Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Earth Sciences B.A.

Department of Earth Sciences
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 65
  • This program requires summer terms.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Earth sciences is the study of the composition, structure, and history of the Earth, as well as the processes that operate on and within it. Emphasis on the crust, oceans, and atmosphere. The BA prepares students for graduate study or professional employment. Earth scientists are employed in a wide range of fields, including exploration for and development of natural resources, environmental science, urban planning, education, oceanography, and other areas related to natural science. Potential employers include the oil, gas, and minerals industries, environmental consultants, federal and private research institutions, universities, schools, and government agencies. An advanced degree is usually required for a career in research or teaching.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University
Students interested in Earth Sciences as a major may want to consider taking one of these courses with a lab: ESCI 1001, 1005, 1006, or 1007.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Earth Sciences BA is ESCI. At least 20 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may complete no more than one degree in the Earth Sciences program: a BA or a BS or a minor. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) students earning a BA, BS, or BIS degree must complete the second-year career management course CLA 3002. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Mathematics
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
Physics
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
· PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling exactly 8 credit(s) from the following:
Chemical Principles I
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· Chemical Principles II
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Core Courses
Take 7 or more course(s) totaling 25 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2001 - Intro to Problems in Earth System Sci -with lab [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2101 - Intro to Problems in Earth System Science - lecutre only [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2202 - Earth History (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3202 - Fluid Earth Dynamics (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 3303W - Geochemical Principles [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 3891 - Field Methods (2.0 cr)
Introductory Field Geology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ESCI 3911 - Introductory Field Geology (4.0 cr)
Electives
ESCI 2302, 4501, and 4602 are strongly recommended for satisfying the elective credits.
Take 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ESCI 2302 - Petrology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3004 - Water and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3006 - Rocks and Stars: Introduction to Planetary Science (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3093 - Directed Studies in Earth & Environmental Sciences: Junior (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ESCI 3403 - Computer Applications in Earth & Environmental Sciences (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3890 - Field Workshop (1.0 cr)
· ESCI 4010 - Undergraduate Seminar: Current Topics in Earth & Environmental Sciences (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4093 - Directed Studies in Earth & Environmental Sciences: Senior (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4094 - Senior Thesis (2.0 cr)
· ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4104 - Evolution and Paleobiology of Fossil Reptiles (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4203 - Environmental Geophysics (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4204 - Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4212 - Geodynamics (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4401 - Aqueous Environmental Geochemistry (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4402 - Biogeochemical Cycles in the Ocean (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4404 - Analytical geochemistry for aqueous solutions and geological materials (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4501 - Structural Geology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4502 - Tectonic Styles (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4602 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4702 - General Hydrogeology (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5201 - Time-Series Analysis of Geological Phenomena (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5203 - Mineral and Rock Physics (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5204 - Geostatistics and Inverse Theory (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5302 - Isotope Geology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5353 - Electron Microprobe Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5503 - Advanced Petrology (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5705 - Limnogeology and Paleoenvironment (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5805 - Standards and Practices for Professional Geoscienists (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 5980 - Seminar: Current Topics in Earth Sciences (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3425 - Atmospheric Pollution: From Smog to Climate Change (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3038 - Human Threats to Ocean Health [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (3.0 cr)
Capstone
These field-based courses provide students with an opportunity to apply knowledge obtained in the classroom to practical “real-world” problems likely to be encountered as professional geoscientists. Both courses require students to make original observations and interpretations while they are outside in the field regarding advanced geologic mapping (ESCI 4911) and hydrogeologic methods (ESCI 4971W).
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major within CLA and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the Earth Sciences BA capstone.
· ESCI 4911 - Advanced Field Geology (4.0 cr)
or ESCI 4971W - Field Hydrogeology [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ESCI 3303W - Geochemical Principles [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4971W - Field Hydrogeology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts
View sample plan(s):
· Earth Sciences BA

View checkpoint chart:
· Earth Sciences B.A.
View PDF Version:
Search.
Search Programs

Search University Catalogs
Related links.

