Twin Cities campus

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Twin Cities Campus

Geography B.S.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2019
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 44 to 59
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Geography focuses on the integrated study of our increasingly connected world, shaped by the interactions between cultural and biophysical forces. The major synthesizes approaches widely used in the humanities, social, biophysical, and digital information sciences. Geography is uniquely poised to investigate combinations of social, political, economic, and ecological processes - especially the role of space, place, and geographic networks in shaping these processes and interactions. Geography attempts to interpret not just these phenomena, but also, how they are perceived and what meanings they hold. Such an integrative perspective on global, regional, and local change provides students with a singular understanding of today's complex world. Depending on their specific interests, geographers employ one or more research techniques, including field observation, legal and archival analysis, interviewing, textual analysis, ethnography, mapping, spatial statistics, and computer and econometric modeling. Many geographers are interested in the intersections of science, technology, and information, such as the application and evaluation of geographic information science on decision-making. All geography undergraduates are trained to be interdisciplinary to be better prepared to address some of the world’s most pressing problems including climate change, inequity, population growth, natural resource use and perception, and economic challenges. Students earning a degree in geography are well-prepared to pursue a wide range of career opportunities due to a strong foundation of interdisciplinary education and training. Students in geography engage in course work in the three primary subfields of the discipline: cultural patterns, environmental processes and global change, and geographic information and mapping sciences. Students pursuing the BS degree may also pursue the Geographic Information Sciences track emphasizing spatial and quantitative analysis skills. Geographers have a broad range of career opportunities. Federal, regional, and local governmental agencies seek geographers for city and regional planning, natural resource management, law enforcement, and transportation positions. Private industry consulting, environmental and marketing firms, the non-profit sector, and local, national, and transnational non-governmental organizations seek geographic skills including geographic information sciences and spatial analytical techniques. Many Geography undergraduate majors obtain careers in education and many go on to graduate school. The BS degree offers a challenging and solid foundation in the theory and practice of geography, with the flexibility needed to specialize in particular areas of student interest. Geography undergraduates are encouraged to tailor their individual programs to meet their needs and goals.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Some GEOG 5xxx-level courses are graduate-level courses and will require departmental consent. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. See major advisor for final approval of individual program. At least 14 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. Students may earn up to one undergraduate degree in the geography program: a BA, a BS, or a minor. Students in the Geography BS may also seek a major or minor in urban studies, or the minor in public health. Students who declare the Geographic Information Science sub-plan in the BS may not minor in Geographic Information Science. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence.
Ways of Knowing
The Ways of Knowing requirement provides a theory-intensive overview of the discipline. Students are encouraged to take 3-5 of their breadth courses and electives before taking their Ways of Knowing course.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
The Capstone is a process that may include data collection, reading, reflection, collaboration, and interpretation, and ends with writing a document. As the culmination of undergraduate training, each project develops from an interest or specialization deriving from previous courses. Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the geography BS capstone, and they do not need to replace the 2 credits.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 2 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Option 1: Seminar
Note: this option is not available every semester.
· GEOG 3985W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3985V {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Option 2: Directed Research
Note: this option requires instructor consent prior to the first day of classes.
· GEOG 3996 {Inactive} (3.0-4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3996H {Inactive} (3.0-4.0 cr)
· Option 3: Supplemental Project
Note: this option requires instructor consent prior to the first day of classes and concurrent registration in a breadth or elective course.
· GEOG 3997 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
or GEOG 3997H {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar [WI] (2.0 cr)
· URBS 3301W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3374V {Inactive} [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3985W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3985V {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Environmental Geography
Breadth Requirement
Breadth courses expose students to geography sub-fields. Students may count ONLY one 1xxx course toward the breadth requirement.
Human Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3101 {Inactive} [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 {Inactive} [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Geography of the Twin Cities
· GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Environmental Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Geographic Information Science
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World [TS, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3521 {Inactive} [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3523 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
Supporting Courses
Note: Some courses require prerequisites. For more information consult the university catalog, or contact the department offering the course directly.
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Mathematics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1155 {Inactive} [MATH] (5.0 cr)
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· Basic Statistics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· Intermediate & Advanced Statistics
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· Programming & Logic
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 1005H {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· Physical Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1202W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Earth Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 1006 - Oceanography [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1106 - Oceanography [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· Biological & Environmental Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Students should work with the departmental advisor to develop a coherent set of electives that meet specific educational goals. Courses counting toward the electives requirements must be worth three or four credits each. In some circumstances, students may substitute 2 two-credit courses for one of the electives. At least 9 of the 15 elective credits must be from the list of Environmental Geography & Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
Environmental Geography & Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Students may petition to take additional courses under the GIS designator for major credit when prerequisites have been met.
Take 3 - 5 course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Environmental Geography Electives
Take 0 - 5 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Take 0 - 5 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5578 - GIS Programming (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· Additional Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3101 {Inactive} [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3211 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3377 - Music in the City [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3521 {Inactive} [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3523 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3362 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5393 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· URBS 3301W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3861 - Financing Cities (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3871 - A Suburban World (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3645 {Inactive} [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3921 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3374V {Inactive} [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5374 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 {Inactive} [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Geographic Information Science
This sub-plan meets federal STEM program requirements. Where does geographic information come from? How can science and society make use of such information? How can geographic information science contribute to urban development and environmental studies? This sub-plan exposes students to a range of applications, including land use and land cover change, environmental justice, mobility studies, transportation improvements, urban, regional and environmental planning, resource conservation, society-technology relations, cyberGIS, and big data analytics.
Breadth Requirement
Breadth courses expose students to geography sub-fields. Students may count ONLY one 1xxx course toward the breadth requirement.
Human Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3101 {Inactive} [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 {Inactive} [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Geography of the Twin Cities
· GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
Environmental Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Geographic Information Science
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
Supporting Courses
Note: Some courses require prerequisites. For more information consult the university catalog, or contact the department offering the course directly. Take 3 of the 4 required Supporting Courses from the following course groups: Mathematics, Basic Statistics, Intermediate & Advanced Statistics, and Programming and Logic.
