Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Sociology B.S.

Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2018
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54 to 61
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Sociology examines stability and change in social life by addressing the underlying patterns of social relations in formal organizations, in legal institutions, and in the family, economy, and political arena. Coursework focuses on the criminal justice system and criminal behavior, mental health, families and close relationships, education, urban and rural communities, politics and policy formation, social movements and social change, diverse racial and ethnic groups, and social psychology. Faculty interests in the comparative study of social relations and institutions in various countries add an international emphasis to these areas of study. All sociology courses emphasize the skills of social inquiry necessary for analyzing patterns of social relationships. The sociology BS program is for students interested in developing a rigorous mathematical concentration in research methodologies. This option builds on the course requirements for the sociology BS program by featuring 12-16 additional credits of upper-division coursework in one of four clusters: (1) organizations, business, or non-profits, (2) health care and careers, (3) policy analysis, or (4) quantitative emphasis. For more information, visit the sociology website for undergraduates at http://cla.umn.edu/sociology/.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students who are interested in the BS option are encouraged to schedule a meeting with the departmental advisor to discuss the major and its requirements.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Preparatory Coursework
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete a sub-plan in consultation with the departmental advisor. Students must be on a pre-approved waiting list to register for the capstone project and should contact the Department of Sociology at least two semesters in advance of registration. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. At least 28 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus Students may earn no more than one undergraduate degree from the Department of Sociology: a BA or BS or minor in sociology; or a BA or BS or minor in sociology of law, criminology, and deviance. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence.
Quantitative Courses
In order to be successful, students must take these courses in sequence. The calculus course should be taken before social statistics.
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Data Analysis Courses
Note: A given course may only count towards one major requirement.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 3412 - Social Networking: Theories and Methods [TS] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3412H - Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods [TS] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3811/5811 and SOC 3801 are prerequisites of SOC 4821.
· SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3811/5811 is a prerequisite of STAT 3022 and STAT 3032. It is strongly recommended that MATH 1142/1271/1571H be completed before taking STAT 3022 or STAT 3032.
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3032 - Regression and Correlated Data (4.0 cr)
Theory & Methods Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· SOC 3701 - Social Theory (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
Electives
Students must complete at least five 3xxx-5xxx SOC elective courses. Any SOC 3xxx, 4xxx, 5xxx, or its cross-list may count towards this requirement. Consult the departmental advisor to choose sociology electives that pair with you sub-plan.
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3018 - What American Dream? Children of the Social Class Divide [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3003 - Social Problems (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3090 - Topics in Sociology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3221 - Sociology of Gender (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3301W - Politics and Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3311W - Hard Times & Bad Behavior: Homelessness & Marginality in the United States [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3411W - Organizations and Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3415 - Consume This! The Sociology and Politics of Consumption (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3421W - Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3452 - Education and Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3641 - Understanding New Zealand: Culture, Society, and Environment [GP, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3721 - Principles of Social Psychology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4090 - Topics in Sociology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4105 - Sociology of Punishment and Corrections (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4106 - Crime on TV (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4108 - Current Issues in Crime Control (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4109 - Domestic Criminal Violence (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4111 - Deviant Behavior (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4114 - Women & the Criminal Justice System (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4125 - Policing America (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4142 - Adolescents and the Legal System (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4149 - Killing (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4161 - Criminal Law in American Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4162 - Criminal Procedure in American Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4190 - Topics in Sociology With Law, Criminology, and Deviance Emphasis (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4511 - Sociology of Youth: Transition to Adulthood (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4703 - Contemporary American Culture [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis (3.0 cr)
· SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology (1.0-3.0 cr)
· SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3101H - Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5246 - Disease, Disasters, and Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3309 - Atheists & Others: Religious Outsiders in the United States [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3624 - Atheists & Others: Religious Outsiders in the United States [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3412 - Social Networking: Theories and Methods [TS] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3412H - Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods [TS] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3511 - World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5511 - World Population Problems (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3671 - Contemporary Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality in China (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3911 - Contemporary Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality in China (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4102 - Criminology (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4102H - Honors: Criminology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4135 - Sociology of White-Collar Crime (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4135H - Honors: Sociology of White-Collar Crime (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4141 - Juvenile Delinquency (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4141H - Honors: Juvenile Delinquency (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4170 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights, Trafficking, and Business Regulation [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4406 - Sociology of International Law: Trafficking, Human Rights, & Business Regulation [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, & Communities [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4309H - Honors: Religion in American Public Life - Culture, Politics, & Communities [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, and Communities [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4411H - Honors: Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4451 - Sport, Culture & Society (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4451H - Honors: Sport, Culture & Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4521 - Love, Sex, & Marriage (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4521H - Honors: Love, Sex, & Marriage (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4551 - Sociology of Sexualities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4551H - Honors: Sociology of Sexualities [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
In the capstone, students will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. Before beginning the capstone, students must be a declared major and have completed all major coursework except one sociology elective course. Students are strongly advised to contact the department at least two semesters in advance of registration to insure they are on the capstone wait list.
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 4 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Sociology capstone, but they do need to replace the 3 credits with another sociology elective course.
Seminar
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write sociological analyses based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University.
SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or Directed Research (4 cr.)
SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) [WI] (4.0 cr)
or Directed Research (1 cr.) with SOC elective
SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) [WI] (1.0 cr)
The additional sociology elective must be pre-approved by the department advisor.
SOC 3xxx
or SOC 4xxx
or SOC 5xxx
or Honors
Students seeking Honors in Sociology should take both proseminars in their senior year.
SOC 4977V - Senior Honors Proseminar I [WI] (3.0 cr)
SOC 4978V - Senior Honors Proseminar II [WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· SOC 3301W - Politics and Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3311W - Hard Times & Bad Behavior: Homelessness & Marginality in the United States [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3411W - Organizations and Society [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3421W - Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar [WI] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) [WI] (1.0 cr)
or SOC 4977V - Senior Honors Proseminar I [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4978V - Senior Honors Proseminar II [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) [WI] (4.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Organization, Business, or Non-Profit
Some courses require prerequisites, consult the university catalog for more information.
Supportive Field Courses
Note: ECON 1101 & 1102 are strongly recommended as prerequisites for most of the following courses.
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ABUS 3301 - Introduction to Quality Management (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4101 - Accounting and Finance for Managers (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4151 - Innovation for Leaders and Organizations (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4509 - New Product Development (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4515 - Strategy and Management for a Sustainable Future (3.0 cr)
· ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (4.0 cr)
· ACCT 3001 - Introduction to Management Accounting (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4511 - American Indian Political Economy (3.0 cr)
· AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3002 - Applied Microeconomics: Managerial Economics (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies (3.0 cr)
· BLAW 3058 - The Law of Contracts and Agency (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· INS 4100 - Corporate Risk Management (2.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
· MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
· MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3380 - Developing Intercultural Competence (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 4420 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations (2.0 cr)
· OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· PA 4190 - Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management (1.0-3.0 cr)
· POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations (3.0 cr)
· SCO 3045 - Sourcing and Supply Management (2.0 cr)
· UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction (4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets (4.0 cr)
or ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy (3.0 cr)
or ECON 3102 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
or CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· HRIR 3021 - Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations (3.0 cr)
or HRIR 3021H - Honors: Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Health Care and Careers
Some courses require prerequisites, consult the university catalog for more information.
Supportive Field Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ADDS 5081 - Multicultural Foundations of Behavioral Health (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health (3.0 cr)
· CSPH 5121 - Whole Systems Healing: Health and the Environment (2.0 cr)
· CSPH 5641 - Animals in Health Care: The Healing Dimensions of Human/Animal Relationships (3.0 cr)
· FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health (3.0 cr)
· KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· PHAR 4200W - Drugs and the U.S. Healthcare System [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3601 - Maternal and Child Health Global Public Health Issues (2.0 cr)
· PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Service (3.0 cr)
· SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Policy Analysis
Some courses require prerequisites, consult the university catalog for more information.
Supportive Field Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3426 - African Americans, Social Policy, and the Welfare State (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3007 - Applied Macroeconomics: Policy, Trade, and Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals (3.0 cr)
· APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3590 - Topics: Social Change, Activism, Law, and Policy Studies (3.0 cr)
· HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ID 3208 - Internship Reflection: Making Meaning of Your Experience (1.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3336 - Religion, Ethics, and Educational Policy [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· OLPD 3380 - Developing Intercultural Competence (3.0 cr)
· PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· PA 4190 - Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management (1.0-3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality (4.0 cr)
· POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3309 - Justice in America (3.0 cr)
· POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3321 - Issues in American Public Policy (3.0 cr)
· POL 3325 - U.S. Campaigns and Elections (3.0 cr)
· POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality (3.0 cr)
· POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3739 - Politics of Race, Class, and Ethnicity (3.0 cr)
· POL 3766 - Political Psychology of Mass Behavior [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3767 - Political Psychology of Elite Behavior [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3769 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4495 - Politics of Family, Sex, and Children [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4771 - Race and Politics in America: Making Sense of Racial Attitudes in the United States [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology [WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets (4.0 cr)
or ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy (3.0 cr)
or ECON 3102 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (4.0 cr)
· AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
or POL 4507 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
or BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3785 - Persuasion and Political Propaganda (3.0 cr)
or POL 3785H - Persuasion and Political Propaganda (3.0 cr)
· WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Quantitative Emphasis
Some courses require prerequisites, consult the university catalog for more information.
Supportive Field Courses
Note: MATH 1272 is a required prerequisite for most of the following courses. MATH 1272 carries a prerequisite of MATH 1271. Students who are interested in this sub-plan should take MATH 1271 instead of MATH 1142 in order to complete these course sequences in a timely fashion.
