Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Business Research M.S.

Curtis L. Carlson School of Management - Adm
Curtis L. Carlson School of Management
Link to a list of faculty for this program.
Contact Information
Business Administration PhD Program, Suite 4-205, 321-19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (Phone: 612-624-0875; Fax: 612-624-8221)
  • Program Type: Master's
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Length of program in credits: 40 to 44
  • This program does not require summer semesters for timely completion.
  • Degree: Master of Science
Along with the program-specific requirements listed below, please read the General Information section of this website for requirements that apply to all major fields.
The business research MS is a terminal master's degree option restricted to eligible business administration PhD students who do not complete the doctoral degree. Applications to the business research MS are not otherwise considered.
Program Delivery
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Prerequisites for Admission
The preferred undergraduate GPA for admittance to the program is 3.00.
Other requirements to be completed before admission:
Applicants must be current business administration PhD students who have completed all required core, concentration, and supporting coursework for the doctoral degree. The preliminary written examination must have been passed at the master's level, based on a set of criteria approved by the Carlson School PhD Committee comprising members from all seven areas of concentration.
Applicants must submit their test score(s) from the following:
  • GRE
  • GMAT
    • Total score: 650
International applicants must submit score(s) from one of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
    • Internet Based - Total Score: 100
  • IELTS
    • Total Score: 7.0
Key to test abbreviations (GRE, GMAT, TOEFL, IELTS).
For an online application or for more information about graduate education admissions, see the General Information section of this website.
Program Requirements
Plan C: Plan C requires 24 to 28 major credits and 16 credits outside the major. There is no final exam.
This program may be completed with a minor.
Use of 4xxx courses towards program requirements is not permitted.
A minimum GPA of 3.30 is required for students to remain in good standing.
At least 4 semesters must be completed before filing a Degree Program Form.
Areas of Concentration
Students select one of seven areas of concentration. Concentration areas may require a first-year examination/presentation in addition to other program requirements.
Accounting (40 credits)
Students pursuing the accounting concentration must work under one of two accounting research paradigms: analytic or empirical.
Required Accounting Coursework (24 credits)
Take the following 24 credits:
ACCT 8801 - Topics in Empirical Research I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8802 - Topics in Empirical Research II (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8803 - Topics in Empirical Research III (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8811 - Topics in Information Economics I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8812 - Topics in Information Economics II (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8813 - Topics in Information Economics III (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8821 - Topics in Capital Markets I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8822 - Topics in Capital Markets II (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8823 - Topics in Capital Markets III (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8832 - Analytical Research Topics II (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8833 - Topics in Analytical Research III (2.0 cr)
Supporting/Methodology Coursework (16 credits)
Courses must be chosen in consultation with the advisor or PhD coordinator. Suggested coursework is listed below.
ACCT 8892 - Readings in Accounting (1.0-8.0 cr)
ACCT 8894 - Research in Accounting (1.0-8.0 cr)
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand (2.0 cr)
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty (2.0 cr)
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information (2.0 cr)
APEC 8004 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Social Choice and Welfare (2.0 cr)
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
FINA 8802 - Theory of Capital Markets I: Discrete Time (2.0 cr)
FINA 8812 - Corporate Finance I (2.0 cr)
FINA 8813 - Corporate Finance II (2.0 cr)
FINA 8822 - Empirical Methods in Finance (2.0 cr)
FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
MATH 4603 - Advanced Calculus I (4.0 cr)
MATH 4604 - Advanced Calculus II (4.0 cr)
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS (1.0 cr)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1 (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Finance (44 credits)
Finance is viewed as a subfield of economics. Students achieve a strong foundation in economic theory and empirical methods.
Required Finance Coursework (20 credits)
Take at least 20 credits from the following list. FINA 8810, 8820, and 8890 may be taken more than once.
FINA 8802 - Theory of Capital Markets I: Discrete Time (2.0 cr)
FINA 8803 - Theory of Capital Markets II: Continuous Time (2.0 cr)
FINA 8804 - Advanced Continuous Time Finance (2.0 cr)
FINA 8810 - Topics in Asset Pricing (2.0 cr)
FINA 8812 - Corporate Finance I (2.0 cr)
FINA 8813 - Corporate Finance II (2.0 cr)
FINA 8820 - Topics in Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
FINA 8822 - Empirical Methods in Finance (2.0 cr)
FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
FINA 8890 - Seminar: Finance Topics (2.0-4.0 cr)
Additional Required Finance Coursework (8 credits)
Take the following sequence of economics courses:
ECON 8101 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8102 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8103 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8104 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
Supporting/Methodology Coursework (16 credits )
Courses must be chosen in consultation with the advisor or PhD coordinator. Other courses may be selected with advisor or PhD coordinator approval.
ACCT 8812 - Topics in Information Economics II (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8832 - Analytical Research Topics II (2.0 cr)
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8105 - Macroeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8106 - Macroeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8107 - Macroeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8108 - Macroeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8181 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8182 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8185 - Advanced Topics in Macroeconomics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8191 - Workshop in Mathematical Economics (1.0 cr)
ECON 8201 - Econometric Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8207 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8208 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8211 - Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8212 - Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8501 - Wages and Employment (2.0 cr)
ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
ECON 8701 - Monetary Economics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8702 - Monetary Economics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8704 - Financial Economics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8705 - Financial Economics (2.0 cr)
FINA 8892 - Independent Study in Finance (1.0-8.0 cr)
FINA 8894 - Directed Research in Finance (1.0-8.0 cr)
MATH 8601 - Real Analysis (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Information and Decision Sciences (41 credits)
Required IDSc Coursework (15 credits)
Take all of the following courses:
IDSC 8511 - Conceptual Topics and Research Methods in Information and Decision Sciences (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8521 - System Development (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8531 - Organizational Theory and Research in Information Systems (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8541 - Introduction to Economics of Information Systems (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8721 - Behavioral Decision Theory (3.0 cr)
Additional IDSC Required Coursework (2 credits)
Take a minimum of 2 credits from the following. 8801 may be repeated.
IDSC 8620 - Data Mining and Personalization (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8630 - Social Media and Online Communities (2.0 cr)
IDSC 8801 - Research Seminar in Information and Decision Sciences (2.0 cr)
Methodology Coursework (8 credits)
Take at least 8 credits in research mthodology from the following:
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand (2.0 cr)
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty (2.0 cr)
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information (2.0 cr)
APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management (3.0 cr)
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
CI 8149 - Qualitative Research: Coding, Analysis, Interpretation, and Writing (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5511 - Artificial Intelligence I (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5512 - Artificial Intelligence II (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5521 - Machine Learning Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5523 - Introduction to Data Mining (3.0 cr)
CSCI 5551 - Introduction to Intelligent Robotic Systems (3.0 cr)
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
ECON 8581 - Advanced Topics in Labor Economics (2.0 cr)
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
JOUR 8500 - Seminar: Advanced Methods Special Topics (3.0 cr)
MABA 6441 - Causal Inference via Econometrics and Experimentation (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5056 - Case Studies for Policy Research (3.0 cr)
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
PSY 5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice (2.0 cr)
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods (3.0 cr)
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8432 - Probability Models for Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8442 - Bayesian Decision Theory and Data Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1 (3.0 cr)
Supporting Field Coursework (16 credits)
Courses must be chosen in consultation with the advisor or PhD coordinator.
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management (3.0 cr)
· APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
· CSCI 5125 - Collaborative and Social Computing (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 5980 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSCI 8551 - Intelligent Agents (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 8980 - Special Advanced Topics in Computer Science (1.0-3.0 cr)
· CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ECON 8581 - Advanced Topics in Labor Economics (2.0 cr)
· ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
· ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
· EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 8820 - Seminar: Special Topics in Work and Organizations Research (2.0 cr)
· IDSC 8892 - Readings in Information and Decision Sciences (1.0-8.0 cr)
· IDSC 8894 - Graduate Research in Information and Decision Sciences (1.0-8.0 cr)
· MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I (2.0 cr)
· PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
· PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8201 - Social Cognition (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 8432 - Probability Models for Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 8442 - Bayesian Decision Theory and Data Analysis (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
· STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1 (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Marketing (40 credits)
Students pursuing the marketing concentration choose one of two focus areas: consumer behavior or quantitative/ marketing strategy.
Consumer Behavior Concentration (24 credits)
Take at least 16 credits of consumer behavior seminars from the list below. Mktg 8810 can be repeated. In addition, take at least 8 credits from the quantitative/marketing strategy concentration course list.
Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8810 - Consumer Behavior Special Topics (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8811 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion I (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8812 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion II (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8813 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making I (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8814 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making II (2.0 cr)
or Quantitative/Marketing Strategy Concentration (24 credits)
Take at least 14 credits of quantitative/marketing strategy seminars from the list below. Mktg 8890 can be repeated. In addition, take at least 10 credits from the consumer behavior concentration course list.
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8851 - Seminar: Marketing Management and Strategy I (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8852 - Marketing Management & Strategy II (2.0 cr)
· MKTG 8890 - Seminar: Marketing Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
Supporting/Methodology Coursework (16 credits)
Courses must be chosen in consultation with the advisor or PhD coordinator. Suggested courses are listed below.
ACCT 8811 - Topics in Information Economics I (2.0 cr)
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis (2.0 cr)
ECON 8101 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8102 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8103 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8104 - Microeconomic Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8118 - Noncooperative Game Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8119 - Cooperative Game Theory (2.0 cr)
ECON 8191 - Workshop in Mathematical Economics (1.0 cr)
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8207 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8208 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8211 - Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8212 - Econometrics (2.0 cr)
ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
ECON 8603 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation (2.0 cr)
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis (3.0 cr)
IDSC 8721 - Behavioral Decision Theory (3.0 cr)
MKTG 8892 - Readings in Marketing (1.0-8.0 cr)
MKTG 8894 - Graduate Research in Marketing (1.0-8.0 cr)
MSBA 6441 - Causal Inference via Econometrics and Experimentation (3.0 cr)
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5204 - Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships (3.0 cr)
PSY 5207 - Personality and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
PSY 8203 - Impression Management (3.0 cr)
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self (3.0 cr)
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
PSY 8935 - Readings in Behavioral Genetics and Individual Differences Psychology (1.0 cr)
PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments (4.0 cr)
-OR-
Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship (40 credits)
Students focus on leadership, strategy, and entrepreneurship connecting the external worlds of competition and collaboration.
