Issues and institutions related to humanitarian challenges and humanitarian suffering around the world including security, disaster response and human rights. The roles of the United States and international and non-governmental humanitarian organizations.
PA 5824 - International Humanitarian Crisis Simulation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students learn/practice humanitarian crisis response skills reflecting international standards through a multi-day, humanitarian dynamic crisis simulation. Includes training in international crisis response standards (SPHERE) and population assessment, WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) for refugee camps, nutrition, interactive shelter design/planning, the international legal basis for humanitarian response, safety and security issues, psychosocial trauma awareness, and field hospital scenarios. Composed of class meetings and an on-site sector skill training and field crisis simulation.
PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intersection of global health, relief, development, and roles/interaction of intergovernmental/governmental agencies and religious/non-religious NGOs in humanitarian response, development and social welfare generation supporting global health. Health, humanitarianism, culture, interagency relations. prereq: Public Health or grad student or instr consent
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice in aspects of field methodology below the level of full field study; detailed reading; analysis of studies in anthropology and education for methodological content.
PA 5031 - Empirical Analysis I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic statistical tools for empirical analysis of public policy alternatives. Frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, elementary probability/probability distributions, statistical inference. Estimation/hypothesis testing. Cross-tabulation/chi-square distribution. Analysis of variance, correlation. Simple/multiple regression analysis.
PA 5032 - Regression Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met. prereq: [5031 or equiv] or instr consent
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PA 5041 - Qualitative Methods for Policy Analysts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Qualitative analysis techniques, examples of application. Meet with researcher. Hands-on experience in designing, gathering, analyzing data.
PA 5044 - Regression Analysis, Accelerated
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models used in regression analysis, including assumptions behind them/problems that arise when assumptions are not met. Course covers similar topics as PA 5032 but uses more mathematical notation/delves deeper into theory/application of methods. prereq: [5031 or equiv} or instr consent
PUBH 6803 - Conducting a Systematic Literature Review
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing skills built on evidence-based practice. Draws on staff of Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center. prereq: Basic knowledge of epidemiology
PUBH 6845 - Using Demographic Data for Policy Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
How to pose researchable policy questions, locate existing data, turn data into a usable format, understand data documentation, analyze data, communicate findings according to standards of the professional policy community. Quantitative issues. prereq: [Grad level research methods course, basic statistics course] or instr consent
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This introductory course is intended for junior faculty, post-docs, graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. Topics will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR's relationship to cultural knowledge systems, and funding CBPR projects. This is NOT a methodology course. CBPR is an approach to conducting research that is amenable to a variety of research designs and methodologies and will NOT cover topics such as survey design, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, focus groups, community needs assessment procedures, etc.
PUBH 7250 - Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Interactive, intensive overview of focus group procedures for public/non-profit environments. Practical approaches to determining appropriate use of focus groups. Design options, developing questions, recruiting participants, moderating. Analyzing/reporting results.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 3011; College algebra or instr consent; Stat course recommended
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering.
BTHX 5520 - Social Justice and Bioethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course explores matters of social justice related to health. Readings from multiple disciplinary perspectives ground examination of how to understand social justice in this context. Class sessions will predominantly focus on specific practical issues such as health disparities, the politics of inclusion and exclusion in clinical research, resource allocation in resource poor settings, and health professional roles during war. Discussions incorporate consideration of these issues’ institutional and broader social contexts. This course is appropriate for a wide audience including students from the health professions, philosophy, social science, and law.
CSPH 5111 - Ways of Thinking about Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cultural contexts explored through field-trip immersion experiences. Aspects of different health care systems. Indigenous North American, Vedic, traditional Chinese, biomedicine. Writing assignment. prereq: [Jr, Sr, or grad student standing], instr consent
PA 5451 - Immigration, Health and Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00519 - PA 5451/PubH 5281
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How to access demographic, health, and background information on US immigrants. Characteristics and health needs of immigrants. Designing culturally competent health programs. How to advocate for needed policy changes to promote immigrant health and wellbeing. Community visits required. Online course.
PUBH 6034 - Evaluation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02013 - PubH 6034/PubH 6852
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing useful program evaluations. Emphasizes skills for program administrators, planners. Needs assessments. Assessment of program design, implementation, impact. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Ethical considerations.
PUBH 6115 - Worker Protection Law
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Role of government in protecting rights of citizens. Labor movement history as starting point for discussion of systems for protecting workers in unsafe workplaces and compensating them for injuries. Laws against class-based discrimination.
PUBH 6134 - Sustainable Development and Global Public Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of globalization on social/sustainable development. Population, war, economics, urbanization, environment, water/sanitation, communicable/non-communicable conditions. New infectious/chronic diseases, food security/environmental health. prereq: Credit will not be granted if received for 6100 or 6365
PUBH 6320 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides an understanding of basic methods and tools used by epidemiologists to study the health of populations.
PUBH 6606 - Children's Health: Issues, Programs, and Policies
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Overview of public health issues related to children in the United States. Focus on identifying and planning public health strategies, policies, and programs to improve health of infants and children.
