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Duluth Campus

History B.A.

History, Political Science & International Studies
College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 38 to 74
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The history program provides students with analytical and communication skills that are vital for their future success and for that of our society. It empowers them to put those skills into practice through rigorous coursework and an array of optional internships in public and private sector jobs. History students' understanding of diverse cultures and the drama of human experience equips them to become effective global citizens. History students critically examine past decisions, look for patterns, and make decisions accordingly. These skills are sought after in business, law, public policy, government, education, non-profit organizations, museums, journalism, and the ministry. The history program offers students four tracks: Global History, Public History, History and Social Science, and Specialist History. > Global History introduces students to major world cultures and provides students with the skills to work critically with a diverse array of source materials in different media. > History and Social Science prepares students for civic-oriented careers such as law, public service, and international affairs. > Public History prepares students to adapt and apply skills in history to private and public audiences on the local, state, and national levels. > Specialist History is for students who want to customize their degree plan and who intend to pursue graduate work in history. All tracks require at least one section of HIST 4999. This course represents the culmination of students' progression through the major and enables them to put the acquired knowledge and skills into practice through the development of a capstone research project. It is recommended that students take HIST 4999 in their junior or senior year. Honors requirements: Students who complete the Specialist History track with an overall U of MN GPA of 3.0 and a History major GPA of 3.3 are eligible for program honors. Students who wish to apply for honors must complete the departmental honors form in the first semester of their senior year (see the program web page).
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program or its approved equivalent.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits completed in compliance with University of Minnesota Duluth academic policies with credit limits (e.g., Satisfactory/Non-Satisfactory Grading Policy, Credit for Prior Learning, etc).
  4. At least 30 semester credits must be earned through UMD, and 15 of the last 30 credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. At least half of upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits that satisfy major requirements (major requirements includes all courses required for the major, including courses in a subplan) through UMD.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. For certificate programs, at least 3 upper-division credits that satisfy requirements for the certificate must be taken through UMD. If the program does not require upper division credits students must take at least one course from the certificate program from UMD.
  8. The minimum cumulative University of Minnesota (UMN) GPA required for graduation is 2.00 and includes only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UMN GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major, minor, and certificate. No academic unit may impose a higher GPA standard to graduate.
  9. Diploma, transcripts, licensure, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
1. A second field of study (e.g. minor, major, degree) is required for this major. 2. Students are strongly encouraged to study abroad and/or study a second language. 3. Students are encouraged, in consultation with the department's internship coordinator, to participate in an internship, a learning experience either on or off campus that introduces them to practical applications or other methodological issues of history as a discipline.
Learning in Community (1 cr)
The Learning in Community requirement will be waived for transfer students with at least 30 credits taken post high school and for UMD students who started in a UMD program where this was not required. First-year students who have completed 30 PSEO credits may request a waiver to the studentís primary college.
UST 1000 - Learning in Community (1.0-2.0 cr)
or EHS 1000 - Into the World [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Core Requirement (4 cr)
Additional Seminars may be applied to a track with prior approval from the History Program Director.
HIST 4999 - Seminar (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Global History
Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120 Required credits within the major: 38 This track provides students with rigorous coursework on a diverse array of geographical, thematic, and chronological topics. It introduces students to major world cultures and provides the skills to work critically with a diverse array of source materials in different media. This track prepares students to succeed in an increasingly global society and market place in both public and private sector fields such as business, education, government, and law.
Foundations (33 cr)
Students must take classes from all six areas. Students take a minimum of 9 courses to reach the minimum 33 credits. To reach the credit total, courses may be taken from either optional elective area. Students may elect to satisfy this requirement by taking all courses at the 2-4xxx level. One course must be at the 3-4xxx level/3 credits. * Take at most 12 cr (0-3 courses) at the 1xxx level including AAAS 1102. * Take at least 13 cr (4-9 courses) at the 2-4xxx level.
Take 9 or more course(s) totaling 33 or more credit(s) from the following:
Ancient
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health [HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Africa
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3615 - Modern Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· East and Southeast Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689 (4.0 cr)
· The Americas
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1310 - Minnesota History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3310 - The American Revolution (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War [CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War (4.0 cr)
· West Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3720 - History of Iran (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3091 - Independent Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3097 - Internship in History (1.0-3.0 cr)
· HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3496 - International Field Work [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Complementary Elective
In order to enroll in some courses, students must have the prerequisite or receive permission to enroll from the instructor or department offering the course. Students should consult the catalog course description for any prerequisite information. At most 4 credits (0-1 course) at the 1xxx level may apply.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1101 - Introduction to Black Caribbean Studies [LE CAT] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1103 - Introduction to Africa [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1104 - Introduction to Black America [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3005 - Roots and Rebellion: Study Abroad in Jamaica [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3202 - African Story-Telling and Folklore (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3305 - African American Cinema (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present [LE CAT, LECD C, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Modern Culture [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3618 - Ancient Middle America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3624 - Archaeology of North America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3635 - Anthropology of Europe (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3638 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1303 - History of World Art I [LE CAT, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1304 - History of World Art II [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1305 - History of World Art III [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2380 - A Global History of Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2390 - US Art and Visual Culture in the 20th Century [LE CAT, LECD C, RACE JUST] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3110 - Art of the Ancient Americas (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3130 - Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3140 - Women in Art/Visual Culture in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3150 - Contemporary Global Exhibition (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3330 - Renaissance Art & Architecture: Europe 1300 - 1550 [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3331 - European Architecture and its Legacy [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3340 - Baroque and Rococo: European Art & Architecture 1550 - 1750 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3360 - Art and Social Change in Europe, Russia, and the United States (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3361 - Being and Becoming Modern: European Art 1855 - 1955 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3370 - Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Art and Visual Culture in the Cold War (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4105 - History of the American Deaf Community [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4110 - Deaf Culture (3.0 cr)
· CHIN 1399 - Language and Culture in China - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· CHIN 3042 - Aspects of Chinese Cultures: Interface between Traditions and Contemporary Values [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 4500 - History of Rhetoric (3.0 cr)
· DN 3611 - Dance History (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1535 - King Arthur in History, Literature, and Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2535 - The Bible in Literature, Art and History [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· FR 3550 - The History of Paris: Evolution and Revolution [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2040 - Berlin: Myth, Legend and Reality [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2041 - Berlin: Myth, Legend, Reality Study Abroad [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3601 - German Studies I: Knights to Nationalisms [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3602 - German Studies II: From the Rise of the Reich to the Fall of the Wall [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 2501 - History of American Media (3.0 cr)
· LGBT 3152 - History of the International Homosexual Rights Movement (1895 - present) [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· MST 1100 - Introduction to Museums (3.0 cr)
· MST 1200 - Introduction to Public History (3.0 cr)
· MU 3201 - Music History I (3.0 cr)
· MU 3202 - Music History II (3.0 cr)
· POL 1050 - International Relations [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451 - Theories of International Relations (4.0 cr)
· POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2550 - Globalization and Sustainability in Latin America [SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3042 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities in Latin America [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3044 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities of Spain [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3894 - Language and Culture in Spain - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· TH 1071 - Musical Theatre History [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4801 - History of the Theatre I [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4802 - History of the Theatre II (3.0 cr)
· WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· WS 3100 - Feminist Thought [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
History and Social Science
Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120 Required credits within the major: 61 The track prepares students for civic-oriented careers such as law, public service, and international affairs. Students who complete this track will complement in-depth training in the content and methods of History with introductory courses in anthropology, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology.
European History (4 cr)
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
American History (4 cr)
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
Anthropology (4 cr)
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology [LE CAT, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology [LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
Economics (3 cr)
ECON 1003 - Economics and Society [LE CAT, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro [LE CAT, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro [LE CAT, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
Geography (7 cr)
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 1414 - The Physical Geography [LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
American Government (3 cr)
POL 1011 - American Government and Politics [LE CAT6, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
Political Science (3 cr)
POL 1050 - International Relations [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
Psychology (4 cr)
PSY 1003 - General Psychology [LE CAT, SOC SCI] (4.0 cr)
Sociology (4 cr)
SOC 1101 - Introduction to Sociology [LE CAT, LECD C, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Foundations (20 cr)
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 20 or more credit(s) from the following:
United States
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 4 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 1310 - Minnesota History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health [HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3310 - The American Revolution (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War [CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War (4.0 cr)
· European
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 4 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689 (4.0 cr)
· Asian, African, Non-U.S. Non-European
Take 1 - 3 course(s) totaling 4 - 12 credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3615 - Modern Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3720 - History of Iran (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
Public History
Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120 Required credits within the major: 48 The program core offers introductory background and general training in public history. An internship offers additional specializations in historic preservation, exhibit design, and collection management. The curriculum provides students with in-depth knowledge in the traditional field of history; introduces students to the skills necessary to successfully undertake applied research; acquaints students with the different career options available in public history; offers students practical experience in public history; and exposes students to the professional and ethical dimensions of public history.
Public History (3 cr)
MST 1200 - Introduction to Public History (3.0 cr)
Required Experience (8 cr)
Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History (4.0 cr)
· JOUR 3401 - Digital Storytelling (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3496 - International Field Work [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
Internship (3 cr)
Take 3 credits.
HIST 3097 - Internship in History (1.0-3.0 cr)
Foundations (29 cr)
Students must take at least one course from each of the six areas. Students take a minimum of 8 courses to reach the minimum 29 credits. To reach the credit total, courses may be taken from either optional elective area. Students may elect to satisfy this requirement by taking all courses at the 2-4xxx level. One course must be at the 3-4xxx level/3 credits. * Take at most 12 cr (0-3 courses) at the 1xxx level including AAAS 1102. * Take at least 9 cr (3-5 courses) at the 2-4xxx level.
Take 8 or more course(s) totaling 29 or more credit(s) from the following:
Ancient
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health [HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Africa
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3615 - Modern Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· East and Southeast Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689 (4.0 cr)
· The Americas
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1310 - Minnesota History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3310 - The American Revolution (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War [CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War (4.0 cr)
· West Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3720 - History of Iran (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3091 - Independent Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3097 - Internship in History (1.0-3.0 cr)
· HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3496 - International Field Work [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Complementary Elective
In order to enroll in some courses, students must have the prerequisite or receive permission to enroll from the instructor or department offering the course. Students should consult the catalog course description for any prerequisite information. At most 4 credits (0-1 course) at the 1xxx level may apply.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1101 - Introduction to Black Caribbean Studies [LE CAT] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1103 - Introduction to Africa [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1104 - Introduction to Black America [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3005 - Roots and Rebellion: Study Abroad in Jamaica [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3202 - African Story-Telling and Folklore (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3305 - African American Cinema (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present [LE CAT, LECD C, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Modern Culture [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3618 - Ancient Middle America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3624 - Archaeology of North America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3635 - Anthropology of Europe (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3638 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1303 - History of World Art I [LE CAT, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1304 - History of World Art II [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1305 - History of World Art III [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2380 - A Global History of Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2390 - US Art and Visual Culture in the 20th Century [LE CAT, LECD C, RACE JUST] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3110 - Art of the Ancient Americas (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3130 - Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3140 - Women in Art/Visual Culture in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3150 - Contemporary Global Exhibition (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3330 - Renaissance Art & Architecture: Europe 1300 - 1550 [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3331 - European Architecture and its Legacy [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3340 - Baroque and Rococo: European Art & Architecture 1550 - 1750 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3360 - Art and Social Change in Europe, Russia, and the United States (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3361 - Being and Becoming Modern: European Art 1855 - 1955 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3370 - Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Art and Visual Culture in the Cold War (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4105 - History of the American Deaf Community [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4110 - Deaf Culture (3.0 cr)
· CHIN 1399 - Language and Culture in China - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· CHIN 3042 - Aspects of Chinese Cultures: Interface between Traditions and Contemporary Values [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 4500 - History of Rhetoric (3.0 cr)
· DN 3611 - Dance History (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1535 - King Arthur in History, Literature, and Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2535 - The Bible in Literature, Art and History [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· FR 3550 - The History of Paris: Evolution and Revolution [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2040 - Berlin: Myth, Legend and Reality [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2041 - Berlin: Myth, Legend, Reality Study Abroad [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3601 - German Studies I: Knights to Nationalisms [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3602 - German Studies II: From the Rise of the Reich to the Fall of the Wall [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 2501 - History of American Media (3.0 cr)
· LGBT 3152 - History of the International Homosexual Rights Movement (1895 - present) [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· MST 1100 - Introduction to Museums (3.0 cr)
· MU 3201 - Music History I (3.0 cr)
· MU 3202 - Music History II (3.0 cr)
· POL 1050 - International Relations [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451 - Theories of International Relations (4.0 cr)
· POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2550 - Globalization and Sustainability in Latin America [SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3042 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities in Latin America [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3044 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities of Spain [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3894 - Language and Culture in Spain - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· TH 1071 - Musical Theatre History [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4801 - History of the Theatre I [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4802 - History of the Theatre II (3.0 cr)
· WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· WS 3100 - Feminist Thought [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
Specialist History
Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120 Required credits within the major: 70 - 74 This track provides students both with a broad historical knowledge by requiring courses in each of the areas and with advanced knowledge of a specific theme or area through the creation of a specialized plan of at least five courses in history and related disciplines. The track culminates with the completion of an original research project in an independent study or second seminar course. Students will also demonstrate competency in a world language. Students who wish to declare this track may apply after completing at least 16 History credits with a minimum U of MN GPA of 3.0 and a History major GPA of 3.3 (see the program web page). The application includes: > A statement of purpose that identifies the field in which the student intends to specialize, lists at least five courses the student has or will take that are directly relevant to this specialist field, and proposes a topic for the research project they intend to complete to fulfill their final project or second seminar. > Approval of at least two History faculty advisors. > An APAS report showing the GPA and History credit requirements.