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 12 - 16 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2263 - Multivariable Calculus (4.0 cr)
· MATH 3283W - Sequences, Series, and Foundations: Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 4242 - Applied Linear Algebra (4.0 cr)
· MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics (4.0 cr)
· PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease (2.0 cr)
· STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data (3.0 cr)
· STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 5011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3797 - History of Population [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5797 - Methods of Population History (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
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· College of Liberal Arts

View future requirement(s):
· Spring 2019

View sample plan(s):
· Organization/Business/Non-Profit
· Health Care and Careers
· Policy Analysis
· Quantitative Emphasis

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· Sociology B.S.
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SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
SOC 1011V - Honors: Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 1001/1011V/1012W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships, and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life and how you, in turn, affect society.
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
SOC 5811 - Social Statistics for Graduate Students (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will introduce statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. Soc 5811 is intended for new graduate students, undergraduate honors students, and students pursuing the Sociology BS degree. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with a strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc majors must register A-F. 5811 is a good social statistics foundation course for MA students from other programs.
SOC 3412 - Social Networking: Theories and Methods (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02230 - Soc 3412/Soc 3412H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks.' prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3412H - Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02230 - Soc 3412/Soc 3412H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course, you will develop practical social science data analysis skills for use in the non-profit or corporate workplace or in a graduate program of research. You will assess the measurement of important social concepts, like race, health, or education, in large social surveys, and the strengths and weaknesses of those different measurement techniques. You will conduct data analysis on large datasets (see, e.g., www.ipums.org) using a statistical software program, such as STATA. You will develop a substantive, empirical final project (poster and paper) based on your analysis. prereq: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 3032 - Regression and Correlated Data
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This is a second course in statistics with a focus on linear regression and correlated data. The intent of this course is to prepare statistics, economics and actuarial science students for statistical modeling needed in their discipline. The course covers the basic concepts of linear algebra and computing in R, simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, statistical inference, model diagnostics, transformations, model selection, model validation, and basics of time series and mixed models. Numerous datasets will be analyzed and interpreted using the open-source statistical software R. prereq: STAT 3011 or STAT 3021
SOC 3701 - Social Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of major social theories ranging from the foundational sociological theories of Marx, Weber and Durkheim to contemporary theories of postmodernism and globalization. We will examine a range of theories with particular attention to their treatments of core sociological questions and concerns. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265 - GCC 3014/GCC 5014
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century.
GCC 3018 - What American Dream? Children of the Social Class Divide (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
As a result of the increasing and widening social class divide present in the early 21st century, American families and their children are facing more challenges than ever before. Academic underachievement, a school-to-prison pipeline, and the opioid epidemic are just a few examples. In this course, students will identify and confront the barriers to opportunities created by the divide and seek solutions that can be pursued with families, schools, and communities, and public policy to redress these inequities. Because of the complexity of this grand challenge, an interdisciplinary approach to intervention and policy is required. From course instructors? respective vantage points in prevention science, developmental and educational psychology, and family social science, and with the perspectives provided by faculty contributors from economics, law, and pediatrics, students engage with diverse modes of inquiry, epistemologies, and critical lenses by which possible solutions can be generated and implemented.
SOC 3003 - Social Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will engage in a sociological examination of major social problems facing the contemporary US and abroad. We explore the origins and causes of different social problems, seek to understand how they impact individuals, groups, and the society as a whole, and evaluate solutions. We ask how an issue becomes defined as a "social problem," discuss the social construction of reality and deviance, and consider the primary frameworks under which societies have organized their responses to different social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
SOC 3102 - Criminal Behavior and Social Control
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will address the social and legal origins of crime and crime control with a focus on general theories of deviance/crime and present an overview of forms of social control. We will critically examine criminological, sociological and legal theories that explain the causes of crime and other misdeeds. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities – why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3221 - Sociology of Gender
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00929 - Soc 3221/WoSt 3201
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Gender is something so fundamental to our lives, to our identities, and how we interact with others that we often take it for granted. However, understandings of gender vary across time and place, and even within cultures, making it clear that our understandings of gender are not universal or timeless. In this class, we will examine how gender intersects with race and sexuality, as well as how it impacts areas of our lives such as child socialization, family structure, the media, intimate relationships, and the workplace prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3301W - Politics and Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3311W - Hard Times & Bad Behavior: Homelessness & Marginality in the United States (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
As we read about hobos and sailors, opium users and saloon girls, and contemporary experiences on the streets, we trace themes about marginality in the US, such as rootlessness produced by labor market, the love-hate relationship between elites and marginal populations in popular culture, and the complex mixture of freedom and deprivation of people on the edge. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3411W - Organizations and Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations, terrorist networks and counterterror organizations. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3415 - Consume This! The Sociology and Politics of Consumption
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How symbols are created, acquired, diffused, and used for organizing personal identity and maintaining group boundaries. Fashion. Socialization. Structure of retail trade. Role of mass media, advertising, marketing/production strategies. Implications of worldwide markets. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3421W - Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02096 - Soc 3451W/Soc 3451V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3452 - Education and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 3501 - Sociology of Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Family has long been a significant experience in human societies; much of what we understand ourselves to be, arises in family life. But family also varies widely in composition across time and place. We will learn how sociologists study and understand families theoretically, as social institutions, as well as sites and sources of social problems. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3641 - Understanding New Zealand: Culture, Society, and Environment (GP, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
This course introduces students to New Zealand society in a 3-week global seminar, covering political structures, indigenous rights, immigration trends, and environmental politics. New Zealand is one of the world's most remote inhabited land-masses, and this remoteness has had a significant impact on its environmental and human history. Like the United States, New Zealand is thought of as a "settler society" that is now largely populated by descendants of people who migrated from Europe in the last couple of centuries. Like the United States it is a long-established democracy, with significant levels of immigration from Europe and Asia. Unlike the United States, the indigenous Maori population comprise around 1/6 of the population giving indigenous issues an unusual prominence in politics and society compared to peer countries such as the US, Canada, Australia, or Scandinavia to which NZ is often compared by social scientists. The predominant language spoken in the country is English, giving students the ability to quickly engage with the local population in formal and informal settings, and access local resources for study such as libraries, archives, speakers from universities, civic organizations, and government. Thematically the course has a continuing focus on indigenous rights, immigration, and the environment in a long-established democracy. Methodologically the course gives students an opportunity to engage with several important social research methods including reading comparative social science that puts New Zealand in context with similar countries; archival and biographical research, and social observation of public spaces. Through the instructor's contacts with colleagues in New Zealand, students also have the opportunity to engage in joint discussions with New Zealand university students about shared assigned readings about New Zealand society, and meet community members in a range of informal and formal settings. Assignments have students undertake reflective journaling on their observations of New Zealand, write a biographical profile from archival sources, and complete a short research paper on a topical issue of the students' choice using academic literature, official statistics, and news media.
SOC 3721 - Principles of Social Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Social psychology is at the intersection of macro and micro sociology, linking social structures, interpersonal relationships and interactions, attitudes, values and the self-concept. Principles of social psychology are drawn from multiple theoretical perspectives, including symbolic interactionism, expectation states theory, social structure and personality, and the life course. This course covers a broad range of topics as well as the diverse methods that social psychologists use to study them (for example, experiments, surveys, ethnographic observation). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
SOC 4105 - Sociology of Punishment and Corrections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Correctional strategies such as prison, probation, and parole. Theories/structures of diversion, probation, parole, and other community corrections programs. U.S. penal policies/practices compared with those in other countries. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4106 - Crime on TV
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: recommended [1001 or 1001V, 1101 or 3101 or 3102]; Soph or above or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course uses television shows to explore sociological perspectives on crime and punishment. We will critically examine how (and to what extent) four television series represent or distort prevailing knowledge about crime and punishment. prereq: recommended [1001 or 1001V, 1101 or 3101 or 3102]; Soph or above or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 4108 - Current Issues in Crime Control
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring & Summer
Selected current criminal justice policies from perspective of courts, legislature, community, and interest groups. Impact of criminal justice policy changes on society and on social control agencies. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4109 - Domestic Criminal Violence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Survey of research on family violence within criminological framework. Definition of domestic violence. Empirical/theoretical approaches. Response of social control agencies. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4111 - Deviant Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Definition/nature of deviant behavior. Social processes associated with deviant careers and social reintegration. Relationship of deviant behavior to social control. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4114 - Women & the Criminal Justice System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Historical/current explanations for female criminality. Current trends in women's participation in crime, their treatment in the legal system. prereq: recommend 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4125 - Policing America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Forms, dynamics, philosophical underpinnings of policing/surveillance agencies (formal/informal). Legal limitations, police culture, community relations, aims of policing, state power. prereq: [3101 or 3102 recommended or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4142 - Adolescents and the Legal System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This is a course covers the legal and social statuses of juveniles in our society. A recurrent theme is the power relationships among minors, their families, social institutions, and the legal system. Issues dealing with delinquent behavior are discussed in terms of different behaviors with which a juvenile justice system has to deal, such as the matter of certification to adult courts, the procedures in different jurisdictions for such matters, and death penalty issues which arose with juveniles and the consequences of several recent Supreme Court cases. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4149 - Killing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociological, legal, psychological aspects of diverse types of killing. Normal killings contrasted with pathological types. Mentally disturbed killings, sexual killings, killings within families, gang killings, terrorist killings. prereq: jr or sr or grad student or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4161 - Criminal Law in American Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of criminal liability, justification, and excuse. Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public order, and morals. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4162 - Criminal Procedure in American Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How constitutional democracy balances need to enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be free of unnecessary government intrusion. prereq: 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4190 - Topics in Sociology With Law, Criminology, and Deviance Emphasis
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [1001, [3101 or 3102]] recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F; cr will not be granted if cr has been received for the same topics title
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Effects of ethnic migration and of social movements. Construction of ethnic/national identities. Questions of citizenship. Rise of transnational movements, how they help shape racial/ethnic conflicts. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4511 - Sociology of Youth: Transition to Adulthood
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Societal trends that shape adolescent experience/transition to adulthood. Increasing diversity in family structures. Expansion of higher education. Shifts in workforce. How young people construct their futures. Ways social locations/resources enhance/constrain options. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4703 - Contemporary American Culture (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Key changes in cultural life in the United States and internationally. Theories that have been developed to understand them. Topics may include work, family, social movements, media and popular culture, and politics. prereq: 1001 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4821 - Measuring the Social World: Concepts and Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course, you will develop practical social science data analysis skills for use in the non-profit or corporate workplace or in a graduate program of research. You will assess the measurement of important social concepts, like race, health, or education, in large social surveys, and the strengths and weaknesses of those different measurement techniques. You will conduct data analysis on large datasets (see, e.g., www.ipums.org) using a statistical software program, such as STATA. You will develop a substantive, empirical final project (poster and paper) based on your analysis. prereq: SOC 3801 or equiv, and SOC 3811 or equivalent
SOC 5090 - Topics in Sociology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Undergrad soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5455 - Sociology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EdPA 5041/Soc 5455
Typically offered: Every Fall
Structures and processes within educational institutions. Links between educational organizations and their social contexts, particularly as these relate to educational change. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3101 - Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02107 - Soc 3101/Soc 3101H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3101H - Honors: Sociological Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02107 - Soc 3101/Soc 3101H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course introduces students to a sociological account of the U.S. criminal justice system. We will critically examine the components, dynamics, and effects of policing, criminal courts, community supervision, jails, and prisons. Throughout the course, we focus on sociological understandings of these processes, with particular attention to ethnic, racial, class, and gender inequalities as well as long-term problems associated with the high rate of criminal justice supervision in the U.S. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honor students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
SOC 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
AAS 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437 - AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02520
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02520
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Far-reaching transformations of the global economy over the last seventy years in the realms of labor, consumption and the environment. The movement away from regulated national economies to a more fully integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, employment, consumption, and waste disposal; rise of supercapitalism: a new culture of market rule over society and nature.
SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02540 - Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 5246 - Disease, Disasters, and Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02540 - Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Grad student or instructor consent.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
SOC 3309 - Atheists & Others: Religious Outsiders in the United States (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02371
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What does it mean to be an atheist in the United States today? Atheists comprise a small percentage of the American population, but one with an increasingly visible presence in popular culture, political discourse, & everyday life. How do atheists organize into groups oriented toward identity-formation, social connection, and political action? prereq: 1001 recommended
RELS 3624 - Atheists & Others: Religious Outsiders in the United States (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02371
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What does it mean to be an atheist in the United States today? Atheists comprise a small percentage of the American population, but one with an increasingly visible presence in popular culture, political discourse, and everyday life. How do atheists organize into groups oriented toward identity-formation, social connection, and political action? prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02101
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02101 - GloS 3322W/Soc 3322W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Origins, dynamics, consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements/political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
SOC 3412 - Social Networking: Theories and Methods (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02230 - Soc 3412/Soc 3412H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks.' prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3412H - Honors: Social Networking: Theories and Methods (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02230 - Soc 3412/Soc 3412H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Network analysis spans a diverse range of phenomena from ego-centric ties, to small work-team sociograms, to organizational relations, to trade and military alliances among nation states. This course introduces undergraduate students to theories and methods for studying social networks, the ties connecting people, groups, and organizations. Topics include friendship, communication, small group, health, sexual and romantic, corporate, social movement, public policy, innovation diffusion, criminal and terrorist, and Internet networks. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F, honors
SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. Emphasizes their daily practices and political, economic, and cultural effects around the world. Politics/business of development. Free market and trade. New transnational professional class. Social activism.
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. Emphasizes their daily practices and political, economic, and cultural effects around the world. Politics/business of development. Free market and trade. New transnational professional class. Social activism.
SOC 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A/F
SOC 3503H - Honors: Asian American Identities, Families & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society. Honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, honors
AAS 3503 - Asian American Identities, Families, & Communities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02098 - AAS 3503/Soc 3503/Soc 3503H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course provides a sociological overview of Asian American identities, families and communities. To place these experiences within a broader historical, structural, and cultural context the course will begin with a brief introduction to the history of Asians and Asian Americans in the United States and sociological theories about incorporation and racial stratification. We will then examine the diversity of Asian American communities and families, highlighting ethnic, gender, and class variations. Other topics of focus include racialization and discrimination, education, ethnic enclaves, family and intergenerational relationships, identity, media, culture, and politics and social action. We will then apply theories and data to understanding two specific cases with particular relevance for Minnesota: Hmong immigrant experiences and transnational adoption. Throughout the course we will consider the ways in which society affects individuals, and how in turn, individuals affect society.
SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02028 - GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02028 - GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: soph, jr, or sr
SOC 3511 - World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3511H - Honors: World Population Problems (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02141 - Soc 3511/Soc 3511H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class is an introduction to the contemporary issues that accompany such dramatic population change, including fertility change, disease experiences, migration as opportunity and challenge and human-environment conflict. Further, we will examine the roles of global organizations, national governments, and culture in shaping and reshaping populations. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: [SOC 1001] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5511 - World Population Problems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02021 - PA 5301/Soc 5511
Typically offered: Every Fall
Population growth, natural resources, fertility/mortality in less developed nations, population dynamics/forecasts, policies to reduce fertility. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F, credit will not be granted if credit has been received for PA 5301
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3671 - Contemporary Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality in China
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02423 - GloS 3911/SOC 3671
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of cultures, social networks, and socioeconomic inequalities in post-1980 China. In addition to lectures, the instructor will show video clips about various backgrounds of China and group discussions will be organized to exchange opinions about issues of common interest. Students will gain a basic understanding of how Chinese society operates today. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3911 - Contemporary Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality in China
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02423
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of cultures, social networks, and socioeconomic inequalities in post-1980 China. In addition to lectures, the instructor will show video clips about various backgrounds of China and group discussions will be organized to exchange opinions about issues of common interest. Students will gain a basic understanding of how Chinese society operates today. rrereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph; SOC 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from a historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph
SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092 - Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092 - Soc 4101W/Soc 4101V/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4102 - Criminology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00885 - Soc 4102/Soc 4102H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class seeks to develop an understanding of patterns of crime and punishment in the United States (including American particularities in international comparison), their social, political, economic, cultural, and institutional conditions, and how these patterns relate to broader sociological themes. We will examine a cross-section of most outstanding recent and some (by now) classical criminological and sociological books and a few articles that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. prereq: [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4102H - Honors: Criminology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00885 - Soc 4102/Soc 4102H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This class seeks to develop an understanding of patterns of crime and punishment in the United States (including American particularities in international comparison), their social, political, economic, cultural, and institutional conditions, and how these patterns relate to broader sociological themes. We will examine a cross-section of most outstanding recent and some (by now) classical criminological and sociological books and a few articles that have attracted much attention among scholars and/or the broader public. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: Honors student, [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended, Sociology and Global Studies majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on an LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates to themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended, Sociology and Global Studies majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended
GLOS 4104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended, Sociology and Global Studies majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on an LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates to themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: At least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended
GLOS 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01871 - GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC or GLOS course recommended
SOC 4135 - Sociology of White-Collar Crime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02299 - Soc 4135/Soc 4135H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course deals with diverse types of white-collar crime (high status, occupational, organizational crimes), their causation, the damage they cause, and their control. We will read some of the outstanding literature on these issues and explore well-known cases in depth. There will be lectures and discussion in the classroom. We will explore what white-collar crime teaches us about the nature and explanation of crime and about the nature of criminal justice and other government social control. prereq: [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent]; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4135H - Honors: Sociology of White-Collar Crime
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02299 - Soc 4135/Soc 4135H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course deals with diverse types of white-collar crime (high status, occupational, organizational crimes), their causation, the damage they cause, and their control. We will read some of the outstanding literature on these issues and explore well-known cases in depth. There will be lectures and discussion in the classroom. We will explore what white-collar crime teaches us about the nature and explanation of crime and about the nature of criminal justice and other government social control. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: Honors, [SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent]
SOC 4141 - Juvenile Delinquency
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02038 - Soc 4141/Soc 4141H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers an overview of social theory and research on youth crime and delinquency. We start by critically examining the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next, we study the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing delinquency and punishment among groups such as gang members. We then trace youth experiences in the juvenile justice system, from policing, to juvenile court, to probation, and institutionalization. Throughout, we analyze the success or failure of key programs implemented in attempts to prevent or reduce delinquency. prereq: [SOC 3101 or 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4141H - Honors: Juvenile Delinquency
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02038 - Soc 4141/Soc 4141H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course offers an overview of social theory and research on youth crime and delinquency. We start by critically examining the social facts surrounding the measurement, extent, and distribution of delinquency. Next, we study the principal sociological explanations of delinquent behavior. These theories provide conceptual tools for analyzing delinquency and punishment among groups such as gang members. We then trace youth experiences in the juvenile justice system, from policing, to juvenile court, to probation, and institutionalization. Throughout, we analyze the success or failure of key programs implemented in attempts to prevent or reduce delinquency. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power-point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: honors student, [SOC 3101 or 3102 or instr consent], Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4170 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights, Trafficking, and Business Regulation (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01339
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural values and practices in a globalized world. Role of international law. Immigration, terrorism, Americanization, and structure of international legal system. prereqs: 1001 or 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 4406 - Sociology of International Law: Trafficking, Human Rights, & Business Regulation (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01339 - GloS 4406/Soc 4170
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Cultural values and practices in a globalized world. Role of international law. Immigration, terrorism, Americanization, and structure of international legal system. prereq: SOC 1001 or SOC 3101 or SOC 3102 or instr consent
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846 - GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: 1001 or environmental course recommended, [soc majors/minors must register A-F]
GLOS 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01846
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines how natural/built environments influence human behavior/social organization. Focuses on microenvironments/their influence on individuals. Impact of macroenvironments on societal organization. Environmental movements. prereq: SOC 1001 or environmental course or instr consent
SOC 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, & Communities (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01524 - RelS 4309/Soc 4309/Soc 4309H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, the family, sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4309H - Honors: Religion in American Public Life - Culture, Politics, & Communities (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01524 - RelS 4309/Soc 4309/Soc 4309H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, family, sexuality. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
RELS 4309 - Religion in American Public Life: Culture, Politics, and Communities (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01524 - RelS 4309/Soc 4309/Soc 4309H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape public life. How religious groups engage in political action, foster understandings of democracy/styles of civic participation. Volunteering/service activities. Race, poverty, the family, sexuality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182 - GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Prerequisites: SOC 1001 recommended
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01182
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global debates over how nature is produced, consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended. Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South relations.
SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02325
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture.
SOC 4411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02142 - Soc 4411/Soc 4411H/Soc 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and, to a degree, length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Prereq: Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4411H - Honors: Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02142 - Soc 4411/Soc 4411H/Soc 5411
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and, to a degree, length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Honors students registering for Soc 4411H: Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. Prereq: Honors
SOC 5411 - Terrorist Networks & Counterterror Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02142 - Soc 4411/Soc 4411H/Soc 5411
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Theories/evidence about origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. Efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by use of law enforcement, security, and military forces. Terror involves using violent actions to achieve political, religious, or social goals. This course examines theories and evidence about the origins, development, and consequences of terrorist networks. It analyzes efforts to prevent, investigate, and punish terrorists by counterterror organizations, including law enforcement, security, and military forces. Graduate and honors students are expected to demonstrate greater depth of discussion, depth and to a degree length of writing assignments, presentations, and leadership of the students. Prereq: Sociology Major/Minors must register A-F
SOC 4451 - Sport, Culture & Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02094 - Soc 4451/Soc 4451H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport? how it is socially organized, who participates in what and why, what role (or roles) sport plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful and paradoxical institutions in the modern world. The course is intended for a wide range of undergraduates, though some familiarity with basic social scientific thinking and techniques will be helpful. prereq: SOC 1001 recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4451H - Honors: Sport, Culture & Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02094 - Soc 4451/Soc 4451H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course is intended to stimulate critical, sociological thinking about sport? How it is socially organized, who participates in what and why, what role (or roles) sport plays in society, and what sporting practices tell us about contemporary social life more generally. It begins from and is grounded in the notion that sport is one of the most powerful and paradoxical institutions in the modern world. The course is intended for a wide range of undergraduates, though some familiarity with basic social scientific thinking and techniques will be helpful. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a topic of interest. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. prereq: Honors; SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 4521 - Love, Sex, & Marriage
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02036
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sociological approaches to intimate human relationships. Love, romance, dating, mate selection. Sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, related public policy debates. Current U.S. practices in historical/cross-cultural context. prereq: [1001 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4521H - Honors: Love, Sex, & Marriage
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02036
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sociological approaches to intimate human relationships. Love, romance, dating, mate selection. Sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, related public policy debates. Current U.S. practices in historical/cross-cultural context. prereq: Honors Student, [1001 or instr consent], soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4551 - Sociology of Sexualities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02095 - Soc 4551/Soc 4551H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, age, and class. This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States. This course is intended to help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills. You will be asked to move beyond your own experience and perspectives to sociologically analyze and evaluate over-simplified explanations of past and contemporary issues as they appear in our course readings. prereq: Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4551H - Honors: Sociology of Sexualities (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02095 - Soc 4551/Soc 4551H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
In this course we will examine social theories and sociological research on the topic of sexuality. We will explore the concept of sexuality as it intersects with race, gender, age, and class. This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of sociological implications of sexuality in the United States. This course is intended to help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills. You will be asked to move beyond your own experience and perspectives to sociologically analyze and evaluate over-simplified explanations of past and contemporary issues as they appear in our course readings. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2 page maximum reflective paper. · Interview a current Sociology graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor. prereq: Honors
SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Faculty guided and self directed research experience at junior/senior level. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement. This Capstone Experience: Directed Research is to include but not limited to: bi-weekly meetings, literature review, multiple drafts and revisions, etc. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives, dept & instructor consent.
SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual research for the sociology major's Capstone requirement, conducted in conjunction with enrollment in an upper division sociology elective. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience, using the structure and foundation of the 6th Sociology elective, majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and the emphasis of the course. The final paper created for 4994W is in addition to the other 6th Sociology elective course requirements. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, and at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives; dept & instructor consent. Students are only authorized to register for Soc 4994W in conjunction with a 6th Sociology Elective.
SOC 4977V - Senior Honors Proseminar I (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis. Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty researchers. prereq: 3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
SOC 4978V - Senior Honors Proseminar II (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing the methodology of senior project, researching it, and writing the thesis. Students work individually or in small groups in consultation with seminar director and other faculty. Group discussion of individual projects. prereq: [4977V or instr consent], 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 9 additional upper div soc cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
SOC 3301W - Politics and Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Political sociology is concerned with the social bases of power and the social consequences of the organization of power, especially how power operates in relationship to various forms of inequality and different institutions. We will explore political socialization, electoral politics and voting, social movements, the media and framing, and politics of inequality, poverty, and welfare. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3311W - Hard Times & Bad Behavior: Homelessness & Marginality in the United States (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
As we read about hobos and sailors, opium users and saloon girls, and contemporary experiences on the streets, we trace themes about marginality in the US, such as rootlessness produced by labor market, the love-hate relationship between elites and marginal populations in popular culture, and the complex mixture of freedom and deprivation of people on the edge. prereq: 1001 recommended, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3411W - Organizations and Society (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces undergraduates to contemporary theories and debates about formal organizations in an international context, including such forms as large corporations, small businesses, public bureaucracies, nonprofits, voluntary associations, social movement organizations, terrorist networks and counterterror organizations. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3421W - Sociology of Work: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs, No Jobs? (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Work is central to individuals, economy, and society. This course introduces students to sociological perspectives and analyses of work. We will look at what makes a good job good, a bad job bad, and impacts of joblessness on society. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3451W - Cities & Social Change (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02096 - Soc 3451W/Soc 3451V
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
The core themes of this class will provide an essential toolkit for approaching broad questions about social justice, culture, work, housing and service provision on multiple levels and across the globe. This course will have units on economic development, inequality, the interaction between design and human action, inclusive and exclusive cultural formations, crime and cultures of fear, social control and surveillance. prereq: 1001 recommended, Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437 - AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
SOC 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02101 - GloS 3322W/Soc 3322W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Origins, dynamics, consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements/political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02101
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements. Challenges facing movement organizations. Relationship between movements and political institutions. Role of movements in bringing about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies. prereq: 1001 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. Emphasizes their daily practices and political, economic, and cultural effects around the world. Politics/business of development. Free market and trade. New transnational professional class. Social activism.
SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02303
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization. Emphasizes their daily practices and political, economic, and cultural effects around the world. Politics/business of development. Free market and trade. New transnational professional class. Social activism.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092 - Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02092 - Soc 4101W/Soc 4101V/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4966W - Capstone Experience: Seminar (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses - often based on community service learning; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this course sociology majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civic engagement. This class is the final step in the sociology undergraduate major. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, dept consent
SOC 4994W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (1 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Guided individual research for the sociology major's Capstone requirement, conducted in conjunction with enrollment in an upper division sociology elective. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience, using the structure and foundation of the 6th Sociology elective, majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and the emphasis of the course. The final paper created for 4994W is in addition to the other 6th Sociology elective course requirements. prereq: 1001/1011V, 3701, 3801, 3811, and at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives; dept & instructor consent. Students are only authorized to register for Soc 4994W in conjunction with a 6th Sociology Elective.
SOC 4977V - Senior Honors Proseminar I (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis. Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty researchers. prereq: 3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
SOC 4978V - Senior Honors Proseminar II (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Developing the methodology of senior project, researching it, and writing the thesis. Students work individually or in small groups in consultation with seminar director and other faculty. Group discussion of individual projects. prereq: [4977V or instr consent], 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 9 additional upper div soc cr, sr soc honors major, dept consent
SOC 4094W - Capstone Experience: Directed Research (4 cr.) (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02612 - Soc 4094W/Soc 4966W/Soc 4994W/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Faculty guided and self directed research experience at junior/senior level. This is designed to: a) provide students with an opportunity to reflect on what they have learned as a sociology major; b) use that knowledge to write a sociological analyses; and c) think about how the knowledge, skills, and insights of the sociological enterprise can be used and applied outside of the University. Through this one:one capstone experience majors will emphasize the relationship between a sociological perspective and critical thinking, effective communication, and meaningful civil engagement. This Capstone Experience: Directed Research is to include but not limited to: bi-weekly meetings, literature review, multiple drafts and revisions, etc. prereq: 1001, 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 12 cr upper div sociology electives, dept & instructor consent.