College of Liberal Arts

TC Undergraduate Admissions

TC Undergraduate Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more
 
MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning. prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1372 - CSE Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates, Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. Use of calculators, cooperative learning. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [1371 or equiv], CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems. Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
ESCI 2001 - Intro to Problems in Earth System Sci -with lab (PHYS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESCI 2001/ESCI 2101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we study Earth as an integrated system of many interacting components. Examples of these components include the atmosphere, the ocean, continents, rivers and lakes, plants and animals, and humans. Changes within and among these components are shaping our planet and environment. Many grand challenges facing our society today, ranging from climate change to natural hazards, cannot be fully understood without a better understanding of these interactions. This course introduces some key concepts and principles of Earth System Science through a collection of recent scientific discoveries and outstanding problems in the field. The class touches on a wide range of fascinating topics related to the Earth?s deep interior, surface environments, life, and its 4.5 billion-year history, highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. Meanwhile, all the topics are centered around introducing basic physical and chemical processes that regulate the operation of the Earth as a system. This course gives students an excellent opportunity to explore a broad spectrum of active research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences, state-of-the-art research techniques, and potential career options in this field. Students are expected to develop quantitative skills in addressing questions in Earth System Science through lectures, in-class discussions, and assignments.
ESCI 2101 - Intro to Problems in Earth System Science - lecutre only (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESCI 2001/ESCI 2101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we study Earth as an integrated system of many interacting components. Examples of these components include the atmosphere, the ocean, continents, rivers and lakes, plants and animals, and humans. Changes within and among these components are shaping our planet and environment. Many grand challenges facing our society today, ranging from climate change to natural hazards, cannot be fully understood without a better understanding of these interactions. This course introduces some key concepts and principles of Earth System Science through a collection of recent scientific discoveries and outstanding problems in the field. The class touches on a wide range of fascinating topics related to the Earth?s deep interior, surface environments, life, and its 4.5 billion-year history, highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. Meanwhile, all the topics are centered around introducing basic physical and chemical processes that regulate the operation of the Earth as a system. This course gives students an excellent opportunity to explore a broad spectrum of active research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences, state-of-the-art research techniques, and potential career options in this field. Students are expected to develop quantitative skills in addressing questions in Earth System Science through lectures, in-class discussions, and assignments.
ESCI 2201 - Solid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of solid Earth, particularly tectonic system. Seismology, internal structure of Earth. Earth's gravity, magnetic fields. Paleomagnetism, global plate tectonics, tectonic systems. Field trip. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in PHYS 1301 or instr consent
ESCI 2202 - Earth History
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Big Bang cosmology, plate tectonics, evolution. Formation of Earth. Chemical evolution of Earth, atmosphere, and ocean. Origin/tectonic evolution of continents. Origin of life, its patterns/processes. Long-term interactions between geosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. prereq: [2201, 2301] or instr consent
ESCI 2203 - Earth Surface Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Earth's surface processes, drivers, and implications. Interactions between atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
ESCI 2301 - Mineralogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, physics. Physical/chemical properties, crystal structures, chemical equilibria of major mineral groups. Lab includes crystallographic, polarizing microscope, X-ray powder diffraction exercises, hand-specimen mineral identification. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271] or instr consent
ESCI 3202 - Fluid Earth Dynamics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dynamics of fluid Earth, mainly surface processes and convection. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2201
ESCI 3303W - Geochemical Principles (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Origin of elements (nucleosynthesis, elemental abundances). Geochemical classifications. Isotopes (radioactive, stable). Phase equilibria. Models of Earth's geochemical evolution. Basic geochemical processes that produced Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065] or instr consent
ESCI 3891 - Field Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Methods in geologic field mapping.
ESCI 3911 - Introductory Field Geology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Geologic mapping on topographic maps and aerial photos. Field identification of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Measurement of stratigraphic sections. Structural/geomorphic features. prereq: ESci 3891, instr consent
ESCI 2302 - Petrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Magmatic and metamorphic processes, with an emphasis on plate tectonic interpretation of rock sequences. prereq: 2301 or instr consent
ESCI 3004 - Water and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
For non-science majors. Study of (1) the role of humans as agents influencing the composition (quality) of water resources through domestic, agricultural, industrial, and other land-use practices; (2) the role of water in various ecosystem services which may be at odds with the anthropocentric view of water as a resource; (3) how population increase and climate change, coupled with human actions, is affecting the quality and quantity of available water, leading to lack of access to clean water and decent sanitation, and to severe water shortages (e.g., for irrigation) in some areas, especially in developing nations and politically unstable regions; and (4) how the availability of water shapes a society’s view of water as a resource and its view of the non-human demands for water (which is not uniform across the globe).
