Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Linguistics B.A.

Linguistics, Institute of
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 34
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Linguistics is the scientific study of human language. Courses explore the principles governing the structure of natural languages, how languages are acquired by children and adults, the role of language in human cognition and social interaction, and how languages change over time.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Linguistics BA is LING. At least 15 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn a BA or a minor in linguistics, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Students completing an additional degree must complete the Capstone in each degree area.
Foundation Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· LING 3001H - Honors: Introduction to Linguistics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· LING 5001 - Introduction to Linguistics (4.0 cr)
Core Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
Syntax
Honors students may take LING 5201 in place of 4201.
· LING 4201 - Syntax I (3.0 cr)
or LING 5201 - Syntactic Theory I (3.0 cr)
· Phonology
Honors students may take LING 5302 in place of 4302W.
· LING 4302W - Phonology I [WI] (3.0 cr)
or LING 5302 - Phonological Theory I (3.0 cr)
· Semantics
· LING 5205 - Semantics (3.0 cr)
· Syntax II or Phonology II
Honors students may take LING 5202 or 5303 in place of 4202/4303.
· LING 4202 - Syntax II (3.0 cr)
or LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II (3.0 cr)
or LING 4303 - Phonology II (3.0 cr)
or LING 5303 - Phonological Theory II (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
Linguistics Courses
Take 11 - 15 credit(s) from the following:
Lower-division
Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· LING 1701 - Language and Society [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· LING 1705W - World Englishes: The Linguistics of English-based varieties around the globe [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· LING 1800 - Topics in Linguistics (1.0-4.0 cr)
· LING 19xx- Freshman Seminar
· Upper-division
Take 11 - 15 credit(s) from the following:
· LING 3051H - Honors: Thesis (3.0 cr)
· LING 3101W - Languages of the World [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LING 3900 - Topics in Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· LING 5105 - Field Methods in Linguistics I (4.0 cr)
· LING 5106 - Field Methods in Linguistics II (4.0 cr)
· LING 5206 - Linguistic Pragmatics (3.0 cr)
· LING 5207 - Advanced Semantics (3.0 cr)
· LING 5461 - Conversation Analysis (3.0 cr)
· LING 5462 - Field Research in Spoken Language (3.0 cr)
· LING 5801 - Introduction to Computational Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· LING 5900 - Topics in Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· LING 5993 - Directed Study (1.0-3.0 cr)
· LING 3601 - Historical Linguistics (3.0 cr)
or LING 5601 - Historical Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· LING 4202 - Syntax II (3.0 cr)
or LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II (3.0 cr)
· LING 4303 - Phonology II (3.0 cr)
or LING 5303 - Phonological Theory II (3.0 cr)
· Other Electives
As many as 6 credits from an allied discipline can count towards the Elective Requirement. This list is not exhaustive, courses not listed below must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.
Take 0 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3500 - Linguistic Analysis of French (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3521 - History of the French Language (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3541 - Oral Discourse of French (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3036 - Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Lands and Languages [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GER 5711 - History of the German Language I (3.0 cr)
· GER 5712 - History of the German Language II (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3231 - Philosophy and Language (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5211 - Modal Logic (4.0 cr)
· PSY 5054 - Psychology of Language (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science (3.0 cr)
· SLHS 3304 - Phonetics (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3701 - Structure of Spanish: Phonology and Phonetics (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3702 - Structure of Spanish: Morphology and Syntax (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3703 - Origins and History of Spanish and Portuguese (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3730 - Topics in Hispanic Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5711 - The Structure of Modern Spanish: Phonology (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5714 - Theoretical Foundations of Spanish Syntax (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5715 - The Structure of Modern Spanish: Semantics (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5716 - Structure of Modern Spanish: Pragmatics (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 5930 - Topics in Ibero-Romance Linguistics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3531 - Sociolinguistics of French [GP] (3.0 cr)
or FREN 5531 - Sociolinguistics of French (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (3.0 cr)
or LAT 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 4231 - Philosophy of Language (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 5231 - Philosophy of Language (3.0 cr)
Capstone
The capstone in Linguistics consists of a 15-25 page research paper. Students typically expand and revise work done in a previous course. The previous work could be a term paper, squib, group project, or in some cases an oral presentation. The topic should be approved by the course instructor before registration for the seminar. Students taking LING 4901W must complete the course with at least an S grade.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Linguistics BA capstone, and they do not need to replace the 3 credits.
