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Morris Campus

Human Services B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The human services major provides students with an understanding of the individual, the family, the community, institutions, and the systems that are set up to serve these individuals and groups. Students will learn how individuals are in constant interaction with their environments, communities, and institutions. They also will learn how socioeconomic and political environments influence individuals, families, and communities. Human service workers carry out many different roles, from case management and intervention to program administration and development. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship. Student Learning Outcomes: Understanding of the history and structure of human services systems Knowledge of human development, family functioning, community dynamics, and political systems Basic skills in intervention with some or all of the following: individuals, families, groups, organizations Research, technology, and information literacy for effective delivery of services, including the use of databases related to human services Knowledge of ethics, values, and policies guiding human services practice Exposure to the domains that inform the field of human services
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Students choose one of the HMSV sub-plans generally no later than the spring semester of their sophomore year. Students may complete more than one sub-plan, however, each elective may only be used to satisfy the requirements of one sub-plan. Students should choose an advisor with a background or specialties related to the human services area (e.g., anthropology, political science, psychology, sociology). Students should discuss the arrangement of their internship with the HMSV internship coordinator during their junior year. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S/N, unless offered S/N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
Courses and directed studies not listed below may be considered for addition to the HMSV major, provided the subject matter is appropriate for the program of study. Contact HMSV coordinator. Students should complete Psy 4102 during the semester before their internship (HMSV 4896 or Psy 4502). Students may complete more than one sub-plan. However, one 4 credit internship may only be used to satisfy the Human Services Internship requirement of one sub-plan.
Introduction to Anthropology or Sociology
ANTH 1111W - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Political Science
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Theory and Practice of Human Services
HMSV 3001 - Theory and Practice of Human Services [SS] (4.0 cr)
Research Methods
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
or IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
Statistics
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Professional Ethics
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
Human Services Internship
HMSV 4896 - Internship in the Human Services (1.0-4.0 cr)
or PSY 4502 - Alcohol & Drug Counseling Practicum (1.0-12.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
General
The general human services sub-plan provides students with an understanding of the individual, the family, the community, institutions, and the systems that are set up to serve these individuals and groups. Students will learn how individuals are in constant interaction with their environments, communities, and institutions. They will also learn how socioeconomic and political environments influence individuals, families, and communities. Human service workers carry out many different roles, from case management and intervention to program administration and development. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Psychology Electives
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PSY 1082 - Introduction to Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
Sociology and Anthropology Electives
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from any elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences (2.0 cr)
· IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
Criminal Justice
The criminal justice human services sub-plan provides students with knowledge of the criminal justice system, theories of criminal behavior, law, administration, and policy. Students will also learn about the reciprocal relationship between sociocultural contexts and the criminal justice system. This knowledge will prepare students interested in pursuing careers related to the criminal justice system. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Courses
POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing [SS] (4.0 cr)
or HMSV 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing [SS] (4.0 cr)
Required Electives
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CMR 2062 - Interpersonal and Group Communication [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 20 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences (2.0 cr)
· IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II (2.0 cr)
· PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [IP] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 1082 - Introduction to Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3302 - Personality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology (2.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
Human Development
The human development human services sub-plan provides students with an understanding of psychological, social, and biological development and facilitates understanding of sociocultural contexts that influence development. The focus is on normative development, individual variations of development and abnormal development. This knowledge will prepare students interested in providing services to children and older adults. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Electives
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 3214 - History of Childhood [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3401 - Child Development (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development [SCI] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
· ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Experience (1.0 cr)
· ED 2121 - Introduction to Education [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences (2.0 cr)
· IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3402 - Adolescent and Emerging Adult Development (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3403 - Adult Development and Aging [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
Social Justice
The social justice human services sub-plan provides students with an understanding of how to create societies or institutions based on the principles of equality and solidarity, the value of human rights, and the importance of recognizing that every human being deserves dignity. Social justice is the view that everyone deserves equal economic, political, and social rights and opportunities. This major will prepare students for jobs related to community activism, human rights advocacy or non-profit administration. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Electives
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America [IP] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974 [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· NAIS 1101 - Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ARTH 3281 - Women and Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2041 - Introduction to African American Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3312 - World Indigenous Literature and Film [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 2101 - American Masculinities: The Making of Guys, Dudes, Bros, and Men [SS] (2.0 cr)
· GWSS 2102 - Masculinities in the Margins: Intersectional and Marginalized Masculinities [SS] (2.0 cr)
· HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3455 - American Immigration [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science [SS] (4.0 cr)
· IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences (2.0 cr)
· IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods [SS] (2.0-4.0 cr)
· MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music [FA] (2.0 cr)
· NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 1103 - Introductory Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics [HDIV] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· Division of Social Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· General Sample Plan
· Criminal Justice Sample Plan
· Human Development Sample Plan
· Social Justice Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Human Services B.A.