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Mathematics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1155 {Inactive} [MATH] (5.0 cr)
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· Basic Statistics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· Intermediate & Advanced Statistics
Take 0 - 2 course(s) from the following:
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· Programming & Logic
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 1005H {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· Physical Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1202W {Inactive} [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Earth Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 1006 - Oceanography [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1106 - Oceanography [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· Biological & Environmental Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Students should work with the departmental advisor to develop a coherent set of electives that meet specific educational goals. Courses counting toward the electives requirements must be worth three or four credits each. In some circumstances, students may substitute 2 two-credit courses for one of the electives. At least 9 of the 15 elective credits must be Geographic Information Sciences Electives. One of the Geographic Information Sciences Electives must be taken at the 5xxx level.
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Students may petition to take additional courses under the GIS designator for major credit when prerequisites have been met.
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· Advanced Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Take 1 - 5 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5578 - GIS Programming (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· Additional Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3101 {Inactive} [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3211 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3377 - Music in the City [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3521 {Inactive} [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3523 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3362 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5393 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· URBS 3301W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3861 - Financing Cities (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3871 - A Suburban World (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3645 {Inactive} [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3921 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3374V {Inactive} [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5374 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 {Inactive} [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W {Inactive} [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2022
· Spring 2021
· Fall 2020
· Summer 2019

View sample plan(s):
· Geography BS - Environmental Interest (4-Year Plan)
· Geography BS - Environmental Interest (2-Year Plan)
· Environmental Geography Sample Plan (4-Year Plan)
· Environmental Geography Sample Plan (2-Year Plan)
· Geographic Information Science Sample Plan (4-Year Plan)

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· Geography B.S.
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GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods/resources for research. Substantial writing. prereq: dept consent
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
An invisible, not-quite-dead, not-quite-alive entity?the coronavirus?forced us, rudely and tragically, to reckon with space. As we try and maintain social distance from other bodies, wear masks to disrupt the virus? pathways of diffusion, confront shortages in grocery stores, home supply outlets, and car dealerships, adjust to interruptions in many services, and either choose to, or are forced to stay at home, in our cities, in our countries, we are thinking and acting spatially. And we are reminded that ?stuff??food, medicines, toilet paper?reaches us often through geographically extensive and logistically intricate webs of economic production and distribution. We will learn what it means to think geographically about the capitalist economy as a spatial, relational formation. In doing so, we will challenge dominant ways of understanding and analyzing the economy, and of what counts as economic. We will also examine two simultaneous aspects of the world economy?fixity and flow. On the one hand, the economy propels and is propelled by flows?of goods, of services, of people, of labor, and of finance. On the other hand, physical infrastructures are rooted in place on the earth. After all, even the digital worlds of Facebook, Google, and Amazon are enabled by vast server farms. The course will also highlight the production and proliferation of inequalities?between social groups, states, countries, and regions?in and by the world economy. In fact, we will ask: Is economic unevenness a mere byproduct of capitalist economic growth, or the condition of possibility for it? Finally, we will discuss the relationships between global phenomena and local events. Crises like global climate change, overflows of waste matter, COVID19, and the 2008 financial meltdown make it clear that the global and the local are intimately entangled. Not only do global events impact individual livelihoods, including yours and mine, but economic jitters in one place can escalate, sending shockwaves across the world.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inequality in the form of extreme wealth and poverty in our world are major causes of environmental degradation. In addition, development failure as well as certain forms of economic growth always led to environment disasters. This course examines how our world?s economic and political systems and the livelihoods they engender have produced catastrophic local and global environmental conditions. Beyond this, the course explores alternative approaches of achieving sustainable environment and equitable development. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us live in cities and thus in urban-modified climates. In this course you?ll learn how and why cities can affect their immediate ? and possibly regional and global ? environments. You?ll also get experience with urban climate research via a project we will develop together as a class. You?ll draw on public documents and research papers, collect and analyze data, and collaborate with your colleagues (and your instructor) to bring the project to completion. The research and problem-solving skills you develop or refine in this course are ones you can draw on in your other courses and in your post-graduate career.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The landscape is shaped by complex interactions among plants, animals, and the physical environment. Where, when, and why different organisms live and interact where they do is influenced by myriad interacting forces. This course aims to provide an opportunity to investigate some specific patterns on the landscape by examining changes over time and space, and among communities comprised of multiple species assemblages. In this course, we will explore a variety of topics, depending on student interests and skills, that relate to biogeography and interactions among the landscape and people. We will examine the different factors that influence population change and examine species interactions, including concepts of keystone species, disturbance/landscape ecology, and species conservation approaches. Principally, we will complete readings and activities that touch on emerging issues in biogeography such as pathways to improving public land management, the incorporation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into ecological restoration plans, wilderness and federal lands policy, and the increasing challenge of invasive species.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3839/Geog 5839
