Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Geography B.S.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 38
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Geography is an academic and practical field that studies the manner in which human-made places and natural systems interact and change. Geographers study these interactions at all scales: neighborhoods and cities; regions and nations; single or multiple biological systems, and even the world as a whole. Geography attempts to explain not only these interactions and changes, but in many instances how they are perceived and what meanings they hold. Depending on their specific interests, geographers will employ one or more of a variety of methods and techniques: fieldwork, mapping, conventional narrative, ethnography, spatial statistics and modeling, and textual analysis. Many geographers are also interested in the intersections of science, technology, and information, such as the impact of geographic information systems (GIS) on decision making. Geography's integrative perspective on regional and global change provides students with unparalleled understanding of today's complex world. The B.S. offers a solid foundation in the science of geography in either the environmental systems or geographic information science track.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Major Courses
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
Quantitative Courses
Take one of the following pairs of courses.
CSCI 1107 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
Senior Project
Take a minimum of 2 credits by choosing to: enroll in GEOG 3985W (honors students should enroll in GEOG 3985V); OR enroll in GEOG 3994; OR enroll in GEOG 4700, and take either GEOG 4121W or GEOG 3411W concurrently with or before GEOG 4700; OR add an additional two credits onto a GEOG major concentration-track course. Note: if choosing GEOG 4700 as the Senior Project, completion of this requirement won't be granted until GEOG 4121W or GEOG 3411W AND GEOG 4700 are complete.
GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3994 - Directed Research (1.0-8.0 cr)
or GEOG 4700 {Inactive} (1.0-3.0 cr)
or 2 additional credits added to a geography major concentration track course.
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Environmental Systems
The environmental systems track examines the natural environments and resources that sustain human life and activity. Students explore the local and global patterns of climate, soils, vegetation, and surface land form; changes over time, both naturally occurring and caused by humans, in the natural environment; and ways of analyzing and predicting both human-caused and naturally occurring environmental change.
Students must complete four to five courses in this track, for a minimum of 15 credits.
Required Courses
Students may not take more than 2 GEOG 1xxx courses for the major.
Take 5 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World [TS, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3355 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4121W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3362 - Geography and Real Estate (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5411W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5421 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5423 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5441 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5565 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology (4.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP adviser and their departmental faculty adviser.
Geographic Information Science
The geographic information science track is concerned with all aspects of geographical information, including collection, storage, manipulation, analysis, and visualization. This track encompasses geographical information science (GIS), cartography, remote sensing, spatial analysis, and numerical modeling. The track is also concerned with the relationship between geographic information science, systems, and society.
Students must take four to five courses in this track, for a minimum of 15 credits.
Required Courses
Students may not take more than 2 GEOG 1xxx courses for the major. Students may substitute GIS-related courses from other departments in consultation with the geography adviser.
Take 5 or more course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World [TS, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5512 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5530 - Cartography Internship (2.0-7.0 cr)
· GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5562 - GIS Development Practicum (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5565 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View future requirement(s):
· Spring 2021
· Fall 2020
· Summer 2019
· Fall 2018
· Fall 2017
· Fall 2016
· Fall 2015
· Fall 2014
· Spring 2014
· Spring 2013
· Fall 2012

View sample plan(s):
· Environmental Systems
· Geographic Information Science

View checkpoint chart:
· Geography B.S.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Liberal Arts

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401/5401
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Complete the research/writing of senior project. prereq: [jr or sr], instr consent
GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Completion of research/writing of senior project. prereq: Honors, instr consent
GEOG 3994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual guided research. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World (TS, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Learn how maps and other spatial technologies like phones, drones, and GPS work. Use web-based tools to make maps for class, jobs, and fun. Explore how mapping is a useful lens through which to view interactions between technology and society, and see how mapping technology saves lives, rigs elections, and spies on people.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BSE 3361W/Geog 3361W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 3362 - Geography and Real Estate
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Through lectures involving professionals working in the real estate business, field trips, and personal research the course examines the nature and history of real property ("land") ownership in the United States with special reference to Minnesota. The focus will be on the mechanistic, legalistic, and historic characteristics of ownership rather than the uses to which real property has been put or the philosophical, sociological, or economic aspects of ownership or use. More attention will be paid to the published and unpublished primary materials that characterize the nature of land ownership than to the secondary literature.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Origin, development, and continuing evolution of landforms in various environments. Environmental implications. Weathering, slope and shore processes, fluvial erosion and deposition, arid region processes, glacial processes. This course includes lecture and laboratory components, including field trips. Prereqs: MATH 1271 (Calculus I) or equivalent; PHYS 1301 (Physics I: Classical Mechanics) or equivalent. Instructor consent is required to take this course without the prerequisite courses or their equivalents, and it is recommended to take these classes at least concurrently (as co-requisites) with geomorphology. No help will be given on material covered in prerequisite courses.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World (TS, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Learn how maps and other spatial technologies like phones, drones, and GPS work. Use web-based tools to make maps for class, jobs, and fun. Explore how mapping is a useful lens through which to view interactions between technology and society, and see how mapping technology saves lives, rigs elections, and spies on people.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics on data sources for mapping. History of thematic cartography (focused on 19th-century European activity). Multivariate classification/symbolization. Models for cartographic generalization, spatial interpolation, and surface representation. Animated/multimedia cartography.
GEOG 5530 - Cartography Internship
Credits: 2.0 -7.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Provides intensive hands-on experience in contemporary map production and design, ranging from GIS applications to digital prepress. Strong computer skills essential. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 5562 - GIS Development Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: GIS 5571 or #
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Algorithms/data structures for digital cartographic data, topological relationships, surface modeling, and interpolation. Map projections, geometric transformations, numerical generalization, raster/vector processing. Hands-on experience with software packages. prereq: GIS 5571 or instr consent
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561