World Language Foundations (12 - 16 cr)
Students must complete a world language through at least the last intermediate-level course. Native and heritage speakers as well as students with previous language study may be exempt. The History Program Director reviews exemptions. For placement, students may contact the World Languages and Cultures Department or the Deaf Studies Program.
American Sign Language
ASL 2001 - Beginning American Sign Language I [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
ASL 2002 - Beginning American Sign Language II [LE CAT3, LECD CAT03, COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
ASL 3003 - Intermediate American Sign Language I [COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
ASL 3004 - Intermediate American Sign Language II [COMM & LAN] (3.0 cr)
or Chinese
CHIN 1101 - Beginning Chinese I: Mandarin Chinese [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
CHIN 1102 - Beginning Chinese II: Mandarin Chinese [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
CHIN 1201 - Intermediate Chinese I: Mandarin Chinese [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
CHIN 1202 - Intermediate Chinese II: Mandarin Chinese [LE CAT3, LEIP CAT03, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
or French
FR 1101 - Beginning French I [LE CAT3, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
FR 1102 - Beginning French II [LE CAT3, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
FR 1201 - Intermediate French I [LE CAT3, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
FR 1202 - Intermediate French II [LE CAT3, LEIP CAT03, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
or German
GER 1101 - Beginning German I [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
GER 1102 - Beginning German II [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
GER 1201 - Intermediate German I [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
GER 1202 - Intermediate German II [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
or Spanish
SPAN 1101 - Beginning Spanish I [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 1102 - Beginning Spanish II [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 1201 - Intermediate Spanish I [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
SPAN 1202 - Intermediate Spanish II [LE CAT, COMM & LAN] (4.0 cr)
Final Project (4 cr)
This track requires an additional seminar or independent study course that focuses on a specialized project developed with a faculty member. Students who take HIST 3091 must register for 4 credits when enrolling in the course to satisfy this requirement.
HIST 3091 - Independent Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
or HIST 4999 - Seminar (4.0 cr)
Foundations (49 cr)
Students must take classes from all six areas. Students take a minimum of 13 courses to reach the minimum 49 credits. To reach the credit total, courses may be taken from either optional elective area. Students may elect to satisfy this requirement by taking all courses at the 2-4xxx level. One course must be at the 3-4xxx level/3 credits. * Take at most 16 cr (0-4 courses) at the 1xxx level including AAAS 1102. * Take at least 25 cr (7-13 courses) at the 2-4xxx level.
Take 13 or more course(s) totaling 49 or more credit(s) from the following:
Ancient
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health [HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Africa
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History [LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3615 - Modern Africa (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· East and Southeast Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3463 - History of Modern China (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned) (4.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689 (4.0 cr)
· The Americas
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present [LE CAT7, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 1310 - Minnesota History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3310 - The American Revolution (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War [CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898 (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War (4.0 cr)
· West Asia
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam [LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3720 - History of Iran (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Electives
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· HIST 3091 - Independent Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned) (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3097 - Internship in History (1.0-3.0 cr)
· HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History (4.0 cr)
or HIST 3496 - International Field Work [GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· Optional Complementary Elective
In order to enroll in some courses, students must have the prerequisite or receive permission to enroll from the instructor or department offering the course. Students should consult the catalog course description for any prerequisite information. At most 4 credits (0-1 course) at the 1xxx level may apply.
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· AAAS 1101 - Introduction to Black Caribbean Studies [LE CAT] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1103 - Introduction to Africa [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 1104 - Introduction to Black America [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3005 - Roots and Rebellion: Study Abroad in Jamaica [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3202 - African Story-Telling and Folklore (3.0 cr)
· AAAS 3305 - African American Cinema (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 [LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present [LE CAT, LECD C, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Modern Culture [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3618 - Ancient Middle America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3624 - Archaeology of North America (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3635 - Anthropology of Europe (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3638 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1303 - History of World Art I [LE CAT, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1304 - History of World Art II [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 1305 - History of World Art III [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2380 - A Global History of Contemporary Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 2390 - US Art and Visual Culture in the 20th Century [LE CAT, LECD C, RACE JUST] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3110 - Art of the Ancient Americas (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3130 - Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3140 - Women in Art/Visual Culture in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3150 - Contemporary Global Exhibition (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3330 - Renaissance Art & Architecture: Europe 1300 - 1550 [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3331 - European Architecture and its Legacy [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3340 - Baroque and Rococo: European Art & Architecture 1550 - 1750 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3360 - Art and Social Change in Europe, Russia, and the United States (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3361 - Being and Becoming Modern: European Art 1855 - 1955 (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3370 - Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Art and Visual Culture in the Cold War (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4105 - History of the American Deaf Community [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· ASL 4110 - Deaf Culture (3.0 cr)
· CHIN 1399 - Language and Culture in China - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· CHIN 3042 - Aspects of Chinese Cultures: Interface between Traditions and Contemporary Values [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 4500 - History of Rhetoric (3.0 cr)
· DN 3611 - Dance History (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1535 - King Arthur in History, Literature, and Art [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2535 - The Bible in Literature, Art and History [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· FR 3550 - The History of Paris: Evolution and Revolution [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World [SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2040 - Berlin: Myth, Legend and Reality [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· GER 2041 - Berlin: Myth, Legend, Reality Study Abroad [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3601 - German Studies I: Knights to Nationalisms [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GER 3602 - German Studies II: From the Rise of the Reich to the Fall of the Wall [HUMANITIES] (4.0 cr)
· GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World [LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 2501 - History of American Media (3.0 cr)
· LGBT 3152 - History of the International Homosexual Rights Movement (1895 - present) [GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· MST 1100 - Introduction to Museums (3.0 cr)
· MST 1200 - Introduction to Public History (3.0 cr)
· MU 3201 - Music History I (3.0 cr)
· MU 3202 - Music History II (3.0 cr)
· POL 1050 - International Relations [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics [LE CAT, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
· POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451 - Theories of International Relations (4.0 cr)
· POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia (3.0 cr)
· POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 2550 - Globalization and Sustainability in Latin America [SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3042 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities in Latin America [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3044 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities of Spain [HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER] (4.0 cr)
· SPAN 3894 - Language and Culture in Spain - Study Abroad [GLOBAL PER] (6.0 cr)
· TH 1071 - Musical Theatre History [LE CAT, HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4801 - History of the Theatre I [HUMANITIES] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4802 - History of the Theatre II (3.0 cr)
· WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class [LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
· WS 3100 - Feminist Thought [HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY] (4.0 cr)
 
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View sample plan(s):
· Global History
· History and Social Science
· Public History
· Specialist History

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· History B.A.
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UST 1000 - Learning in Community
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
EHS 1000 - Into the World (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EHS 1000/UST 1000/ ES 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitates the transition into college learning and student life at UMD and the College of Education and Human Service Professions. Introduces the promise and peril of global challenges in the 21st century and relates these challenges to local communities. pre-req: 1st semester CEHSP student
ES 1000 - Global Cultural Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. This course explores the global cultural context of sustainability while facilitating the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Examine the topic of environmental sustainability through the context of global culture and affairs. Explore different cultural approaches to solving environmental issues, compare and contrast these approaches with those taken in the US. Investigate the concept of outsourcing with respect to the peoples and ecosystems that are impacted by the practice. pre-req: less than 30 credits earned
LING 1000 - Language and Culture in the U.S. What does it Mean to Speak American (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD while simultaneously fulfilling other core requirements. Examines the topic of Cultural Diversity in the U.S. through the context of language and dialect in American English. Explores the impact language has on the broad spectrum of American culture, and conversely, the ways in which various American cultures and their diverse heritages have influenced the many ways language is spoken in the United States. Investigates concepts of linguistic competency, perceptions and biases toward language, power structures manifested in language, and influences of class, race, ethnicity, and heritage on spoken language. pre-req: less than 30 credits
PSY 1100 - Living Your Best Life: Applying Positive Psychology (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course fulfills the UST 1000 requirement. Facilitate the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD; applications of positive psychology across cultures and positive behavior change; the examination of diverse perspectives in positive psychology; the promotion of student well-being, community and inclusivity, and time- and stress-management techniques. pre-req: less than 30 credits
HIST 4999 - Seminar
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 4999/HIST 5905
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced study and individual research on a selected historical topic or there; senior capstone course for history majors. pre-req: instructor consent
AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade (LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Genesis of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, survey of the Middle Passage along with historical formations of the slave trade. Examination of roles of the European powers and African nations with the creation of slave communities, identities, and cultures in the new world the political economy of the slave trade. Analysis of cultural and historical legacies of slavery, the abolitionist movement, and resistance to the abolitionist movement including modern day forms of slavery.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the civilizations and people of Africa and her Diaspora in the Americas generally, and people of African descent in the United States in particular. This course begins with continental Africa from prehistoric times. We will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern Africa states such as Ancient Egypt and Ethiopia, Ancient Ghana, Mali, Songhai. The course will continue to examine the tragedy of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the emergence of Africa's Diaspora throughout the Americas, and consider the tremendous contributions of people of African Descent in early American History, while considering the dynamics leading up to the American Civil War.
HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515
HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of African history not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Summer Even Year
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.
HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines Chinese history from the early 1300s, late Yuan dynasty through the early 20th century. The focus of the course will be the Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, cultural, and diplomatic history in both dynasties. It intends to teach students the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China since middle 1300s and the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China. Ming and Qing dynasties have many things in common, albeit the Ming was founded by a Han peasant and the Qing was created by a Manchu noble.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of East Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course surveys world history from the emergence and development of isolated settlements to the earliest trans-oceanic interactions in the sixteenth century. It will also introduce students to the various sources and analytic techniques historians use to reconstruct the pre-modern past. Major themes include the social, political, religious, and economic ramifications of intercultural exchange and conflict in the ancient and medieval periods.
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.
HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245
HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333
HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041
HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This course approaches the question of the history of Ireland by examining how history itself is written. Since its founding as an independent nation-state only a century ago, the Republic of Ireland has experienced an explosion of historical narratives, both official and unofficial. Each narrative has a distinct agenda, or "constructed image," of Ireland which its proponents believe is essential for the identity, or the self-awareness, fo the new state. Students will examine Irish historiography by focusing on the presentation of three ears common to Irish historical writing: 1) The Prehistoric/"Dreamtime," 2) Early Christian/Medieval, and 3) Modern/Revolution. By examining books, articles, images, and museum displays the students will critically evaluate the construction of various Irish identifies over the past century, and they will also evaluate the academic and popular criticism of these narratives which call for different approaches.
HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of Europe not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the turbulent history of Europe in the 20th century, particularly the causes, development, and consequences of the First and Second World Wars. It will explore the world wars as global phenomena and consider the ways in which these events have shaped contemporary geopolitics and the international world order. The course will address the political, military, cultural, economic and social transformations that characterized this period and influence our society today.
HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The murder of six million Jews as well as hundreds of thousands of other innocent civilians by the Nazi regime during World War II remains one of the most horrific massacres in human history. This course will examine the circumstances and causes that led to the Holocaust, the mechanisms through which the genocide was carried out, and the consequences and responses to the Holocaust. We will consider the perspectives of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, collaborators and resisters, as well as the meanings of these categories themselves. Moreover, this course frames the Holocaust within the broader history of ethnic cleansing and genocide, posing important questions about modernity and threats faced by minority populations in our world today.
HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The Romanov dynasty reigned in Russia for over 300 years and, despite the Romanovs' dramatic fall from power in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, was, by many criteria, one of the most successful dynasties in European history. This course will examine the economic, cultural, political and social transformations of the Russia Empire during the epoch of the Romanovs from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. We will study the accomplishments of the dominating political figures of the period, such as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, as well as the experiences of the diverse populations who lived across the wide expanse of the empire. In doing so, we will gain insight into the causes of the downfall of the imperial regime in 1917.
HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will cover the economic, political, social and cultural changes within the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. Topics to be covered include the Russo-Japanese War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russian Civil War, Russia's industrialization and collectivization of land, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the cold War, late Soviet culture, the collapse of the Soviet Union and Russian under Yeltsin and Putin. Throughout the semester, students will be working with a variety of primary and secondary sources in different media (textual materials, visual sources, and film). Thorough written and oral assignment, student will develop their critical reading, writing and speaking skills. Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2265 or 2365.
HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study aboard in Poland. This course focuses on the history, experience and memory of Jewish life in Poland. One of the focuses of the course will be the experience of discrimination and the history of the Holocaust in Poland. However, the course will also examine the ways in which both Poles and Jews contributed to and engaged in a rich cultural, social and economic life in communities across the region and, in some cases, continued to do so today. The course will consider the history and legacies of the co-existence, interdependence, entangle between Poles, Jews, and other minority populations in this diverse geographic space. We will also explore the contentious contemporary debates over the politics of commemoration of Holocaust sites and Jewish life in Poland today. Pre-req: minimum 30 credits, instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This course will introduce students to the history and memory of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe. Students will explore Jewish life in Hungary, Romania and Poland (including what is now Ukraine, Lithuania and Belarus) during the interwar period and the changes wrought by Nazi occupation. It will also consider the ways in which narratives about the Holocaust have been crafted across Eastern Europe in the decades since. This course emphasizes international engagement through virtual tours, story mapping, and guest lectures. pre-req: minimum 30 credits
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3940/Hist 3245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
HIST 1310 - Minnesota History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines Minnesota's history from the pre-historic and Native American periods through European discovery and American settlement to the present. Topics include: geographic aspects of Minnesota; Native American groups in Minnesota; European exploration and the fur trade; initial American settlement; statehood; the Dakota conflict; the Civil War; the connection between Minnesotans and the natural environment; the Progressive Era and the 1920's; the Depression and World War II; and the state's economic, cultural, and political history since 1945.
HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of colonial Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-contact civilization of the Americas to independence in the early 19th century. Specific topics that will be studies include the pre-contact native societies, the wars of conquest; the ecological, cultural and economic effects of contact among Europeans, Africans, and indigenous inhabitants of the Americas; the role of missionaries the birth of syncretic religious systems (such as Condoble, Voodoo, and Santeria); colonial political structures; and labor systems including slavery.
HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health (HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is unique in its joint appeal to students of history and student of biology, as well students from other related fields in the humanities and the sciences. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research linking the study of early American history, American Indian history, the history of American ecology, modern nutritional science, and the development of immunity to disease. Students will be required to understand the ways in which published scientific data and research can inform historical case studies of the encounter between colonial Americans, American Indians, and European from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and vice versa. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates on the relationship between nutritional science and human immunity, using the to understand the history of colonial American and American Indian health, farming, hunting, and ecology following European contact. These histories, in turn, will illuminate their reading of scientific papers and research.
HIST 3310 - The American Revolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories.
HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3313/FORS 3313
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Taught abroad. Surfing is one of the world's most popular cultural phenomena. Students will explore the intersections of surfing, war, and tourism, addressing how a pastime commonly associated with mindless pleasure has in fact been implicated in some of the major global developments of the last two-hundred years. These include empire-building and the "civilizing mission" in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Hawaii's, modernization and economic development in the so-called Third World, the growth of international tourism following the Second World War, political mass movements and the anti-apartheid struggle, American foreign relations and Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the surf industry and corporate globalization. As a class taught in another country, the course will also cover the history of U.S. foreign policy in that region. And it has an experiential component: to develop an appreciation for the subject and for why millions of people have planned their lives around the sport, students will learn to surf. The course will thus combine academic instruction with outdoor education. pre-req: instructor consent, ability to swim; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the history of religion, in all its forms, during the period of Colonial America and the American Revolution. Special attention is given to the role of religion in the social and political changes of the colonies.
HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.
HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.
HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course seeks to cultivate students' understanding of the military history of the United States, exploring the development and influence of the "American way of war" in the broader context of American history, "American" history began with the invasion by Europeans five centuries ago and has continued to be shaped by war and the preparation for war ever since. This course is intended to assist students in gaining knowledge of important people, events and trends in American military history, and to develop the tools to critically assess and discuss that history.
HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898. prereq: students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.
HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of The Americas not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course is an introduction to Islam delivered fully online through MOODLE. It starts with the history of the pre-Islamic Middle East, the life of the Prophet Muhammad; and the emergence of Islam. It follows the survey of the Qur'an and Traditions; the tenets of the faith, sectarian differences; gender and the family, and Islam's encounter with the Occident.
HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Warfare as the unifying theme in the social and cultural analysis of the impact Alexander the Great had on eastern Mediterranean development between 323 B.C. and 631 A.D. Alexander and his world, the formation of its three great religions, and the Alexandrian legacy of his achievement. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3335 or HMCl 3335.
HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the historical (social, cultural, intellectual, and political) development of the Christian religion from the first century to the schism of 1054, with particular consideration of Eastern Christianity. recommended prereq: 1207
HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330 B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine. prereq: Minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3055 or CSt 3055
HIST 3720 - History of Iran
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course covers 1,200 years of Iranian history, politics and culture. Because Iran has exerted a substantial influence on world history, this course will provide an overview of that history and culture from the Arab Conquests (c. 641) to the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Covering sixteen centuries, the scope of this course will be necessity concentrate on the formative aspects of Iranian history: the first half of the course brings us up to the early modern period (1700); the second half concentrates on the modern period (1800's-1990). Throughout the course, the history of Iran will be placed in the greater context of world history.
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines developments of politics, religion, culture in the contemporary Middle East from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include contacts with the west, connections between modernity, democracy and Islam; gender; national identity; globalization and societal transformation in the urban Middle East.
HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of travel and cultural exchange among ascetics, mystics and yogis of west, central and south Asia in their common search for spiritual enlightenment.
HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Muslim Societies examines the political, religious, and cultural bases of societies in which Islam is the predominant, but not the only, faith. It covers Islamic origins, expansion; and innovation in the premodern period as well as global socio-political issues of the modern era.
HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of West Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines regional Middle Eastern history through documentary and feature film and printed sources. This course will give students an overview of the most significant themes of Middle Eastern history - religious, political, social, and cultural - from the rise and spread of Islam globally to the assimilation of the region to the world economy in modern times. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit
HIST 3091 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced study and research under supervision of a faculty member. Students must consult with a faculty member prior to registration with that faculty member. prereq: instructor consent repeatable: allow up to 2 repetitions totalling up to 8 credits
HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Special topics in history not offered within the regular curriculum.
HIST 3097 - Internship in History
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed project. prereq: 60 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Assisting in teaching a 1xxx- or 2xxx-level history course; experience preparing course materials, advising students in learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and leading discussions, conferences with professor about teaching issues. prereq: History major, completion of 20 credits of 2xxx and above history courses with GPS of 3.3, completion of 90 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3496 - International Field Work (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3496.FORS 3396
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History in an international setting. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. Examples of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation.
HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will investigate both the methods by which material culture can be harnessed for historical and social analysis and the significant genres or avenues of inquiry undertaken by scholars working with material culture sources. Students will gain familiarity with the most significant literature in material culture studies, major trends in material culture historiography, and the leading figures that have given the field its shape and direction.
HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. The focus of the project to be completed will change each time the course is offered. Example of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: department consent
HIST 3496 - International Field Work (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3496.FORS 3396
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History in an international setting. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. Examples of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course surveys world history from the emergence and development of isolated settlements to the earliest trans-oceanic interactions in the sixteenth century. It will also introduce students to the various sources and analytic techniques historians use to reconstruct the pre-modern past. Major themes include the social, political, religious, and economic ramifications of intercultural exchange and conflict in the ancient and medieval periods.
HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health (HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is unique in its joint appeal to students of history and student of biology, as well students from other related fields in the humanities and the sciences. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research linking the study of early American history, American Indian history, the history of American ecology, modern nutritional science, and the development of immunity to disease. Students will be required to understand the ways in which published scientific data and research can inform historical case studies of the encounter between colonial Americans, American Indians, and European from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and vice versa. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates on the relationship between nutritional science and human immunity, using the to understand the history of colonial American and American Indian health, farming, hunting, and ecology following European contact. These histories, in turn, will illuminate their reading of scientific papers and research.
HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Warfare as the unifying theme in the social and cultural analysis of the impact Alexander the Great had on eastern Mediterranean development between 323 B.C. and 631 A.D. Alexander and his world, the formation of its three great religions, and the Alexandrian legacy of his achievement. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3335 or HMCl 3335.
HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the historical (social, cultural, intellectual, and political) development of the Christian religion from the first century to the schism of 1054, with particular consideration of Eastern Christianity. recommended prereq: 1207
HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330 B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine. prereq: Minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3055 or CSt 3055
HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333
HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041
HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area of ancient history not included in the regular curriculum. May be repeated up to 4 times for a maximum of 16 credits. Different topics titles offered during the same semester can both be taken.
AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade (LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Genesis of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, survey of the Middle Passage along with historical formations of the slave trade. Examination of roles of the European powers and African nations with the creation of slave communities, identities, and cultures in the new world the political economy of the slave trade. Analysis of cultural and historical legacies of slavery, the abolitionist movement, and resistance to the abolitionist movement including modern day forms of slavery.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the civilizations and people of Africa and her Diaspora in the Americas generally, and people of African descent in the United States in particular. This course begins with continental Africa from prehistoric times. We will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern Africa states such as Ancient Egypt and Ethiopia, Ancient Ghana, Mali, Songhai. The course will continue to examine the tragedy of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the emergence of Africa's Diaspora throughout the Americas, and consider the tremendous contributions of people of African Descent in early American History, while considering the dynamics leading up to the American Civil War.
HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515
HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of African history not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Summer Even Year
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.
HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines Chinese history from the early 1300s, late Yuan dynasty through the early 20th century. The focus of the course will be the Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, cultural, and diplomatic history in both dynasties. It intends to teach students the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China since middle 1300s and the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China. Ming and Qing dynasties have many things in common, albeit the Ming was founded by a Han peasant and the Qing was created by a Manchu noble.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of East Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.
HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245
HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This course approaches the question of the history of Ireland by examining how history itself is written. Since its founding as an independent nation-state only a century ago, the Republic of Ireland has experienced an explosion of historical narratives, both official and unofficial. Each narrative has a distinct agenda, or "constructed image," of Ireland which its proponents believe is essential for the identity, or the self-awareness, fo the new state. Students will examine Irish historiography by focusing on the presentation of three ears common to Irish historical writing: 1) The Prehistoric/"Dreamtime," 2) Early Christian/Medieval, and 3) Modern/Revolution. By examining books, articles, images, and museum displays the students will critically evaluate the construction of various Irish identifies over the past century, and they will also evaluate the academic and popular criticism of these narratives which call for different approaches.
HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of Europe not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the turbulent history of Europe in the 20th century, particularly the causes, development, and consequences of the First and Second World Wars. It will explore the world wars as global phenomena and consider the ways in which these events have shaped contemporary geopolitics and the international world order. The course will address the political, military, cultural, economic and social transformations that characterized this period and influence our society today.
HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The murder of six million Jews as well as hundreds of thousands of other innocent civilians by the Nazi regime during World War II remains one of the most horrific massacres in human history. This course will examine the circumstances and causes that led to the Holocaust, the mechanisms through which the genocide was carried out, and the consequences and responses to the Holocaust. We will consider the perspectives of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, collaborators and resisters, as well as the meanings of these categories themselves. Moreover, this course frames the Holocaust within the broader history of ethnic cleansing and genocide, posing important questions about modernity and threats faced by minority populations in our world today.
HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The Romanov dynasty reigned in Russia for over 300 years and, despite the Romanovs' dramatic fall from power in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, was, by many criteria, one of the most successful dynasties in European history. This course will examine the economic, cultural, political and social transformations of the Russia Empire during the epoch of the Romanovs from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. We will study the accomplishments of the dominating political figures of the period, such as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, as well as the experiences of the diverse populations who lived across the wide expanse of the empire. In doing so, we will gain insight into the causes of the downfall of the imperial regime in 1917.
HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will cover the economic, political, social and cultural changes within the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. Topics to be covered include the Russo-Japanese War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russian Civil War, Russia's industrialization and collectivization of land, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the cold War, late Soviet culture, the collapse of the Soviet Union and Russian under Yeltsin and Putin. Throughout the semester, students will be working with a variety of primary and secondary sources in different media (textual materials, visual sources, and film). Thorough written and oral assignment, student will develop their critical reading, writing and speaking skills. Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2265 or 2365.
HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study aboard in Poland. This course focuses on the history, experience and memory of Jewish life in Poland. One of the focuses of the course will be the experience of discrimination and the history of the Holocaust in Poland. However, the course will also examine the ways in which both Poles and Jews contributed to and engaged in a rich cultural, social and economic life in communities across the region and, in some cases, continued to do so today. The course will consider the history and legacies of the co-existence, interdependence, entangle between Poles, Jews, and other minority populations in this diverse geographic space. We will also explore the contentious contemporary debates over the politics of commemoration of Holocaust sites and Jewish life in Poland today. Pre-req: minimum 30 credits, instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This course will introduce students to the history and memory of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe. Students will explore Jewish life in Hungary, Romania and Poland (including what is now Ukraine, Lithuania and Belarus) during the interwar period and the changes wrought by Nazi occupation. It will also consider the ways in which narratives about the Holocaust have been crafted across Eastern Europe in the decades since. This course emphasizes international engagement through virtual tours, story mapping, and guest lectures. pre-req: minimum 30 credits
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3940/Hist 3245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
HIST 1310 - Minnesota History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines Minnesota's history from the pre-historic and Native American periods through European discovery and American settlement to the present. Topics include: geographic aspects of Minnesota; Native American groups in Minnesota; European exploration and the fur trade; initial American settlement; statehood; the Dakota conflict; the Civil War; the connection between Minnesotans and the natural environment; the Progressive Era and the 1920's; the Depression and World War II; and the state's economic, cultural, and political history since 1945.
HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of colonial Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-contact civilization of the Americas to independence in the early 19th century. Specific topics that will be studies include the pre-contact native societies, the wars of conquest; the ecological, cultural and economic effects of contact among Europeans, Africans, and indigenous inhabitants of the Americas; the role of missionaries the birth of syncretic religious systems (such as Condoble, Voodoo, and Santeria); colonial political structures; and labor systems including slavery.
HIST 3310 - The American Revolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories.
HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3313/FORS 3313
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Taught abroad. Surfing is one of the world's most popular cultural phenomena. Students will explore the intersections of surfing, war, and tourism, addressing how a pastime commonly associated with mindless pleasure has in fact been implicated in some of the major global developments of the last two-hundred years. These include empire-building and the "civilizing mission" in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Hawaii's, modernization and economic development in the so-called Third World, the growth of international tourism following the Second World War, political mass movements and the anti-apartheid struggle, American foreign relations and Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the surf industry and corporate globalization. As a class taught in another country, the course will also cover the history of U.S. foreign policy in that region. And it has an experiential component: to develop an appreciation for the subject and for why millions of people have planned their lives around the sport, students will learn to surf. The course will thus combine academic instruction with outdoor education. pre-req: instructor consent, ability to swim; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the history of religion, in all its forms, during the period of Colonial America and the American Revolution. Special attention is given to the role of religion in the social and political changes of the colonies.
HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.
HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.
HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course seeks to cultivate students' understanding of the military history of the United States, exploring the development and influence of the "American way of war" in the broader context of American history, "American" history began with the invasion by Europeans five centuries ago and has continued to be shaped by war and the preparation for war ever since. This course is intended to assist students in gaining knowledge of important people, events and trends in American military history, and to develop the tools to critically assess and discuss that history.
HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898. prereq: students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.
HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of The Americas not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course is an introduction to Islam delivered fully online through MOODLE. It starts with the history of the pre-Islamic Middle East, the life of the Prophet Muhammad; and the emergence of Islam. It follows the survey of the Qur'an and Traditions; the tenets of the faith, sectarian differences; gender and the family, and Islam's encounter with the Occident.
HIST 3720 - History of Iran
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course covers 1,200 years of Iranian history, politics and culture. Because Iran has exerted a substantial influence on world history, this course will provide an overview of that history and culture from the Arab Conquests (c. 641) to the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Covering sixteen centuries, the scope of this course will be necessity concentrate on the formative aspects of Iranian history: the first half of the course brings us up to the early modern period (1700); the second half concentrates on the modern period (1800's-1990). Throughout the course, the history of Iran will be placed in the greater context of world history.
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines developments of politics, religion, culture in the contemporary Middle East from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include contacts with the west, connections between modernity, democracy and Islam; gender; national identity; globalization and societal transformation in the urban Middle East.
HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of travel and cultural exchange among ascetics, mystics and yogis of west, central and south Asia in their common search for spiritual enlightenment.
HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Muslim Societies examines the political, religious, and cultural bases of societies in which Islam is the predominant, but not the only, faith. It covers Islamic origins, expansion; and innovation in the premodern period as well as global socio-political issues of the modern era.
HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of West Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines regional Middle Eastern history through documentary and feature film and printed sources. This course will give students an overview of the most significant themes of Middle Eastern history - religious, political, social, and cultural - from the rise and spread of Islam globally to the assimilation of the region to the world economy in modern times. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit
HIST 3091 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced study and research under supervision of a faculty member. Students must consult with a faculty member prior to registration with that faculty member. prereq: instructor consent repeatable: allow up to 2 repetitions totalling up to 8 credits
HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Special topics in history not offered within the regular curriculum.
HIST 3097 - Internship in History
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed project. prereq: 60 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Assisting in teaching a 1xxx- or 2xxx-level history course; experience preparing course materials, advising students in learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and leading discussions, conferences with professor about teaching issues. prereq: History major, completion of 20 credits of 2xxx and above history courses with GPS of 3.3, completion of 90 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation.
HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will investigate both the methods by which material culture can be harnessed for historical and social analysis and the significant genres or avenues of inquiry undertaken by scholars working with material culture sources. Students will gain familiarity with the most significant literature in material culture studies, major trends in material culture historiography, and the leading figures that have given the field its shape and direction.
HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. The focus of the project to be completed will change each time the course is offered. Example of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: department consent
HIST 3496 - International Field Work (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3496.FORS 3396
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History in an international setting. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. Examples of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
AAAS 1101 - Introduction to Black Caribbean Studies (LE CAT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Study of the peoples and cultures of the Black Caribbean; impact of colonization; the evolution, form and content of Black Caribbean cultures, societies and institutions. A survey of the socioeconomic and political development and transformation of the nation-states of the Black Caribbean. Cultural reproductions of Caribbean racial and ethnic identities. Survey of the Caribbean diaspora; Caribbean social and political thought. Relationship with the United States, Britain, and Canada. Inter-Caribbean geopolitical relationship.
AAAS 1103 - Introduction to Africa (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 1103/EDUC 1103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of the histories, cultures, and peoples of Africa. Pre-colonization Africa societies. Colonial and postcolonial contacts with Europe. Brief survey of major social, cultural, economic, and political institutions of Africa and their roles in socioeconomic and political development. Issues facing contemporary African societies. Programs and policies to address Africa's problems. Africa and the world. Positioning Africa and its peoples in world affairs. Course Equivalency: EDUC 1103
AAAS 1104 - Introduction to Black America (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of black America in historical and contemporary periods to the post Obama era. African roots in the formation of black American society; genesis of slavery; impact of slavery on black America; contestation of slavery; black oppression; powerlessness and marginality. Black agitation for civil and economics rights; African American social, cultural, economic, and political thoughts; the persistency of structural racial inequities on blacks; closing the gap of inequality; future of black America. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for AAAS 1100
AAAS 3005 - Roots and Rebellion: Study Abroad in Jamaica (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 3005/FORS 3505
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This three week study abroad course draws on history, literature, cultural studies, and music to explore Jamaican resistance to colonialism and slavery. Students will explore Jamaican culture first hand by visiting cultural heritage sites that attest to the Jamaican experiences of oppression, resistance, and rebellion. Presentations by local community leaders and heritage professionals will bring the history and culture of Jamaica alive for students. pre-req: consent of the International Programs and Services office
AAAS 3202 - African Story-Telling and Folklore
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 3202/EDUC 3202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about the importance of story-telling and folklore in diverse African societies. It will examine the social context of the types, forms, and genres of story-telling in African societies and the folklores associated with story-telling. It traces the history of story-telling in African societies before and after colonization, the cultural expressions and meanings of folklore, uses and applications of story-telling and folklore, and the role of community in defining the boundaries of story-telling and folkloric culture.
AAAS 3305 - African American Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will investigate how the imagery, poetics and politics of race have played out in the history of American film. Our focus will be African American cinema - which can be loosely defined as films written and/or directed by African Americans - but we will also consider the unique contours of its texts against the larger backdrop of Hollywood's representation of African Americans. In addition, we will explore the role of this medium in shaping social realities.
AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 (LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life up to 1900. Native-European encounters, the formation of the United States, and the establishments of hundreds of treaties between the federal government and Native nations has continued relevance for both Native peoples and Americans today. Students will critically interrogate how we interpret the past and how these narratives shape and inform the present. Credit will not be granted if already received for 1110.
AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present (LE CAT, LECD C, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through a chronological and biographical approach, the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life from 1900 to the present will be introduced. Significant changes experienced by American Indians as well as their ability to adapt, resist, and thrive will be analyzed. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 1120.
AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Modern Culture (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the cultural and political history of the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe/Chippewa life from origins to present day. Students will be introduced to the seasonal round and longstanding efforts for sustainability as well as the changes and continuities in these practices.
AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Historical review and analysis of Canadian and U.S. Indians in the fur trades. prereq: minimum 30 credits
AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course fosters a consideration of the planet's indigenous peoples, emphasizing their various and varying cultural, territorial, political, social, legal, aesthetic, economic, and intellectual contributions and claims. Exploring indigenous peoples' relationships with one another, with settler governments, with non-governmental organizations, and with supranational institutions, students in the course will develop a broad understanding of the increasingly global trajectories of indigenous studies.
AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AMIN 3450/WS 3455
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Native women are powerful and influential members of their communities both historically and in the present. By analyzing memoirs, autobiographies, documentaries, and a variety of secondary sources, students gain an understanding of the diverse experiences, contributions, and roles of Native women in both the past and the present. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3618 - Ancient Middle America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: minimum 30 credits
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey of major pre-Hispanic cultures of Mesoamerica, including the Olmecs, Maya, Toltecs, Mixtecs, and Aztecs. Using comparative ethnographic and archaeological materials, the course explores the arrival of hunter-gatherer-foragers, the beginnings of agriculture, and formation of early villages, native mathematical and calendar and writing systems, the florescence of regional art styles, and the religious sociopolitical, and economic development of Classical and Postclassical civilizations through the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3624 - Archaeology of North America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of archaeological data for major cultural areas of North America north of Mexico. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3635 - Anthropology of Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Exploration of European peoples to develop a cross-cultural understanding of how cultures function. Survey of social, political, economic, religious, family and kinship, gender, urban, globalism/globalization. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3638 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: minimum 30 cr or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines how anthropologists study the cultures and social institutions of the modern Middle East. Focus on religion, family life, gender, politics, economy, urban ways of life, kinship and marriage, and the impacts of globalism. prereq: minimum 30 cr or instructor consent
ARTH 1303 - History of World Art I (LE CAT, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of world art and architecture from prehistory through Middle Ages.
ARTH 1304 - History of World Art II (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Development of world art and architecture from Renaissance to present.
ARTH 1305 - History of World Art III (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the arts and visual culture of the Americas, Asia and Africa. This course aims to develop a critical understanding of art forms from global cultures. We will examine a range of visual material including painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture, from prehistoric times to present. We will also examine the critical debates that frame the study of "non-Western" art.
ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The city as a work of art and center of culture. A study of artistic representations combined with references to primary texts. Use of case studies of particular urban centers to explore the rise of the city and the history of urban planning around the globe.
ARTH 2380 - A Global History of Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course maps the trajectories of art and design from the 1970's to the present, paying close attention to: global movements; the terrains of the category called contemporary art; the modes through which globalization affects and challenges this terrain; and the role of art in world politics.
ARTH 2390 - US Art and Visual Culture in the 20th Century (LE CAT, LECD C, RACE JUST)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course offers an introduction to US art and visual culture - including architecture, painting, photography, sculpture, advertising, and performance art - from the 20th century, with some additional contextualization from the 19th century. More than simply offering a survey of stylistic changes over time, the class explores the social and political meanings of art. Students will acquire the tools necessary to analyze what art reveals about the nation's values and beliefs. While offering students exposure to a range of issues that are of critical concern to American society, the course will pay particular attention to questions surrounding gender, race, and ideology.
ARTH 3110 - Art of the Ancient Americas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
A selective visual introduction to the Americas before the Spanish Conquest, focusing on the form, function, and symbolism of Ancient American art and architecture and its role in the construction and maintenance of political power, religious belief and practice, concepts of space, and bodily performance.
ARTH 3130 - Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on modern and contemporary visual culture of Mexico from approximately 1860 to the present. It examines the dominant art forms of late nineteenth and twentieth century Mexico: these include post-revolutionary muralism and social realism; movements, artists, and visual genre outside of the nationalist traditional; abstraction, surrealism, the international avant-garde, urban planning, photography, print culture, film, performance, and conceptual art.
ARTH 3140 - Women in Art/Visual Culture in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course focuses on representations of women and by women in the art and visual culture of Mexico and other Latin American countries, examining the many ways in which the image of female body in Latin America has been used to construct and typify regional understandings of gender, class, racial, and national identities. Distinguishing between women as subject matter and women as producers of art, we will also look to female artists in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries to investigate how they might be engaging with and/or critiquing traditional iconographical representations.
ARTH 3150 - Contemporary Global Exhibition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class will examine the transformation of art worlds and urban spaces by the development of contemporary global exhibitions, such as various Art Biennales now held around the globe, Art Basel, Documenta, and the Sculpture Projects Munster. In particular, we will examine how such exhibitions, as well as globalization in general, have transformed the way art is created, distributed, and received.
ARTH 3330 - Renaissance Art & Architecture: Europe 1300 - 1550 (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores the art and architecture of Europe between 1300 and 1550. Focuses on issues central to understanding the period: relationship between patrons and artists, the changing status of the artist; the intersection of art and polities; representations of religious beliefs; and critical approaches to the stud of artists and their oeuvre.
ARTH 3331 - European Architecture and its Legacy (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Studies the history of architecture and the built environment in Europe from antiquity through 1800 by focusing on theoretical writings and representative building. In addition, the course will explore theories of spatial analysis and the legacy of western architecture into the present day.
ARTH 3340 - Baroque and Rococo: European Art & Architecture 1550 - 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Explores the art and architecture produced in Europe during the Early Modern Period c. 1550 - c. 1750 (periods often referred to as the Baroque and Rococo). IOncludes study of canonical works and the artists that produced them; analysis of primary and secondary source materials, introduction to art historical methodologies; and consideration of the regional variations of the "baroque."