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of past landscape histories are critical for assessing how environments change and identifying causal mechanisms. Tree-rings, the annual growth rings formed by trees growing in temperate regions, are an instrumental tool for elucidating changes over time. As biological entities, tree-rings are recorders of changes in their surroundings. The application of tree-rings to understand environmental change is called dendrochronology. Dendrochronology has played an important role in understanding past climates, disturbance regimes, and the history of Indigenous peoples (to name just a few applications). Its use has been critical to understanding pressing environmental issues such as 20th century global warming, the impacts of fire suppression on forested landscapes, the loss of the Black Forest in Europe (pollution), and the use/abandonment of archaeological sites (the Anasazi and Ojibwe). It is an exceedingly interesting analytical tool that has unique applications, but it isn?t as simple as counting the rings of trees to determine an age. In this course we will focus on the biology, theoretical principles, and operational techniques of dendrochronology and apply this knowledge toward understanding forest change. By the end of the course students will be able to conduct basic dendrochronological research and appreciate the advantages and limitations of this important tool. My aim is to expose you to the foundational science behind the field, provide you with some simple tools, and introduce you to the variety of applications to which tree-ring analysis can be applied by doing some dendrochronological research. We will apply the tools of dendrochronology toward understanding forest dynamics in a specific landscape to examine fire and tree growth patterns and the influence of climate and people on the forested environment. This course will be a mixture of lecture and hands-on data analysis. The primary approach for this course is the development of a group research project utilizing data that is either collected in the field for a specific purpose or the use of data that is already archived. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes. prereq: Honors
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World (TS, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Learn how maps and other spatial technologies like phones, drones, and GPS work. Use web-based tools to make maps for class, jobs, and fun. Explore how mapping is a useful lens through which to view interactions between technology and society, and see how mapping technology saves lives, rigs elections, and spies on people.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
GEOG 3511/5511 is a basic introduction to cartography?the art, science, and technology of maps and map making. Our primary emphasis will be on map making, with lesser emphasis on cartographic research and the history of cartography. Lectures will focus on modern cartographic design principles, how they were developed, and how they might be changing. Lab assignments help develop skills using digital tools for producing effective maps. The course has several specific learning objectives: ? use software to create maps that communicate their subjects appropriately and effectively using sound cartographic design principles ? acquire or produce a base map that is appropriate in scale, projection, and generalization ? select and aggregate data appropriately to represent on a map using a suitable symbolization strategy ? gain an understanding of how current changes in technology impact maps and map making ? understand how fundamental design decisions might differ for printed maps and web/mobile maps ? understand how contemporary GIS and cartography are interrelated, including the use of GIS becoming ubiquitous and map making becoming increasingly available to anyone ? gain an appreciation for the 3,500+ year history of maps! prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math1151/Math1155
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H (or equivalent) honors student
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: linear equations/systems, phase space, forcing/resonance, qualitative/numerical analysis of nonlinear systems, Laplace transforms. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bio Prod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: STAT 3021/STAT 3021H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.
PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Symbolization of natural-language sentences and arguments. Development of deductive systems for first-order logic. Metatheoretic proofs and methods, including proof by mathematical induction and proof of consistency and completeness. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Elements of set theory, including the concepts of enumerability and nonenumerability. Turing machines and recursive functions; the results of Church, Godel, and Tarski and the philosophical significance of those results. prereq: 5201 or instr consent
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1005/Phil 1005H
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. The online modality for CSci 1113 will only be offered during the summer session. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent.
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types(stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Scripting languages using Python language. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab. prereq: (EE major and EE 1301) or (CmpE major and EE 1301) or 1103 or 1113 or instr consent
CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. prereq: 1133 or instr consent
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/ 1071/H/ 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/ 1071/H/ 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: prereq or coreq 1071H; honors student or permission of University Honors Program
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072/1072H/1082/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072/1072H/1082/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC major], instr consent
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems. Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3402/ESci 5402
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using concepts of radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts/controversy over responses/consequences.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
ESCI 1006 - Oceanography (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, and human interaction with the sea. Labs include study of live marine invertebrates, manipulation of oceanographic data, and discussion using videos showing unique aspects of ocean research.
ESCI 1106 - Oceanography (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, human interaction with sea.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4068/EEB 5068
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB3001/3407/3408W/5407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB3001/3407/3408W/5407
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: ?Why is that animal doing that?? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. The lecture parallels a required laboratory. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a field station, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study of animal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicate to one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both of these. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independent research project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90 points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade. This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period in May/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us live in cities and thus in urban-modified climates. In this course you?ll learn how and why cities can affect their immediate ? and possibly regional and global ? environments. You?ll also get experience with urban climate research via a project we will develop together as a class. You?ll draw on public documents and research papers, collect and analyze data, and collaborate with your colleagues (and your instructor) to bring the project to completion. The research and problem-solving skills you develop or refine in this course are ones you can draw on in your other courses and in your post-graduate career.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The landscape is shaped by complex interactions among plants, animals, and the physical environment. Where, when, and why different organisms live and interact where they do is influenced by myriad interacting forces. This course aims to provide an opportunity to investigate some specific patterns on the landscape by examining changes over time and space, and among communities comprised of multiple species assemblages. In this course, we will explore a variety of topics, depending on student interests and skills, that relate to biogeography and interactions among the landscape and people. We will examine the different factors that influence population change and examine species interactions, including concepts of keystone species, disturbance/landscape ecology, and species conservation approaches. Principally, we will complete readings and activities that touch on emerging issues in biogeography such as pathways to improving public land management, the incorporation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into ecological restoration plans, wilderness and federal lands policy, and the increasing challenge of invasive species.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3839/Geog 5839