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ANTH 1111W - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of sociology, the exploration of societies, and how societies operate. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, guides analytical thinking, and develops writing skills. By actively thinking about issues facing societies today, students learn to examine life situations and the influence of societies and groups on people's lives, careers, hopes, fears, and personalities. Emphasis on how society is stratified: how organizations and institutions influence the way people think, talk, feel, and act and how different groups (e.g., racial and ethnic) and divisions (e.g., gender and social class) within society have different access to power and privilege. People live their lives in relation to social and physical environments; sociologists study these environments and their effects on people's experiences and behavior.
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the science of mind and behavior. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, biological bases for behavior, life span development, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive and social processes, personality, psychopathology, and applications of psychology.
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
HMSV 3001 - Theory and Practice of Human Services (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course highlights Human Services' history and relevant theories. Students learn about the structure and dynamics of organizations and society. Human conditions (e.g., crime, poverty, mental illness, physical illness, and substance abuse) that impact the work (e.g. referrals, case management) of human service professionals will be covered. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for HMSV 2001] prereq: Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111 or Pol 1201
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to quantitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: surveys, experiments, controlled observations, structured interviews, and document analysis), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), statistical literacy, and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that use quantitative methods. prereq: any 1xxx level social science course
IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to qualitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and participatory action research), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that want exposure to qualitative human subjects research practices. prereq: any 1xxx social science course
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts of professional ethics in human services professions (e.g. Psychologists, Alcohol and Drug Counselors, Probation Officers); ethically relevant legal mandates and constraints on professional practice (e.g. consultation with other professionals); practical problems in the application of ethical principles (e.g. dual relations). [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for IS 4101] prereq: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
HMSV 4896 - Internship in the Human Services
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A supervised educational experience providing field applications in the Human Services for the student's theoretical classroom learning. prereq: Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
PSY 4502 - Alcohol & Drug Counseling Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -12.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Application of knowledge/skills acquired during coursework to clinical settings. Demonstrate competence in the 8 Practice Dimensions and 12 Core Functions of alcohol and drug counseling, cultural sensitivity, and ethical practice. Participate in a seminar to discuss internship experiences with peers and faculty supervisor and complete assignments. prereq: 4501, successful completion of all Pre-LADC coursework, instr consent
PSY 1082 - Introduction to Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This introductory course provides an overview of the transdisciplinary foundations of alcohol and drug counseling, theories of chemical dependency, the continuum of care, and the process of change. prereq: 1051 or equiv
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081]
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of aspects of human sexuality, including intimacy and communication; male and female anatomy, physiology, and response; development of sexual differentiation, gender identity, gender role, and gender orientation; varieties of sexual expression; pregnancy and child birth; contraception and disease prevention; sexual coercion and abuse; sexual dysfunctions and their treatment. prereq: 1051
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Family systems are known for their complexity. Focus is on the development of families, their interactive relationships, and the influence of external factors (e.g., stress, addiction) and individual decisions. Includes a general examination of various theories, contemporary research, and practical applications of family life development. Analyze research related to family interaction processes across the family life span with an emphasis on relationship dynamics and cultural differences. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Psy 2402] prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biological and behavioral aspects of drug use, abuse, and addiction. Includes focus on therapeutic drugs used to treat psychiatric conditions as well as drugs of abuse. prereq: C- or better in 2581
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of counseling and helping relationships with individuals & groups with psychological/stress disorders (e.g., Substance, Anxiety, Adjustment). Acquisition of helping skills (e.g. client psychoeducation, attending behavior, reflecting skills) and evaluative skills (e.g. orientation, termination). Didactic instruction/practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by social scientists to study and understand race and racisms, particularly in the US. Exploration of how the concept of race has and continues to shift and understanding structural power. Seminar with an emphasis on cultural critique and intersectional analysis.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues within particular social institutions from a sociological perspective.
SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues regarding specific social inequalities from a sociological perspective.
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as SSA 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The first half of the course will focus on theories related to individual and firm decision-making. Core concepts like supply and demand, concepts of elasticity, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, and pricing of factors of production will be covered. The latter half of the course will cover the theories related to the aggregate economy. Core concepts like measurement of economic performance such as national income, inflation, and unemployment, macroeconomic theories to understand business cycle fluctuations, and stabilization policies will be covered. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for 1111 and 1112] prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Analyze the impact of popular media on perceptions of Human Services, Psychology, and Political Science. Understand the scope of media influence from the individual to the systemic level including propaganda, tropes, heuristics, and group think. Course includes films that explicitly address interdisciplinary themes, films viewed as influential, and the consequences of availability. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Preparation for success as a Social Science major. Skills and knowledge for varying futures including graduate school and professional realms. Conference attendance and etiquette; job seeking, resumes and cover letters; interview skills; publication; and graduate school applications. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to quantitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: surveys, experiments, controlled observations, structured interviews, and document analysis), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), statistical literacy, and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that use quantitative methods. prereq: any 1xxx level social science course
IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to qualitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and participatory action research), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that want exposure to qualitative human subjects research practices. prereq: any 1xxx social science course
POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 2202/HMSV 2202
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Same as HMSV 2202. Law enforcement is a critical function in the United States that operates on the local, state, and national level. This course examines processes, actors, and institutions involved in criminal justice, from the investigation of criminal activity through the arrest and incarceration of individuals. With a focus on modern controversies such as use of force and systemic racism, the course provides students with a critical foundation for understanding the criminal justice system in the context of the United States.
POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of the ways American democracy functions in the states. Analysis of principles, organizations, procedures, and functions of state government in the United States, with particular emphasis on comparing state politics and policy outcomes. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3261] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of criminal law, tribal law and criminological theory within the United States. Includes a focus on the interactions between tribal versus federal and state criminal law. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Mgmt 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Biol 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
POL 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 2202/HMSV 2202
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Same as HMSV 2202. Law enforcement is a critical function in the United States that operates on the local, state, and national level. This course examines processes, actors, and institutions involved in criminal justice, from the investigation of criminal activity through the arrest and incarceration of individuals. With a focus on modern controversies such as use of force and systemic racism, the course provides students with a critical foundation for understanding the criminal justice system in the context of the United States.
HMSV 2202 - Criminal Justice and Policing (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 2202/HMSV 2202
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Same as Pol 2202. Law enforcement is a critical function in the United States that operates on the local, state, and national level. This course examines processes, actors, and institutions involved in criminal justice, from the investigation of criminal activity through the arrest and incarceration of individuals. With a focus on modern controversies such as use of force and systemic racism, the course provides students with a critical foundation for understanding the criminal justice system in the context of the United States.
CMR 2062 - Interpersonal and Group Communication (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Activities, assignments, and exercises related to interpersonal and group communication in private and public settings including dating, family, and work.
POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 3231/Pol 3233
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions primarily dealing with the Bill of Rights and including topics such as freedom of religion, speech and the press, rights of the accused, and struggles over the right to privacy and how to guarantee civil rights protections. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions dealing with separation of powers, checks and balances, and issues of federalism. Specific topics include the importance of due process, the Contract Clause, the power to tax and spend, the Commerce Clause, and the struggle to define national and state powers. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3235 - U.S. Criminal and Tribal Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of criminal law, tribal law and criminological theory within the United States. Includes a focus on the interactions between tribal versus federal and state criminal law. prereq: 1201 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues within particular social institutions from a sociological perspective.
SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues regarding specific social inequalities from a sociological perspective.
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Analyze the impact of popular media on perceptions of Human Services, Psychology, and Political Science. Understand the scope of media influence from the individual to the systemic level including propaganda, tropes, heuristics, and group think. Course includes films that explicitly address interdisciplinary themes, films viewed as influential, and the consequences of availability. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Preparation for success as a Social Science major. Skills and knowledge for varying futures including graduate school and professional realms. Conference attendance and etiquette; job seeking, resumes and cover letters; interview skills; publication; and graduate school applications. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to quantitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: surveys, experiments, controlled observations, structured interviews, and document analysis), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), statistical literacy, and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that use quantitative methods. prereq: any 1xxx level social science course
IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to qualitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and participatory action research), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that want exposure to qualitative human subjects research practices. prereq: any 1xxx social science course
MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introductory course in accounting principles and practices. Students develop an understanding of both the conceptual and procedural framework of accounting processes. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and communication of accounting information and the financial statements for proprietorships and partnerships.
MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A continuation of Principles of Accounting I. Students develop an understanding of the issues unique to corporations and organizational financing. Cash flow statements and performance analysis are also emphasized. prereq: 2101
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Critical examination of theoretical and normative issues in the philosophy of law, including the connection (if any) between the law and morality, the nature of criminal responsibility, debates over the purpose of punishment, theories of legal interpretation, etc.
POL 2221 - The American Judicial Process (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2221/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course examining the common law system as broadly practiced in the United States, including types of legal recourse, the structures of state and federal judicial systems, how judges are selected, and the various influences on their decisions.
POL 2222 - The U.S. Supreme Court (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2222/Pol 3221
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
A half-semester course specifically looking at the role of the Supreme Court in U.S. politics with an emphasis on its historical development, how it interacts with the other federal branches, and the decision-making process of the justices on the Court.
POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2234/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Using a case study approach, this half-semester course examines a variety of social movements from across U.S. history. Addresses questions such as why social movements arise, how they succeed or fail, and how the American political system adapts to their influence.
POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2235/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A half-semester course focusing on the growth and importance of interest groups in U.S. politics by looking at different types of interest groups, the tactics they use to try to influence the political system, how successful they are at doing so, and whether this system works for the public good.
POL 3411 - International Law (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
An introduction to public international law, examining basic concepts, theories, and legal cases in international law. Includes the nature of international law, recognition, succession, the rights and duties of international persons, the individual and international law, territorial questions, and laws of war. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 1082 - Introduction to Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This introductory course provides an overview of the transdisciplinary foundations of alcohol and drug counseling, theories of chemical dependency, the continuum of care, and the process of change. prereq: 1051 or equiv
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081]
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3302 - Personality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of personality constructs and theories. Conscious vs. nonconscious processes; emotion and motivation; nature and measurement of personal traits; their dimensional structure, stability, development, and heritability. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 3581 - Psychopharmacology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Biological and behavioral aspects of drug use, abuse, and addiction. Includes focus on therapeutic drugs used to treat psychiatric conditions as well as drugs of abuse. prereq: C- or better in 2581
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of counseling and helping relationships with individuals & groups with psychological/stress disorders (e.g., Substance, Anxiety, Adjustment). Acquisition of helping skills (e.g. client psychoeducation, attending behavior, reflecting skills) and evaluative skills (e.g. orientation, termination). Didactic instruction/practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3214 - History of Childhood (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of changes in childhood and youth from the early modern era to the present. Geographic emphasis on Europe, although the course also allows for exploration of similar themes in other parts of the world. Considers key developments in both ideas about and experiences of children, such as the emergence of children's rights discourse. Other topics may include schooling, play, labor, family, sexuality, consumption, migration, welfare, imperialism, and war. Readings drawn from social, cultural, and political approaches to the history of childhood, as well as historical documents created by children themselves across contexts.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.