ARTH 3360 - Art and Social Change in Europe, Russia, and the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is the relationship between artistic practice and polities? How do artists and their audiences engage with the visual in times of great social change? How do art and visual culture help us to engage with, understand, and change the world? This seminar offers weekly units that offer close examinations of major cultural moments of the modern and contemporary era, and range from the experimental and autonomous to the coervice and fascist. Topics will traverse Europe, Russia, and the United States from the 19th and into the 21st centuries. The exact content of the seminar may vary annually.
ARTH 3361 - Being and Becoming Modern: European Art 1855 - 1955
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This seminar traces a history of art practice from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century across the European continent. It follows key movements and figures of modern art, while emphasizing the social, political, and philosophical events that inform them. Beginning with Realism, and ending at the beginning of the Cold War, this course is bracketed by important questions pertaining to the role of the artist in reflecting upon, critiquing, and influencing national and global culture, writ large. Throughout the term we will also look beyond the limited scope of the fine arts canon to the larger visual cultures that inform and disrupt its boundaries. The exact content of the seminar, including its time period, may vary annually.
ARTH 3370 - Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Art and Visual Culture in the Cold War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Cold War marked a period of nearly five-decades of intense ideological, political, and economic division, which impacted all areas of the glove. This course examines art and visual culture across the period's two major world powers to demonstrate both fundamental discords as well as shared preoccupations. More than a study of the traditional geographies of the capitalist West and the communist East, this course offers insight into how the Cold War's globalization reached all ares of the glove, from the African continent to Latin America to Southeast Asia. A particular emphasis will be placed on experimental forms of culture, particularly in the late Cold War era.
ASL 4105 - History of the American Deaf Community (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical roots of the American Deaf Community, including the establishment and growth of the Deaf Education system, the role of the residential schools in Deaf Culture, power and culture differentials, and systemic oppression. Interrelationship of American Sign Language and the deaf community. History, customs and practices of the American Deaf Community. Dynamics of minority cultural existence. Application of cultural theory to evaluation of the deaf life experience in the United States from 1800-present. prereq: no grad credit
ASL 4110 - Deaf Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Exploration of the history of the deaf community in the United States. Topics will include the deaf community as a cultural and linguistic group with cultural norms, values and traditions. Minority dynamics and cross-cultural interactions also will be covered. ASL will be the language of instruction. prereq: 3004 or instructor consent, no grad credit
CHIN 1399 - Language and Culture in China - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FST 1399/CHIN 1399
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study Chinese language and culture in a classroom setting and on field trips. Emphasis will be on language, culture and history. The program will be held in Beijing, Shanghai, and at the Ocean University of China in Qingdao, China. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
CHIN 3042 - Aspects of Chinese Cultures: Interface between Traditions and Contemporary Values (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of aspects of Chinese civilization and cultures. Students will examine diverse cultural values in the international community and work toward a sense of culturally responsive citizenship in the current global society. Taught in English.
COMM 4500 - History of Rhetoric
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Rhetoric has a long and storied history. This course surveys that rich history from ancient to contemporary times. The course aims at developing understanding of key figures, events, and concepts in rhetoric's history to reflect on the role that all kinds of symbolic action play in the lives of societies, polities, and individuals. Together we will examine enduring philosophical issues in the study of public argument. Students will gain practical tools for understanding public communication and the analysis of rhetorical texts.
DN 3611 - Dance History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The primary focus will be Western Theatrical Dance traditions from the 18th century to the present, with supplemental attention paid to world dance forms as well as vernacular and social dance. The course will explore how the innovations of the 18th and 19th centuries laid the groundwork for the explosion of 20th century creativity leading to today's diverse dance landscape. Balancing between a broad survey and an in depth seminar the course will build a chronological framework for the evolution of dance but also delve more deeply into particular artists and works. Students will also develop an understanding of dance history as both a scholarly and creative discipline. prereq: 1001 or instructor consent
ENGL 1535 - King Arthur in History, Literature, and Art (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of historical accounts, and literary and artistic treatments of King Arthur in Latin, French, and German sources of the Middle Ages and in selected works in modern Arthurian literature.
ENGL 2535 - The Bible in Literature, Art and History (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Study of how scripture has shaped literature and art, and how they have responded to scripture, with consideration of a range of historical, philosophical social and culture context ancient, medieval, and contemporary. Readings and discussions about art and literature representing a variety of literary genres (e.g. poetry, drama, musical theatre, novel, graphic novel) that primarily address the Judeo-Christian tradition, but also offer comparisons with other scriptural traditions.
FR 3550 - The History of Paris: Evolution and Revolution (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course, taught in English with readings in French for French majors, examines themes, topics and episodes related to the cultural history of Paris and the French language through selected readings in literature, sociology, architecture and sustainability studies. Students will use the evolution of Paris and the development of the French language as entry points into a deeper exploration of French identity, including analysis of important contemporary issues related to gender, class, and sustainability. Students will study the ways in which French history has consisted of binary oppositions: Paris-Provinces, Parisian French-Local Patois, Order-Revolution, etc. Additionally, students will explore the traces of French history around Paris, from the names of streets to the monuments in the squares and parks, to the sites of power within the city.
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World (SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture, and politics by examining human geography in the context of global regions. This course introduces core concepts in human geography such as space, place, and scale, and globalization, and applies those concepts to understand the diversity of our globalizing world. Topics from the impact of climate change, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and ethnic and national identities are explored.
GER 2040 - Berlin: Myth, Legend and Reality (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Analysis of Berlin from the turn of the 20th century to today, through films, music, texts and essays. The importance of Berlin in German and European historical, political and social developments. Taught in English.
GER 2041 - Berlin: Myth, Legend, Reality Study Abroad (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ger 2041/FORS 2041
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Short term study abroad. Exploration of Berlin from the turn of the 20th century to today, through film, music, texts, essays, and site visits. Considers the importance of Berlin in German and European historical, political, social, and cultural developments. Taught in English, with basic language instruction for survival abroad. pre-req: instructor consent; also visit the UMD Study Abroad office
GER 3601 - German Studies I: Knights to Nationalisms (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to Germanic history, culture and literature from third century until 1848. Taught in German. prereq: 1202 or 2301 with a grade of C or instructor consent
GER 3602 - German Studies II: From the Rise of the Reich to the Fall of the Wall (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the methods of German Studies, as well as to Germanic history, culture, and literature from the mid-19th to the 21st century. Topics may include: Germany as a nation state; National Socialist rise to power; the Weimar Republic; body culture; exile(s) and exile literature; the city as metropolis; womens movements and womens rights; mass culture; the industrial revolution; education and education reforms; (N)Ostalgia, Wendeliteratur; terrorism; the establishment and influence of green party politics. Taught in German. pre-req: 1202 or 2301 with a grade of C or higher or instructor consent.
GIS 2552 - Mapping Our World (LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GIS 2552/GEOG 2552
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course starts with the definition of what a map is and considers maps as tools for communication. Students are led to explore the effects of scale, projection, cartographic symbolization and generalization on the mapping process and resulting digital databases. Students are introduced to spatial data models, types of spatial data and representation, and study alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS and Remote Sensing. The course includes hands-on map activities; map reading/interpretation, map use, and map production where students will use their laptops to create online web mapping services.
JOUR 2501 - History of American Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explores the social and cultural history of journalism in the United States. Explore examples of journalism in various forms and critiques of journalism from time periods and study key moments in journalism history. Examines the practice of journalism, its core values, and how these have changed over time. Explores how technological, social and economic change shape journalism.
LGBT 3152 - History of the International Homosexual Rights Movement (1895 - present) (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course introduces students to the long winding road toward the emancipation of sexual outsiders (homosexuals, lesbians, bisexuals, transvestites, intersex, and transgender individuals) worldwide. prereq: WS 1000 or CST 2001 or instructor consent
MST 1100 - Introduction to Museums
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will be introduced to the history of museums and the field of museum studies. Issues of theory and practice will be examined as they relate to development, care, and use of museum and systematic collections; museum education; museum administration, exhibition development; research; and evaluation. Particular attention will be given to issues of diversity and multiculturalism; relationship of museums to changing populations and disciplinary trends legal and ethical implications of development and use of collections; and examination of diverse types of collection.
MST 1200 - Introduction to Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory, methods, and practice of history outside the classroom. In this course, we will investigate the challenges of historical work in historic sites, museums, archives, mass media, cultural resource management, historic preservation, and other public history settings.
MU 3201 - Music History I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical eras of Western music, with an emphasis on the cultural, literary, religious and socio-political contexts in which master composers developed. prereq: Mu 1121/1122 or instructor consent
MU 3202 - Music History II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Romantic, Modern and Contemporary eras of music, emphasizing the increasingly non-Western influences and cross-cultural connections on the development of European artistic values into a global aesthetic. prereq: 3201 or instructor consent
POL 1050 - International Relations (LE CAT, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to contemporary international politics: levels of analysis; the international system; nation-state behavior; foreign policy decision making; economic and defense policy issues.
POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (LE CAT, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of the politics of countries selected to reflect alternative styles of politics and forms of government; examples of Western liberal democratic, Communist and post-Communist, and Third World systems.
POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of political thought from a thematic perspective such as freedom and citizenship, democracy and its critics, political obligation and justice, diversity and inequality. Close attention to method of interpretation and argument.
POL 3451 - Theories of International Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical and contemporary theories of international relations. Views of contending theorists are analyzed and assessed. prereq: 30 earned or in-progress credits or instructor consent
POL 3511 - Politics of South Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Comparative study of five South Asian countries (namely India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal). It analyzes the history and impact of colonialism in South Asia; state formations in South Asia; and controversies in recent South Asian politics over issues like globalization, democratization, religious fundamentalism, nuclearism, and gender. Policy solutions to these problems will be considered. pre-req: 30 earned or in-progress credits or instructor consent
POL 3518 - Transitional Politics of Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class is a comparative study of the states in Asia namely India, China, Japan, and others. The class will explore the historical trajectories of these states; will study how these histories have given rise to different forms of their current state formations; will explore their contemporary political systems; economies; their socio-cultural and gender dynamics; and contemporary policy issues faced by these states. The class will also analyze the geo-strategic significance of Asia to the West/United States in the contemporary eras of globalization. pre-req: 30 earned or in-progress credits or instructor consent
POL 3652 - Modern Political Thought
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Advanced survey of political thought from Enlightenment to the present; course topic may include one or more of the following traditions of political theorizing: English (e.g. Hobbes, Locke, Burke, Bentham, Mill, Wollstonecraft), German (e.g. Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Habermas) or French (e.g. Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Foucault, Derrida). pre-req: 30 earned or in-progress credits or instructor consent repeatable: Allow up to 3 repetitions totaling up to 12 credits.
SPAN 2540 - Latino Literatures and Cultures (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The study of Latino communities in the United States, from the colonial period to the present. Topics covered include the Spanish legacy in the Southeast and Southwest, Caribbean communities on the East coast and demographic transition away from major metropolitan areas to the Midwest. Students will read travel narratives, fiction, poetry, and theater, and will have the opportunity to collect oral histories from Latinos in Minnesota. The course is open to all students and will be taught in English.
SPAN 2550 - Globalization and Sustainability in Latin America (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring & Summer Odd Year
The study of Latin America's natural resources, their cultural meaning and management across time and recent environmental movements in the region. Special focus on the indigenous practices that promote environmental, economic, political, social and cultural sustainability. The course may focus on Central America, the Caribbean, and Andes, the Southern Cone, the Amazon or any other geocultural region in Latin America. The course is open to all students and will be taught in English.
SPAN 3042 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities in Latin America (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical overview and survey of key themes of Latin America until the present day. Analysis of key cultural (literary, filmic, artistic, architectural, and musical) texts. Strong focus on academic writing and research. Taught in Spanish. prereq: 2301 with C or better or instructor consent
SPAN 3044 - Civilization, Cultures and Communities of Spain (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Historical overview and survey of key themes of the Iberian Peninsula from pre-history until the present day. Analysis of key cultural (literary, filmic, artistic, architectural, and musical) texts. Strong focus on academic writing and research. Taught in Spanish. prereq: 2301 with C or better or instructor consent
SPAN 3894 - Language and Culture in Spain - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 6.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: FST 3894/SPAN 3894
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Month long summer study abroad program in Salamanca, Spain. Study of Spanish language, literature, art history and culture at the University of Salamanca. Home stay with a Salamanca family. Taught in Spanish. prereq: instructor consent & completion of SPAN 1202 or higher; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
TH 1071 - Musical Theatre History (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Musical theatre genre focusing on integration of theatre, music, and dance. Major librettists, composers, directors, choreographers, and performers.
TH 4801 - History of the Theatre I (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey of selected styles, theories, performance, and production techniques of world theatre from theoretical origins to the present. prereq: TH 2801 or instructor consent
TH 4802 - History of the Theatre II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Seminar exploring the style, theory, performance, and production techniques of selected eras or traditions in world theatre from theoretical origins to present. prereq: 4801 or instructor consent
WS 2101 - Women, Race, and Class (LE CAT8, LECD CAT08, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Racism, sexism, and classism are major factors which have influenced human relations from past to present. This course examines how the social-historical construction of race, class and gender continues to affect the experience of all people in particular people of color. This course seeks to enable students to understand the processes through which these social oppressions are created, normalized, internalized, maintained and perpetuated. A core element to this course is provoking students to recognize their own contribution in perpetuating oppressive systems, and their responsibility creatively to develop individual and collective acts of resistance to all of the "isms" and to societal transformation towards the just society.