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of past landscape histories are critical for assessing how environments change and identifying causal mechanisms. Tree-rings, the annual growth rings formed by trees growing in temperate regions, are an instrumental tool for elucidating changes over time. As biological entities, tree-rings are recorders of changes in their surroundings. The application of tree-rings to understand environmental change is called dendrochronology. Dendrochronology has played an important role in understanding past climates, disturbance regimes, and the history of Indigenous peoples (to name just a few applications). Its use has been critical to understanding pressing environmental issues such as 20th century global warming, the impacts of fire suppression on forested landscapes, the loss of the Black Forest in Europe (pollution), and the use/abandonment of archaeological sites (the Anasazi and Ojibwe). It is an exceedingly interesting analytical tool that has unique applications, but it isn?t as simple as counting the rings of trees to determine an age. In this course we will focus on the biology, theoretical principles, and operational techniques of dendrochronology and apply this knowledge toward understanding forest change. By the end of the course students will be able to conduct basic dendrochronological research and appreciate the advantages and limitations of this important tool. My aim is to expose you to the foundational science behind the field, provide you with some simple tools, and introduce you to the variety of applications to which tree-ring analysis can be applied by doing some dendrochronological research. We will apply the tools of dendrochronology toward understanding forest dynamics in a specific landscape to examine fire and tree growth patterns and the influence of climate and people on the forested environment. This course will be a mixture of lecture and hands-on data analysis. The primary approach for this course is the development of a group research project utilizing data that is either collected in the field for a specific purpose or the use of data that is already archived. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
GEOG 3511/5511 is a basic introduction to cartography?the art, science, and technology of maps and map making. Our primary emphasis will be on map making, with lesser emphasis on cartographic research and the history of cartography. Lectures will focus on modern cartographic design principles, how they were developed, and how they might be changing. Lab assignments help develop skills using digital tools for producing effective maps. The course has several specific learning objectives: ? use software to create maps that communicate their subjects appropriately and effectively using sound cartographic design principles ? acquire or produce a base map that is appropriate in scale, projection, and generalization ? select and aggregate data appropriately to represent on a map using a suitable symbolization strategy ? gain an understanding of how current changes in technology impact maps and map making ? understand how fundamental design decisions might differ for printed maps and web/mobile maps ? understand how contemporary GIS and cartography are interrelated, including the use of GIS becoming ubiquitous and map making becoming increasingly available to anyone ? gain an appreciation for the 3,500+ year history of maps! prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to use spatial data to answer questions on a wide array of social, natural, and information science issues. Exploratory data analysis/visualization. Spatial autocorrelation analysis/regression. prereq: [STAT 3001 or equiv, MGIS student] or instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This Python-focused GIS course is intended for students who have some Python programming experience, or have experience with other programming language(s) and knowledge transferable to Python. Following a review of Python basics, students will use Python modules for spatial data management, mapping, and analysis, including ArcGIS's ArcPy package; work with classes in Python; develop custom modules; and create development environments. A semester-long programming project applying Python skills to a GIS challenge is a significant component of the course. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
The evolution of Minnesota and its current geographical characteristics. The state is a unique political entity that possesses similarities with other states because of the homogenizing influence of the federal government.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems and political economic processes are intimately connected. The latter shape where and how people encounter nature, who has access to resources, and which communities are exposed to or protected from environmental harms. In this course, you will join others in examining how environmental problems are produced and how people organize to address them. Through readings, video, film, and lectures you will learn to identify the racial and class dimensions of environmental change. You will also understand the goals and principles of the environmental justice movement and explore inspiring struggles to build socially just ecological relations. Over the course of the semester you will acquire robust analytical and theoretical tools for understanding the political and ecological dimensions of racial capitalism and settler colonialism and learn how alternative social and ecological worlds might be generated and sustained.
GEOG 3377 - Music in the City (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Why is music so central to the life of the city? Throughout the ages, throughout the world, music seems to have a special power to fill urban space with meaning. This is mostly why the music industry is always desperately trying to chase the new ways music is produced and consumed. Much about the rapid changes in the industry can be linked to changes taking place in the geography of cities and globalization. Through music, people feel connected to landscapes, neighborhoods, buildings, and identities. Music gives value to places, so helps cement us/them divisions, a process easily seen (heard) in national anthems. This course tries to understand how the interplay exactly occurs between sounds, places, and differences through case studies from many genres. The course makes use of a large range of media and learning styles. Themes include the transnational circuits of reggae, the class backgrounds of punk, Motown and civil rights, psychedelic counterculture, underground electronic music, and the ambivalent identities of Minneapolis's very own Prince.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are you wondering whether you will be able to travel as you did a few years ago? One of the largest industries, tourism is in a profound crisis. This course understands tourism in relation to other kinds of mobility, like shopping, colonialism, trafficking, migration, and pilgrimage. As the negative environmental and health impacts of tourism have become obvious, significant demands have emerged on its practices and policies. Investigating the landscapes and economies of cars, planes, beaches, parks, malls, and museums, we come to appreciate the unique challenges tourism poses for global citizenship and the planet. To gain a critical geographical understanding of mobility we engage a range of ethical frameworks such as human rights, feminism, social justice, and utilitarianism. Our final destination is an informed and critical ethics of travel in the age of pandemics and climate change.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Special topics/regions covered by visiting professors in their research fields.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Importance of transit to an urban area. Issues surrounding development/operation of transit. Defining various modes of transit, evaluating why/where each may be used. Making capital improvements to transit system. Finance, travel demand forecasting, environmental assessment, scheduling, evaluation of effectiveness/accessibility.
URBS 3861 - Financing Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The most critical question in government is how you are going to pay for something. There is a plethora of good ideas but only so much money. This class looks at how cities are funded. It looks at tax systems, fee systems, grants, special revenues, private development funding and other ways that we pay for cities. It provides practical knowledge on how city activities are funded.
URBS 3871 - A Suburban World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Suburbs as sites of urgent battles over resources, planning practices, land use, and economic development. How suburban life shapes values, political ideals, and worldviews of its populations.