PSY 2411 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3261 - Human Sexuality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of aspects of human sexuality, including intimacy and communication; male and female anatomy, physiology, and response; development of sexual differentiation, gender identity, gender role, and gender orientation; varieties of sexual expression; pregnancy and child birth; contraception and disease prevention; sexual coercion and abuse; sexual dysfunctions and their treatment. prereq: 1051
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3401 - Child Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to middle childhood. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of counseling and helping relationships with individuals & groups with psychological/stress disorders (e.g., Substance, Anxiety, Adjustment). Acquisition of helping skills (e.g. client psychoeducation, attending behavior, reflecting skills) and evaluative skills (e.g. orientation, termination). Didactic instruction/practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by social scientists to study and understand race and racisms, particularly in the US. Exploration of how the concept of race has and continues to shift and understanding structural power. Seminar with an emphasis on cultural critique and intersectional analysis.
ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by cultural anthropologists to study and understand educational processes. Exploration of approaches to diverse educational settings, including both formal and informal contexts. The seminar-style format of the course emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to connect the readings and course topics to their own lives and experiences.
ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.
ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A survey of gender and sexuality in contemporary Latin America. Course readings attend to the ways gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religion. Topics include women's activism, public health, LGBTQ activism, tourism, and globalized labor.
BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development (SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to scientific methods and the history of biology, with an emphasis on mechanisms of inheritance, development, and descent with modification. Overview of pre-Darwinian scientific thought; the theory of evolution; a qualitative introduction to genetics and molecular biology; and a summary of developmental biology. (two 75-min, or three 50-min, lect) prereq: biol major/minor or chem major or any health sciences preprofessional program or ElEd or SeEd major with middle school science specialties or instr consent
BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as SSA 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Experience
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students complete 30 hours of preprofessional field experience in the schools. Students enrolled in this course are required to pay for and submit to a Minnesota background check. prereq: coreq 2121
ED 2121 - Introduction to Education (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course supports second or third year students pursuing teacher licensure. Provides an introduction to the teaching and learning cycle, including objectives, planning, assessment, curriculum, management, and standards for teacher education. prereq: sophomore standing or instr consent; coreq 2111
IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Analyze the impact of popular media on perceptions of Human Services, Psychology, and Political Science. Understand the scope of media influence from the individual to the systemic level including propaganda, tropes, heuristics, and group think. Course includes films that explicitly address interdisciplinary themes, films viewed as influential, and the consequences of availability. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Preparation for success as a Social Science major. Skills and knowledge for varying futures including graduate school and professional realms. Conference attendance and etiquette; job seeking, resumes and cover letters; interview skills; publication; and graduate school applications. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to quantitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: surveys, experiments, controlled observations, structured interviews, and document analysis), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), statistical literacy, and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that use quantitative methods. prereq: any 1xxx level social science course
IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to qualitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and participatory action research), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that want exposure to qualitative human subjects research practices. prereq: any 1xxx social science course
POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2234/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Using a case study approach, this half-semester course examines a variety of social movements from across U.S. history. Addresses questions such as why social movements arise, how they succeed or fail, and how the American political system adapts to their influence.
POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2235/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A half-semester course focusing on the growth and importance of interest groups in U.S. politics by looking at different types of interest groups, the tactics they use to try to influence the political system, how successful they are at doing so, and whether this system works for the public good.
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3402 - Adolescent and Emerging Adult Development
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical perspectives and research on adolescence and emerging adulthood as distinct stages of the life cycle. Focuses on developmental issues central to the transition from childhood to adulthood, including: puberty and physical development, cognitive and socioemotional development, identity formation, dating and sexuality, family and peer relationships, school and work, culture and media, and the challenges faced by today's adolescents. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3403 - Adult Development and Aging (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introductory exploration of the health, individual, social, and cultural factors associated with adult development (e.g., young adulthood, middle age, and older adulthood). Provides an overview of current concepts, gerontological theories, and current methodology in the study of adult development and aging. Students become familiar with the physical aging process, society's perceptions of aging, aging family relationships, and end of life preparation and planning. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Family systems are known for their complexity. Focus is on the development of families, their interactive relationships, and the influence of external factors (e.g., stress, addiction) and individual decisions. Includes a general examination of various theories, contemporary research, and practical applications of family life development. Analyze research related to family interaction processes across the family life span with an emphasis on relationship dynamics and cultural differences. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Psy 2402] prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues within particular social institutions from a sociological perspective.
SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues regarding specific social inequalities from a sociological perspective.
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Biol 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
ANTH 2203W - Race, Racism, and Resistance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by social scientists to study and understand race and racisms, particularly in the US. Exploration of how the concept of race has and continues to shift and understanding structural power. Seminar with an emphasis on cultural critique and intersectional analysis.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
A survey of gender and sexuality in contemporary Latin America. Course readings attend to the ways gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religion. Topics include women's activism, public health, LGBTQ activism, tourism, and globalized labor.
GWSS 2404 - Feminist, Queer, and Intersectional Theories (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides a historical overview and introduction to fundamental concepts, frameworks, and bodies of theory related to gender, sexuality, feminism, and other related topics across disciplines. It emphasizes critical analysis of foundational theoretical works and applications of theories to current activism, problems, and scholarship. prereq: 1101 or instructor consent
HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of South Africa's settler colonial history from European contact to youth resistance against white supremacy. Special attention to examining the history of structural racism in a global perspective.
HIST 3356 - Civil Rights Era, 1954-1974 (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Background of the Civil Rights movement, emergence of the theory and practice of nonviolence, various Civil Rights groups, role of women, legislative and other accomplishments of the movement, its aftermath and influence.
NAIS 1101 - Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to Native American and indigenous histories and literature, and to other expressive cultures. An interdisciplinary course emphasizing sovereignty, effects of government policies, and diversity of Native American and indigenous societies.
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
An exploration of active debates in political theory and applied political philosophy. Topics such as political legitimacy, free speech (and hate speech), distributive justice, political equality and individual liberties, communitarianism, nationalism, immigration, and secession are discussed from a variety of political perspectives. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2121 - Topics in Social Institutions (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues within particular social institutions from a sociological perspective.
SOC 2122 - Topics in Social Inequalities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examines timely issues regarding specific social inequalities from a sociological perspective.
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
ARTH 3281 - Women and Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A historical survey of women's roles as creators and patrons of the visual arts in Western European and American societies, from antiquity to the present. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of intercultural communication from an interpersonal and group perspective. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ECON 1101 - Principles of Economics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The first half of the course will focus on theories related to individual and firm decision-making. Core concepts like supply and demand, concepts of elasticity, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, and pricing of factors of production will be covered. The latter half of the course will cover the theories related to the aggregate economy. Core concepts like measurement of economic performance such as national income, inflation, and unemployment, macroeconomic theories to understand business cycle fluctuations, and stabilization policies will be covered. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for 1111 and 1112] prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literary and cultural representations of gender. Emphasis on the intersections between power and the social relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 2041 - Introduction to African American Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to issues and themes in African American literature and culture, with emphasis on historical and cultural context. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of literatures by African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, U.S. Latino/a, and other under-represented peoples. prereq: 1509, two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3311 - American Indian Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of American Indian literature written in English. Particular attention given to language, identity, land, and sovereignty. prereq: 1509, two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212 or instr consent
ENGL 3312 - World Indigenous Literature and Film (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Comparative study of indigenous literature and film from North America, New Zealand, and Australia with particular emphasis given to issues of political and cultural sovereignty, cultural appropriation, self-representation, and colonial nostalgia. prereq: 1509, two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212, or instr consent, or NAIS major
ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
If African Americans struggled to achieve equality and recognition in the racist United States, the situation was even more difficult for African American women, who had to contend with the sexism in both the white and black communities. This course examines the writings of prominent African American women. prereq: 1601 or 2109 or equiv or instr consent
ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
During the 1920s, there was a major aesthetic outpouring in the African American community. Listen to jazz, examine African American artwork, and read poetry, short stories, novels and essays from Harlem Renaissance writers. prereq: 1509, two from 1205, 1206, 1211, 1212
GWSS 2101 - American Masculinities: The Making of Guys, Dudes, Bros, and Men (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What makes a man? What does it mean to be "masculine"? How is manhood defined, represented, and enforced in American popular culture? How do race and ethnicity intersect with American manhood? This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore these and other questions about gender, masculinity, and society. We situate definitions of manhood historically, examine representations of masculinity in literature and film, and critically reflect on social and cultural messages of American masculinity.