ABUS 3301 - Introduction to Quality Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/concepts of managing quality in business applications. Improving business processes with six sigma method. Implementing/leading process improvement. Baldrige Award, ISO 9000. prereq: Introductory statistics
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Demands on today's managers, with a focus on small to medium-sized organizations. Techniques/ideas beyond traditional studies. Applying management theory at all levels. Managing in a global workplace. Organizational planning and decision making. Organizing resources. Leading/motivating people. Controlling/evaluating organizational activities. This writing intensive designated course will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to this discipline because clear, accurate, and professional communication is essential to organization management. The ability to write effectively in terms of specified audiences ensures, in the professional world, successful communication between team members as well as the success of the projects, companies, and employees they represent. prereq: 45 semester credits recommended
ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects of communication essential for being persuasive/influential. Organizing/presenting ideas effectively, strategies for audience analysis, choosing communication methods, making appropriate use of informal influence methods, handling dissent. Processes for intercultural communication. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4041 - Dynamics of Leadership
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Successful leadership via flexible approach. Knowledge, skills, and abilities that leaders develop from eight leadership strategies: academic, bureaucratic, eclectic, economic, fellowship, military, political, social. Ways to lead diverse populations in a global environment. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4101 - Accounting and Finance for Managers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01315
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cost accounting concepts. Cost behavior. Management decision making using cost data. Time value of money. Cost of capital. Capital budgeting techniques. Financial statement analysis. Assignments draw on business/industry examples. prereq: Financial accounting, 45 cr
ABUS 4104 - Management and Human Resource Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Providing day-to-day leadership. Organizing work, motivating employees. Delegating, coordinating, and achieving results. Front line human resource practices, including selection, induction, and training of new employees, employee appraisal. Handling grievances/discipline. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4151 - Innovation for Leaders and Organizations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Innovation as cornerstone of knowledge economy. History of innovation process, importance to individuals/organizations. Strategies to foster innovation. Responsibilities in innovation skill-building/leadership. prereq: 45 cr
ABUS 4509 - New Product Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
How new consumer, industrial, and service products are planned/developed. Idea generation, concept/buyer testing, pricing, sales/profit strategies, product positioning, promotion, packaging/distribution. Marketing case histories. Student projects. prereq: [[4103 or 4701 or Mktg 3001], at least 45 cr] or instr consent
ABUS 4515 - Strategy and Management for a Sustainable Future
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sustainability in business. Relationship of sustainable environments to organizations. Economic/strategic enterprise value. Relationship of sustainable business practices to marketplace trends/realities. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02359 - ABUS 4571/ABUS 4571W/HSM 4571
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofits and health care entities will continue to be challenged by limited resources and increased needs in communities they serve. This reality also results in an increased need for these groups to find additional financial support. This course will provide an understanding of ways to find, research, and write proposals for grants offered by government and private entities. As a writing intensive course, it will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to the field because the only way for a nonprofit to be awarded a grant is by submitting a written proposal. The strength of the proposal has a significant impact on the money that an organization will receive. Students will become familiar with various sections of the proposal by drafting, editing, and seeking feedback, and by revising a needs assessment, goal statement, budget justification, and statement of organizational purpose. By learning how to write well in the field, students will increase their chances of being employed by a nonprofit and securing funding for their organization.
ACCT 2050 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00458 - Acct 2050/ApEc 1251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to financial accounting for U.S. organizations. Reading financial statements. prereq: Soph
ACCT 3001 - Introduction to Management Accounting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Costing techniques, including activity-based costing. Applying costing methods to determine costs of products, services, and production processes. Use of costs in operating/strategic decisions. prereq: 2050
AMIN 4511 - American Indian Political Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Sources, nature, consequences of social/economic development/change in Indian communities. Precontact Indian communities. Effect of European contact. Social movements into 20th century, including phenomenon of urban Indian communities. prereq: 1001
AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Impact of global economy on workplaces/workers in the United states, Mexico, and Caribbean countries. Influence on consumption. Consequences for American culture/character. Effects on U.S./Mexican factory work, service sector, temporary working arrangements, offshore production jobs in Dominican Republic, and professional/managerial positions.
ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems of production/distribution, especially in nonindustrial societies. Comparison, history, critique of major theories. Cross-cultural anthropological approach to material life that subsumes market/nonmarket processes.
ANTH 4121 - Business Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01996
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological/ethnographic understandings/research techniques.
APEC 3002 - Applied Microeconomics: Managerial Economics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Microeconomic theory, its application to managerial problems. Introduction to regression analysis, demand analysis, demand function estimation, forecasting, cost function estimation, resource allocation decisions, linear programming, market structure, pricing policy, risk analysis, investment analysis. prereq - ApEc 3001 or Econ 3101 AND SCO 2550 or Stat 3011
APEC 3451 - Food and Agricultural Sales
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Professional selling of agricultural and food products. Students build/refine sales abilities, identify/qualify prospects, deliver sales presentations, close the sale. Principles of market research. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
APEC 3821 - Retail Center Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Management of garden centers, grocery stores, and other retail units selling perishable agricultural products. prereq: [1101 or Econ 1101], [1251 or Acct 2050]
APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02156 - ApEc 3841/ApEc 5841
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the cooperative and mutual form of business organization. Extensive applications to agricultural, food, and consumer cooperatives are used. The class is an active-student learning process with a distance learning component. prereq: ApEc 1101 or 1101H or Econ 1101 or 1101H
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of tourism industry; economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts of tourism development; influence of government policies and organizations; models and tools needed for successful development; consequences of development activities and ways to involve stakeholders in decisions. prereq: 1101, 1102 or Econ 1101, 1102
BLAW 3058 - The Law of Contracts and Agency
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Origin of law, its place in and effect on society; history and development of law; system of courts; legal procedure. Law of contracts as the basic law affecting business transaction. Laws affecting the sale of goods and contracts and the law of agency.
COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cooperative thinking in task-oriented groups. Planning, preparing for, and participating in small groups in private and public contexts.
COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of and factors influencing intercultural communication. Development of effective intercultural communication skills. prereq: Planning an intercultural experience
FINA 3001 - Finance Fundamentals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00196
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Financial management principles. Money/capital markets, risk/return/valuation triad, capital budgeting. Capital structure, financial leverage. Cost of capital, financial performance measures, dividend policy, working capital management, international financial management/derivatives. prereq: ACCT 2050, SCO 2550 or equivalent statistics course
FNRM 4232W - Managing Recreational Lands (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00377 - FNRM 4232W/FNRM 5232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Most of us participate in some form of outdoor recreation: hiking, hunting, riding all-terrain vehicles, or simply enjoying nature. Managing for outdoor recreation on public lands is mandated by federal law and an integral part of natural resource management. In this class, we'll learn why and how agencies manage recreation at the federal level, the management frameworks that guide this work, and apply management principles to an actual federal property in Minnesota. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of outdoor recreation management. Specific objectives are to: 1)compare and contrast federal recreation land management policies & organizations, 2)develop and demonstrate an understanding of conceptual frameworks for recreation resource and visitor use management, 3)evaluate visitor caused impacts to resources and to visitor experiences, 4)understand and apply management tools designed to reduce recreation- related impacts and conflicts, and 5)demonstrate an understanding of course material through exams & applied assignments.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
INS 4100 - Corporate Risk Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory applied to corporate risk management and insurance practices. Identification, measurement, and treatment of an organization.s financial risks integrated with its property, liability, workers compensation, and human resource risks. Selection and application of risk control and risk financing tools: risk retention, reduction and transfer, including insurance.
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00297 - Lead 3961//OLPD 3302W/PA 3961
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00301 - Lead 4961W/OLPD 4303W/PA 4961W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this final, writing intensive capstone course, students pull together the threads of leadership theory and practice worked with over the course of the Leadership Minor. In addition, students gain experience working with diverse leaders from around the world, mapping political contexts, and planning their own global leadership path within their specific field.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects/characteristics of organizations, their members. Why people/groups feel/behave as they do. Processes/methods that improve behavior/attitudes/effectiveness of members. Member/manager skills. Guest speakers, group presentations, films.
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02347
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
MKTG 3001 - Principles of Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to terms, concepts, and skills for analyzing marketing problems. Factors outside the organization affecting its product, pricing, promotion, and distribution decisions. Cases from actual organizations. prereq: ECON 1101
OLPD 3318 - Introduction to Project Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Project management for business and industry. Project lifecycles, deliverables, and processes as they are commonly used in the workplace.
OLPD 3380 - Developing Intercultural Competence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Past/current research on intercultural leadership. Students share their understanding/experiences within intercultural framework.
OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human resource development theories, principles, concepts, and practices.
OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes to carry out theoretically sound training/development practices, within the context of systemic relationship with host organization or system.
OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization development theories, principles, concepts, and practices. How development is used to direct change in an organization.
OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01792
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity in the workplace. Issues of recruiting and selection, management, and performance.
OLPD 4401 - E-Marketing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic understanding and personal experience with how e-marketing can be used as part of an overall marketing and promotion plan.
OLPD 4420 - Practicum in Nonprofit Organizations
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students the opportunity to develop and implement critical aspects of a nonprofit organization from board selection, training, fundraising, event marketing and management, and conducting outreach programs. Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of job functions including: sales, marketing, e-marketing, operations, management, accounting, administration, purchasing, procurement, fundraising, pre-event planning, and post-event evaluation.
OLPD 4426 - Strategic Customer Relationship Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of customer relationship management, brand identity, and integrated marketing communications. Comprehensive framework for how organizations interact with their various publics to create goodwill/loyalty.
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
PA 4190 - Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics in public/nonprofit leadership/management.
POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Corporations are among the most powerful actors in the global political economy. They employ millions of people, produce a variety of goods, and have massive effects on the ecological and social environments in which they do business. How do ordinary people act in order to hold corporations accountable for the effects that their activities have on communities and individuals? This course focuses on two ways that people have mobilized to counter corporate power--as citizens and as consumers. When people mobilize as citizens, they put pressure on corporations through the political system--e.g. through mass protests, lobbying politicians, and pursuing claims through the courts. When people mobilize as consumers, they use the power of their purchasing decisions to encourage corporations to change their behavior. We will explore these different modes of action through an examination of corporate social responsibility/sweatshops, the industrial food system in the US, and the privatization of life (e.g. genes), water, and war.
SCO 3001 - Supply Chain and Operations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing the operations function within manufacturing and service organizations, and across the supply chains of these organizations. The supply chain is the set of organizations and the work that they complete to collectively create customer-valued goods and services. Course emphasizes decision making in work processes, including decision related to managing processes, quality, capacity, inventory, and supply chain activities. Quantitative and qualitative methods are used for improving management of operations.
SCO 3045 - Sourcing and Supply Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategic/operational role of purchasing/supply. Supply management. Supplier-selection criteria such as quantity, quality, cost/price considerations. Buyer-supplier relationships. prereq: 3001
UC 3201 - Web Designer Introduction
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Web design process: plan, design, launch, and publish using industry standard Web design software. Adobe Photoshop and Dreamweaver are used to build and publish a personal Web site using HTML5 and CSS. Design principles, business practices, site analysis, Bootstrap, jQuery and Animate are also covered. Lectures, exercises, lab. No previous experience necessary.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/3101H/3105/ApEc 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consumer/producer decisions. Theory of supply/demand. Markets, pricing, investment, effect regulation, market failures. prereq: [[1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271]] or instr consent; intended for undergrads in [Ag/Food Bus Mgmt, Appl Econ]
ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00025 - Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Behavior of households, firms, and industries under competitive/monopolistic conditions. Factors influencing production, price, and other decisions. Applications of theory. Economic efficiency. Distribution of well-being. prereq: [[1101, 1102] or equiv], [MATH 1271 or equiv]
APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00026 - Econ 3102/ApEc 3006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public sector and market economics. Public goods, externalities, and other allocation issues. Government and stabilization of national economy. Overview of new classical/Keynesian models. Principles of taxation. Individual income tax. Sales, business, and property taxes. prereq: [[1102 or Econ 1102], [3001 or Econ 3101]] or instr consent
ECON 3102 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00026 - Econ 3102/ApEc 3006
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Determinants of national income, employment, and price level; effects of monetary and fiscal policies; emphasis on a general equilibrium approach. Applications of the theory, especially to current macroeconomic policy issues. Students cannot take this course if they have taken ApEc 3006, however, ApEc 3006 does not contain all material in Econ 3102. Econ majors are encouraged to take ECON 3102 instead of ApEc 3006 prereq: 3101 or equiv
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01146 - Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
HRIR 3021 - Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00064 - HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/HRIR 3201
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Role of human resource management in organizations. Labor markets, recruitment, selection, training, compensation, labor relations, performance management. Evolution of work. Discrimination in employment. Work performance, its reward. Effects of changing technology. prereq: ECON 1101, ECON 1102, PSY 1001
HRIR 3021H - Honors: Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00064 - HRIR 3021/HRIR 3021H/IBUS 3021
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Role of human resource management in organizations. Labor markets, recruitment, selection, training, compensation, labor relations, performance management. Evolution of work. Discrimination in employment. Work performance, its reward. Effects of changing technology. prereq: ECON 1101, ECON 1102, PSY 1001
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Technical and professional writing communicates complex information to solve problems or complete tasks. It requires not only knowledge of workplace genres, but also a skill of composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing workplace genres: memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Written and oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing and practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.
ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02359 - ABUS 4571/ABUS 4571W/HSM 4571
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofits and health care entities will continue to be challenged by limited resources and increased needs in communities they serve. This reality also results in an increased need for these groups to find additional financial support. This course will provide an understanding of ways to find, research, and write proposals for grants offered by government and private entities. As a writing intensive course, it will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to the field because the only way for a nonprofit to be awarded a grant is by submitting a written proposal. The strength of the proposal has a significant impact on the money that an organization will receive. Students will become familiar with various sections of the proposal by drafting, editing, and seeking feedback, and by revising a needs assessment, goal statement, budget justification, and statement of organizational purpose. By learning how to write well in the field, students will increase their chances of being employed by a nonprofit and securing funding for their organization.
ADDS 5081 - Multicultural Foundations of Behavioral Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What is culture? How might culture, cultural practices, and history be significant in the use/abuse of substances? How is culture relevant to the attitudes/practices in the prevention/treatment of substance use/abuse? Multicultural counseling and cultural competence in addiction counseling. People as individuals. Clinician's own cultural worldview/ other cultural worldviews.
ANTH 3035 - Anthropologies of Death (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anthropological perspectives on death. Diverse understandings of afterlife, cultural variations in death ritual, secularization of death in modern era, management of death in medicine, cultural shifts/conflicts in what constitutes good or natural death.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
CSPH 5115 - Cultural Awareness, Knowledge and Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How knowledge can become resource for individual, family, community health. Interactive glimpse of wisdom of cultural communities. Develop capacity to see culture within professional education/practice. Cultural constructs underpinning medical system, role of culture in interaction between practitioner/patient, role of reconnection to cultural heritage in healing. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student or instr consent
CSPH 5121 - Whole Systems Healing: Health and the Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Selected interfaces between human health and the environment. Using complexity theory as a theoretical framework, students use phenomenological methodologies to analyze and describe the interrelated dynamics of human and natural systems. Case studies. Develop strategies to optimize the healthy functioning of human/environmental systems. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
CSPH 5641 - Animals in Health Care: The Healing Dimensions of Human/Animal Relationships
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Central elements of animal assisted therapy in multiple health care settings. History, principles, and evidence-based guidelines. Community-based interventions, in-class demonstrations, field trips. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural aspects of regional/cultural diversity in food preferences and food behavior, food habits, demographics, lifestyles, food consumption, and expenditures. Effect of socioeconomic status, religious beliefs, age, and cultural meaning of foods on food choices.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3002W - Health Care in History II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
HMED 3055 - Women, Health, and History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests.
JOUR 5541 - Mass Communication and Public Health
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00291 - Jour 5541/PubH 6074
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an overview of theory and research that lies at the intersection of mass communication and public health. We examine the potential for media exposure to influence public health outcomes, both as a product of people's everyday interactions with media and the strategic use of media messages to accomplish public health goals. To this end, we will explore large-scale public health campaigns in the context of tobacco, obesity, and cancer screening. We also will explore news media coverage of controversial health issues, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and health information in entertainment media, such as smoking in movies. This course seeks to understand whether media messages have had intended and/or unintended effects on public attitudes and behavior. Although our focus is on mass media, interpersonal, medical, and digital media sources will be considered as well.
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of health/wellness. Physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, and financial health. Influence of societal changes on general health/wellness of diverse populations.
OLPD 3601 - Introduction to Human Resource Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human resource development theories, principles, concepts, and practices.
OLPD 3620 - Introduction to Training and Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes to carry out theoretically sound training/development practices, within the context of systemic relationship with host organization or system.
OLPD 3640 - Introduction to Organization Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization development theories, principles, concepts, and practices. How development is used to direct change in an organization.
OLPD 3828 - Diversity in the Workplace
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01792
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Diversity in the workplace. Issues of recruiting and selection, management, and performance.
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: Jr or sr
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
PHAR 4200W - Drugs and the U.S. Healthcare System (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01248
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Being an empowered patient is important when discussing ethics-driven issues within the U.S. healthcare system. This course will expose students to current controversial issues surrounding medications and national healthcare, and help students examine their own role as a participant in this system. Students will learn to draw comparisons between medication use systems around the world and analyze other controversies related to access, choice and quality of healthcare. During this course, students will understand how their choices, ethics and behavior affect societal decisions surrounding the availability of medications in the US and what their rights are as a citizen-participant during the healthcare debate. This is a completely online course with weekly due dates. Course information is sent to the University email addresses of registered students shortly before, and/or on, the first day of classes each Fall and Spring term. For more information, contact phar4200@umn.edu or 612-624-7976.
PSY 3206 - Introduction to Health Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02593 - Madr 3206/Psy 3206
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theories/research in health psychology. Bi-directional relationships between psychological factors and physical health. Stress/coping, adjustment to chronic illness. Psychological factors in etiology/course of disease. Health behavior change. prereq: 1001
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How diseases are distributed among us. Epidemiology terminology, methods, critical thinking, and analysis. Intended for students interested in a health science career or in a career that may need to evaluate epidemiologic evidence such as health journalism or public policy or litigation. prereq: Undergrad statistics course is recommended
PUBH 3601 - Maternal and Child Health Global Public Health Issues
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to global health. Health of mothers, infants, children, adolescents. History of MCH, global burden of disease/premature death. Effect of globalization. Programmatic/policy efforts to address health needs of MCH populations. prereq: Public Health minor requirements or instr consent, [3202 or 3001 or 3004], [3350 or 3106]
PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3801/PubH 3801
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economics of health care markets. Problems faced by consumers/health care services. Builds on principles of supply/demand for health, health care/insurance, and role of government. Theoretical/empirical models/applications. prereq: Course on microeconomics, course on basic statistics
SPAN 3404 - Medical Spanish and Community Health Service
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Creating materials for effective communication with and education of Spanish-speaking patients. Students engage in service learning with community health care partners that serve the Chicano/Latino population. prereq: 3015 with grade of at least B- or [1044, high pass on at least three sections of LPE]
SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on violence in intimate domestic relationships examined through multiple lenses. Overview of interventions in Minnesota, United States, and other societies.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Technical and professional writing communicates complex information to solve problems or complete tasks. It requires not only knowledge of workplace genres, but also a skill of composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing workplace genres: memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Written and oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing and practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.