Required SME Coursework (16 credits)
Take the following courses:
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
MGMT 8102 - Research Methods I - Applied Empirical Methods (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory (4.0 cr)
MGMT 8401 - Strategy I (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8403 - Strategy II (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8501 - Seminar in Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
SME Elective Coursework (8 credits)
Take at least 8 credits of SME electives from the list below.
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8202 - Seminar in International Management (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8402 - Seminar in Behavioral Strategy (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8404 - Seminar in Non-Market Strategy (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8405 - Seminar in Technology Strategy (2.0 cr)
Supporting /Methodology Coursework (16 credits)
Take a minimum of 16 credits of supporting field/methodology coursework. APEC 8211 (2 cr), APEC 8212 (2 cr)and GRAD 8101 (3 cr) are required. Take an additional 9 credits minimum from the list below.
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education (3.0 cr)
Additional Supporting/Methodology Coursework (9 credits)
Take 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8004 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Social Choice and Welfare (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8213 - Econometric Analysis III (2.0 cr)
· CSCI 5980 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1.0-3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
· FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance (2.0 cr)
· HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences (1.0 cr)
· MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
· MGMT 8892 - Readings in Management Theory and Administration (1.0-8.0 cr)
· MGMT 8894 - Graduate Research in Management Theory and Administration (1.0-8.0 cr)
· MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations (4.0 cr)
· PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis (4.0 cr)
· POL 8106 - Quantitative Political Science I (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 8811 - Research Methods in Health Care (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory (4.0 cr)
· SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
· SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
· SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
· STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Supply Chain and Operations (42 credits)
Students complete coursework in the areas of operations and supply chain management.
Required SCO Coursework (22 credits)
Take the following courses:
SCO 8811 - Operations Strategy (4.0 cr)
SCO 8821 - Management of Technological Operations (4.0 cr)
SCO 8822 - Innovative Operations (2.0 cr)
SCO 8831 - Supply Chain Management (2.0 cr)
SCO 8832 - Analytical Models for Operations Management (2.0 cr)
SCO 8841 - Behavioral Research in Operations Management (4.0 cr)
SCO 8842 - Retail Operations (2.0 cr)
SCO 8843 - Sustainable and Socially-Responsible Operations (2.0 cr)
Supporting Field/Methodology Coursework (14 credits)
Take the following courses:
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
APEC 8213 - Econometric Analysis III (2.0 cr)
APEC 8214 - Econometric Analysis IV (2.0 cr)
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building (2.0 cr)
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
Additional Supporting/Methodology Coursework (6 credits)
APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management (3.0 cr)
APEC 8602 - Economics of the Environment (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences (1.0 cr)
HRIR 8802 - Core Seminar: Organizational Behavior (4.0 cr)
MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory (4.0 cr)
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I (2.0 cr)
MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II (2.0 cr)
PA 5032 - Applied Regression (2.0 cr)
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques (2.0 cr)
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistical Inference I (4.0 cr)
PUBH 7406 - Biostatistical Inference II (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis (3.0 cr)
PUBH 7475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar (3.0 cr)
PUBH 8811 - Research Methods in Health Care (3.0 cr)
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (3.0 cr)
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics (4.0 cr)
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods (2.0-3.0 cr)
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
STAT 5701 - Statistical Computing (3.0 cr)
STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods (3.0 cr)
STAT 8311 - Linear Models (3.0 cr)
-OR-
Work and Organizations (44 credits)
Students complete multidisciplinary coursework covering organizational behavior, human resource management, organizational economics, personnel economics, labor relations, and related areas.
Required WOrg Coursework (28 credits)
Take HRIR 8820 4 times for a total of 8 credits. Take HRIR 8825 4 times for a total of 4 credits.
Take 28 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HRIR 8801 - Core Seminar: Fundamentals of Economic Analysis for Work and Organizations (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 8802 - Core Seminar: Organizational Behavior (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 8803 - Core Seminar: Fundamentals of HR Research (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 8812 - Core Seminar: Research Methods in Work and Organizations (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 8820 - Seminar: Special Topics in Work and Organizations Research (2.0 cr)
· HRIR 8825 - Research Practicum/Workshop (1.0 cr)
Supporting/Methodology Coursework (16 credits)
Take a minimum of 16 credits of supporting field/methodology coursework which must include: EPsy 8264 (3 cr); Psy 5862 (3 cr); APEC 5031 (3 cr) or, APEC 8211 and APEC 8212 (2 cr each); and 7 additional credits of supporting field coursework from the list below.
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis (3.0 cr)
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
Required Supporting/Methodology course (3 credits)
Take either APEC 5031 (3 cr) or, APEC 8211 and APEC 8212 (2 cr each).
Take 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis (3.0 cr)
· APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II (2.0 cr)
Additional supporting/methodology coursework (7 credits)
Take 7 or more credit(s) from the following:
· APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8501 - Labor Economics I (2.0 cr)
· APEC 8502 - Labor Economics II (2.0 cr)
· CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics (2.0-4.0 cr)
· ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
· ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics (2.0 cr)
· EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data (3.0 cr)
· HRIR 8991 - Independent Study in Human Resources and Industrial Relations (1.0-8.0 cr)
· MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building (2.0 cr)
· MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design (2.0 cr)
· PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8664 - Personality Assessment (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8701 - Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology I (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8702 - Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology II (3.0 cr)
· PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology (1.0-4.0 cr)
· PUBH 6724 - The Health Care System and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 6832 - Economics of the Health Care System (3.0 cr)
· SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology (3.0 cr)
 
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ACCT 8801 - Topics in Empirical Research I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Capital-markets stream of empirical research in accounting. Accounting earnings and stock prices, earnings-based security valuation (theoretical and empirical), estimation of earnings-based risk measures, market anomalies, and related topics from corporate finance. Econometric techniques in market-based empirical research/application to data analysis. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8802 - Topics in Empirical Research II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Empirical capital markets research topics course. The course is designed to include current research topics in capital markets that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
ACCT 8803 - Topics in Empirical Research III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current research topics in Empirical Research that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
ACCT 8811 - Topics in Information Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Asymmetric information, incentives, and contracts. Moral hazard, adverse selection, reputation, and signaling phenomena. Applications to accounting such as transfer pricing, budgeting, cost allocations, performance measurement, audit pricing. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8812 - Topics in Information Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Information in capital markets; asset pricing with asymmetric information; economics of disclosure and information acquisition. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8813 - Topics in Information Economics III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Asymmetric information, incentives, and contracts. Moral hazard, adverse selection, reputation, and signaling phenomena. Applications to accounting such as transfer pricing, budgeting, cost allocations, performance measurement, audit pricing.
ACCT 8821 - Topics in Capital Markets I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Auction markets; price formation in experimental asset markets; experimental studies of information transfer and capital market efficiency; experimental tests of strategic behavior, trust, and reciprocity.
ACCT 8822 - Topics in Capital Markets II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Heuristics and biases in information processing, auditor judgment, mental accounting, and decision aids.
ACCT 8823 - Topics in Capital Markets III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
PhD seminar course concentrating on current topics in Capital Markets.
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current analytical research topics that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
ACCT 8832 - Analytical Research Topics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current analytical research topics that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
ACCT 8833 - Topics in Analytical Research III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
PhD seminar course focusing on current topics in Analytical Research
ACCT 8892 - Readings in Accounting
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Readings appropriate to an individual student's program or objectives that are not available in regular courses. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8894 - Research in Accounting
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual research on an approved topic appropriate to student's program and objectives. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8001/Econ 8001/Econ 8101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consumer behavior/demand. Introduction to welfare analysis. General equilibrium analysis in pure exchange economy. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[5151 or ECON 3101 or ECON 5151 or intermediate microeconomic theory], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8002/Econ 8002/Econ 8102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Production, competitive markets, and choice under uncertainty. Technology and production, cost minimization and profit maximization, production duality, efficiency and technical change, general equilibrium of production. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8001 or ECON 8001 or ECON 8101], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8003/Econ 8003/Econ 8103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic competition, game theory, and information. Non-cooperative games, static games of complete and imperfect information, dynamic games of complete/incomplete information, application of incomplete information. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8002 or ECON 8002 or ECON 8102], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8004 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Social Choice and Welfare
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8400/Econ 8400/Econ 8104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Welfare economics/measurement, externalities and social choice. Welfare theorems in general equilibrium, externalities and public goods, social choice, social welfare, and welfare change measurement. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8003 or ECON 8003 or ECON 8103], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4163. prereq: 8002
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4164. prereq: 8003
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: Math 4242 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8105, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
FINA 8802 - Theory of Capital Markets I: Discrete Time
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern asset pricing theory. Static/discrete time frameworks. Fundamental asset pricing equation. Classical finance models: CAPM, consumption-based CAPM, Complete markets, representative agent, Pareto prereq: [Econ 8101, Econ 8102, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8812 - Corporate Finance I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Corporate control, managerial incentives, corporate governance, capital structure. What assets are collected within firm. What determines boundaries of firm. Empirical evidence in support of theoretical models. Modern theories of firm, based on incomplete contracts. How corporate finance decisions expand/limit scope of firm. prereq: [Econ 8103, Econ 8104, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8813 - Corporate Finance II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical corporate finance. Initial public offering, dividend policy. Financial distress and its resolution. Financial intermediation, applications of auctions in finance. prereq: [8812, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8822 - Empirical Methods in Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical techniques in analysis of financial markets, how they are applied to actual market data. Statistical properties of asset returns, efficient markets hypothesis. Empirical tests of asset pricing models (CAPM, APT, Intertemporal CAPM, Consumption CAPM). Tests of conditional asset pricing models. prereq: 8802, 8803
FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current empirical research on corporate finance. Mergers/acquisitions, equity offerings, event studies, tests of market efficiency, impact of corporate governance, compensation policies, initial public offerings. prereq: 8802, 8803
MATH 4603 - Advanced Calculus I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 4606/Math 5615/Math 5616
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Axioms for the real numbers. Techniques of proof for limits, continuity, uniform convergence. Rigorous treatment of differential/integral calculus for single-variable functions. prereq: [[2243 or 2373], [2263 or 2374]] or 2574 or instr consent
MATH 4604 - Advanced Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 4604/Math 5616
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sequel to MATH 4603. Topology of n-dimensional Euclidean space. Rigorous treatment of multivariable differentiation and integration, including chain rule, Taylor's Theorem, implicit function theorem, Fubini's Theorem, change of variables, Stokes' Theorem. prereq: 4603 or 5615 or instr consent
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces, random variables, their distributions/expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, sampling, sufficiency, estimation. prereq: [2263 or 2374 or 2573], [2243 or 2373]; [2283 or 2574 or 3283] recommended.
