Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Geography B.S.

Geography, Environment, Society
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2020
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 44 to 59
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
From climate to culture, urban settings to rural land uses, human society to environment, the B.S. in Geography provides students with the tools to understand our world, its processes, and all of its inhabitants. The Geography B.S., with its emphasis on the application of scientific knowledge and critical thinking to a wide variety of contemporary geographic problems, is an exceedingly relevant degree. Students specialize in one of two areas, Environmental Geography or Geographic Information Science (GIS). In Environmental Geography students study natural environments and systems, both in themselves and as they relate to human beings, including weather and climate patterns, climate change, plant and animal distributions, forest fires, and natural resources such as water, wind, and forestland. GIS collects geographic information, creates spatial analytical methods, and uses cutting-edge technologies to advance our knowledge of natural and societal phenomena and processes across space and time. Environmental Geography and GIS are highly employable fields that offer opportunities to study some of the most urgent problems facing society today: How do humans affect the climate? Why are climate-change impacts not the same everywhere? What places are most prone to fire, flooding and other hazards, and why? In a city with many different people and many different needs, where is the best place to locate a new hospital or school? How should electoral boundaries be drawn to ensure fair representation? How can we ensure that everyone has access to the goods and services they need or reduce spatial disparities? A B.S. in Geography provides the fundamental knowledge and analytical skills to tackle these and many other fundamentally geographic questions. The B.S. in Geography directly benefits from being a science field located in a liberal arts department. As noted by the U.S. National Academies, the liberal arts are of increasing importance in scientific and technical fields because they train students to think broadly and in an integrative way. Geography majors at the University of Minnesota report high rates of satisfaction with the major. The B.S. in Geography supports students in connecting the sciences and the liberal arts by including a broad palette of coursework in Geography such as urban geography, economic geography, and social-cultural geographies. The capstone experience, taken near the end of the student's studies, readies students to move forward by encouraging them to synthesize what they have learned. A wide variety of career options are open to students with a B.S. in Geography. Local, regional, and federal agencies seek geographers for city and regional planning, natural resource management, transportation, and community development positions. Private industry consulting, environmental and marketing firms, the non-profit sector, and local, national, and transnational non-governmental organizations seek the geographic skills taught in the Geography B.S. Many Geography undergraduate majors obtain careers in education and many go on to graduate school.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Some GEOG 5xxx-level courses are graduate-level courses and will require departmental consent. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. See major advisor for final approval of individual program. At least 14 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn up to one undergraduate degree in the geography program: a BA, a BS, or a minor. Students in the Geography BS may also seek a major or minor in urban studies, or the minor in public health. Students who declare the Geographic Information Science sub-plan in the BS may not minor in Geographic Information Science. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence.
Ways of Knowing
The Ways of Knowing requirement provides a theory-intensive overview of the discipline. Students are encouraged to take 3-5 of their breadth courses and electives before taking their Ways of Knowing course.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
The Capstone may include data collection, reading, reflection, collaboration, and interpretation, and ends with writing a document. As the culmination of undergraduate training, each project develops from an interest or specialization deriving from previous courses. Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the geography BS capstone, and they do not need to replace the 2 credits.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 2 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
Option 1: Seminar
Note: this option is not available every semester.
· GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
· Option 2: Directed Research
Note: this option requires instructor consent prior to the first day of classes.
· GEOG 3996 - Senior Project Directed Research (3.0-4.0 cr)
· Option 3: Supplemental Project
Note: this option requires instructor consent prior to the first day of classes and concurrent registration in a breadth or elective course.
· GEOG 3997 - Senior Project (2.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar [WI] (2.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Environmental Geography
Breadth Requirement
Students may count two 1xxx courses toward the breadth requirement.
Take 4 or more course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Human Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· Geographic Information Science
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World [TS, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
Supporting Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Mathematics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus [MATH] (5.0 cr)
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· Basic Statistics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Intermediate & Advanced Statistics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· Programming & Logic
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933H - Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· Remote Sensing, GPS, and GIS Applications
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 5715 - From GPS, Google Maps, and Uber to Spatial Data Science (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3362 - Drones: Data, Analysis, and Operations (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· Physical Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Earth Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 1006 - Oceanography [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1106 - Oceanography [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· Biological & Environmental Sciences
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 5407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
Electives
Students should work with the departmental advisor to develop a coherent set of electives that meet specific educational goals.
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
Environmental Geography & Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Students may petition to take additional courses under the GIS designator for major credit when prerequisites have been met.
Take 3 - 5 course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Environmental Geography Electives
Take 0 - 5 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Take 0 - 5 course(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5574 - Web GIS and Services (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5578 - GIS Programming (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· Additional Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3211 - East Asia (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3377 - Music in the City [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3605 - Geographic Perspectives on Planning (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5361 - Geography and Real Estate (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments (4.0 cr)
· URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3861 - Financing Cities (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3871 - A Suburban World (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5374 - The City in Film (4.0 cr)
Geographic Information Science
Breadth Requirement
Students may count two 1xxx courses toward the breadth requirement.
Take 4 or more course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Human Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Geography
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· Geographic Information Science
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 7 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
Supporting Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
Mathematics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus [MATH] (5.0 cr)
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· Basic Statistics
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Intermediate & Advanced Statistics
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· Programming & Logic
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1933H - Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· Remote Sensing, GPS, and GIS Applications
Take 0 - 3 course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 5715 - From GPS, Google Maps, and Uber to Spatial Data Science (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management [WI] (4.0 cr)
· FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3362 - Drones: Data, Analysis, and Operations (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· Physical Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Earth Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 1006 - Oceanography [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 1106 - Oceanography [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
or ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· Biological & Environmental Sciences
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)
· EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· PMB 2022 - General Botany (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· EEB 3407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
or EEB 3807 - Ecology (4.0 cr)
or EEB 5407 - Ecology (3.0 cr)
Electives
Students should work with the departmental advisor to develop a coherent set of electives that meet specific educational goals.
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Students may petition to take additional courses under the GIS designator for major credit when prerequisites have been met.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· Advanced Geographic Information Sciences Electives
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5574 - Web GIS and Services (3.0 cr)
· GIS 5578 - GIS Programming (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology (3.0 cr)
· Additional Geography Electives
Take 0 - 2 course(s) totaling at most 8 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada [SOCS, TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3211 - East Asia (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3377 - Music in the City [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3605 - Geographic Perspectives on Planning (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit (1.0-4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5361 - Geography and Real Estate (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments (4.0 cr)
· URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3861 - Financing Cities (3.0 cr)
· URBS 3871 - A Suburban World (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 5374 - The City in Film (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Geography BS - Environmental Interest (4-Year Plan)
· Geography BS - Environmental Interest (2-Year Plan)
· Environmental Geography Sample Plan (4-Year Plan)
· Environmental Geography Sample Plan (2-Year Plan)
· Geographic Information Science Sample Plan (4-Year Plan)

View checkpoint chart:
· Geography B.S.
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GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Complete the research/writing of senior project. prereq: [jr or sr], instr consent
GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Completion of research/writing of senior project. prereq: Honors, instr consent
GEOG 3996 - Senior Project Directed Research
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01982
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual guided research course taken in fulfillment of the senior project requirement. Prereq instr consent,dept consent,college consent.