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Islamic World is an overarching course on the Muslim world that addresses the following intellectual concerns: 1. Islam and its contribution to the emergence of the modern world 2. Medieval Muslim civilization and their contribution to human culture 3. The relationship between Islam and gender roles in different Muslim cultures 4. The Muslim community?s struggle against colonialism and post-colonialism 5. Islam?s role in the struggle for Democracy and Development in the Muslim World 6. The relationships between Islam and the environment 7. The relationships between Islam and human rights 8. The relations between the West?s war on terror and the terror of War in the Muslim World
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Islamic World is an overarching course on the Muslim world that addresses the following intellectual concerns: 1. Islam and its contribution to the emergence of the modern world 2. Medieval Muslim civilization and their contribution to human culture 3. The relationship between Islam and gender roles in different Muslim cultures 4. The Muslim community?s struggle against colonialism and post-colonialism 5. Islam?s role in the struggle for Democracy and Development in the Muslim World 6. The relationships between Islam and the environment 7. The relationships between Islam and human rights 8. The relations between the West?s war on terror and the terror of War in the Muslim World
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3161/GLoS 3921
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
It is impossible to think about the contemporary world without the lasting impact Europe has had on it. But what are the deeper reasons for Europe to emerge as a dominant region from the late Middle Ages onwards? Why has Europe recently found itself in profound economic and political, even existential crisis? Historical geography provides answers. Divided by landscape, language, religion, and war, European empires imposed the state-form, capitalism, and their cultures on the rest of the world. European societies even became the supposed standard for how all humanity is meant to live. But there have always been cracks in this success story. The project of the European Union promised peace and prosperity for half a billion people but faces unprecedented challenges, from Brexit, the Ukraine war, and the return of state racism to climate change and covid. This course will guide you through Europe?s general historical characteristics to understand how it shaped globalization.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
An invisible, not-quite-dead, not-quite-alive entity?the coronavirus?forced us, rudely and tragically, to reckon with space. As we try and maintain social distance from other bodies, wear masks to disrupt the virus? pathways of diffusion, confront shortages in grocery stores, home supply outlets, and car dealerships, adjust to interruptions in many services, and either choose to, or are forced to stay at home, in our cities, in our countries, we are thinking and acting spatially. And we are reminded that ?stuff??food, medicines, toilet paper?reaches us often through geographically extensive and logistically intricate webs of economic production and distribution. We will learn what it means to think geographically about the capitalist economy as a spatial, relational formation. In doing so, we will challenge dominant ways of understanding and analyzing the economy, and of what counts as economic. We will also examine two simultaneous aspects of the world economy?fixity and flow. On the one hand, the economy propels and is propelled by flows?of goods, of services, of people, of labor, and of finance. On the other hand, physical infrastructures are rooted in place on the earth. After all, even the digital worlds of Facebook, Google, and Amazon are enabled by vast server farms. The course will also highlight the production and proliferation of inequalities?between social groups, states, countries, and regions?in and by the world economy. In fact, we will ask: Is economic unevenness a mere byproduct of capitalist economic growth, or the condition of possibility for it? Finally, we will discuss the relationships between global phenomena and local events. Crises like global climate change, overflows of waste matter, COVID19, and the 2008 financial meltdown make it clear that the global and the local are intimately entangled. Not only do global events impact individual livelihoods, including yours and mine, but economic jitters in one place can escalate, sending shockwaves across the world.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inequality in the form of extreme wealth and poverty in our world are major causes of environmental degradation. In addition, development failure as well as certain forms of economic growth always led to environment disasters. This course examines how our world?s economic and political systems and the livelihoods they engender have produced catastrophic local and global environmental conditions. Beyond this, the course explores alternative approaches of achieving sustainable environment and equitable development. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
An invisible, not-quite-dead, not-quite-alive entity?the coronavirus?forced us, rudely and tragically, to reckon with space. As we try and maintain social distance from other bodies, wear masks to disrupt the virus? pathways of diffusion, confront shortages in grocery stores, home supply outlets, and car dealerships, adjust to interruptions in many services, and either choose to, or are forced to stay at home, in our cities, in our countries, we are thinking and acting spatially. And we are reminded that ?stuff??food, medicines, toilet paper?reaches us often through geographically extensive and logistically intricate webs of economic production and distribution. We will learn what it means to think geographically about the capitalist economy as a spatial, relational formation. In doing so, we will challenge dominant ways of understanding and analyzing the economy, and of what counts as economic. We will also examine two simultaneous aspects of the world economy?fixity and flow. On the one hand, the economy propels and is propelled by flows?of goods, of services, of people, of labor, and of finance. On the other hand, physical infrastructures are rooted in place on the earth. After all, even the digital worlds of Facebook, Google, and Amazon are enabled by vast server farms. The course will also highlight the production and proliferation of inequalities?between social groups, states, countries, and regions?in and by the world economy. In fact, we will ask: Is economic unevenness a mere byproduct of capitalist economic growth, or the condition of possibility for it? Finally, we will discuss the relationships between global phenomena and local events. Crises like global climate change, overflows of waste matter, COVID19, and the 2008 financial meltdown make it clear that the global and the local are intimately entangled. Not only do global events impact individual livelihoods, including yours and mine, but economic jitters in one place can escalate, sending shockwaves across the world.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inequality in the form of extreme wealth and poverty in our world are major causes of environmental degradation. In addition, development failure as well as certain forms of economic growth always led to environment disasters. This course examines how our world?s economic and political systems and the livelihoods they engender have produced catastrophic local and global environmental conditions. Beyond this, the course explores alternative approaches of achieving sustainable environment and equitable development. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us live in cities and thus in urban-modified climates. In this course you?ll learn how and why cities can affect their immediate ? and possibly regional and global ? environments. You?ll also get experience with urban climate research via a project we will develop together as a class. You?ll draw on public documents and research papers, collect and analyze data, and collaborate with your colleagues (and your instructor) to bring the project to completion. The research and problem-solving skills you develop or refine in this course are ones you can draw on in your other courses and in your post-graduate career.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The landscape is shaped by complex interactions among plants, animals, and the physical environment. Where, when, and why different organisms live and interact where they do is influenced by myriad interacting forces. This course aims to provide an opportunity to investigate some specific patterns on the landscape by examining changes over time and space, and among communities comprised of multiple species assemblages. In this course, we will explore a variety of topics, depending on student interests and skills, that relate to biogeography and interactions among the landscape and people. We will examine the different factors that influence population change and examine species interactions, including concepts of keystone species, disturbance/landscape ecology, and species conservation approaches. Principally, we will complete readings and activities that touch on emerging issues in biogeography such as pathways to improving public land management, the incorporation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into ecological restoration plans, wilderness and federal lands policy, and the increasing challenge of invasive species.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3839/Geog 5839