PUBH 6325 - Data Processing with PC-SAS
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to methods for transferring/processing existing data sources. Emphasizes hands-on approach to pre-statistical data processing and analysis with PC-SAS statistical software with a Microsoft Windows operating system.
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses, size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables. Linear models. Decision theory. prereq: [5101 or Math 5651 or instr consent]
STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review of linear algebra. Introduction to probability theory. Random variables, their transformations/expectations. Standard distributions, including multivariate Normal distribution. Probability inequalities. Convergence concepts, including laws of large numbers, Central Limit Theorem. delta method. Sampling distributions. prereq: Statistics grad major or instr consent
FINA 8802 - Theory of Capital Markets I: Discrete Time
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern asset pricing theory. Static/discrete time frameworks. Fundamental asset pricing equation. Classical finance models: CAPM, consumption-based CAPM, Complete markets, representative agent, Pareto prereq: [Econ 8101, Econ 8102, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8803 - Theory of Capital Markets II: Continuous Time
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuous-time financial economics. Emphasizes mathematical/statistical tools. Ito processes, Girsanov?s theorem, risk-neutral pricing. How to formulate/analyze continuous-time models. prereq: [Econ 8101, Econ 8102, Bbsiness admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8804 - Advanced Continuous Time Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Pricing of fixed income securities, optimal capital structure, general equilibrium. Classic/current papers in continuous-time literature. prereq: 8802, 8803
FINA 8810 - Topics in Asset Pricing
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Current topics in asset pricing literature. Students read papers on these topics, rederive the main results, identify the main assumptions and thus identify ideas on how to improve upon the current literature. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
FINA 8812 - Corporate Finance I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Corporate control, managerial incentives, corporate governance, capital structure. What assets are collected within firm. What determines boundaries of firm. Empirical evidence in support of theoretical models. Modern theories of firm, based on incomplete contracts. How corporate finance decisions expand/limit scope of firm. prereq: [Econ 8103, Econ 8104, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8813 - Corporate Finance II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical corporate finance. Initial public offering, dividend policy. Financial distress and its resolution. Financial intermediation, applications of auctions in finance. prereq: [8812, business admin PhD student] or instr consent
FINA 8820 - Topics in Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Current topics in corporate finance literature. Students read current papers, rederive the main results, identify the main assumptions and thus identify ideas on how to improve on the current literature. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
FINA 8822 - Empirical Methods in Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empirical techniques in analysis of financial markets, how they are applied to actual market data. Statistical properties of asset returns, efficient markets hypothesis. Empirical tests of asset pricing models (CAPM, APT, Intertemporal CAPM, Consumption CAPM). Tests of conditional asset pricing models. prereq: 8802, 8803
FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current empirical research on corporate finance. Mergers/acquisitions, equity offerings, event studies, tests of market efficiency, impact of corporate governance, compensation policies, initial public offerings. prereq: 8802, 8803
FINA 8890 - Seminar: Finance Topics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Current topics/problems of interest considered in depth. Topics vary. prereq: [[8802, 8812, 8822, 8823] or equiv], business admin student] or instr consent. No first year students to enroll.
ECON 8101 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 5151 or equiv, Math 2243 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5615 or concurrent registration in Math 8601, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8102 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5615 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8601, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8103 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5616 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8602 or comparable abstract math course, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8104 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8103, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5616 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8602 or comparable abstract math course, grad econ major or instr consent
ACCT 8812 - Topics in Information Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Information in capital markets; asset pricing with asymmetric information; economics of disclosure and information acquisition. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current analytical research topics that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
ACCT 8832 - Analytical Research Topics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current analytical research topics that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4163. prereq: 8002
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4164. prereq: 8003
ECON 8105 - Macroeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamic general equilibrium models: solving for paths of interest rates, consumption, investment, prices. Models with uncertainty, search, matching, indivisibilities, private information. Implications for measurement and data reporting. Overlapping generations and dynasty models. Variational and recursive methods. This seven-week course meets with 4165. prereq: 5152 or equiv, Math 2243, Math 2263 or equiv or instr consent
ECON 8106 - Macroeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamic general equilibrium models: solving for paths of interest rates, consumption, investment, prices. Models with uncertainty, search, matching, indivisibilities, private information. Implications for measurement and data reporting. Overlapping generations and dynasty models. Variational and recursive methods. This seven-week course meets with 4166. prereq: 8105
ECON 8107 - Macroeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dynamic general equilibrium models: solving for paths of interest rates, consumption, investment, prices. Models with uncertainty, search, matching, indivisibilities, private information. Implications for measurement and data reporting. Overlapping generations and dynasty models. Variational and recursive methods. This seven-week course meets with 4167. prereq: 8106
ECON 8108 - Macroeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dynamic general equilibrium models: solving for paths of interest rates, consumption, investment, prices. Models with uncertainty, search, matching, indivisibilities, private information. Implications for measurement and data reporting. Overlapping generations and dynasty models. Variational and recursive methods. This seven-week course meets with 4168. prereq: 8107
ECON 8181 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomics
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Faculty and student presentations based on recent literature. Seven-week course. prereq: 8104 or instr consent
ECON 8182 - Advanced Topics in Microeconomics
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Faculty and student presentations based on recent literature. Seven-week course. prereq: 8104 or instr consent
ECON 8185 - Advanced Topics in Macroeconomics
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Faculty and student presentations based on recent literature. Seven-week course. prereq: 8108 or instr consent
ECON 8191 - Workshop in Mathematical Economics
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students conduct research and present papers under faculty supervision. prereq: 8104 or instr consent
ECON 8201 - Econometric Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic linear regression model, its variants. Panel data, censored/truncated regression, discrete choice models. Time series, simultaneous equation models. prereq: [[3101 or equiv], [Math 1272 or equiv], Stat 5102] or instr consent
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: Math 4242 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8105, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8205, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8102, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8106, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
ECON 8207 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8206, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8103, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8107, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8208 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8207, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8104, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8108, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8211 - Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear regression; general linear hypotheses; Gauss Markov Theorem, generalized least squares and their applications. Decision-theoretic choice among estimators. Simultaneous equations models; identification and estimation. Asymptotic distribution theory. Applications, including multivariate time series models and/or limited dependent variables models. Seven-week course. prereq: 5151, 5152, Math 4242 or equiv, Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8212 - Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear regression; general linear hypotheses; Gauss Markov Theorem, generalized least squares and their applications. Decision-theoretic choice among estimators. Simultaneous equations models; identification and estimation. Asymptotic distribution theory. Applications, including multivariate time series models and/or limited dependent variables models. Seven-week course. prereq: 8211
ECON 8501 - Wages and Employment
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of labor markets and their operation under conditions of both individual and collective bargaining. Implications of labor market operations for resource allocation, wage and price stability, income and employment growth. Wage structures and wage levels. Wage and employment theories and practices. Economic impacts of unions. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102, 8106 or instr consent
ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102 or instr consent
ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8601 or instr consent
ECON 8701 - Monetary Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic role of principal financial institutions. Determinants of value of money. Principal problems of monetary policy. Seven-week course. prereq: 8103, 8106 or instr consent
ECON 8702 - Monetary Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic role of principal financial institutions. Determinants of value of money. Principal problems of monetary policy. Seven-week course. prereq: 8701 or instr consent
ECON 8704 - Financial Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Role of financial institutions in efficient allocation of risk; multiperiod and continuous-time securities markets; theory of firm under uncertainty; financial intermediation; derivation of empirical asset-pricing relationships; tests concerning alternative market structures. Seven-week course. prereq: 8103, 8106 or instr consent
ECON 8705 - Financial Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Role of financial institutions in efficient allocation of risk; multiperiod and continuous-time securities markets; theory of firm under uncertainty; financial intermediation; derivation of empirical asset-pricing relationships; tests concerning alternative market structures. Seven-week course. prereq: 8704 or instr consent
FINA 8892 - Independent Study in Finance
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Problems or developments of special interest to the student. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
FINA 8894 - Directed Research in Finance
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individualized directed research on a project of interest to the student, approved and advised by faculty. prereq: Business admin PhD student specializing in finance or instr consent
MATH 8601 - Real Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Set theory/fundamentals. Axiom of choice, measures, measure spaces, Borel/Lebesgue measure, integration, fundamental convergence theorems, Riesz representation. prereq: 5616 or instr consent
IDSC 8511 - Conceptual Topics and Research Methods in Information and Decision Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relationships to underlying disciplines; major research streams; seminal articles, survey literature, and major researchers. Provides framework for organizing knowledge about information and decision sciences. prereq: instr consent
IDSC 8521 - System Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Business admin PhD student or #
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Why it is hard to develop efficient/effective information systems, what can be done to improve situation. Defining efficiency/effectiveness in development process and in systems. Producing/evaluating artifacts (constructs, models, methods, tools) that enable more efficient/effective information systems to be developed. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
IDSC 8531 - Organizational Theory and Research in Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: PhD student in Business Administration
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction, adoption, use/exploitation of information systems in organizations. Critically examine empirical work. Formulate research questions. Conduct research. prereq: PhD student in Business Administration
IDSC 8541 - Introduction to Economics of Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: PhD student in Business Administration or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Classical research questions. Methods/findings that form backbone of economics of IS. Online auctions, electronic markets, offshoring, human capital issues. prereq: PhD student in Business Administration or instr consent
IDSC 8721 - Behavioral Decision Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Business admin PhD student or #; offered alt yrs
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traditional/current research. Major models/methodologies. Issues of preference, judgment, and choice under conditions of certainty/uncertainty. Seminar format. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
IDSC 8620 - Data Mining and Personalization
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
IDSC 8620 is intended primarily for research-oriented graduate students who are interested in learning about current data mining / machine learning methodologies and how to use them in research. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the exploratory and predictive analytics techniques, focusing on the fundamentals but covering a number of advanced issues as well, and will demonstrate how these techniques can be applied various application areas (including the increasingly important areas of text analytics and recommender systems). The course puts significant emphasis on practical, hands-on experience applying data mining techniques in different settings using real-world datasets, but will also discuss the use and value of data mining in a variety of research contexts.
IDSC 8630 - Social Media and Online Communities
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The purpose of this course is to equip you with theories and methods to critically think and theorize around phenomena related to social media and online communities. We will cover key topics in motivation, contribution, identity, collaboration and innovation, electronic word-of- mouth and social networks, community dynamics, leadership, and evolution. We will also review a wide range of commonly used research methods, both qualitative and quantitative ones, discuss the choice of appropriate methods for a given research question, and explore some of the latest methodological trends. Toward the end of the course, you will formulate your own opinion about the breadth and significance of the phenomena and develop your own research project.