GEOG 3997 - Senior Project
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01983
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Senior Project add-on credit. Must be taken concurrently with required or elective course related to area of specialization. Prereq instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00062
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
URBS 3955W - Senior Paper Seminar (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Methods/resources for research. Substantial writing. prereq: dept consent
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3985W - Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Complete the research/writing of senior project. prereq: [jr or sr], instr consent
GEOG 3985V - Honors Senior Project Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Completion of research/writing of senior project. prereq: Honors, instr consent
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01971
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3101/3102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of the ways in which the aspirations and abilities of diverse groups of people interact with the complexities of the natural environment to produce the contemporary pluralistic cultures and regional differentiation of the United States and Canada.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social and physical characteristics of the Twin Cities. Their place in the urban network of the United States.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social/physical characteristics of Twin Cities. Their place in U.S. urban network.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180 - Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes. prereq: Honors
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01812
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 1502 - Mapping Our World (TS, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Learn how maps and other spatial technologies like phones, drones, and GPS work. Use web-based tools to make maps for class, jobs, and fun. Explore how mapping is a useful lens through which to view interactions between technology and society, and see how mapping technology saves lives, rigs elections, and spies on people.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02579 - Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus (MATH)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graphs of equations and functions; polynomial and rational functions; inverses and composition of functions; exponentials and logarithms; trig functions, graphs, identities; polar coordinates; complex numbers; systems of linear equations; arithmetic, geometric sequences, series; applications. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00068 - Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00561
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/2373/2573
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: linear equations/systems, phase space, forcing/resonance, qualitative/numerical analysis of nonlinear systems, Laplace transforms. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bio Prod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00561 - Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2573H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00841 - Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02133 - CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02133
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programming concepts using Python language. Real world problem solving, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Abstractions/modularity. Optional honors topics: programming robots, programming paradigms, artificial intelligence. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H], CSci majors, pre-majors in CSE/CLA, honors student
CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types(stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Scripting languages using Python language. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab. prereq: (EE major and EE 1301) or (CmpE major and EE 1301) or 1103 or 1113 or instr consent
CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00008
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. prereq: 1133 or instr consent
CSCI 1933H - Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00008 - CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. Optional honors topics: Advanced Java topics, GUI programming, CS research examples. prereq: [1133 or 1133H] and honors student, or inst consent
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
CSCI 5715 - From GPS, Google Maps, and Uber to Spatial Data Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Spatial databases and querying, spatial big data mining, spatial data-structures and algorithms, positioning, earth observation, cartography, and geo-visulization. Trends such as spatio-temporal, and geospatial cloud analytics, etc. prereq: Familiarity with Java, C++, or Python
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00768 - ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
FNRM 3362 - Drones: Data, Analysis, and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02659 - FNRM 3362/FNRM 5362
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores principles and techniques of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS, also 'drones'), applied to natural resource and environmental issues. The course provides hands-on experience with UAS vehicles, sensors, imagery, and software. Course topics include: UAS flight characteristics, regulations/safety, mission planning, flight operations, data collection, image analysis, and applications. Examples of UAS applications to be explored include forest and natural resource inventory, wetland monitoring, and land cover mapping. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS is recommended.
FNRM 3462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02660
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. prereq: FNRM 3262/5262 or instr consent
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079 - Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered. prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena, including optics, atomic structure. Lab. prereq: 1201W
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. prereq: 1401V, honors student or permission of University Honors Program
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01201
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01201
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
ESCI 1006 - Oceanography (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geo 1006/5006
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, and human interaction with the sea. Labs include study of live marine invertebrates, manipulation of oceanographic data, and discussion using videos showing unique aspects of ocean research.
ESCI 1106 - Oceanography (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00057 - Geo 1006/Geo 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, human interaction with sea.
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes, their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01702 - Geo 3402/Geo 5402
Typically offered: Every Spring
Detection/attribution of global warming using concepts of radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts/controversy over responses/consequences.
ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01702
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts. Controversy over responses/consequences.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The principles of evolutionary theory, behavioral biology, comparative anatomy, and Paleolithic archaeology are used to reconstruct the major events in human evolution. The course allows us to understand the behavior of our ancestors as well as ourselves.
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01680
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02591
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 5407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01812
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02579 - Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to use spatial data to answer questions on a wide array of social, natural, and information science issues. Exploratory data analysis/visualization. Spatial autocorrelation analysis/regression. prereq: [STAT 3001 or equiv, MGIS student] or instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
GIS 5574 - Web GIS and Services
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plan, design, develop, publish web-based GIS solution. Build websites, prepare data for web. Commercial software, Open Source software, volunteer geographic information, open GIS standards/developing web GIS application. Hands-on experience with variety of web GIS technologies/software. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, in MGIS program] or instr consent
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Programming techniques using Python and other languages specifically relating to GIS technologies. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3101/3102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of the ways in which the aspirations and abilities of diverse groups of people interact with the complexities of the natural environment to produce the contemporary pluralistic cultures and regional differentiation of the United States and Canada.
GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
The evolution of Minnesota and its current geographical characteristics. The state is a unique political entity that possesses similarities with other states because of the homogenizing influence of the federal government.
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00849
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative analysis and explanation of Europe's physical, demographic, ethnic/cultural, economic, political, and urban landscapes. European integration--the European Union. Transformation of Eastern Europe.
GEOG 3211 - East Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3211/3215/5211/5215
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical and human geography of Japan, mainland China and Taiwan, North and South Korea; population pressure, economic and urban development, and international relations.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
GEOG 3377 - Music in the City (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographical conceptions of place, space, embodiment, identity. Case studies of music.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global flows of tourism from perspective of debates about consumption, development, identity, and the environment. Close reading, field trips, discussion of films, research paper.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3605 - Geographic Perspectives on Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the discipline of urban planning, and to the various challenges planning has aimed to respond during its history. How and why did cities come into being before the invention of modern urban planning? What were the challenges that modern urban planning arose to encounter in the late 20th century? How have the planning challenges changed since then, and how have planning tools and planning systems evolved since the early 21st century in different countries? During the course, we will also discuss the role of planning in contemporary society, asking who needs planning and why. How does planning respond to political struggles and conflicts of interests in cities today? Furthermore, we will reflect on the academic status of urban planning and ask: to what extent can planning be based on knowledge and theory? To answer these questions, we will study history of planning, get acquainted with the basics of planning theory, and look at various international examples of planning systems and planning practice drawn from a variety of international settings, the main focus being on US, UK, and mainland Europe.
GEOG 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An applied learning experience in an agreed-upon, short-term, supervised workplace activity, with defined goals, which may be related to a student's major field or area of interest. The work can be full or part time, paid or unpaid, primarily in off-campus environments. Internships integrate classroom knowledge and theory with practical application and skill development in professional or community settings. The skills and knowledge learned should be transferable to other employment settings and not simply to advance the operations of the employer. Typically the studentís work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator or instructor.
GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Special topics/regions covered by visiting professors in their research fields.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social/physical characteristics of Twin Cities. Their place in U.S. urban network.
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5361 - Geography and Real Estate
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Origins and evolution of land ownership in the United States.
GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of three principal components of rural landscape (form of land surface, plant life that cloaks it, structures that people have placed upon it). Structures associated with agriculture, including mining, forestry, resort areas, and small towns.
URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Importance of transit to an urban area. Issues surrounding development/operation of transit. Defining various modes of transit, evaluating why/where each may be used. Making capital improvements to transit system. Finance, travel demand forecasting, environmental assessment, scheduling, evaluation of effectiveness/accessibility.
URBS 3861 - Financing Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The most critical question in government is how you are going to pay for something. There is a plethora of good ideas but only so much money. This class looks at how cities are funded. It looks at tax systems, fee systems, grants, special revenues, private development funding and other ways that we pay for cities. It provides practical knowledge on how city activities are funded.
URBS 3871 - A Suburban World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Suburbs as sites of urgent battles over resources, planning practices, land use, and economic development. How suburban life shapes values, political ideals, and worldviews of its populations.
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe before rise of capitalism. Rise of Capitalist Europe, colonization of Islamic World Islamic resurgence and post-colonial world. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islamic World and the West. Moslems in North America and Europe. Case studies.
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe. Rise of capitalism, colonization. Islamic resurgence. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islam and the West. Case studies.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00062
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 5374 - The City in Film
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide. Social/cultural conflict, political/economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, population/development issues (especially as they affect women/children). Meets concurrently with 3374. Additional weekly meeting discusses films, readings. Project on a topic selected in consultation with instructor. prereq: grad student or instr consent
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01971
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3101/3102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of the ways in which the aspirations and abilities of diverse groups of people interact with the complexities of the natural environment to produce the contemporary pluralistic cultures and regional differentiation of the United States and Canada.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 1973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social and physical characteristics of the Twin Cities. Their place in the urban network of the United States.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social/physical characteristics of Twin Cities. Their place in U.S. urban network.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 1403H - Honors: Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180 - Geog 1403/Geog 1403H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes. prereq: Honors
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01812
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02579 - Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1155 - Intensive Precalculus (MATH)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graphs of equations and functions; polynomial and rational functions; inverses and composition of functions; exponentials and logarithms; trig functions, graphs, identities; polar coordinates; complex numbers; systems of linear equations; arithmetic, geometric sequences, series; applications. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00068 - Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00561
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/2373/2573
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: linear equations/systems, phase space, forcing/resonance, qualitative/numerical analysis of nonlinear systems, Laplace transforms. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bio Prod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00561 - Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2573H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Logic (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00841 - Phil 1001/1001H/1021
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Sharpen your reasoning skills through a close examination of arguments. Learn formal methods for representing and assessing arguments, including how to represent informal arguments in formal languages, and how to evaluate whether the premises of an argument entail its conclusion.