WS 3100 - Feminist Thought (HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination and analysis of central ideas and concepts within diverse feminist theories - liberal, socialist, radical, multicultural, postcolonial, ecofeminist, lesbian, maternalist, and others - historical and contemporary. Theoretical debates surrounding issues of the bases of women's liberation and oppression; the nature and construction of gender, sexuality, and the body; feminist epistemologies; and ethical issues within feminism. prereq: 1000 or 2101, 45 cr or instructor consent
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
ANTH 1602 - Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (LE CAT, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1601/1602
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Origin and development of extinct and living human forms, primatology, human biological variations, the race concept, evolution, and development of human societies up to the earliest stages of ancient civilizations.
ANTH 1604 - Cultural Anthropology (LE CAT6, LEIP CAT06, SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to representative cultures of the world and to concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, focusing on range of variation and degree of uniformity in human behavior and in cultural adaptations.
ECON 1003 - Economics and Society (LE CAT, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
General description of U.S. economy and analysis of contemporary economic problems. Introduction to major economic issues and problems of the day, providing a simple framework used by economists for analysis. prereq: Cannot apply credit to economics major or minor or BAc or BBA majors
ECON 1022 - Principles of Economics: Macro (LE CAT, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analyzing overall performance of an economic system. National income accounting and theory, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, money, monetary policy, economic growth, international trade, non-U.S. economies, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
ECON 1023 - Principles of Economics: Micro (LE CAT, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analyzing free enterprise system through study of product and resource markets. Supply and demand, utility, production and cost, market structure, resource use, market failures, regulatory role of government, and real-world application of these concepts. prereq: Minimum 15 credits or department consent
GEOG 1205 - Our Globalizing World (SOC SCI, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture, and politics by examining human geography in the context of global regions. This course introduces core concepts in human geography such as space, place, and scale, and globalization, and applies those concepts to understand the diversity of our globalizing world. Topics from the impact of climate change, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and ethnic and national identities are explored.
GEOG 1414 - The Physical Geography (LE CAT, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The environment is highly dynamic and is continually modified by human and environmental processes. This course examines these processes to better understand how the Earth's landscapes were formed and how they are currently being transformed. Specifically, students will understand the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment including Earth-sun relations, water resources, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils.
POL 1011 - American Government and Politics (LE CAT6, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of American national government. Survey of American governmental system, structure, operations, and services; constitutionalism, federalism, civil liberties, parties, pressure groups, and elections.
POL 1050 - International Relations (LE CAT, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to contemporary international politics: levels of analysis; the international system; nation-state behavior; foreign policy decision making; economic and defense policy issues.
POL 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (LE CAT, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of the politics of countries selected to reflect alternative styles of politics and forms of government; examples of Western liberal democratic, Communist and post-Communist, and Third World systems.
POL 1610 - Introduction to Political Theory (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the history of political thought from a thematic perspective such as freedom and citizenship, democracy and its critics, political obligation and justice, diversity and inequality. Close attention to method of interpretation and argument.
PSY 1003 - General Psychology (LE CAT, SOC SCI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of behavior; current knowledge of biological, social, and cognitive areas of psychology. Assessment, research methods, human development, personality, mental disorders, and therapy.
SOC 1101 - Introduction to Sociology (LE CAT, LECD C, SOC SCI, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will help students develop a 'sociological imagination' - that is, an understanding of the relationship between the individual and the wider society. Students are introduced to the discipline of sociology, which is the systematic study of social interaction, social organization, social institutions, and social change. The course covers the main concepts, theories, and methods of sociology that are used to explore everything from daily interactions to widespread social problems.
HIST 1310 - Minnesota History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines Minnesota's history from the pre-historic and Native American periods through European discovery and American settlement to the present. Topics include: geographic aspects of Minnesota; Native American groups in Minnesota; European exploration and the fur trade; initial American settlement; statehood; the Dakota conflict; the Civil War; the connection between Minnesotans and the natural environment; the Progressive Era and the 1920's; the Depression and World War II; and the state's economic, cultural, and political history since 1945.
HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of colonial Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-contact civilization of the Americas to independence in the early 19th century. Specific topics that will be studies include the pre-contact native societies, the wars of conquest; the ecological, cultural and economic effects of contact among Europeans, Africans, and indigenous inhabitants of the Americas; the role of missionaries the birth of syncretic religious systems (such as Condoble, Voodoo, and Santeria); colonial political structures; and labor systems including slavery.
HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health (HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is unique in its joint appeal to students of history and student of biology, as well students from other related fields in the humanities and the sciences. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research linking the study of early American history, American Indian history, the history of American ecology, modern nutritional science, and the development of immunity to disease. Students will be required to understand the ways in which published scientific data and research can inform historical case studies of the encounter between colonial Americans, American Indians, and European from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and vice versa. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates on the relationship between nutritional science and human immunity, using the to understand the history of colonial American and American Indian health, farming, hunting, and ecology following European contact. These histories, in turn, will illuminate their reading of scientific papers and research.
HIST 3310 - The American Revolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories.
HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3313/FORS 3313
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Taught abroad. Surfing is one of the world's most popular cultural phenomena. Students will explore the intersections of surfing, war, and tourism, addressing how a pastime commonly associated with mindless pleasure has in fact been implicated in some of the major global developments of the last two-hundred years. These include empire-building and the "civilizing mission" in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Hawaii's, modernization and economic development in the so-called Third World, the growth of international tourism following the Second World War, political mass movements and the anti-apartheid struggle, American foreign relations and Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the surf industry and corporate globalization. As a class taught in another country, the course will also cover the history of U.S. foreign policy in that region. And it has an experiential component: to develop an appreciation for the subject and for why millions of people have planned their lives around the sport, students will learn to surf. The course will thus combine academic instruction with outdoor education. pre-req: instructor consent, ability to swim; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the history of religion, in all its forms, during the period of Colonial America and the American Revolution. Special attention is given to the role of religion in the social and political changes of the colonies.
HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.
HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.
HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course seeks to cultivate students' understanding of the military history of the United States, exploring the development and influence of the "American way of war" in the broader context of American history, "American" history began with the invasion by Europeans five centuries ago and has continued to be shaped by war and the preparation for war ever since. This course is intended to assist students in gaining knowledge of important people, events and trends in American military history, and to develop the tools to critically assess and discuss that history.
HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898. prereq: students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.
HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of The Americas not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245
HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333
HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041
HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This course approaches the question of the history of Ireland by examining how history itself is written. Since its founding as an independent nation-state only a century ago, the Republic of Ireland has experienced an explosion of historical narratives, both official and unofficial. Each narrative has a distinct agenda, or "constructed image," of Ireland which its proponents believe is essential for the identity, or the self-awareness, fo the new state. Students will examine Irish historiography by focusing on the presentation of three ears common to Irish historical writing: 1) The Prehistoric/"Dreamtime," 2) Early Christian/Medieval, and 3) Modern/Revolution. By examining books, articles, images, and museum displays the students will critically evaluate the construction of various Irish identifies over the past century, and they will also evaluate the academic and popular criticism of these narratives which call for different approaches.
HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of Europe not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the turbulent history of Europe in the 20th century, particularly the causes, development, and consequences of the First and Second World Wars. It will explore the world wars as global phenomena and consider the ways in which these events have shaped contemporary geopolitics and the international world order. The course will address the political, military, cultural, economic and social transformations that characterized this period and influence our society today.
HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The murder of six million Jews as well as hundreds of thousands of other innocent civilians by the Nazi regime during World War II remains one of the most horrific massacres in human history. This course will examine the circumstances and causes that led to the Holocaust, the mechanisms through which the genocide was carried out, and the consequences and responses to the Holocaust. We will consider the perspectives of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, collaborators and resisters, as well as the meanings of these categories themselves. Moreover, this course frames the Holocaust within the broader history of ethnic cleansing and genocide, posing important questions about modernity and threats faced by minority populations in our world today.
HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The Romanov dynasty reigned in Russia for over 300 years and, despite the Romanovs' dramatic fall from power in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, was, by many criteria, one of the most successful dynasties in European history. This course will examine the economic, cultural, political and social transformations of the Russia Empire during the epoch of the Romanovs from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. We will study the accomplishments of the dominating political figures of the period, such as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, as well as the experiences of the diverse populations who lived across the wide expanse of the empire. In doing so, we will gain insight into the causes of the downfall of the imperial regime in 1917.
HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will cover the economic, political, social and cultural changes within the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. Topics to be covered include the Russo-Japanese War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russian Civil War, Russia's industrialization and collectivization of land, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the cold War, late Soviet culture, the collapse of the Soviet Union and Russian under Yeltsin and Putin. Throughout the semester, students will be working with a variety of primary and secondary sources in different media (textual materials, visual sources, and film). Thorough written and oral assignment, student will develop their critical reading, writing and speaking skills. Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2265 or 2365.
HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area of ancient history not included in the regular curriculum. May be repeated up to 4 times for a maximum of 16 credits. Different topics titles offered during the same semester can both be taken.
HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study aboard in Poland. This course focuses on the history, experience and memory of Jewish life in Poland. One of the focuses of the course will be the experience of discrimination and the history of the Holocaust in Poland. However, the course will also examine the ways in which both Poles and Jews contributed to and engaged in a rich cultural, social and economic life in communities across the region and, in some cases, continued to do so today. The course will consider the history and legacies of the co-existence, interdependence, entangle between Poles, Jews, and other minority populations in this diverse geographic space. We will also explore the contentious contemporary debates over the politics of commemoration of Holocaust sites and Jewish life in Poland today. Pre-req: minimum 30 credits, instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This course will introduce students to the history and memory of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe. Students will explore Jewish life in Hungary, Romania and Poland (including what is now Ukraine, Lithuania and Belarus) during the interwar period and the changes wrought by Nazi occupation. It will also consider the ways in which narratives about the Holocaust have been crafted across Eastern Europe in the decades since. This course emphasizes international engagement through virtual tours, story mapping, and guest lectures. pre-req: minimum 30 credits
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3940/Hist 3245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240
HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course is an introduction to Islam delivered fully online through MOODLE. It starts with the history of the pre-Islamic Middle East, the life of the Prophet Muhammad; and the emergence of Islam. It follows the survey of the Qur'an and Traditions; the tenets of the faith, sectarian differences; gender and the family, and Islam's encounter with the Occident.
HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course surveys world history from the emergence and development of isolated settlements to the earliest trans-oceanic interactions in the sixteenth century. It will also introduce students to the various sources and analytic techniques historians use to reconstruct the pre-modern past. Major themes include the social, political, religious, and economic ramifications of intercultural exchange and conflict in the ancient and medieval periods.
HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Summer Even Year
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines Chinese history from the early 1300s, late Yuan dynasty through the early 20th century. The focus of the course will be the Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, cultural, and diplomatic history in both dynasties. It intends to teach students the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China since middle 1300s and the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China. Ming and Qing dynasties have many things in common, albeit the Ming was founded by a Han peasant and the Qing was created by a Manchu noble.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of East Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the civilizations and people of Africa and her Diaspora in the Americas generally, and people of African descent in the United States in particular. This course begins with continental Africa from prehistoric times. We will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern Africa states such as Ancient Egypt and Ethiopia, Ancient Ghana, Mali, Songhai. The course will continue to examine the tragedy of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the emergence of Africa's Diaspora throughout the Americas, and consider the tremendous contributions of people of African Descent in early American History, while considering the dynamics leading up to the American Civil War.
HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515
HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of African history not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3720 - History of Iran
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course covers 1,200 years of Iranian history, politics and culture. Because Iran has exerted a substantial influence on world history, this course will provide an overview of that history and culture from the Arab Conquests (c. 641) to the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Covering sixteen centuries, the scope of this course will be necessity concentrate on the formative aspects of Iranian history: the first half of the course brings us up to the early modern period (1700); the second half concentrates on the modern period (1800's-1990). Throughout the course, the history of Iran will be placed in the greater context of world history.
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines developments of politics, religion, culture in the contemporary Middle East from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include contacts with the west, connections between modernity, democracy and Islam; gender; national identity; globalization and societal transformation in the urban Middle East.
HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of travel and cultural exchange among ascetics, mystics and yogis of west, central and south Asia in their common search for spiritual enlightenment.
HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Muslim Societies examines the political, religious, and cultural bases of societies in which Islam is the predominant, but not the only, faith. It covers Islamic origins, expansion; and innovation in the premodern period as well as global socio-political issues of the modern era.
HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of West Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines regional Middle Eastern history through documentary and feature film and printed sources. This course will give students an overview of the most significant themes of Middle Eastern history - religious, political, social, and cultural - from the rise and spread of Islam globally to the assimilation of the region to the world economy in modern times. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit
MST 1200 - Introduction to Public History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory, methods, and practice of history outside the classroom. In this course, we will investigate the challenges of historical work in historic sites, museums, archives, mass media, cultural resource management, historic preservation, and other public history settings.