AFRO 3426 - African Americans, Social Policy, and the Welfare State
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Period between New Deal (1930s) and present. History/impact of federal policy (presidential, congressional, judicial) and race on African Americans. Politics of allocation of insurance versus relief in Social Security Act of 1935. Race and expansion of social benefits after World War II. School desegregation. Kennedy¿s civil rights policy, LBJ¿s War on Poverty. Affirmative Action. Warren court. Busing. Conservative retreat from welfare state under Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
APEC 3007 - Applied Macroeconomics: Policy, Trade, and Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Indicators of economic development, growth in trade, and welfare of developing countries. Globalization. Drivers of growth, productivity, technical change, and research. Comparative advantage. Distribution consequences of trade. Trade policy instruments/institutions. prereq: [1101 or ECON 1101], [1101H or ECON 1101H], [1102 or ECON 1102], [1102H or ECON 1102H]; 3001, 3006 recommended
APEC 3841 - Agricultural Cooperatives and Mutuals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02156 - ApEc 3841/ApEc 5841
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the cooperative and mutual form of business organization. Extensive applications to agricultural, food, and consumer cooperatives are used. The class is an active-student learning process with a distance learning component. prereq: ApEc 1101 or 1101H or Econ 1101 or 1101H
APEC 4311 - Tourism Development: Principles, Processes, Policies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Evolution of tourism industry; economic, environmental, and sociocultural impacts of tourism development; influence of government policies and organizations; models and tools needed for successful development; consequences of development activities and ways to involve stakeholders in decisions. prereq: 1101, 1102 or Econ 1101, 1102
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ENR 3241W/5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
GEOG 3371W - Cities, Citizens, and Communities (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to cities and suburbs as unique crossroads of cultural, social, and political processes. Competing/conflicting visions of city life, cultural diversity, and justice. Focuses on the American city.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: [3145, 3144] or #
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Issues, procedures, advocacy strategies regarding promotion/protection of international human rights. Students analyze recent case studies of human rights violations in light of evolving laws, enforcement mechanisms. prereq: [3145, 3144] or instr consent
GWSS 3590 - Topics: Social Change, Activism, Law, and Policy Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
HECU 3572 - Inequality in America: Political Sociology of Building Power, Change, and Equity (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Roots and strategies for addressing urban inequality and poverty. Interdisciplinary field study, seminar work, internship. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3571, 3573, dept consent
ID 3208 - Internship Reflection: Making Meaning of Your Experience
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Allows students to examine, reflect on, and construct meaning from their internship experience through self assessment of personal and career needs and goals, examination of what it means to be a "professional" and operate within professional environments, evaluation of performance and accomplishments, articulation of knowledge and skills via effective resume writing. prereq: dept consent
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00297 - Lead 3961//OLPD 3302W/PA 3961
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00301 - Lead 4961W/OLPD 4303W/PA 4961W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this final, writing intensive capstone course, students pull together the threads of leadership theory and practice worked with over the course of the Leadership Minor. In addition, students gain experience working with diverse leaders from around the world, mapping political contexts, and planning their own global leadership path within their specific field.
OLPD 3336 - Religion, Ethics, and Educational Policy (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American religious pluralism in relationship to ethics and educational policy. History of religious belief/expression in K-12 and higher education. Students interact with community leaders. Legal issues, religion/science, sexuality, religious alternatives, policy topics.
OLPD 3380 - Developing Intercultural Competence
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Past/current research on intercultural leadership. Students share their understanding/experiences within intercultural framework.
PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
PA 4190 - Topics in Public and Nonprofit Leadership and Management
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics in public/nonprofit leadership/management.
PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
A study of the relationship among law, morality, and our role as critizens.
POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Democracy based on individual rights. Pluralism. Civic republicanism. Community activism. Dilemmas of democratic government/citizenship in race, class, gender-stratified society. prereq: Suggested prerequisite 1201
POL 3308 - Congressional Politics and Institutions (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00860 - Pol 4308/5308
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Origin/development of U.S. congressional institutions, parties, committees, leaders, lobbying/elections, and relations between Congress/executive branch. Relationship of campaigning/governing, nature of representation, biases of institutional arrangements.
POL 3309 - Justice in America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01344 - Pol 3309/Pol 4309/Pol 5309
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
American judiciary. Selection of judges. How/why these individuals/institutions behave as they do. What influences judicial decisions. What impact decisions have. Why people comply with them. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or instr consent
POL 3319 - Education and the American Dream (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to politics and education in the United States. Equality of educational opportunity, educating democratic citizens, school finance, role of political institutions in making educational policy. Efforts to reform/remake American education, including charter schools and private school vouchers.
POL 3321 - Issues in American Public Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Politics of policy process. Agenda formation, formulation, adoption, implementation, evaluation. Attention to selected policy areas.
POL 3325 - U.S. Campaigns and Elections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Presidential/congressional campaigns/elections in the United States. How political scientists study electoral politics. Theoretical generalizations about candidates, voters, parties, and the media. Ways electoral context and "rules of the game" matter.
POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Causes/consequences of economic inequality in the USA and Europe. America and European countries in contrast to one another. What differences there are and whether they matter.
POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How can the vast disparities of wealth between countries be explained? Why have some countries in the post-colonial world, in particular, those of East Asia, experienced stunning economic growth, while those in others parts have not? We will explore inequality among nations through an engagement with competing explanations from multiple disciplines. Do free markets, the legacies of colonialism, state power, culture, or geography offer the most persuasive account of current patterns of global inequality? The course also examines what we mean by "development" and exposes students to cutting-edge debates in contemporary development studies. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of the causes of and possible solutions to global inequality.
POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Corporations are among the most powerful actors in the global political economy. They employ millions of people, produce a variety of goods, and have massive effects on the ecological and social environments in which they do business. How do ordinary people act in order to hold corporations accountable for the effects that their activities have on communities and individuals? This course focuses on two ways that people have mobilized to counter corporate power--as citizens and as consumers. When people mobilize as citizens, they put pressure on corporations through the political system--e.g. through mass protests, lobbying politicians, and pursuing claims through the courts. When people mobilize as consumers, they use the power of their purchasing decisions to encourage corporations to change their behavior. We will explore these different modes of action through an examination of corporate social responsibility/sweatshops, the industrial food system in the US, and the privatization of life (e.g. genes), water, and war.
POL 3739 - Politics of Race, Class, and Ethnicity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How race/ethnicity/class interact in political process. Political conflict through comparative analysis of United States, South Africa, Brazil.
POL 3766 - Political Psychology of Mass Behavior (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How political behavior of citizens and political elites is shaped by psychological factors, including personality, attitudes, values, emotions, and cognitive sophistication. Political activism/apathy, leadership charisma, mass media, group identifications, political culture.
POL 3767 - Political Psychology of Elite Behavior (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Intersections of politics, personality, and social psychology. Focuses on political leaders and elites. Usefulness of psychological theories for conducting political analysis. Role of individual, of group processes, of political/social cognition, and of context in political decision-making.
POL 3769 - Public Opinion and Voting Behavior (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4767/5767
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major factors influencing electoral decisions/political attitude formation/change.
POL 4495 - Politics of Family, Sex, and Children (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Political fights over volatile issues of family, sex, and children. Diversity of family life in the United States as a source of disharmony and inequality. Same-sex couples, interracial families, polygamous communities, reproductive equality for people with disabilities, targeting of immigrant children, teen sex & pregnancy, working mothers, ⿿childfree⿝ advocates. Citizen efforts aimed at reconciling communities with harshly clashing beliefs.
POL 4501W - The Supreme Court and Constitutional Interpretation (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/analytical approaches to Court's landmark decisions. Theory/techniques of judicial review. Relates Court's authority to wider political/social context of American government.
POL 4771 - Race and Politics in America: Making Sense of Racial Attitudes in the United States (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Race continues to be one of the defining fault lines in American politics. Most obviously, the existence of racial inequality has enormous consequences for any given individual's social and economic standing. However, it also has had an enormous impact on the pattern of attitudes and beliefs which have served as the backdrop for many of society's most pressing political debates and conflicts. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to how political scientists have studied racial attitudes and the larger problem of inter-ethnic conflict in American society. We will begin with a look at the historical circumstances which have given rise to the major research questions in the area. From there, we'll look at the major research perspectives in the area, and see how well they actually explain public opinion on matters of race. In doing so, we'll also get a look at some of the major controversies in this area of study, particularly the issues of whether the "old-fashioned racism" of the pre-civil-rights era has been replaced by new forms of racism; and the degree to which debates over policy matters with no apparent link to race - such as crime and social welfare - may actually have a lot to do with racial attitudes. Finally, we will conclude by taking an informed look at racial attitudes in recent American history, focusing on how racial attitudes and their political consequences of have changed - and not changed - over the course of the Obama presidency and the tumultuous 2016 election.
POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advocacy organizations/social movements as agents of democratic representation/political change in American politics/policy-making. Organizations/movements that represent racial/ethnic minorities, women, religious conservatives, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people, low-income people.
PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3801/PubH 3801
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economics of health care markets. Problems faced by consumers/health care services. Builds on principles of supply/demand for health, health care/insurance, and role of government. Theoretical/empirical models/applications. prereq: Course on microeconomics, course on basic statistics
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3152W - Writing on Issues of Science and Technology (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Read books/articles, discuss, and write about major issues in science/technology. Possible topics: DNA and human genome. Animal/human interaction. Global warming; Alternative energies; Animal/human cloning and stem-cell research. Vaccines from Smallpox to AIDS. Why civilizations collapse.
WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language as creating rather than simply describing "reality." Reading and writing as arenas of active human struggle over social group power. Techniques for analyzing, interpreting, and participating in the conversation of critical literacies.
WRIT 3315 - Writing on Issues of Land and the Environment (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Land in America as idea and as actual space. History of cultural values and the meanings land holds for us. Contrasting views of land, especially those of certain Native American peoples. Rise of the conservation movement and the urbanization of U.S. space.