IDSC 8801 - Research Seminar in Information and Decision Sciences
Credits: 2.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
New areas of research, research methods, issues. prereq: Business Admin PhD student or instr consent
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8001/Econ 8001/Econ 8101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consumer behavior/demand. Introduction to welfare analysis. General equilibrium analysis in pure exchange economy. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[5151 or ECON 3101 or ECON 5151 or intermediate microeconomic theory], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8002/Econ 8002/Econ 8102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Production, competitive markets, and choice under uncertainty. Technology and production, cost minimization and profit maximization, production duality, efficiency and technical change, general equilibrium of production. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8001 or ECON 8001 or ECON 8101], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8003/Econ 8003/Econ 8103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic competition, game theory, and information. Non-cooperative games, static games of complete and imperfect information, dynamic games of complete/incomplete information, application of incomplete information. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8002 or ECON 8002 or ECON 8102], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Formulation and solution of dynamic optimization problems using optimal control theory and dynamic programming. Analytical and numerical solution methods to solve deterministic and stochastic problems for various economic applications. prereq: 5151 or equiv or instr consent
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
CI 8149 - Qualitative Research: Coding, Analysis, Interpretation, and Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How to code/analyze field notes. Individual/group interviews, multimedia using NUDIST NVivo software. Students interpret analyzed material and complete an article length document that includes a review of related research/methodology. prereq: [8133, 8148, grad student, completion of a qualitative research study] or instr consent
CSCI 5511 - Artificial Intelligence I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4511W/CSci 5511
Prerequisites: [2041 or #], grad student
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to AI. Problem solving, search, inference techniques. Logic/theorem proving. Knowledge representation, rules, frames, semantic networks. Planning/scheduling. Lisp programming language. prereq: [2041 or instr consent], grad student
CSCI 5512 - Artificial Intelligence II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 5512W/CSci 5512
Typically offered: Every Spring
Uncertainty in artificial intelligence. Probability as a model of uncertainty, methods for reasoning/learning under uncertainty, utility theory, decision-theoretic methods. prereq: [STAT 3021, 4041] or instr consent
CSCI 5521 - Machine Learning Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Problems of pattern recognition, feature selection, measurement techniques. Statistical decision theory, nonstatistical techniques. Automatic feature selection/data clustering. Syntactic pattern recognition. Mathematical pattern recognition/artificial intelligence. Prereq: [2031 or 2033], STAT 3021, and knowledge of partial derivatives
CSCI 5523 - Introduction to Data Mining
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Data pre-processing techniques, data types, similarity measures, data visualization/exploration. Predictive models (e.g., decision trees, SVM, Bayes, K-nearest neighbors, bagging, boosting). Model evaluation techniques, Clustering (hierarchical, partitional, density-based), association analysis, anomaly detection. Case studies from areas such as earth science, the Web, network intrusion, and genomics. Hands-on projects. prereq: 4041 or equiv or instr consent
CSCI 5551 - Introduction to Intelligent Robotic Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Transformations, kinematics/inverse kinematics, dynamics, control. Sensing (robot vision, force control, tactile sensing), applications of sensor-based robot control, robot programming, mobile robotics, microrobotics. prereq: 2031 or 2033 or instr consent
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
ECON 8581 - Advanced Topics in Labor Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Faculty and student presentations based on recent literature. Seven-week course. prereq: 8502 or instr consent
EPSY 5244 - Survey Design, Sampling, and Implementation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Survey methods, including mail, phone, and Web-based/e-mail surveys. Principles of measurement, constructing questions/forms, pilot testing, sampling, data analysis, reporting. Students develop a survey proposal and a draft survey, pilot the survey, and develop sampling/data analysis plans. prereq: [5221 or 5231 or 5261 or equiv], [CEHD grad student or MEd student]
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Use/interpretation of results from several multivariate statistical techniques. Matrix algebra, variance/covariance, Hotelling's T2, GLM, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, dimensionality, principal components, latent composites, distance, hierarchical clustering. prereq: [8252 or equiv], familiarity with matrix algebra, knowledge of a computerized statistics package
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
JOUR 8500 - Seminar: Advanced Methods Special Topics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced topics in mass communication research methods; addresses the theoretical, conceptual, and analytical perspectives associated with advanced methodological approaches to mass communication scholarship, which may include qualitative, quantitative, ethnographic, humanistic, historical, legal, and/or social network approaches; emphasis on application of course materials to developing, analyzing, and describing data as appropriate for mass communication scholarship.
MABA 6441 - Causal Inference via Econometrics and Experimentation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Controlled experiments in business settings, experiment design, A/B testing; specialized statistical methodologies; fundamentals of econometrics, instrumental variable regression, propensity score matching.
MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar. Topics related to conceptual theories/arguments about experimental design and statistical analysis of experiments. How to design experimental research for testing hypotheses and drawing conclusions. prereq: Doctoral student or [masters programs student, instr consent]
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
OLPD 5056 - Case Studies for Policy Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to knowledge and skills appropriate for the conduct of rigorous case study research in educational, organizational, and other social settings. Underlying purposes and assumptions of case study methods will be examined as well as a variety of methodological approaches. The course focuses on the use of qualitative and mixed-methods approaches as these are the predominant strategies employed in contemporary case study research. Accordingly, it emphasizes links between research purposes, the conceptualization of case study projects, and the development of researchable questions. It also takes up a variety of ethical and political issues related to working with participants during the research process, as well as contemporary trustworthiness criteria for case study reports. The bulk of the course is given to training in observation, generating field notes, interviewing, collecting material cultural artifacts, using surveys, and analyzing, interpreting, and writing up case study data. The first segment of the course focuses on a critical discussion of research paradigms and epistemological assumptions of a variety of case study approaches. Students choose and critique a published case study from their field of interest. The second part of the course is devoted to a very small scale case study project which students design and carry out themselves. This project is supported by relevant readings and in-class activities (including peer review) related to the actual conduct of case study research.
OLPD 5061 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to knowledge and skills appropriate for the conduct of ethnographic research. Underlying purposes, assumptions, and distinctive characteristics of ethnographic methods will be examined as well as appropriate exemplars. Accordingly, the course emphasizes links between research purposes, the conceptualization of ethnographic projects and the development of researchable questions. The course also takes up a variety of ethical and political issues related to working with participants during the research process, as well as contemporary trustworthiness criteria for ethnographic written accounts. The bulk of the course is given to training in observation, generating field notes, developing interview questions, interviewing, collecting material cultural artifacts, using surveys, and analyzing, interpreting, and writing up ethnographic data. The first part of the course focuses on a critical discussion of ethnographic research purposes, epistemological assumptions, and essential features. Students choose and explore a published ethnographic study from their field of interest. The second part of the course is devoted to a very small scale ethnographic project which students design and carry out themselves. This project is supported by relevant readings and in-class activities (including peer review) related to the actual conduct of ethnographic research.
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Mathematical models of complex human behavior, including individual/group decision making, information processing, learning, perception, and overt action. Specific computational techniques drawn from decision theory, information theory, probability theory, machine learning, and elements of data analysis. prereq: Math 1271 or instr consent
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory instruction and seminars in faculty research areas. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
PUBH 6636 - Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health Practice
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Qualitative inquiry, selected data collection, management, analysis methods for qualitative research in public health. Current approaches to assess strength of evidence of qualitative studies in public health. Provision of practical skills that can be applied in public health settings.
PUBH 6810 - Survey Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of survey research in data collection. Sampling, item development, instrument design/administration to conduct survey or be aware of issues related to design/implementation. Identification of sources of error in survey research.
PUBH 6815 - Community-based Participatory Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This introductory course is intended for junior faculty, post-docs, graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. Topics will explore the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR's relationship to cultural knowledge systems, and funding CBPR projects. This is NOT a methodology course. CBPR is an approach to conducting research that is amenable to a variety of research designs and methodologies and will NOT cover topics such as survey design, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, focus groups, community needs assessment procedures, etc.
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS. prereq: Regression at the level of PubH 6451 or PubH 7405 or Stat 5302. Familiarity with basic matrix notation and operations (multiplication, inverse, transpose). Working knowledge of SAS or R (PubH 6420).
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Bayesian methods. Comparison with traditional frequentist methods. Emphasizes data analysis via modern computing methods: Gibbs sampler, WinBUGS software package. prereq: [[7401 or STAT 5101 or equiv], [public health MPH or biostatistics or statistics] grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 8432 - Probability Models for Biostatistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Three basic models used for stochastic processes in the biomedical sciences: point processes (emphasizes Poisson processes), Markov processes (emphasizes Markov chains), and Brownian motion. Probability structure and statistical inference studied for each process. prereq: [7450, 7407, Stat 5102, [advanced biostatstics or statistics] major] or instr consent
PUBH 8442 - Bayesian Decision Theory and Data Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of Bayesian methods. Bayesian methods compared with traditional, frequentist methods. prereq: [[7460 or experience with FORTRAN or with [C, S+]], Stat 5101, Stat 5102, Stat 8311, grad student in [biostatistics or statistics]] or instr consent
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review of linear algebra. Introduction to probability theory. Random variables, their transformations/expectations. Standard distributions, including multivariate Normal distribution. Probability inequalities. Convergence concepts, including laws of large numbers, Central Limit Theorem. delta method. Sampling distributions. prereq: Statistics grad major or instr consent
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8001/Econ 8001/Econ 8101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consumer behavior/demand. Introduction to welfare analysis. General equilibrium analysis in pure exchange economy. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[5151 or ECON 3101 or ECON 5151 or intermediate microeconomic theory], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8002/Econ 8002/Econ 8102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Production, competitive markets, and choice under uncertainty. Technology and production, cost minimization and profit maximization, production duality, efficiency and technical change, general equilibrium of production. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8001 or ECON 8001 or ECON 8101], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8003/Econ 8003/Econ 8103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic competition, game theory, and information. Non-cooperative games, static games of complete and imperfect information, dynamic games of complete/incomplete information, application of incomplete information. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8002 or ECON 8002 or ECON 8102], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Formulation and solution of dynamic optimization problems using optimal control theory and dynamic programming. Analytical and numerical solution methods to solve deterministic and stochastic problems for various economic applications. prereq: 5151 or equiv or instr consent
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
CSCI 5125 - Collaborative and Social Computing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to computer-supported cooperative work, social computing. Technology, research methods, theory, case studies of group computing systems. Readings, hands-on experience. prereq: 5115 or instr consent
CSCI 5980 - Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 27.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Lectures and informal discussions on current topics in computer science. prereq: instr consent; may be repeated for cr
CSCI 8551 - Intelligent Agents
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theories of intelligent agents. Agent architectures; knowledge representation, communication, cooperation, and negotiation among multiple agents; planning and learning; issues in designing agents with a physical body; dealing with sensors and actuators; world modeling. prereq: 5511 or instr consent
CSCI 8980 - Special Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 27.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Lectures and informal discussions. prereq: instr consent
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
ECON 8581 - Advanced Topics in Labor Economics
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Faculty and student presentations based on recent literature. Seven-week course. prereq: 8502 or instr consent
ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102 or instr consent
ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8601 or instr consent
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Use/interpretation of results from several multivariate statistical techniques. Matrix algebra, variance/covariance, Hotelling's T2, GLM, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, dimensionality, principal components, latent composites, distance, hierarchical clustering. prereq: [8252 or equiv], familiarity with matrix algebra, knowledge of a computerized statistics package
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
HRIR 8820 - Seminar: Special Topics in Work and Organizations Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contemporary theories/research on specific topics in work/ organizations. Topics vary. prereq: [Business Admin student or dept consent], grad majors must enroll A-F
IDSC 8892 - Readings in Information and Decision Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Readings useful to a student's individual program and objectives that are not available through regular courses. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
IDSC 8894 - Graduate Research in Information and Decision Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual research on an approved topic appropriate to student's program and objectives. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and theory building, in the social and behavioral sciences. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and research design in the social and behavioral sciences.
MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.02]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major theories and current research on organizational and interorganizational topics from a macro perspective. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Mathematical models of complex human behavior, including individual/group decision making, information processing, learning, perception, and overt action. Specific computational techniques drawn from decision theory, information theory, probability theory, machine learning, and elements of data analysis. prereq: Math 1271 or instr consent
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 5993 - Research Laboratory in Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory instruction and seminars in faculty research areas. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
PSY 8201 - Social Cognition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Social psychological theory/research on social inference and reasoning processes. Psychology of prejudice/stereotyping. prereq: Psych PhD candidate
PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate seminar in subject of current interest in psychology. prereq: Psychology grad student or instr consent
PUBH 7430 - Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated data arise in many situations, particularly when observations are made over time and space or on individuals who share certain underlying characteristics. This course covers techniques for exploring and describing correlated data, along with statistical methods for estimating population parameters (mostly means) from these data. The focus will be primarily on generalized linear models (both with and without random effects) for normally and non-normally distributed data. Wherever possible, techniques will be illustrated using real-world examples. Computing will be done using R and SAS. prereq: Regression at the level of PubH 6451 or PubH 7405 or Stat 5302. Familiarity with basic matrix notation and operations (multiplication, inverse, transpose). Working knowledge of SAS or R (PubH 6420).
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Bayesian methods. Comparison with traditional frequentist methods. Emphasizes data analysis via modern computing methods: Gibbs sampler, WinBUGS software package. prereq: [[7401 or STAT 5101 or equiv], [public health MPH or biostatistics or statistics] grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 8432 - Probability Models for Biostatistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Three basic models used for stochastic processes in the biomedical sciences: point processes (emphasizes Poisson processes), Markov processes (emphasizes Markov chains), and Brownian motion. Probability structure and statistical inference studied for each process. prereq: [7450, 7407, Stat 5102, [advanced biostatstics or statistics] major] or instr consent
PUBH 8442 - Bayesian Decision Theory and Data Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory/application of Bayesian methods. Bayesian methods compared with traditional, frequentist methods. prereq: [[7460 or experience with FORTRAN or with [C, S+]], Stat 5101, Stat 5102, Stat 8311, grad student in [biostatistics or statistics]] or instr consent
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
STAT 8101 - Theory of Statistics 1
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review of linear algebra. Introduction to probability theory. Random variables, their transformations/expectations. Standard distributions, including multivariate Normal distribution. Probability inequalities. Convergence concepts, including laws of large numbers, Central Limit Theorem. delta method. Sampling distributions. prereq: Statistics grad major or instr consent
MKTG 8809 - Consumer Behavior Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Seminar. Topics related to conceptual theories/arguments about experimental design and statistical analysis of experiments. How to design experimental research for testing hypotheses and drawing conclusions. prereq: Doctoral student or [masters programs student, instr consent]
MKTG 8810 - Consumer Behavior Special Topics
Credits: 2.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics related to the fundamentals of consumer behavior such as attitudes, behavioral research methods, branding, consumer well-being, decision making, information processing, and perceptions. See "Class Notes" for details. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8811 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Reading, discussing, and evaluating theories of consumer attitudes and persuasion. Theoretical analysis, rather than practitioner focus. prereq: [[MBA 6210 or equiv], business admin PhD student] or instr consent
MKTG 8812 - Consumer Attitudes and Persuasion II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Science of persuasion. Principles of stickiness--universal principles that lead messages to succeed rather than fail. Principles of influence--universal psychological principles that motivate a person to say "yes." prereq: Doctoral student or instr consent
MKTG 8813 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Different theoretical approaches taken in judgment and decision-making research. Heuristics/biases, affect in decision making, judgments/decisions over time. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8814 - Consumer Judgment and Decision Making II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Draws from work on prospect theory and its derivatives. Anomalous choice. Emphasizes on applications to Marketing theory, from inter-temporal choice to regret and counterfactual thinking in consumers/managers. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From an efficiency perspective, inter-organizational networks involved in task of moving goods and services from point of production to point of consumption. Literature covering the functional, institutional, analytical, and methodological traditions, as well as the behavioral school of thought and transaction cost and relational contracting. prereq: business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research streams in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8851 - Seminar: Marketing Management and Strategy I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in marketing management and formulation and implementation of marketing strategies. Diversity of thought, within marketing and strategic management literature. prereq: [[MBA 6210 or equiv], business admin PhD student] or instr consent
MKTG 8852 - Marketing Management & Strategy II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
PhD seminar. Role of branding within the organization, its business strategy, and its success. Brand management. Critically evaluate fundamental ideas and more recent developments. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8890 - Seminar: Marketing Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Current topics and problems of interest considered in depth. Topics vary with each offering. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8811 - Topics in Information Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Asymmetric information, incentives, and contracts. Moral hazard, adverse selection, reputation, and signaling phenomena. Applications to accounting such as transfer pricing, budgeting, cost allocations, performance measurement, audit pricing. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
ACCT 8831 - Topics in Analytical Research I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The course is designed to include current analytical research topics that are cutting-edge and topics in the instructor's area of expertise. Topics will vary with each offering.
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
ECON 8003 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4163. prereq: 8002
ECON 8004 - Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories of consumer demand, producer supply, and market equilibrium; general equilibrium and welfare. Sample topics: externalities, economics of information and uncertainty, and game theory. This seven-week course meets with 4164. prereq: 8003
ECON 8101 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 5151 or equiv, Math 2243 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5615 or concurrent registration in Math 8601, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8102 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5615 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8601, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8103 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5616 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8602 or comparable abstract math course, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8104 - Microeconomic Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Decision problems faced by the household and firm; theories of choice under conditions of certainty and uncertainty. Partial equilibrium analysis of competition and monopoly. General equilibrium analysis. Welfare economics: economic efficiency of alternative market structures, social welfare functions. Dynamics: stability of markets, capital theory. Seven-week course. prereq: 8103, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 5616 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 8602 or comparable abstract math course, grad econ major or instr consent
ECON 8118 - Noncooperative Game Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Solution concepts for noncooperative games in normal form, including Nash and perfect equilibrium and stable sets of equilibria. Extensive form games of perfect and incomplete information, sequential equilibrium, and consequences of stability for extensive form. Applications including bargaining and auctions. Seven-week course. prereq: 8117
ECON 8119 - Cooperative Game Theory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basics of cooperative game theory, emphasizing concepts used in economics. Games with and without transferable utility; the core, the value, and other solution concepts. Recent results, including potentials, reduced games, consistency, and noncooperative implementation of cooperative solution concepts. Seven-week course. prereq: 8104, Math 5616 or equiv or instr consent
ECON 8191 - Workshop in Mathematical Economics
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Students conduct research and present papers under faculty supervision. prereq: 8104 or instr consent
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: Math 4242 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8105, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8205, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8102, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8106, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
ECON 8207 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8206, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8103, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8107, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8208 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8207, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8104, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8108, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8211 - Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear regression; general linear hypotheses; Gauss Markov Theorem, generalized least squares and their applications. Decision-theoretic choice among estimators. Simultaneous equations models; identification and estimation. Asymptotic distribution theory. Applications, including multivariate time series models and/or limited dependent variables models. Seven-week course. prereq: 5151, 5152, Math 4242 or equiv, Stat 5102 or instr consent
ECON 8212 - Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear regression; general linear hypotheses; Gauss Markov Theorem, generalized least squares and their applications. Decision-theoretic choice among estimators. Simultaneous equations models; identification and estimation. Asymptotic distribution theory. Applications, including multivariate time series models and/or limited dependent variables models. Seven-week course. prereq: 8211
ECON 8601 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8102 or instr consent
ECON 8602 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8601 or instr consent
ECON 8603 - Industrial Organization and Government Regulation
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Behavior of businesses and industries: productivity, firm size distributions, exit-entry dynamics, etc. Theories of the firm, industry structure and performance, invention and innovation, and technology adoption. Positive and normative theories of regulation. Seven-week course. prereq: 8602 or instr consent
EPSY 5221 - Principles of Educational and Psychological Measurement
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, principles, and methods in educational/psychological measurement. Reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, score reports (e.g., grades). Modern measurement theories, including item response theory and generalizability theory. Emphasizes construction, interpretation, use, and evaluation of assessments regarding achievement, aptitude, interests, attitudes, personality, and exceptionality.
