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Human Services B.A.

Division of Social Sciences - Adm
Division of Social Sciences
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The human services major provides students with an understanding of the individual, the family, the community, institutions, and the systems that are set up to serve these individuals and groups. Students will learn how individuals are in constant interaction with their environments, communities, and institutions. They also will learn how socioeconomic and political environments influence individuals, families, and communities. Human service workers carry out many different roles, from case management and intervention to program administration and development. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship. Student Learning Outcomes: Understanding of the history and structure of human services systems Knowledge of human development, family functioning, community dynamics, and political systems Basic skills in intervention with individuals, families, groups, and organizations Research and information literacy for effective delivery of services Knowledge of ethics, values, and policies guiding human services practice Information and technological literacy through exposure to statistical packages Ability to utilize databases related to human services Exposure to the domains that inform the field of human services
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students are required to complete general University and college requirements. For more information, see the general education requirements.
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 2 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
Students choose one of the HMSV sub-plans generally no later than the spring semester of their sophomore year. Students may complete more than one sub-plan, however, each elective may only be used to satisfy the requirements of one sub-plan. Students should choose an advisor with a background or specialties related to the human services area (e.g., anthropology, political science, psychology, sociology). Students should discuss the arrangement of their internship with the HMSV internship coordinator during their junior year. No grades below C- are allowed. Courses may not be taken S-N, unless offered S-N only. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the major to graduate. The GPA includes all, and only, University of Minnesota coursework. Grades of "F" are included in GPA calculation until they are replaced.
Required Courses
Courses and directed studies not listed below may be considered for addition to the HMSV major, provided the subject matter is appropriate for the program of study. Contact HMSV coordinator. Students should complete Psy 4102 during the year before their internship (HMSV 4896). Students may complete more than one sub-plan, however, one 4 credit internship may only be used to satisfy the Human Services Internship requirement of one sub-plan.
Introduction to Anthropology or Sociology
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
Political Science
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Theory and Practice of Human Services
HMSV 3001 - Theory and Practice of Human Services [SS] (4.0 cr)
Research Methods
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
Statistics
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods [M/SR] (4.0 cr)
Professional Ethics
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
Human Services Internship
HMSV 4896 - Internship in the Human Services (2.0-4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
General
The general human services sub-plan provides students with an understanding of the individual, the family, the community, institutions, and the systems that are set up to serve these individuals and groups. Students will learn how individuals are in constant interaction with their environments, communities, and institutions. They also will learn how socioeconomic and political environments influence individuals, families, and communities. Human service workers carry out many different roles, from case management and intervention to program administration and development. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Psychology Electives
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
Sociology and Anthropology Electives
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from any elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ENST 2101 - Environmental Biology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy [E/CR] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior [SS] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
Criminal Justice
The criminal justice human services sub plan provides students with knowledge of the criminal justice system, theories of criminal behavior, law, administration, and policy. Students will also learn about the reciprocal relationship between sociocultural contexts and the criminal justice system. This knowledge will prepare students interested in pursuing careers related to the criminal justice system. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Course
POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
Required Electives
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 1062 - Introduction to Interpersonal and Group Communication [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 20 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· CMR 3251 - Rhetorical Criticism and Free Speech Discourse [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II (2.0 cr)
· PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law [SS] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3411 - International Law [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior [SS] (2.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3302 - Personality (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
Human Development
The human development human services sub plan provides students with an understanding of psychological, social, and biological development and facilitates understanding of sociocultural contexts that influence development. The focus is on normative development, individual variations of development and abnormal development. This knowledge will prepare students interested in providing services to children and older adults. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Electives
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 3214 - History of Childhood [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3465 - History of the American Family [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective [SS] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development [SCI] (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
· ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Practicum (1.0 cr)
· ED 2121 - Introduction to Education [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ED 2131 - Foundations of Reading (2.0 cr)
· ENST 2101 - Environmental Biology [SCI-L] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3112 - Cognition (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3131 - World Population [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy (4.0 cr)
Social Justice
The social justice human services sub plan provides students with an understanding of how to create societies or institutions based on the principles of equality and solidarity, the value of human rights, and the importance of recognizing that every human being deserves dignity. Social justice is the view that everyone deserves equal economic, political and social rights and opportunities. This major will prepare students for jobs related to community activism, human rights advocacy or non-profit administration. Students in human services build professional experience for their resumes through our applied service-learning classes and/or capstone internship.