GWSS 2102 - Masculinities in the Margins: Intersectional and Marginalized Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Is "masculinity" the same throughout America? the world? Which men "count" and why? Are there new versions of masculinity in the making? How do race, class, ethnicity, and nationality intersect with manhood? How have these ideas changed over time? This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore these and other questions about gender, masculinity, and society. We situate definitions of manhood historically; explore concepts of intersectionality and hegemonic, subordinated, and marginalized masculinity; and critically reflect on social and cultural messages about these concepts.
HIST 1402 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Themes and methods in the history of women in the United States. Topics may include women in the colonial era; American Indian, African American, and immigrant women; sex roles; women and work, family, politics, the law, and religion.
HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The experience of the original Americans and their interaction with later immigrants.
HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as NAIS 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for NAIS 1701 or Hist 1701]
HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Consideration of apartheid South Africa's roots and the multiracial country's struggle to reconcile its colonial past. Special attention to 20th-century black and non-racial political thought from a global perspective.
HIST 2708W - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination and discussion of pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial African history through the debates and trends in and between Western feminism, U.S. women of color feminism, Third World feminism, LGBT studies, queer theory, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of African queer studies. Also suitable for students interested in understanding past and present issues of gender and sexuality in Africa through the theories and conditions that animate black queer studies and the black queer diaspora. prereq: 1111 or 1112 or 1113 or Anth 1111 or GWSS 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3304 - Race, Class, and Gender in American History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The themes of race, class, and gender are explored in-depth throughout the semester. Students gain a new awareness about historiography and theories that highlight this growing subfield of American history. Prominent topics covered in lecture and readings include colonization, slavery, suffrage, immigration, sovereignty, labor, ghettoization, art, literature, culture, and the rise of self-determination. Study the intersection of race, class, and gender relations through multiple perspectives of region, ideology, political-economy, and religion.
HIST 3359 - Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Exploration of the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive. Students gain insight into a pivotal time for the "incorporation" of the United States and ongoing tensions between unity and diversity that characterize the nation's political economy and social structure. Paradoxes under scrutiny include the degree to which policies claiming to emancipate actually imprisoned and prisons became homelands.
HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Anth 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3403/AmIn 3403
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Same as NAIS 3403. Examination of indigenous education in the United States from pre-contact to the late 20th century. Topics include indigenous ways of teaching and learning, efforts to assimilate Native peoples through education, the movement toward educational self-determination within Native communities, and contemporary representations of boarding school experiences. Students also gain insight into the history of the Morris Indian School and its contemporary representation at UMM.
HIST 3455 - American Immigration (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The role of voluntary migration in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Emphases on settlement, ethnicity, nativism, transnational issues, and immigration law. Possible topics include European immigrants and "whiteness," restriction of immigration from Asia, ethnicity and U.S. foreign and military policy, and the varieties of immigration, legal and undocumented, since 1965.
HIST 3612 - Social Revolution in 20th-Century Latin America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of social revolution in 20th-century Latin America. Particular attention paid to social revolution in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua. Populism, democratic attempts at social revolution, and counterrevolution in other parts of Latin America also considered. Key issues include imperialism, capitalism, communism, nationalism, and the Cold War.
HIST 3614 - Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Explore issues of race and ethnicity in Latin America from a historical perspective. Covering the colonial and national periods, examine how ideas of race and ethnicity have intersected with political, economic, and socio-cultural developments in the region. Consider the ways in which race, class, and gender have intersected in Latin America.