ESCI 3005 - Earth Resources
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Geologic aspects of energy/material resources. Resource size/life-times. Environmental consequences of resource use. Issues of international/public ethics associated with resource production, distribution, and use.
ESCI 3006 - Rocks and Stars: Introduction to Planetary Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
ESCI 3006 is designed for students without strong backgrounds in math or physical sciences that are interested in an introductory level survey of planetary science. Students with stronger backgrounds in earth or other physical sciences may also find much of interest, although the approach will be largely non-quantitative. The course will introduce undergraduate students to the dazzling variety of worlds in our solar system and illustrate how many of the planetary scale systems of the Earth compare and contrast to those of other planets. The course will also consider the dynamical and chemical processes that lead to the origin of our solar system and Earth. Additionally, we will also survey recent exciting observations and discoveries of exoplanets, including consideration of how the diversity of other solar systems aids understanding of our own. The physical and chemical principles underlying planetary processes will be a unifying theme of the course. The course will take advantage of the many resources made available by planetary exploration missions, including those producing the most recent new observations. Owing to the fast-moving pace of discovery in planetary science the curricular content will be and updated each time the course is taught. prereq: An interest in the solar system and planets.
ESCI 3093 - Directed Studies in Earth & Environmental Sciences: Junior
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed studies in earth & environmental sciences under the direction of a faculty member. Prereq: instr consent
ESCI 3403 - Computer Applications in Earth & Environmental Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3403/ESci 5403
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This class is meant to provide students with skills in scientific computer programming, specifically with a special focus on the Earth & environmental sciences and other disciplines where spatial data are important. The course assumes no previous knowledge of computer programming. Although the class will use MATLAB, topics covered in the course include concepts common to all programming languages including functions, logic, branching, loops, data types, binary code, data formatting for input/output, among others. Additionally, students will develop problem-solving skills in learning how to design algorithms to achieve a task and in learning how to troubleshoot and debug their code. Students taking the class at the 5xxx level will be required to complete a programming project related to their own research. This course will be different from other introductory-level programming courses in that it will have a spatial emphasis and focus on examples and datasets related to the Earth and environmental sciences. Students will learn how to access a variety of Earth and environmental science data repositories and work with data in standard formats (i.e. NetCDF). Working with geographically referenced data in different projections will be explored using different toolboxes available for that purpose. Plotting of data will also be extensively covered including the production of publication-quality figures and animations. Prereq: upper division or instructor consent.
ESCI 3890 - Field Workshop
Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Earth sciences field workshop where students learn about the geological aspects of specific area(s) and culminates in a field trip to that area(s) to see the geology first-hand.
ESCI 4010 - Undergraduate Seminar: Current Topics in Earth & Environmental Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics in earth sciences investigated in a seminar format. prereq: instr consent
ESCI 4093 - Directed Studies in Earth & Environmental Sciences: Senior
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed studies in earth & environmental sciences under the direction of a faculty member. Prereq: instr consent
ESCI 4094 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Senior-level majors engage in independent research under faculty supervision. Select problems according to individual interests and in consultation with faculty committee. Thesis and oral defense. prereq: Sr, Geo or ESci major, instr consent
ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Vertebrate evolution (exclusive of mammals) in phylogenetic, temporal, functional, and paleoecological contexts. Vertebrate anatomy. Methods in reconstructing phylogenetic relationships and origin/history of major vertebrate groups, from Cambrian Explosion to modern diversity of vertebrate animals. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instr consent
ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Evolutionary history of mammals and their extinct relatives. Methods in reconstructing phylogeny. Place of mammals in evolutionary history of vertebrate animals. Major morphological/ecological transitions. Origins of modern groups of mammals. Continuing controversies in studying fossil mammals.