At least 16 elective credits need to be at the 3xxx or 4xxx level.
Required Electives
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· NAIS 1101 - Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3501 - Social Psychology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
Additional Electives
Additional elective credits to total at least 24 elective credits. Electives may be selected from the elective category above and the following (exclusive of the course used to fulfill the Research Methods requirement):
Take 0 - 8 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology [SCI-L] (5.0 cr)
· ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3281 - Women and Art [FA] (4.0 cr)
· CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics [SS] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3414 - Feminist Theory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe [SS] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe [IP] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany [HIST] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation [E/CR] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3455 - American Immigration [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2111 - Introductory Ethics [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism [HUM] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory [SS] (2.0 cr)
· POL 3475 - International Human Rights (4.0 cr)
· PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology [SS] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3313 - Psychopathology (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development [ENVT] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3251 - African Americans [HDIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society [IP] (4.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· Division of Social Sciences

View sample plan(s):
· General Sample Plan
· Criminal Justice Sample Plan
· Human Development Sample Plan
· Social Justice Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Human Services B.A.
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ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.
SOC 1101 - Introductory Sociology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to the field of sociology, the exploration of societies, and how societies operate. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, guides analytical thinking, and develops writing skills. By actively thinking about issues facing societies today, students learn to examine life situations and the influence of societies and groups on people's lives, careers, hopes, fears, and personalities. Emphasis on how society is stratified: how organizations and institutions influence the way people think, talk, feel, and act and how different groups (e.g., racial and ethnic) and divisions (e.g., gender and social class) within society have different access to power and privilege. People live their lives in relation to social and physical environments; sociologists study these environments and their effects on people's experiences and behavior.
PSY 1051 - Introduction to Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introduction to the science of mind and behavior. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, biological bases for behavior, life span development, sensation and perception, learning, cognitive and social processes, personality, psychopathology, and applications of psychology.
POL 1201 - American Government and Politics (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Analysis of principles, organization, procedures, and powers of government in the United States. The federal system, national constitution, civil and political rights, party system; nature, structure, powers, and procedures of legislative, executive, and judicial departments of the national government.
HMSV 3001 - Theory and Practice of Human Services (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Discusses Human Services' history and relevant theories. Students learn about the structure and dynamics of organizations, communities, and society as well as the nature of individuals and groups. The human conditions (e.g., aging, delinquency, crime, poverty, mental illness, physical illness, and developmental disabilities) that provide the focus for human service professionals are also discussed. [Note: no credit for students who have received cr for HMSV 2001] prereq: Psy 1051 or Soc 1101 or Anth 1111 or Pol 1201
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
STAT 1601 - Introduction to Statistics (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scope, nature, tools, language, and interpretation of elementary statistics. Descriptive statistics; graphical and numerical representation of information; measures of location, dispersion, position, and dependence; exploratory data analysis. Elementary probability theory, discrete and continuous probability models. Inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses. Inferences involving one and two populations, ANOVA, regression analysis, and chi-squared tests; use of statistical computer packages. prereq: high school higher algebra
STAT 2601 - Statistical Methods (M/SR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory; laws of probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability models, functions of random variables, mathematical expectation. Statistical inference; point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses. Other statistical methods; linear regression and correlation, ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, statistical quality control, use of statistical computer packages. prereq: Math 1101 or Math 1021
PSY 4102 - Intro to Prof Conduct, Legal Constraints, Ethics in Human Services (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts of professional ethics in human services professions; ethically relevant legal mandates and constraints on professional practice; practical problems in the application of ethical principles. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for IS 4101] prereq: jr, 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
HMSV 4896 - Internship in the Human Services