CSCI 1103 - Introduction to Computer Programming in Java
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental programming concepts/software development using Java language. Problem solving skills. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02133 - CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02133
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Programming concepts using Python language. Real world problem solving, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Abstractions/modularity. Optional honors topics: programming robots, programming paradigms, artificial intelligence. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H], CSci majors, pre-majors in CSE/CLA, honors student
CSCI 1913 - Introduction to Algorithms, Data Structures, and Program Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types(stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Scripting languages using Python language. Substantial programming projects. Weekly lab. prereq: (EE major and EE 1301) or (CmpE major and EE 1301) or 1103 or 1113 or instr consent
CSCI 1933 - Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00008
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. prereq: 1133 or instr consent
CSCI 1933H - Honors Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00008 - CSci 1902/CSci 1933/CSci 1933H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced object oriented programming to implement abstract data types (stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, binary trees) using Java language. Inheritance. Searching/sorting algorithms. Basic algorithmic analysis. Use of software development tools. Weekly lab. Optional honors topics: Advanced Java topics, GUI programming, CS research examples. prereq: [1133 or 1133H] and honors student, or inst consent
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
CSCI 5715 - From GPS, Google Maps, and Uber to Spatial Data Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Spatial databases and querying, spatial big data mining, spatial data-structures and algorithms, positioning, earth observation, cartography, and geo-visulization. Trends such as spatio-temporal, and geospatial cloud analytics, etc. prereq: Familiarity with Java, C++, or Python
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00768 - ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
ESPM 4295W - GIS in Environmental Science and Management (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of geographic information science and technologies (GIS) in complex environmental problems. Students gain experience in spatial data collection, database development, and spatial analysis, including GNSS and field attribute collection, image interpretation, and existing data fusion, raster/vector data integration and analysis, information extraction from LiDAR data, DEM conditioning and hydrologic analysis, neighborhood analysis, bulk processing and automation, and scripting. Problems vary depending on topics, often with extra-University partners. prereq: FNRM 3131 or Geog 3561 or instr consent
FNRM 3262 - Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis of Natural Resources and Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00372
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introductory principles and techniques of remote sensing and geospatial analysis applied to mapping and monitoring land and water resources from local to global scales. Examples of applications include: Land cover mapping and change detection, forest and natural resource inventory, water quality monitoring, and global change analysis. The lab provides hands-on experience working with satellite, aircraft, and drone imagery, and image processing methods and software. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems and introductory Statistics is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS and Statistics is recommended.
FNRM 3362 - Drones: Data, Analysis, and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02659 - FNRM 3362/FNRM 5362
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores principles and techniques of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS, also 'drones'), applied to natural resource and environmental issues. The course provides hands-on experience with UAS vehicles, sensors, imagery, and software. Course topics include: UAS flight characteristics, regulations/safety, mission planning, flight operations, data collection, image analysis, and applications. Examples of UAS applications to be explored include forest and natural resource inventory, wetland monitoring, and land cover mapping. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems is recommended. Prereq: None, but prior coursework in GIS is recommended.