ESCI 4104 - Evolution and Paleobiology of Fossil Reptiles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Reptiles first appear in the fossil record about 315 million years ago as small lizard-like carnivores and diversified greatly into a wide range of ecological roles during the Mesozoic. This radiation includes multiple invasions of the aquatic realm by groups as diverse as turtles, ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs, and also encompasses two of the three groups of vertebrates to evolve active flight, namely birds and pterosaurs. Dinosaurs, most famous among the reptilian clades, dominated terrestrial ecosystems for over 100 million years and evolved large body sizes unsurpassed by any other terrestrial group. This course will cover the fossil record, evolution and paleobiology of reptiles (including birds) from the Carboniferous to the Present. Using both literature and demonstrations on skeletons/casts, students will learn the basics of reptilian anatomy and biology, and how those are used to infer evolutionary relationships and ecology of the diverse extinct reptilian clades listed above. Methods for inferring phylogenetic relationships, measuring biodiversity in the fossil record, and reconstructing the physiology and life history strategies of extinct reptiles will also be covered. The relationship between major geological events, such as changing climate and continental drift, and the origination, diversification, and extinction of reptilian groups through more than 300 million years of in Earth history will be explored. Prerequisites: ESci 1001 or ESci 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instructor consent.
ESCI 4203 - Environmental Geophysics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 4203/ESci 8203
Typically offered: Every Fall
Seismic exploration (reflection and refraction); potential techniques (gravity and magnetics) and electrical techniques of geophysical exploration. prereq: Phys 1301
ESCI 4204 - Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Present geomagnetic field at the Earth's surface, secular variation, geomagnetic field reversals. Physical and chemical basis of paleomagnetism: origin of natural remanent magnetization, mineralogy of magnetic minerals, magnetic polarity stratigraphy, apparent polar wander, and environmental magnetism. prereq: 2201, Phys 1302, Math 1272 or instr consent
ESCI 4212 - Geodynamics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 4212/ESci 8212
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This course focuses on the dynamics of the solid Earth, particularly that of the lithosphere and the asthenosphere, probing further into the geodynamic problems that are introduced in ESCI 2201 through applications of continuum mechanics. Key continuum mechanics concepts to be examined include constitutive relations for different rheological classes (elastic, plastic, viscous, visco-elastic, visco-elasto-plastic), conservation laws (conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; continuity, force balance, and heat transfer), and simplifications and assumptions involved in their applications. Geodynamic problems to be discussed include plate cooling, lithospheric deformation, mantle convection, shear (viscous and frictional) heating, subduction, faulting, and their effects on the Earth?s thermochemical structures, geoid and topography, and the distributions of earthquakes and volcanism. Analytical solutions and numerical models of simple geodynamic problems are introduced, and recent applications of complex geodynamic models to explain geological, geophysical, and geochemical observations are discussed based on selected scientific journal articles. Graduate students are expected to present and lead paper discussions, and their performance will be graded and counted towards their participation. Instructor?s consent will be required if the following prerequisites are not met: ESCI 2201, MATH 1371 and 1372 (or equivalent), and PHYS 1301 and 1302 (or equivalent).
ESCI 4401 - Aqueous Environmental Geochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 4401/ESci 8401
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
General principles of solution chemistry applied to geology. Solution-mineral equilibria. Redox processes in natural waters. Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids. Environmental geochemistry.
ESCI 4402 - Biogeochemical Cycles in the Ocean
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 4402/ESci 8402
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography. Processes controlling chemical composition of oceans past/present. Cycles of major/minor constituents, including carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon, and oxygen and their isotopes. Role of these cycles in climate system. prereq: [CHEM 1021, CHEM 1022] or instr consent
ESCI 4404 - Analytical geochemistry for aqueous solutions and geological materials
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical analysis of natural samples is essential not only in geochemical research but nearly all other subfields of Earth and Environmental Science research today. Some analytical capability routine to geochemists, such as high precision isotope analysis, has also found potential applications in many other disciplines. Outside academia, chemical analysis is fundamental to many activities directly relevant to our everyday life, ranging from pollution monitoring to soil testing. With the explosion of analytical capability and increasing applications of geochemical analysis, there is greater need for students in Earth and Environmental Sciences to get familiarized with some common analytical instruments and to grasp some fundamental principles of analytical chemistry. This course will introduce several modern analytical equipment with a particular focus on plasma source mass spectrometers, as well as important techniques developed for precise and accurate analysis of geological and environmental samples. During this course, students will have access to some of the most advanced analytical equipment in geochemical research and gain hands-on experience during in-class lab practice. The lab practice is primarily designed to illustrate some key concepts covered in lectures, rather than a comprehensive training on instrument operation. At the end of this course, students are expected to be capable of critically evaluating geochemical data and master a set of analytical skills that can serve their future careers in research or other chemical analysis related professions. This course is designed to be accessible to students with limited prior analytical experiences. Prerequisites recommended to attend this course are PHYS 1301 (or equivalency) and CHEM 1061 (or equivalency).