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A supervised educational experience providing field applications in the Human Services for the student's theoretical classroom learning. prereq: Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081] prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as SSA 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic economic problems, concepts, and theoretical models. U.S. economic institutions and the economic organization of society. The role of markets in the production and distribution of societal resources. Measurement of economic performance; national income, inflation, and unemployment; competing macroeconomic theories and stabilization policies. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ENST 2101 - Environmental Biology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts in biodiversity, evolution, and ecology. Includes basic chemistry and concepts from cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. A one-course gateway into upper division Biology courses normally requiring the Biol 1111-2101 sequence. (two 65-min lectures, one 180-min lab)[Note: credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Biol 2101]
MGMT 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as Psy 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
POL 2261 - States: Laboratories of American Democracy (E/CR)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examination of the ways American democracy functions in the states. Analysis of principles, organizations, procedures, and functions of state government in the United States, with particular emphasis on comparing state politics and policy outcomes. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Pol 3261] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3701 - Organizational Behavior (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00926 - Mgmt 3701/Psy 3701
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Mgmt 3701. Uses the theories and research of the behavioral sciences to understand how organizations function at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Topics include stress in the workplace; group dynamics; power, leadership, and attribution theory. prereq: Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, jr or sr
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Biol 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
POL 1202 - Law and Society: Introduction to Public Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Law is a significant part of modern-day society and culture, especially in the United States. Examine the adversarial system of law and the various actors and institutions that influence and shape it in this country. In particular, look at where legal authority comes from and its limits in modern society. Explore the ways in which law acts to restrict and empower individuals and groups in society. This introductory level course is intended as a survey of the concept of public law both for students interested in taking upper-level courses dealing with legal and constitutional questions and for students simply interested in a greater understanding of why and how law matters in 21st-century society. It is taught using lectures mixed with some in-class activities and simulations.
ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly. prereq: 1201 or Biol 2102
CMR 1062 - Introduction to Interpersonal and Group Communication (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Activities, assignments, and exercises related to interpersonal and group communication in private and public settings including dating, family, and work.
POL 3231 - Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02137 - Pol 3231/Pol 3233
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions primarily dealing with the Bill of Rights and including topics such as freedom of religion, speech and the press, rights of the accused, and struggles over the right to privacy and how to guarantee civil rights protections. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
POL 3232 - Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers and Constraints (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1201 or #
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Case-based examination of major Supreme Court opinions dealing with separation of powers, checks and balances, and issues of federalism. Specific topics include the importance of due process, the Contract Clause, the power to tax and spend, the Commerce Clause, and the struggle to define national and state powers. [Note: this course is one part of a two-part set of courses covering Constitutional Law; these courses may be taken in any order] prereq: 1201 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
SOC 3141 - Sociology of Deviance (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of deviance. Explores the social reality of deviance within contemporary society and examines the social construction of deviant categories. Focuses on images of deviance as social constructs, rather than as intrinsic elements of human behavior. Investigates the complex relationships between individual behavior and social structure, with a focus on power, inequality, and oppression. Also, examines the socio-cultural definitions of morality and behavior. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
CMR 3251 - Rhetorical Criticism and Free Speech Discourse (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis and evaluation of Supreme Court opinions establishing the contours of First Amendment protection for freedom of speech. Particular attention is devoted to the nature of "communication" revealed by the decisions studied. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
MGMT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introductory course in accounting principles and practices. Students develop an understanding of both the conceptual and procedural framework of accounting processes. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and communication of accounting information and the financial statements for proprietorships and partnerships.
MGMT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A continuation of Principles of Accounting I. Students develop an understanding of the issues unique to corporations and organizational financing. Cash flow statements and performance analysis are also emphasized. prereq: 2101
PHIL 3131 - Philosophy of Law (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Critical examination of theoretical and practical normative issues in the philosophy of law, especially questions regarding the justification of punishment.
POL 3411 - International Law (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Relations of international law to individuals, states, the international community, jurisdictional problems, survey of principles developed by diplomatic agents and consuls, treaties, arbitration, treatment of aliens, pacific settlement. War, military occupation, war crimes, neutrality. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 2581 - Drugs and Human Behavior (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of psychoactive drugs, their effects on mind and behavior, and prevention and treatment of drug abuse. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for Psy 1081] prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3302 - Personality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nature of personality constructs and theories. Conscious vs. nonconscious processes; emotion and motivation; nature and measurement of personal traits; their dimensional structure, stability, development, and heritability. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3214 - History of Childhood (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of changes in childhood and youth from the early modern era to the present. Geographic emphasis on Europe, although the course also allows for exploration of similar themes in other parts of the world. Considers key developments in both ideas about and experiences of children, such as the emergence of children's rights discourse. Other topics may include schooling, play, labor, family, sexuality, consumption, migration, welfare, imperialism, and war. Readings drawn from social, cultural, and political approaches to the history of childhood, as well as historical documents created by children themselves across contexts.
HIST 3465 - History of the American Family (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of the history of the American family from the colonial period to the present. One focus is demographic and explores changes in family size and structure due to economic change and modernization. Also examined are altered relationships within families, as the nuclear family became more democratic and affectionate, as the position of women within American life changed, as people began to practice different methods of family limitation, and as childhood and adolescence were recognized as distinctive life course phases. Additional topics include the role of class and cultural differences in defining family systems, shifting gender and sexual norms, the rise of unrelated individuals, and the aging of the population, etc.
PSY 2411 - Introduction to Lifespan Developmental Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to theory, data, and research approaches in development from the prenatal period through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging until the cessation of life. Includes physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, moral, personality, socio-emotional, family, and career development and changes over time, as well as issues of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes a multicultural focus. prereq: 1051
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 3504 - Educational Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Discussion of psychological principles/theories in relation to learning in academic settings. Topics may include: a consideration of developmental and social issues that are likely to impact the learner; a discussion of individual differences in learning; an examination of different theoretical approaches to learning applied specifically to educational settings; an analysis of factors related to student motivation and behavior; and a discussion of issues related to testing and measurement in academic settings. prereq: 1051
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by cultural anthropologists to study and understand educational processes. Exploration of approaches to diverse educational settings, including both formal and informal contexts. The seminar-style format of the course emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to connect the readings and course topics to their own lives and experiences.
BIOL 1111 - Fundamentals of Genetics, Evolution, and Development (SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to scientific methods and the history of biology, with an emphasis on mechanisms of inheritance, development, and descent with modification. Overview of pre-Darwinian scientific thought; the theory of evolution; a qualitative introduction to genetics and molecular biology; and a summary of developmental biology. (two 75-min lect) prereq: biol major/minor or chem major or any health sciences preprofessional program or ElEd or SeEd major with middle school science specialties or instr consent
BIOL 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as SSA 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
ED 2111 - Tutor-Aide Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students complete 30 hours of preprofessional field experience in the schools. Students enrolled in this course are required to pay for and submit to a Minnesota background check. prereq: coreq 2121
ED 2121 - Introduction to Education (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
History, philosophy, and purposes of American education; classroom practices and effective teaching; instructional technology; and certification requirements in education. prereq: coreq 2111
ED 2131 - Foundations of Reading
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of research on key aspects of literacy development and assessment. [Note: this course is a prerequisite for admission to the Elementary Education program; open to students from all disciplines. Students enrolled in this course are required to pay for and submit to a Minnesota background check.]
ENST 2101 - Environmental Biology (SCI-L)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to concepts in biodiversity, evolution, and ecology. Includes basic chemistry and concepts from cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. A one-course gateway into upper division Biology courses normally requiring the Biol 1111-2101 sequence. (two 65-min lectures, one 180-min lab)[Note: credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Biol 2101]
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 3101 - Learning Theory and Behavior Modification
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Major theories of learning and their importance for understanding human and nonhuman behavior. Classical and operant conditioning, generalization, discrimination, stimulus control, animal cognition. Behavior modification theories and techniques and their application to clinical populations. Lab projects demonstrate learning and behavior modification theories, concepts, and techniques and illustrate research methods and theory testing. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3112 - Cognition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 2001 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical study of memory, language behaviors, representation of knowledge, judgment, decision making, problem solving, and creative thinking. Includes lab. prereq: 2001 or instr consent
PSY 3401 - Developmental Psychology I: Child Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory, data, and research in development from conception to middle childhood. Prenatal and physical development as well as perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social development. Language acquisition and Piaget's theory of cognitive development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3402 - Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory, data, and research in adolescent development with emphasis on physical, cognitive, and social development. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3403 - Developmental Psychology III: Adulthood and Aging (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An overview of current concepts, theories, and methods in the study of adult development and aging. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3131 - World Population (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population theory and demographic method. Dynamics of fertility and mortality as the basis of population forecasting and its policy implications. Emphasis on the tie between Third World demographic trends and population issues in the rest of the world. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SSA 2102 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Same as Biol 2102. Structure of human systems at their organ and cellular level. (two 75-min lect, one 120-min lab)[Note: no elective cr for biol majors or minors] prereq: soph
NAIS 1101 - Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to Native American and indigenous histories and literature, and to other expressive cultures. An interdisciplinary course emphasizing sovereignty, effects of government policies, and diversity of Native American and indigenous societies.
ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.
HIST 2312 - History of South Africa to 1976 (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Exploration of South Africa's settler colonial history from European contact to youth resistance against white supremacy. Special attention to examining the history of structural racism in a global perspective.
PHIL 3121 - Political Philosophy (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Explores fundamental issues in political philosophy (e.g., political authority; distributive justice; nature, origin, and justification of the state; natural and civil rights) by, among other things, an examination of the works of philosophers such as Plato, Hobbes, Mill, and Rawls. prereq: 1101 or 2101 or 2111 or instr consent
PSY 3501 - Social Psychology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or Soc 1101 or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories and research in the study of interpersonal behavior. Topics include aggression, prejudice, altruism, persuasion, group dynamics, and social influence. prereq: 1051 or Soc 1101 or instr consent
PSY 3542 - Multicultural Psychology (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01335 - Psy 3541/Psy 3542
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theoretical and methodological approaches to multicultural psychology. Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of behavior, cognition, and affect settings where people of different backgrounds interact. Exploration of these interactions both within and outside of the United States. Topics may include worldviews, communication styles, acculturation, prejudice, white privilege, identity development, physical and mental health, and multicultural competencies. prereq: 1051
SOC 2101 - Systems of Oppression (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patterns of group dominance, exploitation, and hate in the United States and globally. Emphasis on sexism, racism, and classism with some attention to other systems of oppression such as heterosexism and ageism. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
SOC 3121 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality. Focuses on gender difference and gender inequality. Analyzes the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of women and men as their societies (and subsequently, gender relations and power) undergo change in today's world. Following a theoretical overview, examines how gender and sexuality affect everyday experiences. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111 or instr consent
ANTH 1201 - Becoming Human: Introduction to Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.
ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues.
ARTH 3281 - Women and Art (FA)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or #
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
A historical survey of women's roles as creators and patrons of the visual arts in Western European and American societies, from antiquity to the present. prereq: any 1xxx ArtH course or jr status or instr consent
CMR 3411 - Intercultural Communication Theory and Research (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Study of intercultural communication from an interpersonal and group perspective. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
ECON 1111 - Principles of Microeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of scarce resource allocation in a market economy. Supply and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, market structure, pricing of factors of production, income distribution and the role of government. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ECON 1112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to basic economic problems, concepts, and theoretical models. U.S. economic institutions and the economic organization of society. The role of markets in the production and distribution of societal resources. Measurement of economic performance; national income, inflation, and unemployment; competing macroeconomic theories and stabilization policies. prereq: high school algebra or instr consent
ENGL 2031 - Gender in Literature and Culture (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Introduction to literary and cultural representations of gender. Emphasis on the intersections between power and the social relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or declared English major
ENGL 3301 - U.S. Multicultural Literature (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination of literatures by African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, U.S. Latino/a, and other under-represented peoples. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212, or instr consent
ENGL 3332 - African American Women Writers (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
If African Americans struggled to achieve equality and recognition in the racist United States, the situation was even more difficult for African American women, who had to contend with the sexism in both the white and black communities. This course examines the writings of prominent African American women. prereq: 1601 (or 1011) or equiv or instr consent
ENGL 3414 - Feminist Theory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01928 - Engl 3414/GWSS 3414
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as GWSS 3414. Engages students in a critical examination of several influential works participating in the elaboration of feminist theories. Readings and discussions focus on a series of themes and issues--gender, sexuality, race, class, language, bodies, etc.--and how these issues bear upon society. prereq: [2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212] or [GWSS 1101]
ENGL 3522 - Harlem Renaissance (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
During the 1920s, there was a major aesthetic outpouring in the African American community. Listen to jazz, examine African American artwork, and read poetry, short stories, novels and essays from Harlem Renaissance writers. prereq: 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212
GWSS 3414 - Feminist Theory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01928 - Engl 3414/GWSS 3414
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Same as Engl 3414. Engages students in a critical examination of several influential works participating in the elaboration of feminist theories. Readings and discussions focus on a series of themes and issues--gender, sexuality, race, class, language, bodies, etc.--and how these issues bear upon society. prereq: [1101] or [Engl 2501 (or 1131), two from 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212]
HIST 2251 - American Indians and the United States: A History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The experience of the original Americans and their interaction with later immigrants.
HIST 2252 - Comparative Indigenous History: Beyond Native America (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02307 - Hist 2252/AmIn 2252
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as NAIS 2252. Explore indigenous experiences with settler colonialism in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and sub-Saharan Africa. With special attention to issues of race, labor, gender, education, and movements for decolonization, place the indigenous histories of Morris and Minnesota within a global context. [Note: no credit for students who have received credit for NAIS 1701 or Hist 1701]
HIST 2313 - History of South Africa since 1910 (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Consideration of apartheid South Africa's roots and the multiracial country's struggle to reconcile its colonial past. Special attention to 20th-century black and non-racial political thought from a global perspective.
HIST 2704 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Medieval Europe (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Analysis of the history of European women and gender systems as constructed during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500).
HIST 2708 - Gender, Women, and Sexuality in Modern Europe (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of the forces that have shaped the lives of European women since 1600 and analysis of how changes in the structures of power and authority--religious, political, social, familial--affected the choices available to them. Students engage critically with the question of what bringing gender to the forefront of the study of European history has to teach them. Students gain an understanding of many of the underpinnings of American society, which has been deeply affected by European patterns of thought about women and their place in the world.
HIST 3008 - The Making of the Islamic World (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.
HIST 3021 - Gender and Sexuality in African History (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examination and discussion of pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial African history through the debates and trends in and between Western feminism, U.S. women of color feminism, Third World feminism, LGBT studies, queer theory, and the emerging interdisciplinary field of African queer studies. Also suitable for students interested in understanding past and present issues of gender and sexuality in Africa through the theories and conditions that animate black queer studies and the black queer diaspora. prereq: 1111 or GWSS 1101 or instr consent
HIST 3204 - Nazi Germany (HIST)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
History of Nazi Germany. Social and political origins, Nazi rule in the 1930s, the "final solution," World War II, and Germany's attempt to assess this era in its history.
HIST 3402 - Representations from the Field: American Indian Ethnography and Ethnohistory (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01990 - Hist 3402/Anth 3402
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Same as Anth 3402. An analysis of ethnographic and ethnohistoric materials focusing on specific American Indian cultures.
HIST 3403 - American Indian Education: History and Representation (E/CR)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02429 - Hist 3403/AmIn 3403
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Same as NAIS 3403. Examination of indigenous education in the United States from pre-contact to the late 20th century. Topics include indigenous ways of teaching and learning, efforts to assimilate Native peoples through education, the movement toward educational self-determination within Native communities, and contemporary representations of boarding school experiences. Students also gain insight into the history of the Morris Indian School and its contemporary representation at UMM.
HIST 3455 - American Immigration (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The role of voluntary migration in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Emphases on settlement, ethnicity, nativism, transnational issues, and immigration law. Possible topics include European immigrants and "whiteness," restriction of immigration from Asia, ethnicity and U.S. foreign and military policy, and the varieties of immigration, legal and undocumented, since 1965.
PHIL 2111 - Introductory Ethics (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to philosophical accounts of what makes right acts right and wrong acts wrong, issues involving the concept of goodness, and arguments or debates about moral responsibility.