FNRM 3462 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02660
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the introductory remote sensing class, FNRM 3262/5262. It provides a detailed treatment of advanced remote sensing and geospatial theory and methods including Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA), lidar processing and derivatives, advanced classification algorithms (including Random Forest, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines), biophysics of remote sensing, measurements and sensors, data transforms, data fusion, multi-temporal analysis, and empirical modeling. In-class and independent lab activities will be used to apply the course topics to real-world problems. Prior coursework in Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and statistics is necessary. prereq: FNRM 3262/5262 or instr consent
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1101W - Introductory College Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of physics in the context of everyday world. Use of kinematics/dynamics principles and quantitative/qualitative problem solving techniques to understand natural phenomena. Lecture, recitation, lab. prereq: High school algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry; primarily for students interested in technical areas
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079 - Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered. prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena, including optics, atomic structure. Lab. prereq: 1201W
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. prereq: 1401V, honors student or permission of University Honors Program
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
SOIL 2125 - Basic Soil Science (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00452 - Soil 2125/Soil 5125
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil fertility. Use of soil survey information to make a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation information. prereq: [CHEM 1015, CHEM 1017] or CHEM 1021 or equiv
ESCI 1001 - Earth and Its Environments (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01201
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues/global change. Lecture/lab. Optional field experience.
ESCI 1101 - Introduction to Geology (lecture only) (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01201
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical processes that shape the Earth: volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, glaciers, rivers. Current environmental issues and global change. Lecture.
ESCI 1006 - Oceanography (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geo 1006/5006
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, and human interaction with the sea. Labs include study of live marine invertebrates, manipulation of oceanographic data, and discussion using videos showing unique aspects of ocean research.
ESCI 1106 - Oceanography (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00057 - Geo 1006/Geo 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall
How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, human interaction with sea.
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01284
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes, their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01702 - Geo 3402/Geo 5402
Typically offered: Every Spring
Detection/attribution of global warming using concepts of radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts/controversy over responses/consequences.
ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01702
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts. Controversy over responses/consequences.
GEOG 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ESPM 1425 - Introduction to Weather and Climate (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00671 - ESPM 1425/Geog 1425
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A pre-calculus introduction to the nature of the atmosphere and its behavior. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, structure, stability, and motion; precipitation processes, air masses, fronts, cyclones, and anticyclones; general weather patterns; meteorological instruments and observation; weather map analysis; and weather forecasting.
ANTH 1001 - Human Evolution (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The principles of evolutionary theory, behavioral biology, comparative anatomy, and Paleolithic archaeology are used to reconstruct the major events in human evolution. The course allows us to understand the behavior of our ancestors as well as ourselves.
EEB 4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01680
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.
EEB 4611 - Biogeochemical Processes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02591
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs). prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent
FNRM 3203 - Forest Fire and Disturbance Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00307 - FNRM 3203/FNRM 5203
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecology, history, management, control of fire, wind, insect infestation, deer browsing, other disturbances in forests, including disturbance regimes of boreal, northern hardwood, savannas of North America. Influence of disturbance on wildlife habitat, urban/wildland interfaces, forest management, stand/landscape dynamics. Tree mortality in fires, successional patterns created by fires, interactions of life history traits of plants with disturbances.
GEOG 1403 - Biogeography of the Global Garden (BIOL, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02180
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The geography of biodiversity and productivity, from conspicuous species to those that cause human disease and economic hardship. The roles played by evolution and extinction, fluxes of energy, water, biochemicals, and dispersal. Experiments demonstrating interactions of managed and unmanaged biotic with the hydrologic cycle, energy budgets, nutrient cycles, the carbon budget, and soil processes.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
PMB 2022 - General Botany
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the biology of plants, algae, and fungi. Structure, growth, development, reproduction, diversity, and aspects of their ecology. Includes laboratory that focuses on structures in photosynthetic organisms and fungi as well as an introduction to physiology. prereq: One semester of college biology
BIOL 1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1001H - Introductory Biology I: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01640
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
EEB 3407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.