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of past landscape histories are critical for assessing how environments change and identifying causal mechanisms. Tree-rings, the annual growth rings formed by trees growing in temperate regions, are an instrumental tool for elucidating changes over time. As biological entities, tree-rings are recorders of changes in their surroundings. The application of tree-rings to understand environmental change is called dendrochronology. Dendrochronology has played an important role in understanding past climates, disturbance regimes, and the history of Indigenous peoples (to name just a few applications). Its use has been critical to understanding pressing environmental issues such as 20th century global warming, the impacts of fire suppression on forested landscapes, the loss of the Black Forest in Europe (pollution), and the use/abandonment of archaeological sites (the Anasazi and Ojibwe). It is an exceedingly interesting analytical tool that has unique applications, but it isn?t as simple as counting the rings of trees to determine an age. In this course we will focus on the biology, theoretical principles, and operational techniques of dendrochronology and apply this knowledge toward understanding forest change. By the end of the course students will be able to conduct basic dendrochronological research and appreciate the advantages and limitations of this important tool. My aim is to expose you to the foundational science behind the field, provide you with some simple tools, and introduce you to the variety of applications to which tree-ring analysis can be applied by doing some dendrochronological research. We will apply the tools of dendrochronology toward understanding forest dynamics in a specific landscape to examine fire and tree growth patterns and the influence of climate and people on the forested environment. This course will be a mixture of lecture and hands-on data analysis. The primary approach for this course is the development of a group research project utilizing data that is either collected in the field for a specific purpose or the use of data that is already archived. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes. prereq: Honors
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
GEOG 3511/5511 is a basic introduction to cartography?the art, science, and technology of maps and map making. Our primary emphasis will be on map making, with lesser emphasis on cartographic research and the history of cartography. Lectures will focus on modern cartographic design principles, how they were developed, and how they might be changing. Lab assignments help develop skills using digital tools for producing effective maps. The course has several specific learning objectives: ? use software to create maps that communicate their subjects appropriately and effectively using sound cartographic design principles ? acquire or produce a base map that is appropriate in scale, projection, and generalization ? select and aggregate data appropriately to represent on a map using a suitable symbolization strategy ? gain an understanding of how current changes in technology impact maps and map making ? understand how fundamental design decisions might differ for printed maps and web/mobile maps ? understand how contemporary GIS and cartography are interrelated, including the use of GIS becoming ubiquitous and map making becoming increasingly available to anyone ? gain an appreciation for the 3,500+ year history of maps! prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math1151/Math1155
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/1281/1371/1471/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H (or equivalent) honors student
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: linear equations/systems, phase space, forcing/resonance, qualitative/numerical analysis of nonlinear systems, Laplace transforms. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bio Prod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: STAT 3021/STAT 3021H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.
PHIL 5201 - Symbolic Logic I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of syntax and semantics of sentential and first-order logic. Symbolization of natural-language sentences and arguments. Development of deductive systems for first-order logic. Metatheoretic proofs and methods, including proof by mathematical induction and proof of consistency and completeness. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
PHIL 5202 - Symbolic Logic II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Elements of set theory, including the concepts of enumerability and nonenumerability. Turing machines and recursive functions; the results of Church, Godel, and Tarski and the philosophical significance of those results. prereq: 5201 or instr consent
PHIL 1005 - Scientific Reasoning
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phil 1005/Phil 1005H
Typically offered: Every Fall
How does science work? What is scientific method? How to evaluate scientific information in popular media or specialized publications, especially when it relates to technology used in everyday life? General reasoning skills. prereq: [1st or 2nd] yr student or instr consent
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. The online modality for CSci 1113 will only be offered during the summer session. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent.
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types(stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Scripting languages using Python language. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab. prereq: (EE major and EE 1301) or (CmpE major and EE 1301) or 1103 or 1113 or instr consent
CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. prereq: 1133 or instr consent
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/ 1071/H/ 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/ 1071/H/ 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: prereq or coreq 1071H; honors student or permission of University Honors Program
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072/1072H/1082/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/1072/1072H/1082/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2332HChem 2304
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H/2312
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC major], instr consent
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1101W/Phys 1107
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems. Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3402/ESci 5402
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using concepts of radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts/controversy over responses/consequences.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1001/ESci 1101/ESci 1005/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
ESCI 1006 - Oceanography (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, and human interaction with the sea. Labs include study of live marine invertebrates, manipulation of oceanographic data, and discussion using videos showing unique aspects of ocean research.
ESCI 1106 - Oceanography (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, human interaction with sea.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
What does it mean to be human? This question, central to the discipline of anthropology, has provided inspiration to scientists, philosophers, and artists for many centuries. In this course, we will begin to answer this question using the scientific study of the biological and cultural evolution of the human lineage. The first half of the term will introduce you to basic concepts in evolutionary theory: natural selection, genetics, behavioral ecology, and comparative anatomy. Using these tools, we will then spend the rest of the semester reconstructing the ecology, diet, anatomy, and behavior of our early ancestors, from the first apes to walk on two legs to the modern humans that conquered the globe. Weekly readings and lectures will provide the theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary biology of Homo sapiens; laboratory sections will give you an opportunity to apply these theories and evaluate the fossil evidence for yourself. Through this combined approach, we will tackle such important questions as: What features define the human lineage? In what ecological setting did our ancestors become bipedal? What role did global climate change play in our evolution? How did tool use and cultural evolution feedback into our biological evolution? When and where did modern humans originate and what behaviors characterized this emergence? Why were there many species of humans in the past but only one today? Why is it important for the future of humanity for the average citizen to understand the principles of evolution as applied to the human animal? Upon completion of this course, you will have a broad knowledge of the role biological anthropology plays within the discipline of anthropology. More importantly, however, you will acquire a better understanding of the biological heritage of our species and our place among other forms of life on our planet.
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4068/EEB 5068
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
ANTH 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.