· Capstone Seminar
· LING 4901W - Capstone Seminar in Linguistics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Honors Thesis
Students seeking honors in Linguistics should take LING 3052V to fulfill the Linguistics capstone. Note: LING 3051H is a prerequisite for LING 3052V. LING 3051H counts towards the elective requirement.
· LING 3052V - Honors: Thesis [WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· LING 3052V - Honors: Thesis [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LING 3101W - Languages of the World [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LING 4302W - Phonology I [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LING 4901W - Capstone Seminar in Linguistics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music [SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ability to acquire and use language is a biological trait of the human species. This capacity for language manifests itself as thousands of particular languages spoken around the world in communities large and small. But what is language? What does it mean for a human to ?know? a particular language? How do children acquire this knowledge? How do we use language to communicate? These are some of the important questions addressed by the field of linguistics, the scientific study of the human capacity for language in its physiological, cognitive, historical, and social manifestations. This course introduces some of the essential findings of linguistics: first and foremost, that all varieties of all languages are intricately structured at multiple distinct but related levels. Second, that this intricate structure can be described in terms that are not only precise, but which apply to all human languages. We will work to replicate some of these findings by deploying simple analytical methods on data from a variety of languages. These methods allow us to answer questions about the different structural components of language: phonology (how do speech sounds pattern?), morphology (what are possible words and how are they built?), and syntax (what is the hierarchical structure underlying sequences of words?). In all instances these methods require that we pay attention to basic notions of semantics, from which more complex conceptions of meaning will emerge. Having characterized language as an intricately-structured system of knowledge, we will then possess the tools to ask a number of additional questions about language and cognition. How does such complex knowledge play into the actual task of sentence production or comprehension? What do we know about the neural implementation of this knowledge in human brains? How does child language acquisition proceed, and what makes it so much more robust than language acquisition later in life? Do animals have languages of their own? Can they learn human languages? Finally, we will turn our attention to variation in language patterns observed over the passage of time, across geographical space, and within social systems. How and why do languages change over historical time? What can we know about languages spoken before the invention of writing? What distinctions exist between languages spoken in different places, and how can we tell whether similarities are due to genealogical relationships? How do new languages emerge? How do languages disappear? How does language use vary between individuals from the same place or the same community? How do socioeconomic class, ethnicity, and gender relate to the linguistic behavior of individuals? How does language policy affect educational outcomes? What about social cohesion and conflict? Although we will find that most of these questions lack definitive answers, we will develop an understanding of what it takes to ask them meaningfully and precisely. In particular, we will be able to eliminate false or misleading answers, especially when they fail to take into account the observable and describable properties of the human capacity for language.
LING 3001H - Honors: Introduction to Linguistics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific study of human language. Methods, questions, findings, and perspectives of modern linguistics. Components of the language system (phonetics/phonology, syntax, semantics/pragmatics); language acquisition; language and social variables; language and cognition; language change; language processing; language and public policy. prereq: Honors student or instr consent
LING 5001 - Introduction to Linguistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human language. Methods, questions, findings, and perspectives of modern linguistics. Components of the language system (phonetics/phonology, syntax, semantics/pragmatics); language acquisition; language and social variables; language and cognition; language change; language processing; language and public policy; language and cognition.
LING 4201 - Syntax I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4201/Ling 5201
Typically offered: Every Spring
How words are organized into phrases/sentences. Basic units of a sentence. How these units are structured. How languages may be the same, or different, in syntax. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 5201 - Syntactic Theory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4201/Ling 5201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues in current syntactic theory. prereq: 5001 or honors student or instr consent
LING 4302W - Phonology I (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4302W/Ling 5302
Typically offered: Every Spring
How sounds are organized/patterned in human languages. Foundation in phonological theory/problem-solving for advanced work in phonology and other fields in linguistics. Analyzing data, presenting written solutions. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 5302 - Phonological Theory I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4302W/Ling 5302
Typically offered: Every Fall
How sounds are organized/patterned in human languages. Phonological theory/problem-solving for advanced work in in linguistics. Analyzing data. Presenting written solutions to problem sets. prereq: 5001 or honors student or instructor consent. LING 5302 is directed towards honors students and graduate students.
LING 5205 - Semantics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of sentence meaning. Semantic properties. Relations such as analyticity, entailment, quantification, and genericity. Philosophical background, formal techniques of semantic analysis, how sentence meaning depends on word meaning, syntax, and context. The role of semantics in grammatical theory. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or instr consent
LING 4202 - Syntax II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4202/Ling 5202
Typically offered: Every Fall
Syntactic theory. Principles and Parameters (P&P) approach to grammar. Focuses on Minimalist Program (MP). prereq: 4201 or 5201
LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4202/Ling 5202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Modern syntactic theory. Syntactic phenomena in various languages. Syntactic argumentation, development of constraints on grammar formalisms. prereq: 5201 or instructor consent. LING 5201 is directed towards honors students and graduate students.
LING 4303 - Phonology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4303/Ling 5303
Typically offered: Every Fall
Continues work of LING 4302W with emphasis on critical reading of current phonological literature. Phonological phenomena in the context of new developments in the field. Optimality Theory and the phonology-morphology interface. prereq: Ling 4302W
LING 5303 - Phonological Theory II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4303/Ling 5303
Typically offered: Every Spring
Phonology of human languages. Reading papers in the literature. Doing research in phonology. prereq: 5302 or instr consent. LING 5303 is directed towards honors and graduate students.
LING 1701 - Language and Society (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Role of language in human social interaction; linguistic indicators of social status and attitudes; language and sex roles; linguistic ecology; language planning for multilingual communities; implications for education and public policy.
LING 1705W - World Englishes: The Linguistics of English-based varieties around the globe (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the linguistic questions that arise concerning the many varieties of English that are spoken around the globe. Our overarching concern will be what we can learn about humans and the human mind by studying the variation found across English varieties. Our investigation will focus on three primary threads of linguistic research: methods of data collection and analysis, tools of formal grammatical analysis, and critical analysis of sociopolitical contexts of language use. By approaching the global landscape of Englishes and English-based creoles in this way, we will tackle a number of questions, including: Who is a native speaker? What is a standard? What value judgments do people ascribe to different varieties of English? What sorts of (linguistic and extra-linguistic) relationships exist between different varieties of English and their speakers? What role does English play in an increasingly globalized world? How has its role changed over time and from place to place? Through this course, students will gain an understanding of how English is situated in the global linguistic landscape, an ability to critically read linguistics articles and other media relating to language use, experience in analyzing linguistic data to understand patterns and variation, and an ability to communicate their findings and analyses effectively.
LING 1800 - Topics in Linguistics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
LING 3051H - Honors: Thesis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Supervised planning and research for honors thesis to be completed in 3052. prereq: Linguistics honors candidate, instr consent
LING 3101W - Languages of the World (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of language families of the world. Classifying languages genetically/typologically. Historical relationships among languages. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 3900 - Topics in Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
LING 5105 - Field Methods in Linguistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 5105/Ling 8105
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on a core methodological tool in linguistics: working directly with native speakers of a language in order to gather information about that language. To gain practice and understanding in this broad methodological technique, we discuss practical fieldwork concerns, including: approaches to organization and record-keeping; techniques and pitfalls for conducting interviews; developing a good working relationship with native speaker consultants; ethical issues; and the relation between linguistic theory and language data. Each year, the course will tackle these issues in the context of a particular language of focus, working directly with a native speaker of that language in order to gain an understanding of the basic grammatical structure of the language. Students will learn to conduct interviews with the language consultant in class and will practice these techniques on their own as they pursue individual research projects through weekly interviews conducted outside of class. The course relies on knowledge of linguistic theory that students bring from syntax (LING 4201 or 5201) and phonology (LING 4302 or 5302) courses, but does not require any background knowledge of the language that we will investigate. Prerequisites: LING 4201 or 5201 and LING 4302W or 5302, or instructor consent
LING 5106 - Field Methods in Linguistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques for obtaining/analyzing linguistic data from unfamiliar languages through direct interaction with a native speaker. prereq: [5105, grad major] or instr consent
LING 5206 - Linguistic Pragmatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of linguistic phenomena in relation to beliefs and intentions of language users; speech act theory, conversational implicature, presupposition, information structure, relevance theory, discourse coherence. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or instr consent
LING 5207 - Advanced Semantics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, we will explore some semi-advanced to advanced topics in the field of natural language semantics. Broadly construed, natural language semanticists study how human beings process complexity in meaning in language, with the building blocks being how small units of meaning compose together to form larger and larger units, all of which are produced and understood in milliseconds. Building on the fundamental foundations of semantic theory learnt in Semantics, Advanced Semantics is geared towards providing expansive knowledge on several vital topics that current vibrant research in the field is concerned with. The array of topics include quantifier scope, definiteness and indefiniteness, plurals and mass/count nouns, attitude predicates and attitude ascription, event semantics, tense and aspect, modality and conditionals, questions, focus and alternative semantics, and imperatives. As we make our way through the critical last few decades of formal semantics through these vast and diverse topics, we will balance empirical coverage and formalism with development of intuition and methodology. Prerequisites: LING 5205 - Semantics I
LING 5461 - Conversation Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 5461/Ling 5461
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Discourse processes. Application of concepts through conversation analysis. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 5462 - Field Research in Spoken Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Comm 5462/Ling 5462
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Transcribing/analyzing talk and movement related to talk. Applying concepts to recorded conversations. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 5801 - Introduction to Computational Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Methods/issues in computer understanding of natural language. Programming languages, their linguistic applications. Lab projects. prereq: [4201 or 5201] or programming experience or instr consent
LING 5900 - Topics in Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
LING 5993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed study for Linguistics. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
LING 3601 - Historical Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3601/5601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical change in phonology, syntax, semantics, and lexicon. Linguistic reconstruction. Genetic relationship among languages. prereq: 3001 or instr consent
LING 5601 - Historical Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3601/5601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical change in phonology, syntax, semantics, and lexicon. Linguistic reconstruction. Genetic relationship among languages. prereq: 3001 or 3011H or 5001
LING 4202 - Syntax II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4202/Ling 5202
Typically offered: Every Fall
Syntactic theory. Principles and Parameters (P&P) approach to grammar. Focuses on Minimalist Program (MP). prereq: 4201 or 5201
LING 5202 - Syntactic Theory II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4202/Ling 5202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Modern syntactic theory. Syntactic phenomena in various languages. Syntactic argumentation, development of constraints on grammar formalisms. prereq: 5201 or instructor consent. LING 5201 is directed towards honors students and graduate students.
LING 4303 - Phonology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4303/Ling 5303
Typically offered: Every Fall
Continues work of LING 4302W with emphasis on critical reading of current phonological literature. Phonological phenomena in the context of new developments in the field. Optimality Theory and the phonology-morphology interface. prereq: Ling 4302W
LING 5303 - Phonological Theory II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4303/Ling 5303
Typically offered: Every Spring
Phonology of human languages. Reading papers in the literature. Doing research in phonology. prereq: 5302 or instr consent. LING 5303 is directed towards honors and graduate students.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
CPSY 4345 - Language Development and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How do children acquire language? Learn about acquisition of phonology (the sound system of the language), semantics (the meaning of units in the language), syntax (the structure of sentences), morphology (the structure of words, phrases, and sentences), and pragmatics (language use). Study English learning along with the acquisition of other spoken and signed languages. prereq: CPSY 2301 / 3301 or equiv
FREN 3500 - Linguistic Analysis of French
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 3015
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduction to scientific study of French language. Concepts/terminology to describe nature/functioning of sounds, words, sentences/meaning, and variation. Taught in French. prereq: 3015
FREN 3521 - History of the French Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Origins/development of French language from Latin to contemporary French. Selected texts. Present stage/development. prereq: 3015, [3500 or Ling 3001 or instr consent]
FREN 3541 - Oral Discourse of French
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Contemporary French discourse. Spontaneous, multi-speaker discourse. Readings. Syntactic analysis. Phonological/lexical particularities. Macro level analyses. Discourse analysis/conversation analysis. prereq: 3015, [3500 or Ling 3001 or instr consent]
GCC 3036 - Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Lands and Languages (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seeking Connection through Decolonization: The Power of Indigenous Languages and Place-Based Knowledge in the Face of Racism How has unequal distribution of power resulted in the decline in Indigenous language and the loss of societal connections to the land? How might we all, from different positionalities, revitalize our relationships to indigenous land and languages, in the face of racism and attempts to perpetuate colonization? In this course students will grapple with ideological roots of the ongoing decline in Indigenous language and place-based knowledge and how their decline has implications for all peoples. To understand the connections, students will participate in Indigenous language learning (Dakota and Ojibwe) as acts of cultural production. Discussion and reading will be supplemented with visits to local sites, for example, Medicine Gardens, Bell Museum, Gibbs Farm, and Bdote to directly interact with the land as pedagogy. Through the course themes, students will experience the interconnectedness of place-based knowledge, language and human identity, while also seeing the importance of understanding the lands on which one resides and the power of indigenous languages in re-imagining those relationships.
GER 5711 - History of the German Language I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Historical development of German, from beginnings to 1450. prereq: 3011
GER 5712 - History of the German Language II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Historical development of German from 1450 to 2000. prereq: 5711
PHIL 3231 - Philosophy and Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Philosophical issues concerning the nature and use of human language.
PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Symbolization of natural-language sentences and arguments. Development of deductive systems for first-order logic. Metatheoretic proofs and methods, including proof by mathematical induction and proof of consistency and completeness. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Elements of set theory, including the concepts of enumerability and nonenumerability. Turing machines and recursive functions; the results of Church, Godel, and Tarski and the philosophical significance of those results. prereq: 5201 or instr consent
PHIL 5211 - Modal Logic
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Axiomatic and semantic treatment of propositional and predicate modal logics; problems of interpreting modal languages. prereq: 5201 or instr consent
PSY 5054 - Psychology of Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories/experimental evidence in past/present conceptions of psychology of language. prereq: Grad or [[jr or sr], [3011 or 3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or instr consent
SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of typical language development, major theoretical perspectives about development, and analyses of children's language.
SLHS 3304 - Phonetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Phonetic transcription of speech produced by children and adults who speak a variety of the world's languages. Extensive practice with transcription. Phonetic theory, including theories of phonetic variation over the lifespan and across the world's languages. A strong emphasis on developing fluency in phonetic transcription, and on appreciating the limits of this skill. Introduction to socially meaningful phonetic variation.