EEB 3807 - Ecology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00005
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work. prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]
EEB 5407 - Ecology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth. prereq: [Math 1142, 1241, 1271 or equivalent]
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02579 - Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall
Applied/theoretical aspects of geographical quantitative methods for spatial analysis. Emphasizes analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in human/physical areas.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02617 - Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, reading, and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: grad
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
GEOG 5564 - Urban Geographic Information Science and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Core concepts in urban geographic information science including sources for urban geographical and attribute data (including census data), urban data structures (focusing on the TIGER data structure), urban spatial analyses (including location-allocation models), geodemographic analysis, network analysis, and the display of urban data. prereq: 3561 or 5561
GIS 5555 - Basic Spatial Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to use spatial data to answer questions on a wide array of social, natural, and information science issues. Exploratory data analysis/visualization. Spatial autocorrelation analysis/regression. prereq: [STAT 3001 or equiv, MGIS student] or instr consent
GIS 5571 - ArcGIS I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of a two-course series focusing on ArcGIS Desktop. Overview of ArcGIS system and its use for spatial data processing. Data capture, editing, geometric transformations, map projections, topology, Python scripting, and map production. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, status in MGIS program, familiarity with computer operating systems] or instr consent
GIS 5574 - Web GIS and Services
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Plan, design, develop, publish web-based GIS solution. Build websites, prepare data for web. Commercial software, Open Source software, volunteer geographic information, open GIS standards/developing web GIS application. Hands-on experience with variety of web GIS technologies/software. prereq: [GEOG 5561 or equiv, in MGIS program] or instr consent
GIS 5578 - GIS Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Programming techniques using Python and other languages specifically relating to GIS technologies. prereq: instr consent
GEOG 3401 - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00812
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 3423 - Urban Climatology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban climatology focuses on how cities modify the local environment. Initial focus is on urban energy balance as the basis of most urban-climate research. The course also explores how atmospheric composition, urban hydrology, and urban ecosystems affect the urban climate, and how urban climates are linked to regional and global climate change.
GEOG 5426 - Climatic Variations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of climatic fluctuations and change at decadal to centuries time scales; analysis of temporal and spatial fluctuations especially during the period of instrumental record. prereq: 1425 or 3401 or instr consent
URBS 3751 - Understanding the Urban Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examine links between cities and the environment with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and green space, undesirable land uses, environmental justice, and the basic question of how to sustain urban development in an increasingly fragile global surrounding.
GEOG 3431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 5431 - Plant and Animal Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3431/5431
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to biogeography. Focuses on patterns of plant/animal distributions at different scales over time/space. Evolutionary, ecological, and applied biogeography. Paleobiogeography, vegetation-environment relationships, vegetation dynamics/disturbance ecology, human impact on plants/animals, nature conservation. Discussions, group/individual projects, local field trips.
GEOG 3839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 5839 - Introduction to Dendrochronology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01812
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical development, operational techniques, biological background, and principles of tree ring analysis. Applications of tree-ring data to investigate environmental change and past cultures. prereq: [1403, [BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or equiv]] or instr consent
GEOG 3101 - Geography of the United States and Canada (SOCS, TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3101/3102
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of the ways in which the aspirations and abilities of diverse groups of people interact with the complexities of the natural environment to produce the contemporary pluralistic cultures and regional differentiation of the United States and Canada.
GEOG 3111 - Geography of Minnesota
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
The evolution of Minnesota and its current geographical characteristics. The state is a unique political entity that possesses similarities with other states because of the homogenizing influence of the federal government.
GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00849
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Comparative analysis and explanation of Europe's physical, demographic, ethnic/cultural, economic, political, and urban landscapes. European integration--the European Union. Transformation of Eastern Europe.
GEOG 3211 - East Asia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3211/3215/5211/5215
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Physical and human geography of Japan, mainland China and Taiwan, North and South Korea; population pressure, economic and urban development, and international relations.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3373 - Changing Form of the City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Urban origins, ancient cultures/cities, the medieval city, rediscovery of planning, colonial cities. Industrialization and urban expansion. Speculative cities, utopian cities, planning triumphs/disasters. Cities as reflections of society, culture, the past.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology of North America (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social production of nature in North America related to questions of social/environmental justice. Economic, political, cultural, ecological relations that shape specific urban/rural environments, social movements that have arisen in response to environmental change. Importance of culture/identity in struggles over resources/environments.
GEOG 3377 - Music in the City (DSJ, AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographical conceptions of place, space, embodiment, identity. Case studies of music.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global flows of tourism from perspective of debates about consumption, development, identity, and the environment. Close reading, field trips, discussion of films, research paper.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3605 - Geographic Perspectives on Planning
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the discipline of urban planning, and to the various challenges planning has aimed to respond during its history. How and why did cities come into being before the invention of modern urban planning? What were the challenges that modern urban planning arose to encounter in the late 20th century? How have the planning challenges changed since then, and how have planning tools and planning systems evolved since the early 21st century in different countries? During the course, we will also discuss the role of planning in contemporary society, asking who needs planning and why. How does planning respond to political struggles and conflicts of interests in cities today? Furthermore, we will reflect on the academic status of urban planning and ask: to what extent can planning be based on knowledge and theory? To answer these questions, we will study history of planning, get acquainted with the basics of planning theory, and look at various international examples of planning systems and planning practice drawn from a variety of international settings, the main focus being on US, UK, and mainland Europe.
GEOG 3896 - Internship for Academic Credit
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
An applied learning experience in an agreed-upon, short-term, supervised workplace activity, with defined goals, which may be related to a student's major field or area of interest. The work can be full or part time, paid or unpaid, primarily in off-campus environments. Internships integrate classroom knowledge and theory with practical application and skill development in professional or community settings. The skills and knowledge learned should be transferable to other employment settings and not simply to advance the operations of the employer. Typically the studentís work is supervised and evaluated by a site coordinator or instructor.
GEOG 3900 - Topics in Geography
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Special topics/regions covered by visiting professors in their research fields.
GEOG 3973 - Geography of the Twin Cities (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00054 - Geog 1973W/3973
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social/physical characteristics of Twin Cities. Their place in U.S. urban network.
GEOG 4001 - Modes of Geographic Inquiry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examination of competing approaches to the study of geography. Environmental determinism; regional tradition; scientific revolution; behavioral geography; modeling and quantitative geography; radical geography; interpretive and qualitative approaches; feminist and postmodern geography; ecological thinking and complexity; geographic ethics.
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5361 - Geography and Real Estate
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Origins and evolution of land ownership in the United States.
GEOG 5393 - Rural Landscapes and Environments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Analysis of three principal components of rural landscape (form of land surface, plant life that cloaks it, structures that people have placed upon it). Structures associated with agriculture, including mining, forestry, resort areas, and small towns.
URBS 3771 - Fundamentals of Transit
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Importance of transit to an urban area. Issues surrounding development/operation of transit. Defining various modes of transit, evaluating why/where each may be used. Making capital improvements to transit system. Finance, travel demand forecasting, environmental assessment, scheduling, evaluation of effectiveness/accessibility.
URBS 3861 - Financing Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The most critical question in government is how you are going to pay for something. There is a plethora of good ideas but only so much money. This class looks at how cities are funded. It looks at tax systems, fee systems, grants, special revenues, private development funding and other ways that we pay for cities. It provides practical knowledge on how city activities are funded.
URBS 3871 - A Suburban World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Suburbs as sites of urgent battles over resources, planning practices, land use, and economic development. How suburban life shapes values, political ideals, and worldviews of its populations.
GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3145/GloS 3645
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe before rise of capitalism. Rise of Capitalist Europe, colonization of Islamic World Islamic resurgence and post-colonial world. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islamic World and the West. Moslems in North America and Europe. Case studies.
RELS 3711 - The Islamic World (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00353
Typically offered: Every Fall
Foundation of Islam in Arabian Peninsula, its spread to Asia and Africa. Islamic civilization, influence on Europe. Rise of capitalism, colonization. Islamic resurgence. State-society and development. Culture/conflict in Moslem societies. Gender and Islam. Islam and the West. Case studies.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3374W - The City in Film (AH, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00062
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide including social and cultural conflict, political and economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, and population and development issues (especially as they affect women and children).
GEOG 5374 - The City in Film
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3374W/3374V/5374W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cinematic portrayal of changes in 20th-century cities worldwide. Social/cultural conflict, political/economic processes, changing gender relationships, rural versus urban areas, population/development issues (especially as they affect women/children). Meets concurrently with 3374. Additional weekly meeting discusses films, readings. Project on a topic selected in consultation with instructor. prereq: grad student or instr consent