EPSY 5245 - Advanced Survey Data Analysis for Categorical and Rating Scale Data
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Practical course. Specific nature of survey data (typically categorical or ordinal). Appropriate data analytic methods. prereq: 5244, 5261
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
EPSY 5262 - Intermediate Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Application of statistical concepts/procedures. Analysis of variance, covariance, multiple regression. Experimental design: completely randomized, block, split plot/repeated measures. prereq: 3264 or 5261 or equiv
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8267 - Applied Multivariate Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Use/interpretation of results from several multivariate statistical techniques. Matrix algebra, variance/covariance, Hotelling's T2, GLM, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, dimensionality, principal components, latent composites, distance, hierarchical clustering. prereq: [8252 or equiv], familiarity with matrix algebra, knowledge of a computerized statistics package
IDSC 8721 - Behavioral Decision Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Business admin PhD student or #; offered alt yrs
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Traditional/current research. Major models/methodologies. Issues of preference, judgment, and choice under conditions of certainty/uncertainty. Seminar format. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
MKTG 8892 - Readings in Marketing
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Readings useful to student's individual program and objectives that are not available in regular courses. prereq: MBA 6210 or equiv, business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8894 - Graduate Research in Marketing
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual research on an approved topic appropriate to student's program and objectives. prereq: MBA 6210 or equiv, business admin PhD student or instr consent
MSBA 6441 - Causal Inference via Econometrics and Experimentation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Controlled experiments in business settings, experiment design, A/B testing. Specialized statistical methodologies. Fundamentals of econometrics, instrument variable regression, propensity score matching.
PSY 5202 - Attitudes and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theory/research on social psychology of beliefs/attitudes. Persuasion principles. prereq: 3201 or instr consent
PSY 5204 - Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to interpersonal relationship theory/research findings. prereq: Honors or grad student or instr consent
PSY 5207 - Personality and Social Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 4207/Psy 5207
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual/methodological strategies for scientific study of individuals and their social worlds. Applications of theory/research to issues of self, identity, and social interaction. prereq: 3101 or 3201 or honors or grad student or instr consent
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 8203 - Impression Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Classic and contemporary theory and research concerning interpersonal strategies of impression management and interplay between private and public self. prereq: Grad psych major; 8208 recommended; instr consent
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social psychological theory and research concerning the self and social behavior. prereq: Psych background especially in personality and soc psych
PSY 8209 - Research Methods in Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Experimental/quasi-experimental methods for research in social psychology. Statistical, interpretive, operational, and ethical issues. prereq: Psych PhD student
PSY 8935 - Readings in Behavioral Genetics and Individual Differences Psychology
Credits: 1.0 [max 10.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Each week participants read and discuss one or two primary research articles. prereq: 5135, 5137 or instr consent
PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate seminar in subject of current interest in psychology. prereq: Psychology grad student or instr consent
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of variance. Multiple comparisons. Variance-stabilizing transformations. Contrasts. Construction/analysis of complete/incomplete block designs. Fractional factorial designs. Confounding split plots. Response surface design. prereq: 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
MGMT 8102 - Research Methods I - Applied Empirical Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This is a course in applied empirical methods, focusing on approaches to causal inference commonly used in strategic management and entrepreneurship research, as well as other research design and execution issues. We will discuss issues of the validity of independent and dependent measures, econometric approaches to implementing various designs. We will study these methods by reading and discussing empirical papers in strategy and entrepreneurship and by working with data in problem sets.
MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.02]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major theories and current research on organizational and interorganizational topics from a macro perspective. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8401 - Strategy I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Review of research in strategy. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8403 - Strategy II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This is the second strategy core course for Business admin PhD students in Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship. It will focus on both strategy content and process. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8501 - Seminar in Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This seminar provides a broad introduction to the field of entrepreneurship. It helps students develop the skills and knowledge needed to conduct their own research within this domain. It introduces them to the theoretical and empirical foundations of the field of entrepreneurship as a scholarly discipline. It will familiarize students with key debates in the field. It will also sharpen students' conceptual and analytical skills, and help them develop their research agenda.
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and theory building, in the social and behavioral sciences. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and research design in the social and behavioral sciences.
MGMT 8202 - Seminar in International Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Overview of the field of international management research. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8402 - Seminar in Behavioral Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Designed to help doctoral students interpret and conduct research on strategic management. Will focus on research that reflects a behavioral approach to strategy. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8404 - Seminar in Non-Market Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
This is a Ph.D. seminar in the field of nonmarket strategy, i.e., the strategies by which firms alter, influence, or adapt to their existing institutional environment in order to gain competitive advantage. Drawing on foundations in both institutional economics and institutional theory, the seminar examines a body of recent research in the field of strategic management that studies how and to what effect firms engage with political, legal, and social stakeholders. While the primary focus of the course is on the antecedents and consequences of such nonmarket strategies for firms, we shall also consider the impact of these strategies on social welfare, and the resulting implications for public policy. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8405 - Seminar in Technology Strategy
Credits: 2.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This is a course that will cover theories and phenomena that are central to the field of technology strategy. The course will include readings on a broad range of topics and perspectives pertaining to firms? technology and innovation strategy. An illustrative list of readings are provided below. These readings will be grouped into required and recommended readings. The course is intended to prepare students to undertake research in technology strategy. Towards this goal students will prepare summaries of assigned readings, serve as discussion leaders for the class topics and write a research proposal (including a research question, theory and hypotheses and research design) that builds on the course concepts. prereq: PhD student or instr consent
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
GRAD 8101 - Teaching in Higher Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Teaching methods/techniques. Active learning, critical thinking, practice teaching, and preparing a portfolio to document/reflect upon teaching. Readings, discussion, peer teaching, e-mail dialog, reflective writing, co-facilitation of course. prereq: Non-Degree Students: contact pffcollege consentumn.edu with questions about registration. If adding a section after first class meeting, contact your instructor as soon as you enroll.
APEC 8001 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Consumer Choice and Consumer Demand
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8001/Econ 8001/Econ 8101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Consumer behavior/demand. Introduction to welfare analysis. General equilibrium analysis in pure exchange economy. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[5151 or ECON 3101 or ECON 5151 or intermediate microeconomic theory], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8002 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Production and Choice Under Uncertainty
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8002/Econ 8002/Econ 8102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Production, competitive markets, and choice under uncertainty. Technology and production, cost minimization and profit maximization, production duality, efficiency and technical change, general equilibrium of production. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8001 or ECON 8001 or ECON 8101], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8003/Econ 8003/Econ 8103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic competition, game theory, and information. Non-cooperative games, static games of complete and imperfect information, dynamic games of complete/incomplete information, application of incomplete information. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8002 or ECON 8002 or ECON 8102], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8004 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Social Choice and Welfare
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8400/Econ 8400/Econ 8104
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Welfare economics/measurement, externalities and social choice. Welfare theorems in general equilibrium, externalities and public goods, social choice, social welfare, and welfare change measurement. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8003 or ECON 8003 or ECON 8103], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8213 - Econometric Analysis III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory of M-estimation, generalized method of moments, and maximum likelihood. Quantile regression, discrete choice models, and quasi-maximum likelihood in the linear exponential family. Censoring and selection bias. prereqs: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
CSCI 5980 - Special Topics in Computer Science
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 27.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Lectures and informal discussions on current topics in computer science. prereq: instr consent; may be repeated for cr
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8252 - Statistical Methods in Education II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8252/EPsy 8262
Prerequisites: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical Methods in Education II is the second course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course focuses on multiple linear regression and provides an introduction to linear mixed models. prereq: [8251, 8261 or equiv]
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
FINA 8823 - Empirical Corporate Finance
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current empirical research on corporate finance. Mergers/acquisitions, equity offerings, event studies, tests of market efficiency, impact of corporate governance, compensation policies, initial public offerings. prereq: 8802, 8803
HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Computer programming essentials for health sciences/health care applications using Python 3. Intended for students with limited programming background, or students wishing to obtain proficiency in Python programming language. prereq: Junior or senior or grad student or professional student or instr consent
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces, random variables, their distributions/expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, sampling, sufficiency, estimation. prereq: [2263 or 2374 or 2573], [2243 or 2373]; [2283 or 2574 or 3283] recommended.
MGMT 8892 - Readings in Management Theory and Administration
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive research on a management topic; major term paper. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent, adviser consent
MGMT 8894 - Graduate Research in Management Theory and Administration
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Research project on a management problem of interest to student; may be completed in cooperation with a business firm. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent, adviser consent
MKTG 8831 - Seminar: Inter-Organizational Relations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
From an efficiency perspective, inter-organizational networks involved in task of moving goods and services from point of production to point of consumption. Literature covering the functional, institutional, analytical, and methodological traditions, as well as the behavioral school of thought and transaction cost and relational contracting. prereq: business admin PhD student or instr consent
PA 8302 - Applied Policy Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Design/evaluation of public policies. Emphasizes market/non-market contexts. Microeconomics and welfare economics of policy analysis. Econometric tools for measurement of policy outcomes. Applications to policy problems. prereq: Intermediate microeconomics, introduction to econometrics
POL 8106 - Quantitative Political Science I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides a thorough grounding in the quantitative analysis of political science data. The emphasis is on how to analyze such data, interpret statistical results, and summarize and report the findings. By the end of the term you will (1) know how to describe variables; (2) test hypotheses; (3) use measures of association to quantify the relationship between two variables while holding a third variable constant; (4) understand bivariate regression and the basics of multiple regression; (5) understand reliability and validity and how to assess these properties empirically; and (6) know how to use the STATA statistical software program. prereq: political science grad major or instr consent
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
PUBH 8811 - Research Methods in Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Research methods commonly used in analysis of health services research and health policy problems. prereq: [8810, [grad or professional school] student] or instr consent
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8701 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditions of social theory basic to sociological knowledge, their reflection and expansion in contemporary theory, their applications in selected areas of empirical research. Sample topics: social inequality, social organization and politics, family organization and social reproduction, social order and change, sociology of knowledge and religion.
SOC 8721 - Social Psychology: Micro-Sociological Approaches to Inequalities and Identities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Social psychology is basic to an understanding of contemporary social life. This subfield of sociology focuses on social phenomena at the micro-level. Small group dynamics, social interactions, and individual experiences are importantly structured by the macro-structural context, e.g., by socioeconomic status, race, gender, sexuality, and other dimensions of social inequality. At the same time, these and other micro-sociological processes reflect individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations and cognitions. This seminar examines a wide range of social psychological phenomena linked to inequality (e.g., the effects of class, minority status, and gender on disparities in identity, self-concept, and health; the development of status hierarchies in small group interaction; intergroup relations, prejudice, and discrimination). We begin with a consideration of ?personal structure,? emphasizing the cultural and structural variability of self-conceptions and identities, cognitive processes, and motivation, as well as the biosocial bases of action. These may be considered individual-level ?building blocks? of social psychological theories (along with emotions, attitudes, values, and ideologies). We then address prominent theoretical perspectives in social psychology that illuminate the linkages between micro-social contexts of inequality and identity, including symbolic interactionism, exchange theory, structural social psychology (?social structure and personality?) and the social psychology of the life course. Social psychological theory and research are foundational to many specialty fields in sociology, including the sociology of the family, education, health, deviance, work, social mobility, social movements, emotions, and the sociology of childhood, youth, and aging. Social psychology is also central to prominent theoretical debates in sociology surrounding the relationship between social structure and agency; individual-level identities, perceptions, motivations, goals, and strategies are both structured by the social context and affect the capacity of individuals to act agentically and to achieve their goals.