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/3101H/3105/ApEc 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consumer/producer decisions. Theory of supply/demand. Markets, pricing, investment, effect regulation, market failures. prereq: [[1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271]] or instr consent; intended for undergrads in [Ag/Food Bus Mgmt, Appl Econ]
ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00025 - Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Behavior of households, firms, and industries under competitive/monopolistic conditions. Factors influencing production, price, and other decisions. Applications of theory. Economic efficiency. Distribution of well-being. prereq: [[1101, 1102] or equiv], [MATH 1271 or equiv]
APEC 3006 - Applied Macroeconomics: Government and the Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00026 - Econ 3102/ApEc 3006
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Public sector and market economics. Public goods, externalities, and other allocation issues. Government and stabilization of national economy. Overview of new classical/Keynesian models. Principles of taxation. Individual income tax. Sales, business, and property taxes. prereq: [[1102 or Econ 1102], [3001 or Econ 3101]] or instr consent
ECON 3102 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00026 - Econ 3102/ApEc 3006
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Determinants of national income, employment, and price level; effects of monetary and fiscal policies; emphasis on a general equilibrium approach. Applications of the theory, especially to current macroeconomic policy issues. Students cannot take this course if they have taken ApEc 3006, however, ApEc 3006 does not contain all material in Econ 3102. Econ majors are encouraged to take ECON 3102 instead of ApEc 3006 prereq: 3101 or equiv
AMIN 3501 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states, federal government.
POL 3701 - American Indian Tribal Governments and Politics (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 3501/Pol 3701
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
History, development, structure, politics of American Indian Governments. North American indigenous societies from pre-colonial times to present. Evolution of aboriginal governments confronted/affected by colonizing forces of European/Euro-American states. Bearing of dual citizenship on nature/powers of tribal governments in relation to states and federal government.
AMIN 4501 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01844 - AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century. prereq: 1001
POL 4507 - Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01844 - AmIn 4501/Pol 4507
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
History of American Indian law and the post-contact effects of colonial and U.S. law on American Indians through the 20th century.
AMIN 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00285 - Pol 4525/AmIn 4525
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature related to policies.
POL 4525W - Federal Indian Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 4525/AmIn 4525
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Formulation, implementation, evolution, comparison of Indian policy from pre-colonial times to self-governance of new millennium. Theoretical approaches to federal Indian policy. Major federal Indian policies. Views/attitudes of policy-makers, reactions of indigenous nations to policies. Effect of bodies of literature on policies.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in the United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, and transportation.
BSE 3361W - Geography and Public Policy (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01979
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nature/effects of federal policy in United States. How documents produced as policy are crafted/implemented. Policies relating to food/agriculture, forestry, wildlife, transportation.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3303 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts for analyzing relations between capitalist development and environment in Third World. Historical geography of capitalist development. Case studies. Likelihood of social/environmental sustainability. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064 - Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
HIST 3804 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01685 - Hist 3804/RelS 3623
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
RELS 3623 - Religion and the American Culture Wars (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01685
Typically offered: Every Fall
Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, James Madison, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and John Adams on religion, faith, and religion in politics. Deism. Enlightenment-era discussions about rational religion. Rise of evangelicalism. Separation of church/state, framers' original intent for first amendment. Religious Right.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3322W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
POL 3785 - Persuasion and Political Propaganda
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01925 - Pol 3785/Pol 3785H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to persuasion and political propaganda. Persuasion theories relevant to designing effective political propaganda. Applying theories to analyze WWI/WWII propaganda posters, films, and political campaign commercials. Use of fiction as propaganda tool.
POL 3785H - Persuasion and Political Propaganda
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01925
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Persuasion theories relevant to designing effective political propaganda. Applying theories to analyze WWI/WWII propaganda posters, films, and political campaign commercials. Use of fiction as propaganda tool.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Technical and professional writing communicates complex information to solve problems or complete tasks. It requires not only knowledge of workplace genres, but also a skill of composing such genres. This course allows students to practice rhetorically analyzing writing situations and composing workplace genres: memos, proposals, instructions, research reports, and presentations.
WRIT 3562V - Honors: Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Written and oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing and practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. Honors section includes discussion on scholarly readings in technical and professional writing as well as a final project that must be addressed to a real-world audience.
GEOG 3511 - Principles of Cartography
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02579 - Geog 3511/Geog 5511
Typically offered: Every Spring
History and development of US academic cartography, coordinate systems and map projections, data classification and map generalization, methods of thematic symbolization, and cartographic design. A series of computer-based lab exercises will apply conceptual lecture material to the creation of thematic maps. prereq: 3 cr in geog or instr consent
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of geographical quantitative methods with a focus on spatial analysis. Emphasis placed on the analysis of geographical data for spatial problem solving in both the human and physical areas of the discipline.
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02490
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GEOG 5563 - Advanced Geographic Information Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced study of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include spatial data models, topology, data encoding, data quality, database management, spatial analysis tools and visualization techniques. Hands-on experience using an advanced vector GIS package. prereq: B or better in 3561 or 5561 or instr consent
HIST 5970 - Advanced Research in Quantitative History
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students will carry out publishable-quality research on a quantitative historical topic.
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/2373/2573
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2263 - Multivariable Calculus
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/2373/2573H/3251
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Derivative as linear map. Differential/integral calculus of functions of several variables, including change of coordinates using Jacobians. Line/surface integrals. Gauss, Green, Stokes Theorems. prereq: [1272 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 3283W - Sequences, Series, and Foundations: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2283/3283W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to reasoning used in advanced mathematics courses. Logic, mathematical induction, real number system, general/monotone/recursively defined sequences, convergence of infinite series/sequences, Taylor's series, power series with applications to differential equations, Newton's method. Writing-intensive component. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2243 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2373 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2374] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 4242 - Applied Linear Algebra
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01212 - Math 4242/Math 4457
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues, canonical forms, quadratic forms, applications. prereq: 2243 or 2373 or 2573
MATH 5651 - Basic Theory of Probability and Statistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00259 - MATH 4653/Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces, random variables, their distributions/expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, sampling, sufficiency, estimation. prereq: [2263 or 2374 or 2573], [2243 or 2373]; [2283 or 2574 or 3283] recommended.
PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Empirical research techniques. Testing a political hypothesis using data. Topics such as setting up research question in political science, research design, and techniques of data analysis.
PSY 5018H - Mathematical Models of Human Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Mathematical models of complex human behavior, including individual/group decision making, information processing, learning, perception, and overt action. Specific computational techniques drawn from decision theory, information theory, probability theory, machine learning, and elements of data analysis. prereq: Math 1271 or instr consent
PSY 5862 - Psychological Measurement: Theory and Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Types of measurements (tests, scales, inventories) and their construction. Theory/measurement of reliability/validity. prereq: 3801H or MATH 1271 or grad student
PSY 5865 - Advanced Psychological and Educational Measurement
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 8222/Psy 5865
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Topics in test theory. Classical reliability/validity theory/methods, generalizability theory. Linking, scaling, equating. Item response theory, methods for dichotomous/polytomous responses. Comparisons between classical, item response theory methods in instrument construction. prereq: 5862 or instr consent
PUBH 3350 - Epidemiology: People, Places, and Disease
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How diseases are distributed among us. Epidemiology terminology, methods, critical thinking, and analysis. Intended for students interested in a health science career or in a career that may need to evaluate epidemiologic evidence such as health journalism or public policy or litigation. prereq: Undergrad statistics course is recommended
STAT 4101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency. prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H
STAT 4102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Stat 4102/5102
Typically offered: Every Spring
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data. prereq: 4101
STAT 5101 - Theory of Statistics I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00259 - Math 5651/Stat 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall
Logical development of probability, basic issues in statistics. Probability spaces. Random variables, their distributions and expected values. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions, multivariate normal distribution. prereq: [Math 2263 or Math 2374 or Math 2573H], [CSCI 2033 or Math 2373 or Math 2243]
STAT 5102 - Theory of Statistics II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Stat 4102/5102
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses, size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables. Linear models. Decision theory. prereq: 5101 or Math 5651
STAT 5201 - Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation. Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling. Spatial sampling. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5302 - Applied Regression Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression. Estimation, testing, prediction. Use of graphics in regression. Stepwise and other numerical methods. Weighted least squares, nonlinear models, response surfaces. Experimental research/applications. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5303 - Designing Experiments
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Analysis of variance. Multiple comparisons. Variance-stabilizing transformations. Contrasts. Construction/analysis of complete/incomplete block designs. Fractional factorial designs. Confounding split plots. Response surface design. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
STAT 5401 - Applied Multivariate Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear models. Repeated measures, growth curve and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components and factor analysis. Discrimination, classification, and clustering.
STAT 5421 - Analysis of Categorical Data
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications, contingency tables. Tests for independence. Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation. Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression. Generalized linear/multinomial-response models.
STAT 5601 - Nonparametric Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Order statistics. Classical rank-based procedures (e.g., Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis). Goodness of fit. Topics may include smoothing, bootstrap, and generalized linear models. prereq: 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or instr consent
HIST 3011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02029 - Hist 3011/Hist 5011
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basics of quantitative historical data collection, measurement, analysis.
HIST 5011 - Measuring the Past: Quantitative Methods for Historical Research
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02029 - Hist 3011/Hist 5011
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Basics of quantitative historical data collection, measurement, and analysis. prereq: Primarily for 1st-yr grad students
HIST 3797 - History of Population (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02643 - Hist 3797/Hist 5797
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of births, deaths, migration, population size, and population characteristics. Evidence from Europe, the United States, and Latin America with comparative material from Africa and Asia. Methods of historical population analysis and research of historical population data.
HIST 5797 - Methods of Population History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02643 - Hist 3797/Hist 5797
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Standard methods of population analysis. Focuses on methods widely used for historical population research.