HIST 3525 - Introduction to Historic Preservation
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class examines the history and theory of historic preservation, focusing on the United States, but with reference to traditions and practices in other countries. The class is designed to examine the largely untold history of the historic preservation movement in this country, and explore how laws, public policies and cultural attitudes shape how we preserve or do not preserve the built environment. The class will give students a grounding in the history, theory and practice of historic preservation.
HIST 3535 - Material Culture: from Object to History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will investigate both the methods by which material culture can be harnessed for historical and social analysis and the significant genres or avenues of inquiry undertaken by scholars working with material culture sources. Students will gain familiarity with the most significant literature in material culture studies, major trends in material culture historiography, and the leading figures that have given the field its shape and direction.
JOUR 3401 - Digital Storytelling
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Produce various forms of digital news stories drawing on photography, audio, video and other digital forms of storytelling. Learn the style differences between writing electronic news scripts and writing for print. Learn basic field recording techniques and production skills for audio and video. prereq: 2001
HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. The focus of the project to be completed will change each time the course is offered. Example of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: department consent
HIST 3496 - International Field Work (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3496.FORS 3396
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History in an international setting. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. Examples of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3097 - Internship in History
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed project. prereq: 60 credits, instructor consent
HIST 1200 - World History to 1500: From Antiquity to the Age of Exploration (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course surveys world history from the emergence and development of isolated settlements to the earliest trans-oceanic interactions in the sixteenth century. It will also introduce students to the various sources and analytic techniques historians use to reconstruct the pre-modern past. Major themes include the social, political, religious, and economic ramifications of intercultural exchange and conflict in the ancient and medieval periods.
HIST 2350 - Hunting and Gathering and the History of American Health (HUMANITIES, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is unique in its joint appeal to students of history and student of biology, as well students from other related fields in the humanities and the sciences. Students will be exposed to cutting-edge research linking the study of early American history, American Indian history, the history of American ecology, modern nutritional science, and the development of immunity to disease. Students will be required to understand the ways in which published scientific data and research can inform historical case studies of the encounter between colonial Americans, American Indians, and European from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century and vice versa. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates on the relationship between nutritional science and human immunity, using the to understand the history of colonial American and American Indian health, farming, hunting, and ecology following European contact. These histories, in turn, will illuminate their reading of scientific papers and research.
HIST 3035 - Ancient Warfare From Alexander to Mohammad
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Warfare as the unifying theme in the social and cultural analysis of the impact Alexander the Great had on eastern Mediterranean development between 323 B.C. and 631 A.D. Alexander and his world, the formation of its three great religions, and the Alexandrian legacy of his achievement. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3335 or HMCl 3335.
HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the historical (social, cultural, intellectual, and political) development of the Christian religion from the first century to the schism of 1054, with particular consideration of Eastern Christianity. recommended prereq: 1207
HIST 3055 - The Bible & Ancient Near East
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330 B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine. prereq: Minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3055 or CSt 3055
HIST 3133 - Ancient Greece from Homer to Alexander
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333
HIST 3141 - Ancient Rome: From Republic to Empire
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041
HIST 3295 - Special Topics Ancient History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area of ancient history not included in the regular curriculum. May be repeated up to 4 times for a maximum of 16 credits. Different topics titles offered during the same semester can both be taken.
AAAS 1102 - Introduction to Atlantic Slave Trade (LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Genesis of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, survey of the Middle Passage along with historical formations of the slave trade. Examination of roles of the European powers and African nations with the creation of slave communities, identities, and cultures in the new world the political economy of the slave trade. Analysis of cultural and historical legacies of slavery, the abolitionist movement, and resistance to the abolitionist movement including modern day forms of slavery.
HIST 2515 - Ancient to Pre-Modern African History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course considers African peoples and states from Ancient times through the Pre-Modern era. The unique geography, vast history, varied political, and dynamic social life of Africa will be examined. We will discuss the importance of understanding Africa, and the important contributions the study of Africa has made to our knowledge of the world in which we live. We will give particular attention to how and why states form, were sustained and reproduced. In addition to considering the birth of humanity, we will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern African states such as Nubia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Ghana, the Empire of Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe and the Swahili city-states. What makes these states states? What are the social needs of developments that give rise to political activities such as providing security, adjudicating disputes, creating laws and enforcing order? Are there identifiable patterns of relations with other peoples and states?
HIST 3550 - Africa and Her Early American Diaspora
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will examine the civilizations and people of Africa and her Diaspora in the Americas generally, and people of African descent in the United States in particular. This course begins with continental Africa from prehistoric times. We will look at state formation processes of ancient and pre-modern Africa states such as Ancient Egypt and Ethiopia, Ancient Ghana, Mali, Songhai. The course will continue to examine the tragedy of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the emergence of Africa's Diaspora throughout the Americas, and consider the tremendous contributions of people of African Descent in early American History, while considering the dynamics leading up to the American Civil War.
HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515
HIST 3695 - Special Topics African History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of African history not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Summer Even Year
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.
HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.
HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Summer
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.
HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines Chinese history from the early 1300s, late Yuan dynasty through the early 20th century. The focus of the course will be the Ming dynasty and the Qing dynasty with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, cultural, and diplomatic history in both dynasties. It intends to teach students the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China since middle 1300s and the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China. Ming and Qing dynasties have many things in common, albeit the Ming was founded by a Han peasant and the Qing was created by a Manchu noble.
HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.
HIST 3495 - Special Topics East Asian History (Various Titles to be Assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of East Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.
HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.
HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245
HIST 3145 - Ireland and the Construction of History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This course approaches the question of the history of Ireland by examining how history itself is written. Since its founding as an independent nation-state only a century ago, the Republic of Ireland has experienced an explosion of historical narratives, both official and unofficial. Each narrative has a distinct agenda, or "constructed image," of Ireland which its proponents believe is essential for the identity, or the self-awareness, fo the new state. Students will examine Irish historiography by focusing on the presentation of three ears common to Irish historical writing: 1) The Prehistoric/"Dreamtime," 2) Early Christian/Medieval, and 3) Modern/Revolution. By examining books, articles, images, and museum displays the students will critically evaluate the construction of various Irish identifies over the past century, and they will also evaluate the academic and popular criticism of these narratives which call for different approaches.
HIST 3195 - Special Topics European History (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of Europe not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the turbulent history of Europe in the 20th century, particularly the causes, development, and consequences of the First and Second World Wars. It will explore the world wars as global phenomena and consider the ways in which these events have shaped contemporary geopolitics and the international world order. The course will address the political, military, cultural, economic and social transformations that characterized this period and influence our society today.
HIST 3244 - Holocaust & Genocide in Europe in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
The murder of six million Jews as well as hundreds of thousands of other innocent civilians by the Nazi regime during World War II remains one of the most horrific massacres in human history. This course will examine the circumstances and causes that led to the Holocaust, the mechanisms through which the genocide was carried out, and the consequences and responses to the Holocaust. We will consider the perspectives of victims, bystanders, perpetrators, collaborators and resisters, as well as the meanings of these categories themselves. Moreover, this course frames the Holocaust within the broader history of ethnic cleansing and genocide, posing important questions about modernity and threats faced by minority populations in our world today.
HIST 3264 - Russian Empire under the Tsars: Russia under the Romanovs from Peter the Great to Lenin (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The Romanov dynasty reigned in Russia for over 300 years and, despite the Romanovs' dramatic fall from power in the wake of the Revolution of 1917, was, by many criteria, one of the most successful dynasties in European history. This course will examine the economic, cultural, political and social transformations of the Russia Empire during the epoch of the Romanovs from the 17th to the early 20th centuries. We will study the accomplishments of the dominating political figures of the period, such as Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, as well as the experiences of the diverse populations who lived across the wide expanse of the empire. In doing so, we will gain insight into the causes of the downfall of the imperial regime in 1917.
HIST 3265 - The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and Contemporary Russia (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will cover the economic, political, social and cultural changes within the Russian empire, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation over the course of the 20th century and into the 21st. Topics to be covered include the Russo-Japanese War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Russian Civil War, Russia's industrialization and collectivization of land, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the cold War, late Soviet culture, the collapse of the Soviet Union and Russian under Yeltsin and Putin. Throughout the semester, students will be working with a variety of primary and secondary sources in different media (textual materials, visual sources, and film). Thorough written and oral assignment, student will develop their critical reading, writing and speaking skills. Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2265 or 2365.
HIST 3575 - Jews & Poles: Entangled Lives, Cultures and Memories in the 20th Century Poland - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study aboard in Poland. This course focuses on the history, experience and memory of Jewish life in Poland. One of the focuses of the course will be the experience of discrimination and the history of the Holocaust in Poland. However, the course will also examine the ways in which both Poles and Jews contributed to and engaged in a rich cultural, social and economic life in communities across the region and, in some cases, continued to do so today. The course will consider the history and legacies of the co-existence, interdependence, entangle between Poles, Jews, and other minority populations in this diverse geographic space. We will also explore the contentious contemporary debates over the politics of commemoration of Holocaust sites and Jewish life in Poland today. Pre-req: minimum 30 credits, instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3580 - Eastern Europe during the Holocaust: A Virtual Experience
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
This course will introduce students to the history and memory of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe. Students will explore Jewish life in Hungary, Romania and Poland (including what is now Ukraine, Lithuania and Belarus) during the interwar period and the changes wrought by Nazi occupation. It will also consider the ways in which narratives about the Holocaust have been crafted across Eastern Europe in the decades since. This course emphasizes international engagement through virtual tours, story mapping, and guest lectures. pre-req: minimum 30 credits
HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239
HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3940/Hist 3245
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240
HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.
HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (LE CAT7, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.
HIST 1310 - Minnesota History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course examines Minnesota's history from the pre-historic and Native American periods through European discovery and American settlement to the present. Topics include: geographic aspects of Minnesota; Native American groups in Minnesota; European exploration and the fur trade; initial American settlement; statehood; the Dakota conflict; the Civil War; the connection between Minnesotans and the natural environment; the Progressive Era and the 1920's; the Depression and World War II; and the state's economic, cultural, and political history since 1945.
HIST 2315 - Colonial Latin America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of colonial Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-contact civilization of the Americas to independence in the early 19th century. Specific topics that will be studies include the pre-contact native societies, the wars of conquest; the ecological, cultural and economic effects of contact among Europeans, Africans, and indigenous inhabitants of the Americas; the role of missionaries the birth of syncretic religious systems (such as Condoble, Voodoo, and Santeria); colonial political structures; and labor systems including slavery.
HIST 3310 - The American Revolution
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories.
HIST 3313 - Global Surf Culture - Study Abroad (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3313/FORS 3313
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Taught abroad. Surfing is one of the world's most popular cultural phenomena. Students will explore the intersections of surfing, war, and tourism, addressing how a pastime commonly associated with mindless pleasure has in fact been implicated in some of the major global developments of the last two-hundred years. These include empire-building and the "civilizing mission" in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Hawaii's, modernization and economic development in the so-called Third World, the growth of international tourism following the Second World War, political mass movements and the anti-apartheid struggle, American foreign relations and Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the surf industry and corporate globalization. As a class taught in another country, the course will also cover the history of U.S. foreign policy in that region. And it has an experiential component: to develop an appreciation for the subject and for why millions of people have planned their lives around the sport, students will learn to surf. The course will thus combine academic instruction with outdoor education. pre-req: instructor consent, ability to swim; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
HIST 3315 - Ideas of God in Early America
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines the history of religion, in all its forms, during the period of Colonial America and the American Revolution. Special attention is given to the role of religion in the social and political changes of the colonies.
HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.
HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.
HIST 3355 - War and American Society, 1500-Present
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course seeks to cultivate students' understanding of the military history of the United States, exploring the development and influence of the "American way of war" in the broader context of American history, "American" history began with the invasion by Europeans five centuries ago and has continued to be shaped by war and the preparation for war ever since. This course is intended to assist students in gaining knowledge of important people, events and trends in American military history, and to develop the tools to critically assess and discuss that history.
HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898. prereq: students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.
HIST 3395 - Special Topics The Americas (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of The Americas not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.
HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course is an introduction to Islam delivered fully online through MOODLE. It starts with the history of the pre-Islamic Middle East, the life of the Prophet Muhammad; and the emergence of Islam. It follows the survey of the Qur'an and Traditions; the tenets of the faith, sectarian differences; gender and the family, and Islam's encounter with the Occident.
HIST 3720 - History of Iran
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course covers 1,200 years of Iranian history, politics and culture. Because Iran has exerted a substantial influence on world history, this course will provide an overview of that history and culture from the Arab Conquests (c. 641) to the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Covering sixteen centuries, the scope of this course will be necessity concentrate on the formative aspects of Iranian history: the first half of the course brings us up to the early modern period (1700); the second half concentrates on the modern period (1800's-1990). Throughout the course, the history of Iran will be placed in the greater context of world history.
HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines developments of politics, religion, culture in the contemporary Middle East from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics include contacts with the west, connections between modernity, democracy and Islam; gender; national identity; globalization and societal transformation in the urban Middle East.
HIST 3730 - Ascetics, Mystics, and Yogis: Travel, Learning, and the Spiritual Quest
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines the history of travel and cultural exchange among ascetics, mystics and yogis of west, central and south Asia in their common search for spiritual enlightenment.