PUBH 6634 - Children and Families: Public Health Policy and Advocacy
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will focus on how public policies at the federal, state and local level influence children's health. Students will develop practical skills to understand, analyze, communicate, and advocate on children’s policy issues. The course will include presentations and discussions with Minnesota's current leaders in children's health policy including legislators, advocates, and state commissioners. Instructor information: Lauren Gilchrist is the Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Mark Dayton. In this role, she works with commissioners, legislators, local government and stakeholders to advance health and human services policy issues for the state of Minnesota. She previously served as an advisor to the late Senator Ted Kennedy and Senator Al Franken.
PUBH 6801 - Health and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relationship of health and human rights in public health context. Philosophical frameworks/groundings. Nexus between health and human rights. Historical/contemporary topics. prereq: Grad student or professional student or instr consent
PUBH 6804 - Community Mental Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Social-psychological processes that shape experience of mental health/illness. Consequences of disorders for individuals, families, and communities. Epidemiology research, theories of mental health/illness. Effect of policies related to organizing/financing services.
PUBH 6807 - Global Health Relief, Development, and Religious and Non-Religious NGOs
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intersection of global health, relief, development, and roles/interaction of intergovernmental/governmental agencies and religious/non-religious NGOs in humanitarian response, development and social welfare generation supporting global health. Health, humanitarianism, culture, interagency relations. prereq: Public Health or grad student or instr consent
ESPM 5251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3251/5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use in developing countries. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Latin American case studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAW 6215 - Environmental Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Legal aspects of major environmental problems with emphasis on issues that appear in various regulatory contexts, such as the degree to which environmental quality should be protected; who should bear the cost of enhancing environmental quality; allocation of responsibilities among courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies; the role of citizens. groups; and environmental litigation.
LAW 6400 - International Environmental Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will examine issues of international environmental law. Although there is a limited body of older law, most of the topic has emerged during the past half century.
LAW 7012 - CL: Environment and Energy Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The Environmental Law Clinic is a client-driven course based on representation of nongovernmental organizations. This clinic will improve students' skills in analyzing problems in environmental law and policy, and allow them to work directly with advocates on environmental issues. This clinic engages in projects related to achieving environmental and energy sustainability through the management of land, water, and energy resources. Typically the clinic takes on two to four year-long projects that require the students to work in small groups with clients. Projects often include the following: (1) providing advice to local NGOs; (2) representation of NGOs before an administrative state body; (3) production of legal research reports; (4) support organizations participating in regulatory decision-making processes, such as the Public Utilities Commission; and (5) education or advocacy presentations to citizens and elected or appointed decision-makers. Client management skills and legal research methods are honed throughout the projects.
PA 5242 - Environmental Planning, Policy, and Decision Making
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory and practice. Ethical, legal, and institutional frameworks relative to a range of environmental issues. Innovative environmental decision making informed by collaboration, conflict resolution, adaptive management, and resilience thinking. prereq: Grad or instr consent
PA 5711 - Science, Technology & Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Interplay of science, technology, the environment, and society. Approaches from across the social sciences will cover how science and technology can create new environmental pressures as well as policy challenges in a range of spheres from climate change to systems of intellectual property and international development.
PA 5722 - Economics of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01860 - ApEc 5651/PA 5722
Typically offered: Every Spring
Public policy associated with natural resource use and environmental protection. Develops/applies economic concepts/methodologies/policy mechanisms. Principles of environmental/resource economics. Issues related to renewable/nonrenewable resources and environmental pollution. Focuses on scientific/political aspects of policy. prereq: [Intermediate microeconomics, intermediate policy analysis, grad student] or instr consent
PA 5723 - Water Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01827
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural, legal, economic, and environmental forces affecting supply/use of water by individuals, sectors, and governance institutions. Historical trends; water laws in United States and internationally. Institutional structures for managing water at federal, state, and local levels. Current water-related issues/policies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
PA 5724 - Climate Change Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Existing and proposed approaches to mitigate and adapt to climate change through policies that cross scales of governance (from local to global) and impact a wide range of sectors. Exploration of climate change policy from a variety of disciplinary approaches and perspectives, emphasizing economic logic, ethical principles, and institutional feasibility. How policy can be shaped in the face of a variety of competing interests to achieve commonly desired outcomes. Students develop a deep knowledge of climate change in particular countries through a team final project. prereq: Intro microecon (such as Econ 1101 or equiv)
PA 5752 - Material-Energy Flows for a Sustainable Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Material and energy flows in the context of: a) Economic and human development; b) Resource scarcity, renewability and recyclability; and c) As a source of environmental pollution. Inter-disciplinary approach, integrating core topics from environmental economics, industrial ecology, and human health risk assessment, in the context of public policy.
PA 5721 - Energy and Environmental Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Impact of energy production/consumption choices on environmental quality, sustainable development, and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public policy choices for energy/environment, linkages between them. prereq: Grad or instr consent