ESCI 4501 - Structural Geology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts related to deformation of Earth's crust. Processes associated with deformation, faulting, folding, fabric development. Lab/recitation include solving problems, conducting physical/numerical experiments. Field trips.
ESCI 4502 - Tectonic Styles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Origin and nature of major types of tectonic disturbances affecting the crust and lithosphere, including analysis of the form and development of individual structural components and relationship to plate tectonics. Changes over geologic time in the nature of orogenic processes. prereq: 4501 or instr consent
ESCI 4602 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Interpretation of origin of sedimentary rocks through application of basic physical/chemical principles. Modern depositional environments, petrographic microscopy, basin dynamics, stratigraphy. prereq: [2301] or instr consent
ESCI 4701 - Geomorphology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Origin, development, and continuing evolution of landforms in various environments. Environmental implications. Weathering, slope and shore processes, fluvial erosion and deposition, arid region processes, glacial processes. This course includes lecture and laboratory components, including field trips. Prereqs: MATH 1271 (Calculus I) or equivalent; PHYS 1301 (Physics I: Classical Mechanics) or equivalent. Instructor consent is required to take this course without the prerequisite courses or their equivalents, and it is recommended to take these classes at least concurrently (as co-requisites) with geomorphology. No help will be given on material covered in prerequisite courses.
ESCI 4702 - General Hydrogeology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theory of groundwater geology, hydrologic cycle, watershed hydrology, Darcy's law, governing equations of groundwater motion, flow net analysis, analog models, groundwater resource evaluation/development. Applied analysis of steady and transient equations of groundwater motion and chemical transport. Chemistry of natural waters. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1062, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1066, MATH 1271, PHYS 1201] or instr consent
ESCI 4703 - Glacial Geology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Formation and characteristics of modern glaciers; erosional and depositional features of Pleistocene glaciers; history of quaternary environmental changes in glaciated and nonglaciated areas. Field trips and labs. prereq: 1001 or instr consent
ESCI 4801 - Geomicrobiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geosphere/biosphere interactions over temporal/spatial scales. Global biogeochemical cycling, microbe-metal interactions, microbial paleobiology, environmental geomicrobiology, life detection, habitability of planets. prereq: One semester college level biology
ESCI 5201 - Time-Series Analysis of Geological Phenomena
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Time-series analysis of linear and nonlinear geological and geophysical phenomena. Examples drawn from ice age cycles, earthquakes, climatic fluctuations, volcanic eruptions, atmospheric phenomena, thermal convection and other time-dependent natural phenomena. Modern concepts of nonlinear dynamics and complexity theory applied to geological phenomena. prereq: Math 2263 or instr consent
ESCI 5203 - Mineral and Rock Physics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Physical properties of minerals and rocks as related to the composition and dynamics of the Earth's crust, mantle, and core. prereq: 2201, Phys 1302
ESCI 5204 - Geostatistics and Inverse Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Statistical treatment of geological and geophysical data. Statistical estimation. Stochastic processes/fields. Non-linear/non-assumptive error analysis. Cluster analysis. Eigenvalue-eigenvector methods. Regional variables. Correlograms and kriging. Theoretical framework of linear geostatistics and geophysical inverse theory. prereq: Stat 3011 or instr consent
ESCI 5302 - Isotope Geology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory and uses of radioactive, radiogenic, and stable isotopes in geology. Radioactive dating, geothermometry, and tracer techniques in geologic processes. prereq: 3303W or instr consent
ESCI 5353 - Electron Microprobe Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 5353/MatS 5353
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Characterizing solid materials with electron beam instrumentation, including reduction of X-ray data to chemical compositions. prereq: [One yr chem, one yr physics] or instr consent
ESCI 5503 - Advanced Petrology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Quantitative approach to modern igneous/metamorphic petrology. Emphasizes thermodynamics of minerals/melts and with applications to phase diagrams, thermobarometry, melting relationships, and energetics of petrologic mass transfer. prereq: 2302, CHEM 1061, CHEM 1065, [MATH 1372 or MATH 1272 or MATH 1572]
ESCI 5705 - Limnogeology and Paleoenvironment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Within-lake, hydrogeologic, and landscape (geological/biological) processes that lead to formation of various proxy records of paleoenvironment. Systems approach to physical, geochemical, biogeochemical, and biotic proxies. Basic principles, case studies. Emphasizes how proxy records relate to paleoclimate. prereq: instr consent
