Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Master of Science Patent Law

Law School
Law School
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
University of Minnesota Law School Master of Science in Patent Law Program 411 Walter F. Mondale Hall 229 19th Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55455
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2018
  • Length of program in credits: 30
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Science Patent Law
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The master of science in patent law is a professional master's degree for scientists and engineers interested in pursuing a career in the growing field of patent law. The program requirements may be completed in one year of full-time study or in two years (with an optional third year) on a part-time basis. This program is offered through the University of Minnesota Law School. Students in this program will learn practical patent drafting, patent research, portfolio management, and innovation skills. Many courses in this program will be taken jointly with JD students.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
Applicants with a degree in Science or Engineering are preferred.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
GRE and LSAT scores are accepted but not required.
Special Application Requirements:
Personal statement, resume, letters of recommendation, interview, patent bar eligibility assessment.
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
  • IELTS
Key to test abbreviations (TOEFL, IELTS).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 30 major credits and 0 credits outside the major. There is no final exam. A capstone project is required.
Capstone Project: Patent Law CAPSTONE: Innovation (3 credits): Students select a technology of interest with the cooperation of their adviser. Using their knowledge of innovation, patent law, patent prosecution, patent research and strategy they will identify, articulate and present opportunities for innovation in their chosen technology.
This program may not be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 2.80 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 1 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Patent Law: Core Curriculum
Take 20 credits of core coursework and the 3-credit capstone course for a total of 23 credits.
LAW 5001 - Introduction to the American Legal System (2.0 cr)
LAW 5003 - Writing, Analysis & Persuasion (3.0 cr)
LAW 5025 - Patent Law Proseminar (1.0 cr)
LAW 5026 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar (1.0 cr)
LAW 5075 - Ethics for Patent Agents (1.0 cr)
LAW 5224 - Patents (3.0 cr)
LAW 5231 - Patent Prosecution Practice I (2.0 cr)
LAW 5232 - Patent Prosecution Practice II (3.0 cr)
LAW 5250 - Patent Portfolio Management (2.0 cr)
LAW 5707 - Intellectual Property Transactions (2.0 cr)
Capstone Course
Students are required to take the 3 credit capstone course.
LAW 5290 - Patent Law Capstone: Innovation (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take at least 7 elective credits in consultation with the program director. Coursework can be from the following list or selected with approval from the program director.
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAW 5062 - Energy Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 5076 - Essentials of Business for Lawyers (3.0 cr)
· LAW 5103 - Data Privacy Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 5608 - Trademarks (3.0 cr)
· LAW 5613 - Copyright (3.0 cr)
· LAW 5908 - Independent Research and Writing (1.0-2.0 cr)
· LAW 5909 - Independent Field Placement (1.0-3.0 cr)
· LAW 6037 - Emerging Sciences and Technologies: Law, Ethics and Policy (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6133 - Data Compliance Practicum (1.0 cr)
· LAW 6225 - Winning Patent Litigation (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6402 - Food and Drug Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6605 - Health Law (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6609 - International Intellectual Property (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6610 - Unfair Competition (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6622 - International Business Operation and Negotiation (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6705 - Information Governance (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6709 - Current Agriculture-Environment Issues (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6714 - E-Discovery (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6832 - Cybercrime and Cybersecurity (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6853 - Law, Biomedicine and Bioethics (3.0 cr)
· LAW 6876 - Digital Evidence (2.0 cr)
· LAW 6949 - Biotechnology & Patent Law (2.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· Law School

View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

Law School

Graduate Admissions

Graduate School Fellowships

Graduate Assistantships

Colleges and Schools

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
LAW 5001 - Introduction to the American Legal System
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This is an introductory course in American law, providing an overview of a wide variety of constitutional, statutory and common law legal issues. A primary focus will be on American constitutional law: legislative, judicial, and executive powers; the legal structure of “checks and balances” among the three national governmental powers; the distribution of powers between the national government and state governments (federalism); and the constitutional rights of individuals (including rights of free speech, freedom of religion, due process, and equal protection). We will also examine the American system of litigation: the structure of the court system, the jurisdiction of federal (national) and state courts, and the litigation process. We will also address some common law substantive topics in American law including torts and contracts. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to read and interpret American legal materials, to do legal research within the legal system, and to write an analytical legal memorandum.
LAW 5003 - Writing, Analysis & Persuasion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Writing, analysis and persuasion are integral parts of patent law and practice. Performing a patent search, for example, requires the ability to distinguish the novel features of the invention from those of the prior art. Procuring patent protection requires a showing that the invention is not "obvious" in light of the prior art. These are matters upon which reasonable minds may disagree - and often do. Writing, analysis and persuasion are essential tools of the successful patent practitioner. Through this course, students will be exposed to a broad range of persuasive and analytical techniques. We will explore how these techniques are used across a variety platforms, from written work product to images and visual media. Students will also enhance their writing skills through a number of progressively more challenging iterative writing exercises.
LAW 5025 - Patent Law Proseminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02174 - Law 5025/Law 6925
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall
The field of patent law extends across the boundaries of business, technology, innovation, and law. In this course, students will be introduced to current topics and compelling issues in patent law presented by leading patent and intellectual property law professionals. Students will gain real-world insights from in-house and private practice attorneys and agents, with a focus on patent prosecution and patent litigation.
LAW 5026 - Intellectual Property and Technology Proseminar
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02179 - Law 5026/Law 6926
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The field of intellectual property extends across the boundaries of business, technology, innovation, and law. In this course, students will be introduced to a broad range of IP related topics presented by leading practitioners working at the intersection of law and technology. Topics may include trade secrets, copyrights, trademarks, patents, IP transactions, IP litigation, emerging technologies, intellectual asset management, IP valuation and commercialization. Lecturers may include corporate general counsels, firm lawyers, transactional lawyers, litigators, consultants, tech transfer officers, R&D Leaders, and CTO.
LAW 5075 - Ethics for Patent Agents
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction and understanding of the ethics and rules of professional responsibility and the unauthorized practice of law. Scope: This course covers ethics and professional responsibility for lawyers, ethics and professional responsibility for patent agents and patent attorney’s and the unauthorized practice of law. Goals: This course will provide students with the framework that will guide their actions and conduct as future patent professionals by introducing them to various scenarios that they are likely to encounter in their professional career. By the end of the course, students will understand the principles behind the ethics and rules of professional responsibility and the unauthorized practice of law as it applies to nonlawyers. prereq: Master of Science Patent Law Students.
LAW 5224 - Patents
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02175
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course offers an overview of patent law for both those students intending to specialize in patent prosecution and those whose general practice may include patent litigation and licensing. Topics to be covered include the requirements for patentable subject matter; standards of novelty, utility, and non-obviousness; statutory bars; conception, priority, enablement, and written description requirements in patent procurement; direct and vicarious patent infringement; claims interpretation.
LAW 5231 - Patent Prosecution Practice I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02176 - Law 5231/Law 6231
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course focuses on preparation of patent applications and prosecution before the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Topics include types of patent applications, inventor interviews, analysis of prior art, preparation of the patent specification, claim drafting, inventorship determination, ownership determination, amendment practice, and argument practice, with coverage of U.S. law and regulations governing patent prosecution practice. The course is highly practical and will include a number of drafting assignments. A technical background is not required to take this course.
LAW 5232 - Patent Prosecution Practice II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02178
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course builds on the foundation from Patent Prosecution Practice I. In this course, we will study advanced patent prosecution and patent practice matters including a review of prosecution-related Federal Circuit cases, appeals practice before the USPTO, opinions, post grant challenge procedures, design patents, foreign prosecution, and more. The course is highly practical and will include take-home projects and in-class exercises. prereq: Master of Science Patent Law Students only.
LAW 5250 - Patent Portfolio Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02177
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Patent portfolio management is the art of aligning patent strategy with business objectives. In general, the successful portfolio manager must have the ability to transform complex patent information into actionable insights that provide decision-making value to a wide variety of stakeholders. This course introduces students to the various practices and skills that go into building, implementing, and managing a patent portfolio whether from the point of view of a small, innovative, start-up company or a Fortune 500 company in a highly competitive market space.
LAW 5707 - Intellectual Property Transactions
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02262
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intellectual property rights have been described as a “sword and shield.” Rights holders are thought to act offensively by suing or threatening to sue infringers and seeking money damages, irrespective of the holders’ marketing and product sales programs. Or they act defensively to protect their current or future market positions by having federal courts enjoin competitors. This course considers a third way: intellectual property rights are also valuable intangible assets that may be bought and sold. In this course, we will explore the principal theories and practices of intellectual property transactions. We will be considering closely the doctrines regulating the assigning and licensing of patent, copyright, trademark and other intellectual property rights, and we will be questioning critically whether these laws and practices encourage or inhibit commercial activity and innovation. While studying specific transactions in the course, we will be examining the practical uses of intellectual property law to meet commercial objectives.