HIST 3735 - Muslim Societies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Muslim Societies examines the political, religious, and cultural bases of societies in which Islam is the predominant, but not the only, faith. It covers Islamic origins, expansion; and innovation in the premodern period as well as global socio-political issues of the modern era.
HIST 3795 - Special Topics in West Asia (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics on any period or area in the history of West Asia not included in the regular curriculum.
HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties. prereq: minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725
HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course examines regional Middle Eastern history through documentary and feature film and printed sources. This course will give students an overview of the most significant themes of Middle Eastern history - religious, political, social, and cultural - from the rise and spread of Islam globally to the assimilation of the region to the world economy in modern times. prereq: 30 credits, no grad credit
HIST 3091 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced study and research under supervision of a faculty member. Students must consult with a faculty member prior to registration with that faculty member. prereq: instructor consent repeatable: allow up to 2 repetitions totalling up to 8 credits
HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (various titles to be assigned)
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Special topics in history not offered within the regular curriculum.
HIST 3097 - Internship in History
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed project. prereq: 60 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Assisting in teaching a 1xxx- or 2xxx-level history course; experience preparing course materials, advising students in learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and leading discussions, conferences with professor about teaching issues. prereq: History major, completion of 20 credits of 2xxx and above history courses with GPS of 3.3, completion of 90 credits, instructor consent
HIST 3096 - Fieldwork in Public History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. The focus of the project to be completed will change each time the course is offered. Example of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: department consent
HIST 3496 - International Field Work (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3496.FORS 3396
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course will introduce students to the methods used in Public History in an international setting. Public History is defined as the interaction of the non-academic public and the fields of Museum Studies, Historic Preservation, Cultural Resource Management, Heritage Tourism, and Popular History. Examples of projects to be completed during the course are: Interpretive Plan for a historic district, historic survey of a neighborhood, archival research, artifact cataloging and analysis at a local museum, pedestrian survey of a historic site, archaeological excavation/evaluation of a historic site, feasibility study for a local museum, and designing an interpretive display for a historic resource. pre-req: instructor consent; admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Programs and Services Office
AAAS 1101 - Introduction to Black Caribbean Studies (LE CAT)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Study of the peoples and cultures of the Black Caribbean; impact of colonization; the evolution, form and content of Black Caribbean cultures, societies and institutions. A survey of the socioeconomic and political development and transformation of the nation-states of the Black Caribbean. Cultural reproductions of Caribbean racial and ethnic identities. Survey of the Caribbean diaspora; Caribbean social and political thought. Relationship with the United States, Britain, and Canada. Inter-Caribbean geopolitical relationship.
AAAS 1103 - Introduction to Africa (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 1103/EDUC 1103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of the histories, cultures, and peoples of Africa. Pre-colonization Africa societies. Colonial and postcolonial contacts with Europe. Brief survey of major social, cultural, economic, and political institutions of Africa and their roles in socioeconomic and political development. Issues facing contemporary African societies. Programs and policies to address Africa's problems. Africa and the world. Positioning Africa and its peoples in world affairs. Course Equivalency: EDUC 1103
AAAS 1104 - Introduction to Black America (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of black America in historical and contemporary periods to the post Obama era. African roots in the formation of black American society; genesis of slavery; impact of slavery on black America; contestation of slavery; black oppression; powerlessness and marginality. Black agitation for civil and economics rights; African American social, cultural, economic, and political thoughts; the persistency of structural racial inequities on blacks; closing the gap of inequality; future of black America. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for AAAS 1100
AAAS 3005 - Roots and Rebellion: Study Abroad in Jamaica (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 3005/FORS 3505
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
This three week study abroad course draws on history, literature, cultural studies, and music to explore Jamaican resistance to colonialism and slavery. Students will explore Jamaican culture first hand by visiting cultural heritage sites that attest to the Jamaican experiences of oppression, resistance, and rebellion. Presentations by local community leaders and heritage professionals will bring the history and culture of Jamaica alive for students. pre-req: consent of the International Programs and Services office
AAAS 3202 - African Story-Telling and Folklore
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAAS 3202/EDUC 3202
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is about the importance of story-telling and folklore in diverse African societies. It will examine the social context of the types, forms, and genres of story-telling in African societies and the folklores associated with story-telling. It traces the history of story-telling in African societies before and after colonization, the cultural expressions and meanings of folklore, uses and applications of story-telling and folklore, and the role of community in defining the boundaries of story-telling and folkloric culture.
AAAS 3305 - African American Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will investigate how the imagery, poetics and politics of race have played out in the history of American film. Our focus will be African American cinema - which can be loosely defined as films written and/or directed by African Americans - but we will also consider the unique contours of its texts against the larger backdrop of Hollywood's representation of African Americans. In addition, we will explore the role of this medium in shaping social realities.
AMIN 1010 - American Indian Experience to 1900 (LE CAT, LECD C, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life up to 1900. Native-European encounters, the formation of the United States, and the establishments of hundreds of treaties between the federal government and Native nations has continued relevance for both Native peoples and Americans today. Students will critically interrogate how we interpret the past and how these narratives shape and inform the present. Credit will not be granted if already received for 1110.
AMIN 1020 - American Indian Experiences: 1900-present (LE CAT, LECD C, HUMANITIES, CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through a chronological and biographical approach, the social, economic, political, and cultural changes and continuities of American Indian life from 1900 to the present will be introduced. Significant changes experienced by American Indians as well as their ability to adapt, resist, and thrive will be analyzed. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 1120.
AMIN 2015 - Ojibwe History and Modern Culture (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines the cultural and political history of the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe/Chippewa life from origins to present day. Students will be introduced to the seasonal round and longstanding efforts for sustainability as well as the changes and continuities in these practices.
AMIN 3410 - Fur Trade in Canada and the United States (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Historical review and analysis of Canadian and U.S. Indians in the fur trades. prereq: minimum 30 credits
AMIN 3430 - Global Indigenous Studies (GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course fosters a consideration of the planet's indigenous peoples, emphasizing their various and varying cultural, territorial, political, social, legal, aesthetic, economic, and intellectual contributions and claims. Exploring indigenous peoples' relationships with one another, with settler governments, with non-governmental organizations, and with supranational institutions, students in the course will develop a broad understanding of the increasingly global trajectories of indigenous studies.
AMIN 3450 - American Indian Women (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AMIN 3450/WS 3455
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Native women are powerful and influential members of their communities both historically and in the present. By analyzing memoirs, autobiographies, documentaries, and a variety of secondary sources, students gain an understanding of the diverse experiences, contributions, and roles of Native women in both the past and the present. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3618 - Ancient Middle America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: minimum 30 credits
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey of major pre-Hispanic cultures of Mesoamerica, including the Olmecs, Maya, Toltecs, Mixtecs, and Aztecs. Using comparative ethnographic and archaeological materials, the course explores the arrival of hunter-gatherer-foragers, the beginnings of agriculture, and formation of early villages, native mathematical and calendar and writing systems, the florescence of regional art styles, and the religious sociopolitical, and economic development of Classical and Postclassical civilizations through the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3624 - Archaeology of North America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of archaeological data for major cultural areas of North America north of Mexico. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3635 - Anthropology of Europe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Exploration of European peoples to develop a cross-cultural understanding of how cultures function. Survey of social, political, economic, religious, family and kinship, gender, urban, globalism/globalization. prereq: minimum 30 credits
ANTH 3638 - Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: minimum 30 cr or instructor consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines how anthropologists study the cultures and social institutions of the modern Middle East. Focus on religion, family life, gender, politics, economy, urban ways of life, kinship and marriage, and the impacts of globalism. prereq: minimum 30 cr or instructor consent
ARTH 1303 - History of World Art I (LE CAT, HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of world art and architecture from prehistory through Middle Ages.
ARTH 1304 - History of World Art II (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Development of world art and architecture from Renaissance to present.
ARTH 1305 - History of World Art III (HUMANITIES, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the arts and visual culture of the Americas, Asia and Africa. This course aims to develop a critical understanding of art forms from global cultures. We will examine a range of visual material including painting, sculpture, ceramics, and architecture, from prehistoric times to present. We will also examine the critical debates that frame the study of "non-Western" art.
ARTH 2300 - The City as a Work of Art (LE CAT, HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The city as a work of art and center of culture. A study of artistic representations combined with references to primary texts. Use of case studies of particular urban centers to explore the rise of the city and the history of urban planning around the globe.
ARTH 2380 - A Global History of Contemporary Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course maps the trajectories of art and design from the 1970's to the present, paying close attention to: global movements; the terrains of the category called contemporary art; the modes through which globalization affects and challenges this terrain; and the role of art in world politics.
ARTH 2390 - US Art and Visual Culture in the 20th Century (LE CAT, LECD C, RACE JUST)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course offers an introduction to US art and visual culture - including architecture, painting, photography, sculpture, advertising, and performance art - from the 20th century, with some additional contextualization from the 19th century. More than simply offering a survey of stylistic changes over time, the class explores the social and political meanings of art. Students will acquire the tools necessary to analyze what art reveals about the nation's values and beliefs. While offering students exposure to a range of issues that are of critical concern to American society, the course will pay particular attention to questions surrounding gender, race, and ideology.
ARTH 3110 - Art of the Ancient Americas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
A selective visual introduction to the Americas before the Spanish Conquest, focusing on the form, function, and symbolism of Ancient American art and architecture and its role in the construction and maintenance of political power, religious belief and practice, concepts of space, and bodily performance.
ARTH 3130 - Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on modern and contemporary visual culture of Mexico from approximately 1860 to the present. It examines the dominant art forms of late nineteenth and twentieth century Mexico: these include post-revolutionary muralism and social realism; movements, artists, and visual genre outside of the nationalist traditional; abstraction, surrealism, the international avant-garde, urban planning, photography, print culture, film, performance, and conceptual art.
ARTH 3140 - Women in Art/Visual Culture in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course focuses on representations of women and by women in the art and visual culture of Mexico and other Latin American countries, examining the many ways in which the image of female body in Latin America has been used to construct and typify regional understandings of gender, class, racial, and national identities. Distinguishing between women as subject matter and women as producers of art, we will also look to female artists in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries to investigate how they might be engaging with and/or critiquing traditional iconographical representations.
ARTH 3150 - Contemporary Global Exhibition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class will examine the transformation of art worlds and urban spaces by the development of contemporary global exhibitions, such as various Art Biennales now held around the globe, Art Basel, Documenta, and the Sculpture Projects Munster. In particular, we will examine how such exhibitions, as well as globalization in general, have transformed the way art is created, distributed, and received.
ARTH 3330 - Renaissance Art & Architecture: Europe 1300 - 1550 (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores the art and architecture of Europe between 1300 and 1550. Focuses on issues central to understanding the period: relationship between patrons and artists, the changing status of the artist; the intersection of art and polities; representations of religious beliefs; and critical approaches to the stud of artists and their oeuvre.
ARTH 3331 - European Architecture and its Legacy (HUMANITIES)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Studies the history of architecture and the built environment in Europe from antiquity through 1800 by focusing on theoretical writings and representative building. In addition, the course will explore theories of spatial analysis and the legacy of western architecture into the present day.
ARTH 3340 - Baroque and Rococo: European Art & Architecture 1550 - 1750
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Explores the art and architecture produced in Europe during the Early Modern Period c. 1550 - c. 1750 (periods often referred to as the Baroque and Rococo). IOncludes study of canonical works and the artists that produced them; analysis of primary and secondary source materials, introduction to art historical methodologies; and consideration of the regional variations of the "baroque."
ARTH 3360 - Art and Social Change in Europe, Russia, and the United States
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is the relationship between artistic practice and polities? How do artists and their audiences engage with the visual in times of great social change? How do art and visual culture help us to engage with, understand, and change the world? This seminar offers weekly units that offer close examinations of major cultural moments of the modern and contemporary era, and range from the experimental and autonomous to the coervice and fascist. Topics will traverse Europe, Russia, and the United States from the 19th and into the 21st centuries. The exact content of the seminar may vary annually.
ARTH 3361 - Being and Becoming Modern: European Art 1855 - 1955
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This seminar traces a history of art practice from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century across the European continent. It follows key movements and figures of modern art, while emphasizing the social, political, and philosophical events that inform them. Beginning with Realism, and ending at the beginning of the Cold War, this course is bracketed by important questions pertaining to the role of the artist in reflecting upon, critiquing, and influencing national and global culture, writ large. Throughout the term we will also look beyond the limited scope of the fine arts canon to the larger visual cultures that inform and disrupt its boundaries. The exact content of the seminar, including its time period, may vary annually.
ARTH 3370 - Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Art and Visual Culture in the Cold War
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The Cold War marked a period of nearly five-decades of intense ideological, political, and economic division, which impacted all areas of the glove. This course examines art and visual culture across the period's two major world powers to demonstrate both fundamental discords as well as shared preoccupations. More than a study of the traditional geographies of the capitalist West and the communist East, this course offers insight into how the Cold War's globalization reached all ares of the glove, from the African continent to Latin America to Southeast Asia. A particular emphasis will be placed on experimental forms of culture, particularly in the late Cold War era.
ASL 4105 - History of the American Deaf Community (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: