Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Creative Writing Minor

English Language & Literature
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits in this minor: 19 to 22
Students who minor in creative writing study the craft of writing and revision and the creation of imaginative literary work. They also practice close reading and discussion of published fiction, nonfiction, and/or poetry, including pre-twentieth-­century literature.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 4 credits before admission to the program.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introduction to Creative Writing
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGW 1101W - Introduction to Creative Writing [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
Minor Requirements
Coursework completed outside of the Department of English may be counted, but only with prior departmental approval. At least two minor courses must be completed at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. A given course may only count towards one minor requirement. Students may earn a bachelor of arts in English and a minor in creative writing, or a minor in English and a minor in creative writing. Students may not earn a BA in English and a minor in English. Only one course may count toward both the major and minor or toward both minors. Students are encouraged to take a minimum of two tiered workshops in their chosen genre (either as an introductory course, intermediate course, or advanced elective).
Introductory Courses
ENGW 1101W is a prerequisite to declaring the minor.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGW 1102 - Introduction to Fiction Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 1103 - Introduction to Poetry Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 1104 - Introduction to Literary Nonfiction Writing (3.0 cr)
Intermediate Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing (3.0 cr)
Historical Foundation Course
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3092 - The Original Walking Dead: Misbehaving Dead Bodies in the 19th Century [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3114 - Dreams and Dream Visions (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3116 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3133 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3134 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3627 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Only students pursuing both a BA in English and this minor should take ENGW 3960W. Students pursuing other majors should choose different electives from the list below. Please note: ENGW 3960W can be taken by department permission only and requires completion of 6 credits of ENGW courses and submission of a creative writing sample before registering.
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ENGW 3110 - Topics in Creative Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3960W - Capstone Seminar in Creative Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0 cr)
or ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing (3.0 cr)
· One of the following courses may also be used as an elective with instructor permission:
· ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing (4.0 cr)
or ENGW 5104 - Graduate Poetry Writing (4.0 cr)
or ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing (4.0 cr)
or ENGW 5310 - Reading as Writers (4.0 cr)
 
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ENGW 1101W - Introduction to Creative Writing (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing poetry/prose. Small group workshops, lectures by visiting writers. prereq: Students may not audit this course
ENGW 1102 - Introduction to Fiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Beginning instruction in art of fiction: characterization, plot, dialogue, and style. Writing exercises to generate ideas. Students read/discuss published fiction and their own writing.
ENGW 1103 - Introduction to Poetry Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Beginning instruction in art of poetry. Discussion of student poems and contemporary poetry. Ideas for generating material. Writing exercises in/out of class.
ENGW 1104 - Introduction to Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Art of literary nonfiction. Discussion of student work and contemporary creative nonfiction. Ideas for generating material. Writing exercises. prereq: Students not allowed to audit this course
ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [EngW 1101 OR 1102 OR 1103 OR 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will provide a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Our focus will be on tracing the interactions between literature and wider British culture as well as on tracing the development of literary form during this period. You should leave this course being able to identify major literary trends and authors and link them to corresponding formal techniques and innovations. You should also have a sense of the major historical and political events, rulers, and social conditions in Britain at this time. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will leave this class familiar with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this wide-ranging survey of British and post-colonial literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, we will explore representative literary texts and genres from British Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and the postwar era. Besides analyzing the language, aesthetic features, and technical construction of these literary artifacts, we will examine our readings as reflections of and reactions to social upheavals like the Industrial Revolution, challenges to the traditional role of women, scientific discoveries that sparked religious doubt, and the First World War. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will familiarize yourself with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This writing-intensive course will survey the Anglophone literature of what would become the United States from the arrival of English settlers to the Civil War. We will define "literature" broadly to not only include fiction and poetry but also the sermon, the letter, the essay, the autobiography, and other non-fictional forms. Course topics will include the Puritan theology that cast such a long shadow over the American cultural imagination; the fraught literary construction in the Revolutionary era of a national identity under the influence of such Enlightenment ideals as reason, civility, cosmopolitanism, and sympathy; the Gothic doubts about democracy that attended the literature of the early republic; the rise in the mid-nineteenth century of a radical intellectual and social movement in Transcendentalism; the antebellum ideological struggles over such political issues as slavery, industrialism, women's rights, and Native American rights; and the self-conscious cultivation of a national literary aesthetic in the Romantic prose and poetry of the period later critics would come (controversially) to call "the American Renaissance."
ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Situated between three continents and at the intersection of numerous ethnic and national cultures, the Mediterranean is like no other place on earth. A place of diverse languages, religions, economies, governments, and ways of daily life, it serves as a microcosm for the world itself imagined as an integrated global system. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean with particular emphasis on the literatures it has produced over the last three millennia. As the protagonists of these epic poems, religious texts, and novels travel from one shore to another, they experience the Mediterranean as a place of violence, cultural accommodation, hope, ethnic and linguistic bewilderment, and endless moral challenge. This course will place as much emphasis on the region's history as its cultural productions. With that in mind, reading may include David Abulafia's The Great Sea in addition to The Odyssey, The Aeneid, the biblical books of Joshua and Acts, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata (an epic set during the first crusade), Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Antony and Cleopatra, Flaubert's Salammbo, Akli Tadjer's Les ANI du Tassali, A.b. Yehoshua's Mr. Mani, and Pamuk's The White Castle.
ENGL 3092 - The Original Walking Dead: Misbehaving Dead Bodies in the 19th Century (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination and analysis of 19th-century British literature about dead bodies, the science of death, burial practices and anxieties, and theories of the supernatural. This course includes fiction and poetry but also non-fiction, historical documents, and sensationalist media.
ENGL 3114 - Dreams and Dream Visions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduction to the literary genre known as the medieval English "dream vision" and to the historical and theoretical discussion of dreams. We concentrate on four late medieval dream visions: Langland's Piers Plowman; Chaucer's Book of Duchess and House of Fame; and the Gawain-Poet's Pearl.
ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literature of Jewish Bible ("Old Testament"). Narratives (Torah through Kings), prophets (including Isaiah), writings (including Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes). God's words/deeds as reported by editors/translators.
ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will introduce you to some of the best literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century in England. Think of this course as a challenge: how can you, as someone who will spend most of your life in the 21st century, learn to appreciate and learn from literature written in far different times and places? A lot depends on your willingness to empathize with ways of thinking and being that are quite different from your own and your comfort with believing that other ages were just as complicated and as interesting as the one you live in. Typical authors include Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Fielding, and Burney.
ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British literature written between 1780 and 1830. Concept of Romanticism. Effects of French Revolution on literary production. Role of romantic artist.
ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Novels, from early Republic, through Hawthorne, Melville, and Stowe, to writers at end of 19th century (e.g., Howells, Twain, James, Chopin, Crane). Development of a national literature. Tension between realism and romance. Changing role of women as writers and as fictional characters.
ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British novel during the century in which it became widely recognized as a major vehicle for cultural expression. Possible topics include the relation of novel to contemporary historical concerns: rise of British empire, developments in science, and changing roles for women; formal challenges of the novel; definition of realism.
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02549 - EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
RELS 3627 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02549 - EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01603 - EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is a sampling of Shakespeare’s corpus designed for English majors and minors and for other students who wish to study his works in depth. Our goal will be to view these works simultaneously as cultural artifacts of sixteenth and seventeenth-century England and as enduring classics of world literature that seem to transcend their cultural moment. To this end, we will apply various biographical, social, linguistic, generic, theatrical, political, and intellectual contexts to the plays. We will attempt to understand how these documents from early modern England have spoken so profoundly about the enduring mysteries of human experience from the moment of their inceptive genesis to the present day. English majors/minors must take this course A-F only grading basis.
ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01603 - EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Plays from all of Shakespeare's periods, including at least A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, the history plays, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello, and The Winter's Tale. prereq: Honors or instr consent
ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02494
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
MEST 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02494
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
ENGL 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
MEST 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073 - EngL 3102/MeSt 3102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909 - Afro 3597W/EngL 3597W
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGW 3110 - Topics in Creative Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104 or dept consent
ENGW 3960W - Capstone Seminar in Creative Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is devoted to the writing of the senior paper in creative writing. To graduate with a BA in English, students with an interest in creative writing may choose to produce a substantial manuscript of poetry, literary fiction, or literary nonfiction rather than an extended, scholarly essay. In this advanced creative writing workshop, students receive instruction on writing this manuscript from tenured and tenure-track faculty in English. Class sessions typically include in-class writing exercises, which are then expanded into more finished works of poetry or prose reviewed by the faculty and discussed in workshops by the students themselves. Writing exercises and assignments lead, at the end of the semester, to a finished, thoroughly revised manuscript of at least 2,500 words. Faculty teach students to produce a significant body of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction though discussions of method, craft, and development; instruction in specific writing techniques; workshopping and revising drafts; solving problems; and creating a coherent and elegant final product. While the subjects about which students write vary depending on student interest and faculty expertise, at least 50 percent of the course grade is determined by students’ writing performance. The senior seminar also functions as a capstone experience that fulfills many of the Student Learning Outcomes for the English major and the capstone course for those who are pursuing a Minor in Creative Writing. Prerequisites for Admission: Admission to ENGW 3960W requires: (1) English major status and completion of ENGL 3001W with a minimum grade of C-minus; (2) completion of at least six credits of creative writing courses, including one intermediate (ENGW 3xxx-level) or advanced creative writing workshop, preferably in the genre of the ENGW 3960W workshop to which you are applying; and (3) submission of a creative writing sample. Admission is by permission of the instructor. Priority will be given to students with senior status who have completed the majority of the major requirements, as well as to students who plan to graduate in the term they are requesting to take the senior seminar.
ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory workshop to screenwriting basics, including formatting, style and structure. In-class and take-home exercises will assist the students in learning techniques for developing engaging characters, writing concise description and vivid dialogue, and outlining a usable plot. prereq: One EngW or EngL 3xxx course, [permission number available in creative writing office]
ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [EngW 1101 OR 1102 OR 1103 OR 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing fiction.
ENGW 5104 - Graduate Poetry Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing poetry. Students will explore new poetic possibilities while studying contemporary poetry and poetics.
ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing literary nonfiction.
ENGW 5310 - Reading as Writers
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Special topics in reading fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry. Topics specified in Class Schedule.