PHIL 2113 - International and Biomedical Ethics (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
A general survey of topics in international and biomedical ethics. Topics may include: nuclear deterrence, humanitarian intervention, just war theory, famine relief, global justice, abortion, euthanasia, doctor-patient relationships, clinical trials, animal experimentation, and genetic engineering.
PHIL 2141 - Analytic Feminism (HUM)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Applies an analytical approach to issues discussed in feminist writings. A mixture of lecture and discussion. Requirements include essay exams, papers, attendance, service-learning projects with related reflective journals, and class participation.
POL 3303 - Gender, Sexuality, and Political Theory (SS)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Examination of the politics of sex, gender, and sexuality through study of contemporary critical analyses within political theory. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
POL 3475 - International Human Rights
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1401 or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explores the historical and philosophical development of concepts of human rights and the contemporary international political and legal frameworks to address rights. Analyzes contemporary concerns about political, economic, and social rights, as well as specific human rights topics like human trafficking and war crimes. Compares American, European, Asian, and Developing World conceptions and critiques of human rights. prereq: 1401 or instr consent
PSY 2001 - Research Methods in Psychology (SS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Design, analysis, and interpretation of research in psychology. Instruction on different research techniques and ethics in research. Students conduct, analyze, and evaluate empirical research and gain experience preparing APA-style research reports. Includes laboratory/discussion sessions. prereq: 1051, Stat 1601 or Stat 2601, or instr consent
PSY 3313 - Psychopathology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1051 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Psychological disorders and their treatment, including anxiety, personality, mood, schizophrenia, eating, substance and other recognized disorders of adults. prereq: 1051 or instr consent
PSY 3404 - Culture and Human Development (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Examination of the role of culture in human development through current research and examples from around the world. Learn about similarities and cultural differences in human development, and the regularities that explain these variations. Topics include the concept of culture in developmental psychology, diversity in child rearing practices, enculturation, gender roles, schooling, development in multicultural contexts, and the influence of technology and cultural change on development. Students learn to think culturally about their own development and see how it applies to their future careers. prereq: 1051
PSY 4101 - Helping Relationships
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or #
Typically offered: Every Fall
Approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Theories of helping relationships. Acquisition of helping skills, including attending behavior, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, confrontation, and summarization. Major humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral approaches. Didactic instruction, observation of counseling and psychotherapeutic techniques, and practical experiences. prereq: 8 cr 3xxx or 4xxx Psy or Soc or Anth courses or instr consent
SOC 3103 - Research Methodology in Sociology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall
An introduction to research procedures used in sociology. Developing a research design and applying it to a concrete problem. Questions of validity and reliability examined in the context of research projects developed by the students. prereq: 1101
SOC 3112 - Sociology of the Environment and Social Development (ENVT)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of the environment and social development. Examines the impact of international environmental and development efforts on individuals at the local level. Focuses on grassroots environmental activism and social development work. Explores and discusses power relations and systems of inequality within the context of environmental and social development efforts. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3122 - Sociology of Childhoods (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Introduces students to the sociological study of childhoods. Examines the interaction between societies and their youngest members-how societies shape children's lives through social institutions such as families, education, and the state. Takes a close look at children's access to privileges and resources as determined by children's experiences of race, gender, class, nationality, and sexual orientation. prereq: 1101 or instr consent
SOC 3123 - Sociology of Aging (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
An introduction to sociology of aging. Examination of the major theories of social aging as well as the historical and cross-cultural variations in aging and differences by race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. prereq: 1101
SOC 3124 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: 1101
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore the emergence and function of law through the lens of social theories. The course assumes law is embodied in the social structure of society; hence, it is the product of social interaction. Based on this assumption, it examines the role of law in maintaining and reproducing social order, class, race, and gender inequalities. The course is interdisciplinary and comparative in its scope and integrates jurisprudence and various social science theories. prereq: 1101
SOC 3251 - African Americans (HDIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examination of African American religious, economic, political, family, and kinship institutions in the context of the greater American society. Struggles to overcome problems and the degree of success or failure of these struggles are examined and placed in historical context. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111
SOC 3252 - Women in Muslim Society (IP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The cultures and social statuses of women in several Muslim countries are examined and placed in their political, economic, and religious contexts. prereq: 1101 or Anth 1111