SOC 8735 - Sociology of Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Definition/importance of culture as dimension of social life. Structural/Durkheimian approaches, cultural Marxism, practice theory. Cultural creation/reception. Identities as cultural formations. Culture/social inequality. Culture and race. Cultural construction of social problems. Culture and globalization.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear/generalized linear models, modern regression methods including nonparametric regression, generalized additive models, splines/basis function methods, regularization, bootstrap/other resampling-based inference. prereq: Statistics grad or instr consent
SCO 8811 - Operations Strategy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course goal is to expose students to the operations strategy area holistically, starting with its origins and historical evolution over time. Students will understand the breadth, develop a sense of the pertinent research questions that have been examined and those that remain unanswered, and begin to develop an informed sense of the emerging/existing research paradigms. The seminar approach is both topical and methodological, using published and working papers as the context and starting point for discussions. Although the focus of the class is not to teach new methods, a significant amount of time will be spent on the theoretical, empirical, and econometric research paradigms used in the papers. Each session is built around a specific theme. The objective is to develop a deep, collective understanding of the various research streams, different empirical methods, and the opportunities for contributions in the areas discussed. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8821 - Management of Technological Operations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The learning objectives of the seminar are to develop an understanding of the problems in managing technological operations (i) within firms (intra-firm), and (ii) across firms (inter-firm) ? i.e., designing and sustaining reliable, responsive, resilient and responsible supply chains. Theories and methodologies that either have been, or can be, applied to address these problems will be reviewed. Emerging and impactful problem areas relevant to managing technological operations within and across firms, and their supply chains, and their potential to serve as topics for new lines of research inquiries will be explored. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8822 - Innovative Operations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course will focus on emerging research topics in supply chain and operations with a particular focus on topics that relate to: (i) technology and supply chains in the context of developing economies and the public sector, and (ii) the increased digitization of supply chains through the use of sharing economy platforms. While these topics build upon and extend the core focus areas of supply chain operations (e.g., technology management, operations strategy, and inventory management), they also cross disciplinary boundaries (e.g., information systems, strategy, and public policy) and represent areas of much interest to scholars across disciplines. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8831 - Supply Chain Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with some foundational tools and techniques to model and analyze business problems in the context of supply chain management. Basic theoretical models as well as related quantitative methods and techniques will be discussed. In addition, each session will involve detailed discussions of classic and recent research articles that demonstrate how various supply chain topics of interest can be modeled and analyzed using different conceptual and methodological approaches. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8832 - Analytical Models for Operations Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This is a foundational course that introduces PhD students to analytical models widely used in operations management including optimization, game theory, and queueing theory. This course pays particular attention to emerging applications in supply chain, sustainable operations, retail, service, online platforms, and machine learning. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8841 - Behavioral Research in Operations Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course aims to prepare students to conduct rigorous research in the field of behavioral operations. It focuses on developing skills in three areas (1) knowledge of classic behavioral theories in economics, sociology, psychology, and other social sciences as they apply to an operations context; (2) ability to ascertain and discover novel behavioral issues that arise within operations contexts, particularly those with the potential for major impact on operational outcomes such as profit, demand, operational efficiency, service level, employee retention, and customer satisfaction; and (3) judgement of what research methodologies are most appropriate for studying a given behavioral issue and practice using these methodologies. Special emphasis is given to experimental and analytical methodologies, with applications spanning operational decisions in service systems, new product development, supply chain management, and responsible operations. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8842 - Retail Operations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide an overview of research in the field of retail operations and to help students develop necessary skills to conduct research in retail operations. To achieve these goals, the course covers a range of topics including forecasting and inventory management, assortment planning, store labor, store execution, consumer returns, omnichannel retailing, and innovative retail practices. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
SCO 8843 - Sustainable and Socially-Responsible Operations
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
With the fast expanding public awareness and aggravating environmental issues witnessed in recent years, the sustainability of business is receiving keen interest from both firms and policy-makers across the globe. Operations play a central role, as the objective of environmentally- and socially-responsible business needs to be realized through implementation and operationalization on the ground. Over the past decades, operations research has made significant contributions to advance our understanding and approaches on the sustainable aspects, examples include studies on the design and management of closed-loop supply chains (to deal with the resell, reuse, recycling or remanufacturing of used items), the development and implementation of evaluation systems to assess the environmental performance of firms (such as incorporation of the industrial ecology tool of Life-Cycle Assessment into the analysis), the formulation of environmental regulations (ranging from waste management, energy, to emissions and pollutions), the innovative business models (such as different new product development strategies, servicing and sharing economy), and those on the broader social and humanitarian issues. In this course, we will dive into the related literature, to have in-depth discussions on papers that use different conceptual and methodological approaches. Prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent; offered alt yrs
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
APEC 8213 - Econometric Analysis III
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory of M-estimation, generalized method of moments, and maximum likelihood. Quantile regression, discrete choice models, and quasi-maximum likelihood in the linear exponential family. Censoring and selection bias. prereqs: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8214 - Econometric Analysis IV
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Principles and methods of causal inference. Rubin potential outcomes framework, treatment effect concepts, matching, instrumental variables, and regression discontinuity designs. prereqs: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and theory building, in the social and behavioral sciences. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces. Random variables, their distributions and expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, multivariate normal distribution. prereq: (MATH 2263 or MATH 2374 or MATH 2573H), (CSCI 2033 or MATH 2373 or MATH 2243)
APEC 8206 - Dynamic Optimization: Applications in Economics and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Formulation and solution of dynamic optimization problems using optimal control theory and dynamic programming. Analytical and numerical solution methods to solve deterministic and stochastic problems for various economic applications. prereq: 5151 or equiv or instr consent
APEC 8602 - Economics of the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of environmental management, emphasizing environmental policy. Application of microeconomic theory to problems of market failure, market-based pollution control policies, contingent valuation, hedonic models, option value, and other topics. prereq: 8004 or ECON 8004 or ECON 8104 or equiv or instr consent
EPSY 8251 - Statistical Methods in Education I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8251/EPsy 8261
Prerequisites: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Statistical Methods in Education I is the first course in an entry-level, doctoral sequence for students in education. This course covers estimation and hypothesis testing with a particular focus on ANOVA and an introduction to multiple linear regression. Prepares students for EPSY 8252/8262. prereq: [EPSY 5261 or equiv] or undergrad statistics course
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
HINF 5502 - Python Programming Essentials for the Health Sciences
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Computer programming essentials for health sciences/health care applications using Python 3. Intended for students with limited programming background, or students wishing to obtain proficiency in Python programming language. prereq: Junior or senior or grad student or professional student or instr consent
HRIR 8802 - Core Seminar: Organizational Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Major theories/current research on individuals in organizations. Job attitudes/motivation. Personality/individual differences. Team effectiveness. Antisocial/pro-social behavior. Emotions. Justice.
MGMT 8302 - Seminar in Organizational Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.02]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major theories and current research on organizational and interorganizational topics from a macro perspective. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MKTG 8842 - Quantitative Modeling I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
MKTG 8843 - Quantitative Modeling II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Advanced readings seminar. Quantitative research in marketing. Topics from theoretical/empirical research streams in marketing, econometrics, and industrial organization. Classic/contemporary articles. prereq: Doctoral student or [master's program student, instr consent]
PA 5032 - Applied Regression
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Bivariate/multivariate models of regression analysis, assumptions behind them. Problems using these models when such assumptions are not met.
PA 5033 - Multivariate Techniques
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of bivariate and multivariate statistical approaches for analyzing and evaluating public affairs issues and the assumptions behind the analytical approaches. Designed to help students read, understand, interpret, use, and evaluate empirical work used in social sciences by policy analysts and policy makers. prereq: [5032 or 5044 or equiv] or instr consent. May fulfill stats requirements in other programs.
PUBH 7405 - Biostatistical Inference I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
T-tests, confidence intervals, power, type I/II errors. Exploratory data analysis. Simple linear regression, regression in matrix notation, multiple regression, diagnostics. Ordinary least squares, violations, generalized least squares, nonlinear least squares regression. Introduction to General linear Model. SAS and S-Plus used. prereq: [[Stat 5101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7406 - Biostatistical Inference II
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, single and multifactor analysis of variance, logistic regression, log-linear models, multinomial logit models, proportional odds models for ordinal data, gamma and inverse-Gaussian models, over-dispersion, analysis of deviance, model selection and criticism, model diagnostics, and an introduction to non-parametric regression methods. R is used. prereq: [7405, [STAT 5102 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in STAT 5102], biostatistics major] or instr consent
PUBH 7440 - Introduction to Bayesian Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Bayesian methods. Comparison with traditional frequentist methods. Emphasizes data analysis via modern computing methods: Gibbs sampler, WinBUGS software package. prereq: [[7401 or STAT 5101 or equiv], [public health MPH or biostatistics or statistics] grad student] or instr consent
PUBH 7475 - Statistical Learning and Data Mining
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Various statistical techniques for extracting useful information (i.e., learning) from data. Linear discriminant analysis, tree-structured classifiers, feed-forward neural networks, support vector machines, other nonparametric methods, classifier ensembles, unsupervised learning. prereq: [[[6450, 6452] or equiv], programming backgroud in [FORTRAN or C/C++ or JAVA or Splus/R]] or instr consent; 2nd yr MS recommended
PUBH 8804 - Advanced Quantitative Methods Seminar
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Understand/competently use advanced quantitative methods in applied social science, policy, demographic research. Methods considered largely within or related to framework of regression analysis. Effort will be made to reflect interests of class. prereq: This is an advanced, doctoral-level course. Students are expected to have completed a full year of doctoral-level introductory statistical and/or econometric classes in their respective field prior to enrolling in this course (e.g., PubH 7401-2, ApEc8211-2, SOC 8801-8811). Exceptions may be granted with instr consent.