ESCI 5805 - Standards and Practices for Professional Geoscienists
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is meant to provide students with a clear understanding of the standards and practices regularly used by Geoscience professionals in industry and agency. The course builds on the foundational knowledge offered through the core curriculum of the Earth Sciences undergraduate major, and fills a critical gap in showing how this knowledge is translated into common standards and practices, regulations, funding mechanisms, and even professional expectations within a variety of geoscience disciplines. In short, this course aims to smooth a student?s transition from University to an entry-level position from which they can build a successful and sustainable career. This course is targeted for both upper level undergraduates and graduate students. Aspects of the course include: -Detailed discussion of regional stratigraphy, bedrock and glacial geology and how they relate to various industrial applications and environmental issues. -Examination of state and federal environmental regulations, as well as the phases of environmental impact statements. -Survey of fundamental investigation techniques (GeoProbe drilling, hollow-stem auger drilling, well installation, analytical testing ? soil, groundwater, air). -Introduction to environmental clean-up grants and their management. -Assessment of topics covered in the National Association of State Boards of Geology (ASBOG) Fundamentals of Geology (FG) exam. This exam is a required step on the way to becoming a registered geologist. The exam is offered in mid-March, and the expectation is that students participating in the class will take it. -Coordination and completion of the 40 hour HAZWOPER training through UMN. -Invited lectures from select representatives of various subfields and professional organizations (groundwater & contaminant hydrogeology, mining & geophysical exploration, environmental engineering, petroleum) to give students a jumpstart in their professional networking.
ESCI 5980 - Seminar: Current Topics in Earth Sciences
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics in earth sciences investigated in a seminar format.
ESPM 3425 - Atmospheric Pollution: From Smog to Climate Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Processes governing chemical makeup of Earth's atmosphere. Implications for air pollution, climate, human welfare. Evolution of atmosphere. Atmospheric structure/transport. Biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, mercury. Greenhouse effect. Aerosols. Stratospheric ozone loss. prereq: [CHEM 1061, PHYS 1101W, MATH 1142 or 1271] or equiv or instr consent
GCC 3038 - Human Threats to Ocean Health (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Human Threats to Ocean Health This grand challenge course addresses the scope of the anthropogenic alterations in natural biogeochemical cycling (BGCC) of oceans that will help the students to develop strategies to intervene, advocate, and sustain planetary health for all of humanity. The following grand challenge questions will be addressed: (1) How does Ocean Biogeochemical Cycling (BGCC) of nutrients support global ecosystems and biodiversity? (2) What human (anthropogenic) activities disrupt ocean BGCC of nutrients, resulting in depletion of biodiversity, ecosystem health, ecosystem services, and environmental justice for humans? (3) What do humans have to do to protect the future of ocean health and all of humanity? Global recycling of nutrients and metals within the environment (geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere) and the biosphere are essential for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services on which all of humanity depends. Living organisms extract and transform nutrients for their metabolism, growth, and reproduction, ultimately releasing these nutrients (often in a transformed state) back to the inanimate sphere via biogeochemical cycling (BGCC) driven by energy transformations. In natural environments, BGCC maintains a dynamic equilibrium/homeostasis between abiotic and biotic spheres, a process essential for survival of life on Earth. However, the current human practices have caused massive changes in the BGCC of nutrients, thus disrupting the natural cycling and (i) threatening the biosphere?s nutrient availability and (ii) precipitating many of the current environmental problems such as climate change, nitrogen pollution, ocean acidification, acid rain, mercury deposition, etc. At the current scale of human development, these alterations to the BGCC in the oceans may seriously damage the environment and biodiversity, thus threatening the entire Planet?s future. Further, the adverse effects of the loss of ecosystem services may not be shared equally amongst society, whereby access to a healthy environment is increasingly distributed by power, class, and race. An understanding of these inequities and incorporation of environmental justice in eco-centric environmental advocacy will be essential for sustaining the health of our planet. Therefore, the students registering for this course will develop an understanding and the scope of the anthropogenic alterations in natural biogeochemical cycling of oceans that will help them develop strategies to intervene, advocate, and sustain planetary health for all of humanity. The specific aims are following: (1) Describe global and local mechanisms of natural BGCC on Earth and connection to the oceans; (2) Explain human impacts on BGCC, and relationships between abnormal BGCC and nutrient distribution in water, sediment, and air; (3) Determine impact of human-altered ocean nutrient cycling on society, including members disproportionately impacted by environmental issues and underrepresented in environmental movements; (4) Strategize sustainable strategies to mitigate the health and environmental problems associated with abnormal biogeochemical nutrient cycling, bringing environmental justice perspectives to the forefront; and (5) Convince students that positive actions made now can and will impact the future. This course will focus on multiple vectors of inquiry (i.e., chemistry, toxicology, environment science and justice, sustainability and biodiversity), and students' progress through the course will give them powerful tools to confront the Grand Challenges of our age, global change in biogeochemical cycles. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5008 - Policy and Science of Global Environmental Change (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 5146/FNRM 5146/GCC 5008/P
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Through readings, lectures, discussions, written assignments, and presentations this course introduces the critical issues underpinning global change and its environmental and social implications. The course examines current literature in exploring evidence for human-induced global change and its potential effects on a wide range of biological processes and examines the social and economic drivers, social and economic consequences, and political processes at local, national, and international scales related to global change. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
ESCI 3002 - Climate Change and Human History (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes; their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years.
ESCI 5102 - Climate Change and Human History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3002/ESci 5102
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Causes of long-/short-term climate change. Frequency/magnitude of past climate changes, their geologic records. Relationship of past climate changes to development of agrarian societies and to shifts in power among kingdoms/city-states. Emphasizes last 10,000 years. prereq: 1001 or equiv or instr consent
ESCI 3402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3402/ESci 5402
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using concepts of radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts/controversy over responses/consequences.
ESCI 5402 - Science and Politics of Global Warming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 3402/ESci 5402
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Detection/attribution of global warming using radiation, climate system, and carbon cycle. Effects on society/biodiversity. National/global efforts. Controversy over responses/consequences.
ESCI 4911 - Advanced Field Geology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Geologic mapping; study of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks; structures and surficial features; problem solving. Paper required. prereq: 3911, instr consent
ESCI 4971W - Field Hydrogeology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Aquifer, vadoze zone, and surface water hydrology field techniques. Shallow soil boring, sampling. Well installation. Single/multiple well aquifer testing. Ground water sampling for chemical analysis. Weather data collection, hydrogeologic mapping, water balance calculation. prereq: instr consent
ESCI 3303W - Geochemical Principles (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Origin of elements (nucleosynthesis, elemental abundances). Geochemical classifications. Isotopes (radioactive, stable). Phase equilibria. Models of Earth's geochemical evolution. Basic geochemical processes that produced Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1061, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in CHEM 1065] or instr consent
ESCI 4971W - Field Hydrogeology (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Aquifer, vadoze zone, and surface water hydrology field techniques. Shallow soil boring, sampling. Well installation. Single/multiple well aquifer testing. Ground water sampling for chemical analysis. Weather data collection, hydrogeologic mapping, water balance calculation. prereq: instr consent
ESCI 4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Vertebrate evolution (exclusive of mammals) in phylogenetic, temporal, functional, and paleoecological contexts. Vertebrate anatomy. Methods in reconstructing phylogenetic relationships and origin/history of major vertebrate groups, from Cambrian Explosion to modern diversity of vertebrate animals. prereq: 1001 or 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instr consent
ESCI 4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Evolutionary history of mammals and their extinct relatives. Methods in reconstructing phylogeny. Place of mammals in evolutionary history of vertebrate animals. Major morphological/ecological transitions. Origins of modern groups of mammals. Continuing controversies in studying fossil mammals.