LAW 5290 - Patent Law Capstone: Innovation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02269
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This capstone course introduces students to the principles of successful innovation and the integral role of patents in this process. This is a course in innovation. There are no right or wrong answers. Large companies with very smart people often launch products that fail. Venture capitalists seeking to invest in winners more-often-than-not end up investing in losers. Innovation is an art not a science. There is no “secret formula” that guarantees success. There are simply different tools, skills, methods of analysis and approaches that may or may not work better than others. We will explore the art of innovation and the integral role that patents play in turning an idea into an innovation. Goals: Students will learn how to research complex subject matter across the intersecting domains of business, finance, marketing, science, technology and intellectual property. Students will then develop the ability to present their findings in a clear and concise manner that is understandable to and can be acted upon by a cross-functional audience of high-level decision makers.
LAW 5062 - Energy Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02388
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to U.S. energy law. The first portion of the course introduces the nation’s primary sources of energy: coal, oil, biofuels, natural gas, hydropower, nuclear, wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In doing so, it explores the physical, market, and legal structures within which these energy sources are extracted, transported, and converted into energy. The second portion turns to the two major sectors of our energy economy: electricity and transportation. The third part of the course explores case studies of hot topics in energy law and policy that highlight the complex transitions taking place in the energy system. These topics include Smart Grid development, electric vehicles, risks and benefits associated with hydraulic fracturing and deepwater drilling, and the continued role of nuclear energy. In addition to traditional textbook reading and class discussion, the course will include industry, government, and nonprofit guest speaker presentations and in-class simulated exercises.
LAW 5076 - Essentials of Business for Lawyers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02309
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will teach you how to: (1) Understand basic accounting principles; (2) Read an annual report and analyze financial statements; (3) Look beyond numbers to gauge the financial performance and strength of an entity; (4) Employ cash flow analysis to value a business or determine the potential financial rewards of an investment opportunity; and (5) Understand the strategic questions that business managers must confront in governing their companies. The course surveys foundational concepts, analytical techniques and practices related to finance, accounting and strategic management issues lawyers confront when working with business executives either as an outside consulting attorney or as an inside corporate counsel. It may also consider other concepts used by business executives, including organizational behavior, marketing and quantitative analysis. The aim of the course is to help law students better appreciate the broader business context of legal decision-making so that they can contribute more effectively as a member of a firm’s top management team or as outside counsel.
LAW 5103 - Data Privacy Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02390
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Every single day, the newspaper contains stories—plural intended—about data privacy and security. Whether they concern the National Security Agency, Facebook, or a data breach at a small business, the handling of personal information has become a central concern of our time. In response, a complex law of data privacy has emerged, and now it is a fast growing area of legal practice. This course will equip students to counsel clients about an array of federal, state, and international legal requirements—while also analyzing them critically and thinking about the societal challenges posed by new information technology. Assessment will include group projects and a take-home final.
LAW 5608 - Trademarks
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02395
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will consider how marketers secure and enforce trademark rights. Trademarks are the indicators that consumers rely upon to determine the origin of goods and services. The course will focus on U.S. federal trademark law, but will also look at state and international trademark law as well as related areas such as false advertising, publicity rights, and cybersquatting. This course will provide a solid foundation for students interested in practicing trademark law (application, enforcement, licensing, or litigation) or more general intellectual property law. It will also be useful to attorneys who do any work with trademark-dependent industries such as retail sales, advertising, or media and entertainment. Finally and more generally, trademark law offers excellent case studies of the interaction between law, culture, and technology, and of the evolution of traditional doctrine under pressure from rapid changes in surrounding circumstances.
LAW 5613 - Copyright
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02396
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course provides a detailed introduction to the basic law of copyright—traditional copyright subject matter, the concept of originality and authorship, copyright transfers (and terminations of transfers), infringement, and fair use. The course coverage excludes patent law, except in brief overview, and only touches briefly upon related areas of intellectual property law. Copyright (and copyright-like schemes) have increasingly become a necessary tool of the general practitioner as a result of the explosive growth in economic value of information-based products, like computer software and digital networks and databases. The lawyer ignorant of basic copyright principles will be increasingly handicapped in many areas of practice, such as negotiating technology transfers, drafting contractual rights, developing schemes of protection and privacy, distinguishing criminal from non-criminal behavior, and in litigation.
LAW 5908 - Independent Research and Writing
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students may earn 1 or 2 credits (and in exceptional circumstances, 3 credits) for researching and writing a note, article, memo, or other paper on a legal topic. At least 3,750 words are required for one credit, at least 7,500 for two credits, and at least 11,250 for three credits. To register, the student should confer with a supervising faculty member, draft a description of the proposed project, and complete the online Independent Research form. LAW 5908 is for students who are not enrolled in the Law School, as well as MSPL candidates. Other law school degree candidates should enroll in LAW 7606 or LAW 7608 instead of LAW 5908.
LAW 5909 - Independent Field Placement
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students may earn up to three credits in a semester for work in a patent practice setting under the supervision of a qualified field supervisor and a faculty advisor. At least 50 hours of patent-related activities are required per credit. The student is responsible for identifying a field placement setting and supervisor, finding a faculty advisor, and submitting the Independent Field Placement Enrollment Form for approval by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs prior to enrollment.
LAW 6037 - Emerging Sciences and Technologies: Law, Ethics and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This interdisciplinary course will examine issues at the nexus of law, ethics, public policy, and emerging sciences and technologies (ES&T) including nanotechnology, genetic and biomedical engineering, cognitive science, synthetic biology, and robotics. Topics we will explore include the role of science and technology as both a tool for and the subject of law and policy; the legal, ethical, economic, and policy implications of ES&T research and development; environmental and human health risk analysis and regulation (e.g., EPA, FDA, OSHA, and state and local regulatory mechanisms); intellectual property issues; liability issues; and global impacts. Topics will be approached from the perspective of different stakeholders (e.g., federal agencies, industry, academic researchers, the environment, international organizations, and the public) and in the context of different application areas (e.g., drugs, devices, food, agriculture, energy, environmental remediation) using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Students with a broad range of interests are encouraged to enroll.
LAW 6133 - Data Compliance Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The enormous growth in the importance of data privacy law over the past ten years has created opportunities for attorneys with expertise in this fascinating and fast-moving field. The Data Privacy Practicum aims to prepare students who may wish to specialize in the area with real-world exposure to practice and credentials that demonstrate readiness for its challenges. Students will 1) study for and take an exam overseen by the International Association of Privacy Professionals that will entitle them to become Certified Information Privacy Professionals—many attorneys working in this area display the “CIPP” credential proudly on their business cards and bios, demonstrating its reputational value; 2) shadow a privacy professional in the Twin Cities working in organizations such as Target, 3M, US Bank, Cargill, Optum Health, and major law firms; 3) attend six proseminar sessions with guest speakers practicing in the field; and 4) research and write a short paper tackling an important problem in current data privacy law.
LAW 6225 - Winning Patent Litigation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course focuses on practical litigation strategy in the context of patent litigation. It uses patent litigation as a vehicle for seeing how parties develop a winning strategy for a variety of complex legal issues, including choice of law, personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, and certain patent-specific issues, such as claim construction. A general understanding of patent law is helpful but not mandatory.
LAW 6402 - Food and Drug Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The primary focus of the class will be on the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and the FDA. In addition, time will be spent on specific food and drug aspects of other areas of the law. For example, the class will review the special rules and cases in the product liability field relating to food and drugs and the interface between food and drug regulation and subjects such as environmental law, the practice of medicine, and free choice in medical care.
LAW 6605 - Health Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is a comprehensive introduction to health law. We will investigate the organization of health care delivery in the United States; the nature of the physician-patient relationship; methods of quality control; responses to harm and error, including through medical malpractice litigation; problems of access to health care; and approaches to cost control. We will also analyze proposals for health care reform.
LAW 6609 - International Intellectual Property
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides an overview of international intellectual property law. Likely topics include (1) a comparison of US and foreign law relating to patents, copyrights, and trademarks; (2) the principal multinational agreements relating to intellectual property, including the Paris Convention, Berne Convention, and the TRIPs Agreement, as well as the implementation of these agreements within the domestic law of the United States and other countries; and (3) other topics such as the protection of indigenous knowledge and the law of judgments, jurisdiction, and choice of law as it relates to intellectual property disputes. It is highly recommended that students enrolling in this course have taken, or be in the process of taking, at least one other intellectual property course. prereq: One prior or concurrent intellectual property course.
LAW 6610 - Unfair Competition
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an overview of false advertising and product disparagement under the Lanham Act; the right of publicity; and trade secret law. The course does not provide comprehensive coverage of antitrust, trademarks or trade dress, or consumer protection law.
LAW 6622 - International Business Operation and Negotiation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The course surveys foundational concepts, analytical techniques and practices related to organization and strategic management of multinational firms and cross-border transactions they negotiate with host-country governments, firms and non-governmental organizations. The overall aim of the course is to give law students basic proficiency in theories, practices and analytical techniques for understanding why and how multinational firms emerge and organize operations differently, negotiate cross-border transactions differently, and perform differently over time. Students will gain this basic proficiency with special reference to the multinational firm’s general counsel and her contributions to top-management decision-making, so that these future legal professionals can contribute more effectively as a member of a multinational firm’s top management team. The pedagogical approach of this course will be a modified Socratic method utilizing business and legal cases as well as in-class exercises letting law students play different organizational roles in different negotiating contexts.
LAW 6705 - Information Governance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students will explore the values placed on information in the modern corporate enterprise, as well as the risks, costs and challenges associated with governing various forms of information, given the innumerable laws and regulations that apply to information. The purpose of the broad survey is to expose students to multiple disciplines that will undoubtedly affect their careers, and help them to develop a real-world sense of options to enhance risk avoidance, cost containment, and compliance. Students will be exposed to various disciplines related to the management of information, which have traditionally been “siloed” or separate — including e-discovery, privacy, records and information management, and security — but which increasingly are seen as parts of a greater, integrated whole.
LAW 6709 - Current Agriculture-Environment Issues
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The seminar will cover selected legal environmental issues related to agriculture. Half the semester will explore the Des Moines Water Works litigation. Filed in 2015 by a water utility, this lawsuit has attracted wide attention in the farming and environmental communities. It seeks to hold farming accountable for dramatically increased cost of treating water to meet public health standards. Legal issues center on water quality and lead to questions of drainage, fertilizers, pesticides, erosion, irrigation, genetically modified organisms, livestock manure, and antibiotics. Also the course will consider ag/environment/legal aspects of organic farming, air quality, global warming, endangered species, and state and federal farm programs. Attorneys, scholars, and public officials will be invited classroom guests. Students will present their research topics to the class. Readings will be selected portions of texts, articles, & cases.
LAW 6714 - E-Discovery
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Familiarity with all aspects of e-discovery is no longer optional for new attorneys and courts are increasingly penalizing attorneys who fail to satisfy their e-discovery obligations. The outcomes of many cases turn on a few key electronic documents that can be missed if the e-discovery process is not carefully pursued. This seminar will follow the life cycle of a case, covering topics such as document preservation, collection, search, review, and production. Students will participate in mock client interviews and meet and confers, receive lectures on important topics such as spoliation, and observe demonstrations of available document search and review technologies. The seminar will also include guest speakers on topics such as an in-house counsel’s perspective on gathering electronic documents.
LAW 6832 - Cybercrime and Cybersecurity
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course will cover the key constitutional, statutory, technological, and policy issues regarding computer crime, electronic-evidence gathering (including electronic surveillance), and cybersecurity. The course grade will be determined by a final paper, a brief class presentation based on the final paper, and class participation. Criminal Procedure (LAW 6085) is recommended but not required as a prerequisite.
LAW 6853 - Law, Biomedicine and Bioethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Research on human subjects, behavioral biology, medically assisted procreation/reproductive decision making, maternal-fetal relations. Genetic testing, screening, engineering, cloning. Definition of death, termination of life-sustaining treatment, physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia. Organ transplantation, artificial organs.
LAW 6876 - Digital Evidence
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This seminar will cover the fast growing area of digital evidence and the legal issues that arise when digital evidence is investigated and used in criminal law and civil practice.
LAW 6949 - Biotechnology & Patent Law
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course emphasizes patent law principles and doctrines as applied to biotechnology, including pharmaceutical, patents. Although there will be some coverage of United States Patent and Trademark Office policies as well as biotechnology patent principles in non-U.S. jurisdictions, the focus will be on U.S. Federal Circuit and Supreme Court case law developments. Topics include patent eligibility of biotechnological inventions including diagnostics and “natural” products such as genes, claim strategies, written description, enablement, utility, best mode including requirements for biological deposits, inventorship, inherent anticipation, obviousness, infringement, and the intersection of patent and FDA regimes for small molecules and biologics.