PUBH 8811 - Research Methods in Health Care
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Research methods commonly used in analysis of health services research and health policy problems. prereq: [8810, [grad or professional school] student] or instr consent
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
In this course, students will learn core statistical and computations principles that will allow them to perform quantitative analyses using social data. The course is designed for social science students at the beginning of their graduate school careers. However, advanced undergraduates can take the course, which will involve a few modifications to the assignment schedule. Sociology 5811 will review basic probability, and then move on to univariate inference, the linear regression model, and introductory lessons of causal inference. In doing so, students will explore statistical concepts and methods that provide the foundation sociologists use to most commonly collect and analyze numerical evidence. Sociology 5811 will also provide the foundation for data management and statistical inference using Stata, a statistical computing environment that is popular in the social sciences. prereq: Undergraduate students are expected to have familiarity with the materials taught in the equivalent of 3811. Students who are unsure of the course requirements should contact the instructor. Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs. 5811 will not count for credits towards the Soc PhD program requirements.
SOC 8412 - Social Network Analysis: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to theoretical/methodological foundations of social network analysis. Concepts/principles, measurements, computer techniques. Applications to friendships, communities, workteams, intra-/inter-organizational relations, international systems. Focuses on network visualizations.
SOC 8801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Multiple objectives of social research and how they inform research design. Conceptualization and measurement of complex concepts. Broad issues in research design and quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and management. prereq: Grad soc major or instr consent
SOC 8811 - Advanced Social Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Statistical methods for analyzing social data. Sample topics: advanced multiple regression, logistic regression, limited dependent variable analysis, analysis of variance and covariance, log-linear models, structural equations, and event history analysis. Applications to datasets using computers. prereq: recommend 5811 or equiv; graduate student or instr consent
SOC 8890 - Advanced Topics in Research Methods
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced Research Methods (e.g., multilevel models), historical/comparative, field, survey research. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 8801, 8811, or instr consent. Cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses, size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables. Linear models. Decision theory. prereq: [5101 or Math 5651 or instr consent]
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent Please note this course generally does not count in the Statistical Practice BA or Statistical Science BS degrees. Please consult with a department advisor with questions.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models. prereq: STAT 3022 or 3032 or 3301 or 5302 or 4051 or 8051 or 5102 or 4102
STAT 5701 - Statistical Computing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: (Stat 5102 or Stat 8102) and (Stat 5302 or STAT 8051) or consent
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Statistical programming, function writing, graphics using high-level statistical computing languages. Data management, parallel computing, version control, simulation studies, power calculations. Using optimization to fit statistical models. Monte Carlo methods, reproducible research. prereq: (Stat 5102 or Stat 8102) and (Stat 5302 or STAT 8051) or consent
STAT 8051 - Advanced Regression Techniques: linear, nonlinear and nonparametric methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Linear/generalized linear models, modern regression methods including nonparametric regression, generalized additive models, splines/basis function methods, regularization, bootstrap/other resampling-based inference. prereq: Statistics grad or instr consent
STAT 8311 - Linear Models
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model theory from a coordinate-free geometric approach. Distribution theory, ANOVA tables, testing, confidence statements, mixed models, covariance structures, variance components estimation. prereq: Linear algebra, 5102 or 8102 or instr consent
HRIR 8801 - Core Seminar: Fundamentals of Economic Analysis for Work and Organizations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theoretical/empirical approaches in labor/organizational economics. Labor supply/demand. Monopoly/institutional features of labor markets. Compensation, incentives sorting, training. Approaching topics/questions in work/organizations from economic perspective. prereq: [Business Admin PhD student or dept consent], grad majors must enroll A-F
HRIR 8802 - Core Seminar: Organizational Behavior
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Major theories/current research on individuals in organizations. Job attitudes/motivation. Personality/individual differences. Team effectiveness. Antisocial/pro-social behavior. Emotions. Justice.
HRIR 8803 - Core Seminar: Fundamentals of HR Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major theories/current research on human resources/industrial relations practices/institutions. Recruitment, selection, job performance. Training/development. Compensation. Other practices/institutions. prereq: [Business Admin PhD student or dept consent], grad majors must enroll A-F
HRIR 8812 - Core Seminar: Research Methods in Work and Organizations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Application in research projects. prereq: [Business Admin PhD student or dept consent], grad majors must enroll A-F
HRIR 8820 - Seminar: Special Topics in Work and Organizations Research
Credits: 2.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contemporary theories/research on specific topics in work/ organizations. Topics vary. prereq: [Business Admin student or dept consent], grad majors must enroll A-F
HRIR 8825 - Research Practicum/Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experience in conducting research/other doctoral student activities.
EPSY 8264 - Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
General linear model used as context for regression. Matrix algebra, multiple regression, path analysis, polynomial regression, standardized regression, stepwise solutions, analysis of variance, weighted least squares, logistic regression. prereq: [8252 or equiv], regression/ANOVA course, familiarity with statistical analysis package
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
APEC 5031 - Methods of Economic Data Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Statistical and econometrics techniques for applied economists. Theory and application of multivariate regression model using data sets from published economic studies. Emphasis on use of statistical techniques to understand market behavior. prereq: APEC 3001, Math 1142 or Math 1272, Stat 3001 or Sco 2550 or grad student or instructor consent
APEC 8211 - Econometric Analysis I
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Asymptotic theory, theory and application of linear models. Reproducibility of econometric research will be emphasized. prereq: ApEc 5031 or equiv OR Ph.D. student OR instr consent
APEC 8212 - Econometric Analysis II
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Correlated errors, linear probability models, instrumental variables, and panel data. Resampling and randomization inference prereq: 8211 or equiv or instr consent
APEC 8003 - Applied Microeconomic Analysis of Game Theory and Information
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 8003/Econ 8003/Econ 8103
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strategic competition, game theory, and information. Non-cooperative games, static games of complete and imperfect information, dynamic games of complete/incomplete information, application of incomplete information. Part of four-course sequence (APEC 8001-8004). prereq: [[8002 or ECON 8002 or ECON 8102], [[MATH 2243, MATH 2263] or equiv]] or instr consent
APEC 8501 - Labor Economics I
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Theoretical and empirical studies of compensating differentials, discrimination, personnel economics, and gross flows. prereq: 8003 or equiv or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8003, 8211, 5032 or equiv
APEC 8502 - Labor Economics II
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Topics in applied microeconomics related to labor supply and human capital. Household decisions and resulting outcomes in labor market. Household labor supply. Estimation of labor supply and earnings functions. Theory of human capital, wage structure and determination, and impacts of tax and transfer policies.
CSOM 8101 - Methods and Topics in Applied Economics
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Intermediate methods/topics in business research.
ECON 8205 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: Math 4242 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8101, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Econ 8105, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
ECON 8206 - Applied Econometrics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application in research, including classical and Bayesian approaches; formulation, comparison, and use of models and hypotheses; inference and prediction in structural models; simulation methods. Seven-week course. prereq: 8205, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8102, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 8106, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Stat 5101 or instr consent
EPSY 5247 - Qualitative Methods in Educational Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to qualitative methods of inquiry. Contrasting different research traditions (e.g., case study, phenomenology, ethnography, social interactionism, critical theory). Practice with field notes, observations, and interviewing. Use of NVIVO to track/code data. prereq: Graduate student or Applied Psychology in Educational and Community Settings Minor
EPSY 5261 - Introductory Statistical Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/5231/5261/5263
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
EPSY 5261 is designed to engage students in statistics as a principled approach to data collection, prediction, and scientific inference. Students first learn about data collection (e.g., random sampling, random assignment) and examine data descriptively using graphs and numerical summaries. Students build conceptual understanding of statistical inference through the use of simulation-based methods (bootstrapping and randomization) before going on to learn parametric methods, such as t-tests (one-sample and two-sample means), z-tests (one-sample and two-sample proportions), chi-square tests, and regression. This course uses pedagogical methods grounded in research, such as small group activities and discussion. Attention undergraduates: As this is a graduate level course, it does not fulfill the Mathematical Thinking Liberal Education requirement. If you would like to take a statistics course in our department that fulfills that requirement, please consider EPSY 3264.
EPSY 8266 - Statistical Analysis Using Structural Equation Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Quantitative techniques using manifest/latent variable approaches for analysis of educational/social science data. Introduction to structural equation modeling approaches to multiple regression, factor analysis, path modeling. Developing, estimating, interpreting structural equation models. prereq: 8265, [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8268 - Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Conceptual framework of hierarchical linear models for nested data, their application in educational research. Nature/effects of nested data, logic of hierarchical models, mixed-effects models. Estimation/hypothesis testing in these models, model-checking, nonlinear models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
EPSY 8282 - Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Traditional/modern approaches to analyzing longitudinal data. Dependent t-test, repeated measures ANOVA/MANOVA. Linear mixed models, multilevel models, generalized models. prereq: [8252 or equiv]
HRIR 8991 - Independent Study in Human Resources and Industrial Relations
Credits: 1.0 -8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual readings and/or research projects. prereq: instr consent
MGMT 8101 - PhD Seminar: Theory Building
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and theory building, in the social and behavioral sciences. prereq: Business admin PhD student or instr consent
MGMT 8104 - PhD Seminar: Research Design
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem formulation, conceptual modeling, and research design in the social and behavioral sciences.
PSY 8208 - Social Psychology: The Self
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Social psychological theory and research concerning the self and social behavior. prereq: Psych background especially in personality and soc psych
PSY 8664 - Personality Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Concepts/issues concerning individual differences in personality and their assessment; content, reality, and significance of personality traits; classification of personality traits; major approaches to measurement of personality. prereq: Psy grad student or instr consent
PSY 8701 - Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Application of research and theory in psychological measurement and individual differences to problems in job analysis, personnel selection and classification, performance assessment, and individual training. prereq: instr consent
PSY 8702 - Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Determinants of behavior, performance, job satisfaction that can be influenced after an individual enters an organization. Application of research/theory in attitudes, motivation, leadership, group/team dynamics, and job design to enhancement of job performance/satisfaction. prereq: instr consent
PSY 8960 - Graduate Seminar in Psychology
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 36.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Graduate seminar in subject of current interest in psychology. prereq: Psychology grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6724 - The Health Care System and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Overview of health care delivery, finance systems within public health context. Components of health care system: financing, role of employers/public programs, health care delivery system, managed care. Collaborative interventions between managed care, public health. prereq: Public health or grad student or instr consent
PUBH 6832 - Economics of the Health Care System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines applications of microeconomic principles to the U.S. health care system. Topics include demand for medical care, insurance theory and selection issues, provider payment, competition in health care markets, the health care workforce, pharmaceutical prices and innovation, health care spending growth, quality of care, externalities, the relationship between income and health, and the economics of the opioid epidemic. Prerequisite: an introductory economics or microeconomic theory course ? or permission of the instructor.
SOC 8590 - Topics in Life Course Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sociology of aging, sociology of youth, and mental health and adjustment in early life course. Topics specified in [Class Schedule].