Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sociology of Law, Criminology, and Deviance B.S.

Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2012
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 31
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Sociology examines stability and change in social life by addressing the underlying patterns of social relations in formal organizations, in legal institutions, and in the family, economy, and political arena. Coursework focuses on the criminal justice system and criminal behavior; mental health; families and close relationships; education; urban and rural communities; politics and policy formation; social movements and social change; diverse racial and ethnic groups; and social psychology. Faculty interests in the comparative study of social relations and institutions in various countries add an international emphasis to these areas of study. All sociology courses emphasize the skills of social inquiry necessary for analyzing patterns of social relationships. Students may earn a B.A. or B.S. in sociology or in sociology of law, criminology, and deviance, but not both. For more information, visit the sociology website at www.soc.umn.edu/undergrad/.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 1 courses before admission to the program.
To be considered for the B.S. program, students must submit a written proposal to the undergraduate adviser in the Department of Sociology. Students will be signed up for the B.A. in sociology of law, criminology, and deviance until the proposal is approved by department faculty.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Preparatory Courses
Students are encouraged to complete two semesters of calculus before declaring the major. Calculus is often a prerequisite to complete other courses in the major.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
All major coursework must be completed before beginning the senior project. Students must be on a pre-approved waiting list to register for the senior project and should contact the Department of Sociology at least two semesters in advance of registration.
Major Courses
SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control (3.0 cr)
SOC 3701 - Social Theory (4.0 cr)
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
At least 6 credits must be from 41xx law, criminology, and deviance courses.
Take 12 or more credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 3xxx
· SOC 4xxx
· SOC 5xxx
Supportive Field Courses
Complete 12-16 credits.
Take 4 or more course(s) from the following:
· CSCI 4041 - Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· ECON 4113 - Introduction to Mathematical Economics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 4211 - Principles of Econometrics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 4261 - Introduction to Econometrics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 4262 {Inactive} (2.0 cr)
· MATH 4242 - Applied Linear Algebra (4.0 cr)
· MATH 4606 {Inactive} (4.0 cr)
· MATH 5248 - Cryptology and Number Theory (4.0 cr)
· MATH 5335 - Geometry I (4.0 cr)
· MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
· MATH 5707 - Graph Theory and Non-enumerative Combinatorics (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· Take no more than 2 course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5113 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought [WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 4611 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
Senior Project
All major coursework must be completed prior to beginning the senior project. Elective coursework must be taught by the same faculty member who is guiding the student's project.
SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) [WI] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) [WI] (1.0 cr)
SOC 3xxx
or SOC 4xxx
or SOC 5xxx
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP adviser and their departmental faculty adviser.
Honors students must complete at least two of the required five SOC electives at the 4xxx level. Students must take pro-seminars SOC 4977V and SOC 4978V in their senior year. Before beginning the pro-seminars, students must have completed all major core courses and at least three of the five required SOC electives.
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View future requirement(s):
· Summer 2019
· Spring 2019
· Fall 2018
· Fall 2017
· Fall 2016
· Summer 2015
· Fall 2014
· Spring 2014
· Fall 2012

View sample plan(s):
· Sociology of Law, Criminology, and Deviance B.S.

View checkpoint chart:
· Sociology of Law, Criminology, and Deviance B.S.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Liberal Arts

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/1011V/1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02107 - Soc 3101/Soc 3101H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3701 - Social Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
CSCI 4041 - Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02015
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Rigorous analysis of algorithms/implementation. Algorithm analysis, sorting algorithms, binary trees, heaps, priority queues, heapsort, balanced binary search trees, AVL trees, hash tables and hashing, graphs, graph traversal, single source shortest path, minimum cost spanning trees. prereq: [(1913 or 1933) and 2011] or instr consent; cannot be taken for grad CSci cr
ECON 4113 - Introduction to Mathematical Economics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02006 - Econ 4113/Econ 4113H/Econ 4118
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of selected models of economic behavior in mathematical terms. Topics selected to illustrate advantages of mathematical formulation. prereq: [[3101, 3102] or equiv], [[MATH 1271, MATH 1272, MATH 2243] or equiv]
ECON 4211 - Principles of Econometrics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Data analysis/quantitative methods in economics. Violation of classical regression model assumptions, modified estimation procedures that retain desirable properties. Multi-equation models. Computer applications/interpretation of empirical results. prereq: [3101 or equiv], [Stat 3011 or equivalent, Stat 3022 or equivalent] or higher level Stat courses]
ECON 4261 - Introduction to Econometrics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For Econ B.S. majors only. Review of basic linear regression model, its variants. Time series/simultaneous equation models. Material may include panel data, censored/truncated regressions, discrete choice models. prereq: [3101 or equiv], [[Math 1271, Math 1272] or equiv], Math 2243, Math 2263, [[Stat 4101, Stat 4102] or [Stat 5101, Stat 5102]]; Math 4242 strongly recommended
MATH 4242 - Applied Linear Algebra
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01212 - Math 4242/Math 4457
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, canonical forms, quadratic forms, applications. prereq: 2243 or 2373 or 2573
MATH 5248 - Cryptology and Number Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Classical cryptosystems. One-time pads, perfect secrecy. Public key ciphers: RSA, discrete log. Euclidean algorithm, finite fields, quadratic reciprocity. Message digest, hash functions. Protocols: key exchange, secret sharing, zero-knowledge proofs. Probablistic algorithms: pseudoprimes, prime factorization. Pseudo-random numbers. Elliptic curves. prereq: 2 sems soph math
MATH 5335 - Geometry I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced two-dimensional Euclidean geometry from a vector viewpoint. Theorems/problems about triangles/circles, isometries, connections with Euclid's axioms. Hyperbolic geometry, how it compares with Euclidean geometry. prereq: [2243 or 2373 or 2573], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2374 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2574]
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00259 - MATH 4653/Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces, random variables, their distributions/expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, sampling, sufficiency, estimation. prereq: [2263 or 2374 or 2573], [2243 or 2373]; [2283 or 2574 or 3283] recommended.
MATH 5707 - Graph Theory and Non-enumerative Combinatorics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic topics in graph theory: connectedness, Eulerian/Hamiltonian properties, trees, colorings, planar graphs, matchings, flows in networks. Optional topics include graph algorithms, Latin squares, block designs, Ramsey theory. prereq: [2243 or 2373 or 2573], [2263 or 2374 or 2574]; [2283 or 3283 or experience in writing proofs] highly recommended; Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: 4707
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00260
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: STAT 4101
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3032 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models.
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, and assessment. Topics: behaviorism, cognitive and social constructivism, human information processing theory, intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability, validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, and portfolios.
EPSY 5114 - Psychology of Student Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01814
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to the theories, data, and methods of Educational Psychology most relevant to understanding student thinking and learning. The first third of the course reviews those aspects of cognitive development that are foundational for education. The second third considers how cognitive psychology informs questions of learning, memory, knowledge, and transfer. With this background in place, the final third of the course will focus on the classroom: on instruction, motivation, individual differences, and group differences. The course concludes by considering the neural correlates of classroom learning.
PHIL 3601W - Scientific Thought (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Science influences us daily, shaping how we understand ourselves and interpret nature. This course is an introduction to how scientists reason about the world, what that means for our lives, and the status of science as a human activity. What is science and what?s so great about it? Is science the ultimate authority on the world and our place in it? This course examines the authority of science, how scientists reason, and science?s status as a human activity. prereq: One course in philosophy or natural science
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Faculty guided and self directed research experience at junior/senior level. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement. This Capstone Experience: Directed Research is to include but not limited to: bi-weekly meetings, literature review, multiple drafts and revisions, etc. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives, dept & instructor consent.
SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual research for the sociology major's Capstone requirement, conducted in conjunction with enrollment in an upper division sociology elective. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience, using the structure and foundation of the 6th Sociology elective, majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and the emphasis of the course. The final paper created for 4994W is in addition to the other 6th Sociology elective course requirements. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, and at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives; dept & instructor consent. Students are only authorized to register for Soc 4994W in conjunction with a 6th Sociology Elective.