EEB 3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
ANTH 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture. prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB3001/3407/3408W/5407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB3001/3407/3408W/5407
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: ?Why is that animal doing that?? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. The lecture parallels a required laboratory. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
EEB 3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a field station, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study of animal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicate to one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both of these. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independent research project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90 points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade. This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period in May/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology course Credit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
GEOG 3511/5511 is a basic introduction to cartography?the art, science, and technology of maps and map making. Our primary emphasis will be on map making, with lesser emphasis on cartographic research and the history of cartography. Lectures will focus on modern cartographic design principles, how they were developed, and how they might be changing. Lab assignments help develop skills using digital tools for producing effective maps. The course has several specific learning objectives: ? use software to create maps that communicate their subjects appropriately and effectively using sound cartographic design principles ? acquire or produce a base map that is appropriate in scale, projection, and generalization ? select and aggregate data appropriately to represent on a map using a suitable symbolization strategy ? gain an understanding of how current changes in technology impact maps and map making ? understand how fundamental design decisions might differ for printed maps and web/mobile maps ? understand how contemporary GIS and cartography are interrelated, including the use of GIS becoming ubiquitous and map making becoming increasingly available to anyone ? gain an appreciation for the 3,500+ year history of maps! prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to use spatial data to answer questions on a wide array of social, natural, and information science issues. Exploratory data analysis/visualization. Spatial autocorrelation analysis/regression. prereq: [STAT 3001 or equiv, MGIS student] or instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This Python-focused GIS course is intended for students who have some Python programming experience, or have experience with other programming language(s) and knowledge transferable to Python. Following a review of Python basics, students will use Python modules for spatial data management, mapping, and analysis, including ArcGIS's ArcPy package; work with classes in Python; develop custom modules; and create development environments. A semester-long programming project applying Python skills to a GIS challenge is a significant component of the course. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us live in cities and thus in urban-modified climates. In this course you?ll learn how and why cities can affect their immediate ? and possibly regional and global ? environments. You?ll also get experience with urban climate research via a project we will develop together as a class. You?ll draw on public documents and research papers, collect and analyze data, and collaborate with your colleagues (and your instructor) to bring the project to completion. The research and problem-solving skills you develop or refine in this course are ones you can draw on in your other courses and in your post-graduate career.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The landscape is shaped by complex interactions among plants, animals, and the physical environment. Where, when, and why different organisms live and interact where they do is influenced by myriad interacting forces. This course aims to provide an opportunity to investigate some specific patterns on the landscape by examining changes over time and space, and among communities comprised of multiple species assemblages. In this course, we will explore a variety of topics, depending on student interests and skills, that relate to biogeography and interactions among the landscape and people. We will examine the different factors that influence population change and examine species interactions, including concepts of keystone species, disturbance/landscape ecology, and species conservation approaches. Principally, we will complete readings and activities that touch on emerging issues in biogeography such as pathways to improving public land management, the incorporation of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) into ecological restoration plans, wilderness and federal lands policy, and the increasing challenge of invasive species.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3839/Geog 5839
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examination of past landscape histories are critical for assessing how environments change and identifying causal mechanisms. Tree-rings, the annual growth rings formed by trees growing in temperate regions, are an instrumental tool for elucidating changes over time. As biological entities, tree-rings are recorders of changes in their surroundings. The application of tree-rings to understand environmental change is called dendrochronology. Dendrochronology has played an important role in understanding past climates, disturbance regimes, and the history of Indigenous peoples (to name just a few applications). Its use has been critical to understanding pressing environmental issues such as 20th century global warming, the impacts of fire suppression on forested landscapes, the loss of the Black Forest in Europe (pollution), and the use/abandonment of archaeological sites (the Anasazi and Ojibwe). It is an exceedingly interesting analytical tool that has unique applications, but it isn?t as simple as counting the rings of trees to determine an age. In this course we will focus on the biology, theoretical principles, and operational techniques of dendrochronology and apply this knowledge toward understanding forest change. By the end of the course students will be able to conduct basic dendrochronological research and appreciate the advantages and limitations of this important tool. My aim is to expose you to the foundational science behind the field, provide you with some simple tools, and introduce you to the variety of applications to which tree-ring analysis can be applied by doing some dendrochronological research. We will apply the tools of dendrochronology toward understanding forest dynamics in a specific landscape to examine fire and tree growth patterns and the influence of climate and people on the forested environment. This course will be a mixture of lecture and hands-on data analysis. The primary approach for this course is the development of a group research project utilizing data that is either collected in the field for a specific purpose or the use of data that is already archived. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
The evolution of Minnesota and its current geographical characteristics. The state is a unique political entity that possesses similarities with other states because of the homogenizing influence of the federal government.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems and political economic processes are intimately connected. The latter shape where and how people encounter nature, who has access to resources, and which communities are exposed to or protected from environmental harms. In this course, you will join others in examining how environmental problems are produced and how people organize to address them. Through readings, video, film, and lectures you will learn to identify the racial and class dimensions of environmental change. You will also understand the goals and principles of the environmental justice movement and explore inspiring struggles to build socially just ecological relations. Over the course of the semester you will acquire robust analytical and theoretical tools for understanding the political and ecological dimensions of racial capitalism and settler colonialism and learn how alternative social and ecological worlds might be generated and sustained.
GEOG 3377 - Music in the City (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Why is music so central to the life of the city? Throughout the ages, throughout the world, music seems to have a special power to fill urban space with meaning. This is mostly why the music industry is always desperately trying to chase the new ways music is produced and consumed. Much about the rapid changes in the industry can be linked to changes taking place in the geography of cities and globalization. Through music, people feel connected to landscapes, neighborhoods, buildings, and identities. Music gives value to places, so helps cement us/them divisions, a process easily seen (heard) in national anthems. This course tries to understand how the interplay exactly occurs between sounds, places, and differences through case studies from many genres. The course makes use of a large range of media and learning styles. Themes include the transnational circuits of reggae, the class backgrounds of punk, Motown and civil rights, psychedelic counterculture, underground electronic music, and the ambivalent identities of Minneapolis's very own Prince.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Are you wondering whether you will be able to travel as you did a few years ago? One of the largest industries, tourism is in a profound crisis. This course understands tourism in relation to other kinds of mobility, like shopping, colonialism, trafficking, migration, and pilgrimage. As the negative environmental and health impacts of tourism have become obvious, significant demands have emerged on its practices and policies. Investigating the landscapes and economies of cars, planes, beaches, parks, malls, and museums, we come to appreciate the unique challenges tourism poses for global citizenship and the planet. To gain a critical geographical understanding of mobility we engage a range of ethical frameworks such as human rights, feminism, social justice, and utilitarianism. Our final destination is an informed and critical ethics of travel in the age of pandemics and climate change.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Special topics/regions covered by visiting professors in their research fields.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1973/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The University of Minnesota sits in the middle of a fascinating city, and in this class you will explore parts of that city in-depth. You will learn about the human geography of the Twin Cities, how they have developed in the past, and how they are changing. You will examine the settlement, economic change, social practices, and political events that have shaped the Twin Cities, learning how to look at this place through multiple and contesting perspectives. Through a combination of in-depth field work, applied research, readings, and discussion, you will learn about urban concepts like immigration, Native populations, poverty, homelessness, segregation, redlining, suburbanization, shifts in retail and jobs, zoning, transit, metropolitan governance, urban renewal, and more. The goal is to foster your critical reflection on important, contemporary challenges facing our metropolitan region, and develop a new way to look at your present home.
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Importance of transit to an urban area. Issues surrounding development/operation of transit. Defining various modes of transit, evaluating why/where each may be used. Making capital improvements to transit system. Finance, travel demand forecasting, environmental assessment, scheduling, evaluation of effectiveness/accessibility.
URBS 3861 - Financing Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The most critical question in government is how you are going to pay for something. There is a plethora of good ideas but only so much money. This class looks at how cities are funded. It looks at tax systems, fee systems, grants, special revenues, private development funding and other ways that we pay for cities. It provides practical knowledge on how city activities are funded.
URBS 3871 - A Suburban World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Suburbs as sites of urgent battles over resources, planning practices, land use, and economic development. How suburban life shapes values, political ideals, and worldviews of its populations.
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Islamic World is an overarching course on the Muslim world that addresses the following intellectual concerns: 1. Islam and its contribution to the emergence of the modern world 2. Medieval Muslim civilization and their contribution to human culture 3. The relationship between Islam and gender roles in different Muslim cultures 4. The Muslim community?s struggle against colonialism and post-colonialism 5. Islam?s role in the struggle for Democracy and Development in the Muslim World 6. The relationships between Islam and the environment 7. The relationships between Islam and human rights 8. The relations between the West?s war on terror and the terror of War in the Muslim World
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645/RelS 3711
Typically offered: Every Fall
The Islamic World is an overarching course on the Muslim world that addresses the following intellectual concerns: 1. Islam and its contribution to the emergence of the modern world 2. Medieval Muslim civilization and their contribution to human culture 3. The relationship between Islam and gender roles in different Muslim cultures 4. The Muslim community?s struggle against colonialism and post-colonialism 5. Islam?s role in the struggle for Democracy and Development in the Muslim World 6. The relationships between Islam and the environment 7. The relationships between Islam and human rights 8. The relations between the West?s war on terror and the terror of War in the Muslim World
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3161/GLoS 3921
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
It is impossible to think about the contemporary world without the lasting impact Europe has had on it. But what are the deeper reasons for Europe to emerge as a dominant region from the late Middle Ages onwards? Why has Europe recently found itself in profound economic and political, even existential crisis? Historical geography provides answers. Divided by landscape, language, religion, and war, European empires imposed the state-form, capitalism, and their cultures on the rest of the world. European societies even became the supposed standard for how all humanity is meant to live. But there have always been cracks in this success story. The project of the European Union promised peace and prosperity for half a billion people but faces unprecedented challenges, from Brexit, the Ukraine war, and the return of state racism to climate change and covid. This course will guide you through Europe?s general historical characteristics to understand how it shaped globalization.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
An invisible, not-quite-dead, not-quite-alive entity?the coronavirus?forced us, rudely and tragically, to reckon with space. As we try and maintain social distance from other bodies, wear masks to disrupt the virus? pathways of diffusion, confront shortages in grocery stores, home supply outlets, and car dealerships, adjust to interruptions in many services, and either choose to, or are forced to stay at home, in our cities, in our countries, we are thinking and acting spatially. And we are reminded that ?stuff??food, medicines, toilet paper?reaches us often through geographically extensive and logistically intricate webs of economic production and distribution. We will learn what it means to think geographically about the capitalist economy as a spatial, relational formation. In doing so, we will challenge dominant ways of understanding and analyzing the economy, and of what counts as economic. We will also examine two simultaneous aspects of the world economy?fixity and flow. On the one hand, the economy propels and is propelled by flows?of goods, of services, of people, of labor, and of finance. On the other hand, physical infrastructures are rooted in place on the earth. After all, even the digital worlds of Facebook, Google, and Amazon are enabled by vast server farms. The course will also highlight the production and proliferation of inequalities?between social groups, states, countries, and regions?in and by the world economy. In fact, we will ask: Is economic unevenness a mere byproduct of capitalist economic growth, or the condition of possibility for it? Finally, we will discuss the relationships between global phenomena and local events. Crises like global climate change, overflows of waste matter, COVID19, and the 2008 financial meltdown make it clear that the global and the local are intimately entangled. Not only do global events impact individual livelihoods, including yours and mine, but economic jitters in one place can escalate, sending shockwaves across the world.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inequality in the form of extreme wealth and poverty in our world are major causes of environmental degradation. In addition, development failure as well as certain forms of economic growth always led to environment disasters. This course examines how our world?s economic and political systems and the livelihoods they engender have produced catastrophic local and global environmental conditions. Beyond this, the course explores alternative approaches of achieving sustainable environment and equitable development. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.