SPAN 3701 - Structure of Spanish: Phonology and Phonetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3701/Tldo 3236/Venz 3705
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of phonetics/phonology of modern Spanish. Regional/social variants of the language in Spain and Spanish America. Emphasizes improving Spanish pronunciation. prereq: A C- or better in Span 3107W or TLDO 3107W
SPAN 3702 - Structure of Spanish: Morphology and Syntax
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3702/3802
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Using linguistic concepts such as morpheme, flexional affix, noun phrase, subject, subordination, and coordination to identify different morphological/syntactic components of Spanish. prereq: A C- or better in SPAN 3107W or TLDO 3107W
SPAN 3703 - Origins and History of Spanish and Portuguese
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of Spanish from its Latin roots. Phonetic, morphological, syntactic, and sociolinguistic aspects of language variations over time. prereq: A Grade of C- or better in Span 3107W or TLDO 3107W
SPAN 3730 - Topics in Hispanic Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: SPAN 3107W or TLDO 3107W or VENZ 3107 or instr consent
SPAN 5701 - History of Ibero-Romance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Origins and developments of Ibero-Romance languages; evolution of Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 5711 - The Structure of Modern Spanish: Phonology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Formulating and evaluating a phonological description of Spanish. Approaches to problems in Spanish phonology within metrical, autosegmental, and lexical phonological theories. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 5714 - Theoretical Foundations of Spanish Syntax
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Linguistic types/processes that appear across languages. Grammatical relations, word order, transitivity, subordination, information structure, grammaticalization. How these are present in syntax of Spanish. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 5715 - The Structure of Modern Spanish: Semantics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Applying semantic theory to Spanish: conceptual organization and the structuring of experience; meaning and cultural values; semantic fields; categorization and prototypes; cognitive model theory; metaphor, metonymy, and mental imagery as source and change of meaning. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 5716 - Structure of Modern Spanish: Pragmatics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Concepts in current literature in Spanish pragmatics. Deixis, presupposition, conversational implicature, speech act theory, conversational structure. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
SPAN 5930 - Topics in Ibero-Romance Linguistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Problems in Hispanic linguistics; a variety of approaches and methods.
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
FREN 3531 - Sociolinguistics of French (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3531/5531
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Explores variation in the use of French associated with factors such as medium (oral/written), style (formal/informal), region, social and economic groups. Prerequisite: FREN 3015 or equivalent; strongly recommended: FREN 3500 or LING 3001.
FREN 5531 - Sociolinguistics of French
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3531/5531
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Explores variation in the use of French associated with factors such as medium (oral/written), style (formal/informal), region, social and economic groups. prereq: Graduate student status and advanced proficiency in French
GRK 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 5715/Lat 5715
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/comparative grammar of Greek and Latin from their Proto-Indo-European origins to classical norms.
LAT 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 5715/Lat 5715
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/comparative grammar of Greek and Latin from proto-Indo-European origins to classical norms. prereq: Two yrs college [Greek or Latin] or instr consent
PHIL 4231 - Philosophy of Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4231/Phil 5231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories of reference, linguistic truth, relation of language/thought, translation/synonymy. prereq: 1001 or 5201 or instr consent
PHIL 5231 - Philosophy of Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 4231/Phil 5231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories of reference, linguistic truth, relation of language/thought, translation/synonymy. prereq: 1001 or 5201 or instr consent
LING 4901W - Capstone Seminar in Linguistics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Revision/expansion of a paper completed for a linguistics course. prereq: Ling major, [jr or sr]
LING 3052V - Honors: Thesis (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Supervised research, writing, and revision for honors thesis begun in LING 3051H.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
LING 3052V - Honors: Thesis (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Supervised research, writing, and revision for honors thesis begun in LING 3051H.
LING 3101W - Languages of the World (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of language families of the world. Classifying languages genetically/typologically. Historical relationships among languages. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 4302W - Phonology I (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 4302W/Ling 5302
Typically offered: Every Spring
How sounds are organized/patterned in human languages. Foundation in phonological theory/problem-solving for advanced work in phonology and other fields in linguistics. Analyzing data, presenting written solutions. prereq: 3001 or 3001H or 5001 or instr consent
LING 4901W - Capstone Seminar in Linguistics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Revision/expansion of a paper completed for a linguistics course. prereq: Ling major, [jr or sr]
ANTH 3015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.
ANTH 5015W - Biology, Evolution, and Cultural Development of Language & Music (SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3015W/Anth 5015W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language is the most human form of behavior, and the investigation of the ways language and culture interact is one of the most important aspects of the study of human beings. The most fascinating problem in this study is how language itself may have evolved as the result of the interaction between biological and cultural development of the human species. In this course we will consider the development of the brain, the relationship between early hominins, including Neanderthals and Modern Humans, and such questions as the role of gossip and music in the development of language.