IS 2301W - Movie Magic or Malice? How Media Influences Ideas on Human Services, Psychology, & Political Science (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Analyze the impact of popular media on perceptions of Human Services, Psychology, and Political Science. Understand the scope of media influence from the individual to the systemic level including propaganda, tropes, heuristics, and group think. Course includes films that explicitly address interdisciplinary themes, films viewed as influential, and the consequences of availability. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2302 - Professional Development in the Social Sciences
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Preparation for success as a Social Science major. Skills and knowledge for varying futures including graduate school and professional realms. Conference attendance and etiquette; job seeking, resumes and cover letters; interview skills; publication; and graduate school applications. prereq: Pol 1201 or Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111
IS 2303 - Quantitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to quantitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: surveys, experiments, controlled observations, structured interviews, and document analysis), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), statistical literacy, and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that use quantitative methods. prereq: any 1xxx level social science course
IS 2304 - Qualitative Research Methods (SS)
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
An introduction to qualitative research methods including research design, ethics, data collection (for example: interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and participatory action research), evaluation of academic literature/research, data analysis (including the use of professional software), and communication of research findings (including appropriate citation forms). This class is appropriate for students across disciplines that want exposure to qualitative human subjects research practices. prereq: any 1xxx social science course
MUS 3115 - Gender and Sexuality in Music (FA)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores both representation of and discourse on gender and sexuality through music. Course content includes examples from both cultivated and vernacular traditions. prereq: ability to read music and identify basic scales and chords
NAIS 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Hist 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for AmIn 1701 or Hist 1701]
PHIL 1103 - Introductory Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to philosophical positions about the nature of morality, what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong, and various applied-ethical debates, such a abortion, wage ethics, and animal rights. [Note: no cr for students who have received cr for Phil 2111]
PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course examines a number of ethical issues that arise in the context of international relations and biomedical technologies. Topics include: warfare, terrorism, abortion, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, patient autonomy, humanitarian intervention, organ donation, famine relief, and genetic enhancement.
PHIL 2114 - Environmental Ethics (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Survey of fundamental theoretical debates in environmental ethics. Major positions in environmental ethics such as anthropocentrism and deep ecology are canvassed. Specific topics include: speciesism, the tension between animal rights and environmentalism, geoengineering, de-extinction, and indigenous environmental approaches.
POL 2234 - Race, Class and Power: Social Movements in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2234/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Using a case study approach, this half-semester course examines a variety of social movements from across U.S. history. Addresses questions such as why social movements arise, how they succeed or fail, and how the American political system adapts to their influence.
POL 2235 - Race, Class and Power: Interest Groups in U.S. Politics (HDIV)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 2235/Pol 3234
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
A half-semester course focusing on the growth and importance of interest groups in U.S. politics by looking at different types of interest groups, the tactics they use to try to influence the political system, how successful they are at doing so, and whether this system works for the public good.
POL 3251 - American Democracy in Action: Campaigns, Elections, and Political Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the American system of choosing new political leaders and the reasons behind political engagement and making specific voting choices. Attention is paid to the demographics of who does and does not participate, what happened in recent elections, and how American voting behavior has changed and is changing. There is a significant focus on the mid-term or presidential elections which occur during the semester the course is offered, including the creation and implementation of a poll of voters. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 4251] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 3051 - The Psychology of Women and Gender (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Exploration of the interactive biological, psychological, and socio-cultural processes that shape the lives of women and the experience of gender. Topics include: the psychobiology of sex; the social construction of sex and gender; socialization and development; media representations; identity and sexuality; language and communication; motivation and personality; relationships; work and family lives; mental and physical health; mid- and later life development; victimization; therapy; intersections of race, class, and gender; and feminist approaches to teaching, learning, and knowing. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3314 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Broad overview of child and adolescent psychopathology--initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to classification and assessment--followed by comprehensive information concerning the major childhood disorders (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, pervasive developmental disorders). prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3405 - Family Interaction Dynamics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Family systems are known for their complexity. Focus is on the development of families, their interactive relationships, and the influence of external factors (e.g., stress, addiction) and individual decisions. Includes a general examination of various theories, contemporary research, and practical applications of family life development. Analyze research related to family interaction processes across the family life span with an emphasis on relationship dynamics and cultural differences. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for Psy 2402] prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of counseling and helping relationships with individuals & groups with psychological/stress disorders (e.g., Substance, Anxiety, Adjustment). Acquisition of helping skills (e.g. client psychoeducation, attending behavior, reflecting skills) and evaluative skills (e.g. orientation, termination). Didactic instruction/practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent