Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Special Education B.S.

Educational Psychology
College of Education and Human Development
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2019
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 57 to 70
  • Practicum experiences will be conducted at sites serving individuals with disabilities.
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
The bachelor of science degree program in special education (BS/SE) prepares students to serve persons with frequently occurring (high incidence) disabilities. The program emphasizes the fundamentals of special education, effective intervention strategies, and the problem solving approach to instruction. The BS/SE undergraduate program maintains the integrity of a research-based degree program recognized nationally. The program is specifically designed for developing scientist-practitioners by focusing on the latest developments in educational research and supporting the need to make informed, data-based instructional decisions to ensure that persons with special needs reach their full potential.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 30 credits before admission to the program.
A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:
  • 2.75 already admitted to the degree-granting college
  • 2.75 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.75 transferring from outside the University
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Admission Requirements
The following courses must be complete or in progress. All prerequisites and major courses must be completed A/F unless the course is offered S/N only. Students transferring into the University of Minnesota must have completed the equivalent of first-year composition (WRIT 1301 or higher) and college algebra or higher (Math 1031 or higher). Once admitted to the major, transfer students will be expected to complete EPSY 2601 in their first semester.
EPSY 2601 - Understanding Differences, Disabilities, and the Career of Special Education (4.0 cr)
Licensure Track
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1051 - Precalculus I [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or Foundations Track
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1051 - Precalculus I [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1151 - Precalculus II [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or MATH 1142 - Short Calculus [MATH] (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Special Education Licensure
This track is for students who intend to become special education teachers at the completion of their degree. Graduates of this track receive a license as an Academic and Behavioral Strategist (ABS) to teach in the field of special education in grades kindergarten through age 21. Students must meet minimum performance standards in the core requirements: (a) B average in licensure coursework prior to student teaching; and (b) minimum of B- in each licensure course.
Core Requirements (38-43 credits)
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving [WI] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5617 - Academic and Social Interventions for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5618 - Specialized Interventions for Students With Mild/Moderate Disabilities in Reading & Written Language (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5604 - Transition From School to Work and Community Living for Persons With Special Needs (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator [WI] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5657 - Interventions for Behavioral Problems in School Settings (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5631 - Module 1: Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (1.0 cr)
EPSY 5704 - Practicum: Special Education Field Experience in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms (1.0-2.0 cr)
EPSY 5705 - Practicum: Special Ed Field Experience in Early Childhood SpEd (ECSE) & Elementary School Classrooms (1.0-2.0 cr)
EPSY 5741 - Student Teaching: Academic and Behavioral Strategist (3.0-6.0 cr)
EPSY 5699 - Experimental Teaching Seminar (2.0 cr)
CI 5645 - Methods for Teaching English Learners (3.0 cr)
MTHE 5355 - Mathematics for Diverse Learners (3.0 cr)
Standards of Effective Practice (7.5 credits)
All students are required to take the following courses:
OLPD 5005 - School and Society (2.0 cr)
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society (1.0 cr)
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning (1.5 cr)
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment (3.0 cr)
Other courses required for the Special Ed Major (7 credits)
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or CPSY 3301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving [WI] (3.0 cr)
Foundations of Special Education for Schools and Society
This track is for students interested in receiving expertise and experience in special education but who do not want to become licensed teachers. Students supplement foundational special education training with coursework in areas of interest that relate to student professional goals in order to expand the reach of special education in schools and society. This track does not lead to the ABS license required to teach special education.
Core Requirements (21 credits)
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving [WI] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5617 - Academic and Social Interventions for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5604 - Transition From School to Work and Community Living for Persons With Special Needs (3.0 cr)
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
EPSY 3303 - Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum (3.0 cr)
Required Courses
Special Ed Special Interest (2-3 credits)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 5661 - Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5625 - Education of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children with Disabilities: Introduction (2.0 cr)
· EPSY 5641 - Foundations of Deaf Education (3.0 cr)
· ASL 3001 - Cultural and Sociolingual Views within the Deaf Community (3.0 cr)
Human Development (3-4 credits)
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· CPSY 1334 - Global Issues on Children and Youth in Society [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· CPSY 4302 - Infant Development (3.0 cr)
· CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology (3.0 cr)
· NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach (3.0 cr)
Diversity and Social Justice (9-12 credits)
Take 3 or more course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 3132 - Psychology of Multiculturalism in Education [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History [HIS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CI 3101 - Issues in Urban Education (3.0 cr)
· CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education (3.0 cr)
· CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America [DSJ, SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University [WI] (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community (3.0 cr)
· LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3307 - Social Justice and Community Service [AH, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3452 - Education and Society (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies [GP] (3.0 cr)
· SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education [WI] (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving [WI] (3.0 cr)
Supporting Program (15 credits)
With the supporting program, students will work with their adviser to explore an area of interest to enhance special education coursework. Students may choose from a variety of themes, or a combination of themes, related to their professional goals in working with people with disabilities across the spectrum. Examples of supporting programs include:
Deaf Studies
ASL 1701 - American Sign Language I (5.0 cr)
ASL 1702 - American Sign Language II (5.0 cr)
ASL 3703 - American Sign Language III (5.0 cr)
ASL 3704 - American Sign Language IV (5.0 cr)
EPSY 5641 - Foundations of Deaf Education (3.0 cr)
or Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences
SLHS 1402 - The Talking Brain [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science (3.0 cr)
SLHS 1301W - The Physics and Biology of Spoken Language [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or SLHS 1301V - The Physics and Biology of Spoken Language Honors [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
SLHS 1401 - Communication Differences and Disorders [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or SLHS 3401 - Communication Differences and Disorders [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or Mental health, well-being, and resilience
EPSY 3801 - The Science of Human Resilience and Wellbeing: Foundational Knowledge for Career and Life Success [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
HSM 3040 - Dying and Death in Contemporary Society: Implications for Intervention (2.0 cr)
PUBH 3107 - Global Public Health and the Environment (2.0 cr)
PUBH 3123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research and Application (2.0 cr)
PUBH 3950 - From Kid to Community: Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on Youth Obesity (2.0 cr)
PUBH 3955 - Using Policy to Address the Weight-Related Health of Child and Adolescent Populations (1.0 cr)
or Elementary Ed Foundations
Reading
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading (3.0 cr)
CI 5414 - Practicum: Working With Developing Readers (2.0 cr)
CI 5405 - Middle School Language Arts Methods (2.0 cr)
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature [WI] (3.0 cr)
or Math
MTHE 3101 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers I (3.0 cr)
MTHE 3102 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers II (3.0 cr)
CI 5822 - Mathematics Instruction in the Elementary Grades (3.0 cr)
or Social Studies
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education (3.0 cr)
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy (3.0 cr)
or Science
[Students can take CI 1943W beginning spring 2019]
CI 1563 - Physics by Inquiry [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
or Counseling psychology
EPSY 3302 - Introduction to Communication Skills for Educational and Community Settings (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5401 - Counseling Procedures (3.0 cr)
or Learning Technologies
CI 3342 - Social Media & Connected Learning (3.0 cr)
CI 2311W - Introduction to Technology and Ethics in Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CI 4311W - Technology and Ethics in Society [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
CI 2312 - Sex, Drugs, and the Internet: Educational Perspectives (3.0 cr)
or CI 4312 - Sex, Drugs, and the Internet: Educational Perspectives (3.0 cr)
or Psychological foundations of education
EPSY 5113 - Psychology of Instruction and Technology (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5119 - Mind, Brain, and Education (3.0 cr)
EPSY 5157 - Social & Developmental Psychology of Education (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Education and Human Development

View sample plan(s):
· Special Education BS Sample Plan
· Special Education Licensure Sample Plan
· Special Education Foundations Sample Plan

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· Special Education B.S.
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EPSY 2601 - Understanding Differences, Disabilities, and the Career of Special Education
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Impact of disabilities on individual/family. Support systems for persons with disabilities, approaches for advocacy. Employ reflective practices when considering concept of disability. This course has an imbedded school-based practicum.
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math modeling, including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, counting/probability. Excel or calculators used to develop equations/graphs from theoretical/real interdisciplinary data. Projects enable students to use models to examine trends, make predictions. prereq: Three yrs high school math or grade of at least C+ in PsTL 0731 or PsTL 0732 or CI 0832 or placement test score or instr consent
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1051 - Precalculus I (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions with applications; zeroes of polynomials; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; coverage beyond that found in the usual 3 years of high school math. prereq: 3 yrs of high school math or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
CI 1806 - College Algebra through Modeling (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math modeling, including linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, counting/probability. Excel or calculators used to develop equations/graphs from theoretical/real interdisciplinary data. Projects enable students to use models to examine trends, make predictions. prereq: Three yrs high school math or grade of at least C+ in PsTL 0731 or PsTL 0732 or CI 0832 or placement test score or instr consent
MATH 1031 - College Algebra and Probability (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02451 - CI 1806/Math 1031
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions, with applications; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; basic probability rules, conditional probabilities, binomial probabilities. prereq: 3 yrs high school math or satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1051 - Precalculus I (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Graphs of equations and functions, transformations of graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, and rational functions with applications; zeroes of polynomials; inverses and compositions of functions; exponential and logarithmic functions with applications; coverage beyond that found in the usual 3 years of high school math. prereq: 3 yrs of high school math or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [PSTL 731 or PSTL 732 or CI 0832]
MATH 1151 - Precalculus II (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00066
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses, including graphs and identities, with applications; polar coordinates, equations, graphs; complex numbers, complex plane, DeMoivre's Theorem; conic sections; systems of linear equations and inequalities, with applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement exam or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
MATH 1142 - Short Calculus (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A streamlined one-semester tour of differential and integral calculus in one variable, and differential calculus in two variables. No trigonometry/does not have the same depth as MATH 1271-1272. Formulas and their interpretation and use in applications. prereq: Satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1031 or 1051]
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization of educational programs/services for people with disabilities. First course for students seeking to become licensed in special education.
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Participants will learn basic standardized assessment and how it directly relates to special education. In addition, students will use the assessment as part of an ongoing process for making instructional programming decisions. Students will apply skills in designing and evaluating assessment plans and in making eligibility decisions.
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Assumptions, principles, procedures of problem solving approach to analyzing behavior/programs for classroom management. Conducting observations, intervening, evaluating behavioral change.
EPSY 5617 - Academic and Social Interventions for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use problem solving model to make data-based decisions regarding implementation and evaluation of instruction for students with academic and behavioral difficulties. prereq: instr consent
EPSY 5618 - Specialized Interventions for Students With Mild/Moderate Disabilities in Reading & Written Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical/contemporary perspectives, empirical evidence relating to reading/written language instruction/assessment designed to improve outcomes of students with disabilities. Field work in tutoring.
EPSY 5604 - Transition From School to Work and Community Living for Persons With Special Needs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Use of strategies/models for improving transition of youth from school to work and community living. Course content that specifically addresses all phases of student assessment, individualized transition planning. Parent, family, and student involvement in designing post school options. Community-based services (employment, residential living, social and recreational services, etc). Comprehensive interagency approaches.
EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills/knowledge required to consult/collaborate with school personnel, families, other professionals to maintain effective educational support.
EPSY 5657 - Interventions for Behavioral Problems in School Settings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive behavioral programs for students with social and or emotional disabilities. Instructing students with social and or emotional disabilities.
EPSY 5631 - Module 1: Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Terms/concepts related to augmentative/alternative communication. Myths/facts regarding AAC.
EPSY 5704 - Practicum: Special Education Field Experience in Middle and Secondary School Classrooms
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Pre-Student Teaching/Field-Based Practicum. Gain a better understanding of the role of special education teachers (in a variety of settings) and related service professionals. Apply knowledge from University courses in school settings - connecting theory, research, and practice.
EPSY 5705 - Practicum: Special Ed Field Experience in Early Childhood SpEd (ECSE) & Elementary School Classrooms
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Pre-Student Teaching/Field-Based Practicum. Gain a better understanding of the role of special education teachers (in a variety of settings) and related service professionals. Apply knowledge from University courses in school settings - connecting theory, research, and practice.
EPSY 5741 - Student Teaching: Academic and Behavioral Strategist
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Transfer of theoretical knowledge to practical application. Responsibilities of special education teacher in variety of settings. prereq: Special education licensure program or instr consent
EPSY 5699 - Experimental Teaching Seminar
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
EPsy 5699 will be taken concurrently with the student teaching experience. Coursework will center around experimental teaching utilizing data-based instruction for affecting student growth academically. Students will demonstrate this understanding by planning and conducting a 3-to-5 lesson instructional sequence for a selected focus learner during their student teaching year. In addition, students will record their instruction and reflect on the effectiveness of their academic instruction. Prereq: instr consent
CI 5645 - Methods for Teaching English Learners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The course is designed to give teaching licensure candidates grounding in theory and practice for teaching linguistically and culturally diverse students. This course provides an overview of the benefits and challenges of working with English learners (ELs) and linguistically and culturally diverse students in a variety of settings. Central topics include instructional practices and strategies for teaching English learners; second language literacy and biliteracy development; language learning and bilingualism; and culturally responsive pedagogy. The course is designed to help teacher candidates to develop an understanding of the language-specific challenges that accompany subject matter learning and to demonstrate the ability to apply a range of instructional strategies to help English learners succeed academically. prereq: Early Childhood or Elementary Education ILP or Special Education Major or Special Education M.Ed./M.A candidates
MTHE 5355 - Mathematics for Diverse Learners
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Mathematical concepts and methods for exceptional students, both low achieving and gifted. Experimental materials and methods designed for underachieving students. prereq: Teaching license or student in elem ed or special ed or instr consent
OLPD 5005 - School and Society
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Readings in history, philosophy, social sciences, and law revealing diverse educational values in a pluralistic society. Multiple expectations of schools. Civil liberties, rights, community. Varying cultural backgrounds of students, family circumstances, exceptional needs. prereq: Jr or sr or MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent
OLPD 5009 - Human Relations: Applied Skills for School and Society
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues of prejudice/discrimination in terms of history, power, social perception. Knowledge/skills acquisition in cooperative learning, multicultural education, group dynamics, social influence, leadership, judgment/decision making, prejudice reduction, conflict resolution, teaching in diverse educational settings. prereq: MEd/init lic or CLA music ed or preteaching or instr consent
CI 5307 - Technology for Teaching and Learning
Credits: 1.5 [max 1.5]
Prerequisites: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or #], basic computer skills
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse educational technology in K-12 classrooms. Effective use of technology. Computer technologies used to stimulate personal productivity/communication and to enhance teaching/learning processes. prereq: [MEd/initial licensure or CLA music ed major or preteaching major or instr consent], basic computer skills
EPSY 3119 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, and assessment. Topics: behaviorism, cognitive and social constructivism, human information processing theory, intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability, validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, and portfolios.
EPSY 5001 - Learning, Cognition, and Assessment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3119/EdHD 5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Principles of learning, cognition, cognitive development, classroom management, motivation, instruction, assessment. Behaviorism, cognitive/social constructivism, human information processing theory. Intelligence, knowledge acquisition, reasoning skills, scholastic achievement, standardized testing, reliability/validity, student evaluation, performance assessment, portfolios, demonstrations. Applications to instruction/organization of curricular materials. prereq: MEd/initial licensure student or CLA music ed or preteaching major or instr consent; psych course recommended
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. PSY majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 3301.
CPSY 3301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. This course is intended for non-Child Psychology/Early Childhood majors. Those majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 2301.
EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills/knowledge required to consult/collaborate with school personnel, families, other professionals to maintain effective educational support.
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Participants will learn basic standardized assessment and how it directly relates to special education. In addition, students will use the assessment as part of an ongoing process for making instructional programming decisions. Students will apply skills in designing and evaluating assessment plans and in making eligibility decisions.
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Assumptions, principles, procedures of problem solving approach to analyzing behavior/programs for classroom management. Conducting observations, intervening, evaluating behavioral change.
EPSY 5613 - Foundations of Special Education I (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Organization of educational programs/services for people with disabilities. First course for students seeking to become licensed in special education.
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Participants will learn basic standardized assessment and how it directly relates to special education. In addition, students will use the assessment as part of an ongoing process for making instructional programming decisions. Students will apply skills in designing and evaluating assessment plans and in making eligibility decisions.
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Assumptions, principles, procedures of problem solving approach to analyzing behavior/programs for classroom management. Conducting observations, intervening, evaluating behavioral change.
EPSY 5617 - Academic and Social Interventions for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use problem solving model to make data-based decisions regarding implementation and evaluation of instruction for students with academic and behavioral difficulties. prereq: instr consent
EPSY 5604 - Transition From School to Work and Community Living for Persons With Special Needs
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Use of strategies/models for improving transition of youth from school to work and community living. Course content that specifically addresses all phases of student assessment, individualized transition planning. Parent, family, and student involvement in designing post school options. Community-based services (employment, residential living, social and recreational services, etc). Comprehensive interagency approaches.
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
EPSY 3303 - Educational Psychology Undergraduate Practicum
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02777
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This culminating course familiarizes students with the principles and practice of applied psychology in educational and community settings. Through supervised fieldwork experiences in either research or practice settings, students will develop an understanding of ethical considerations in educational psychology and explore how psychological research can be used to advance the practice of psychology in applied settings. This course is designed for undergraduate students completing an Educational Psychology undergraduate minor or the Special Education major. The course meets for 120 minutes weekly, and students complete 90 hours of fieldwork (approximately 8-10 hours/week). This is a community-engaged learning course. Fieldwork experiences can include: * A research experience conducted with an approved Educational Psychology faculty member. * A practical experience in an approved community engaged service-learning setting. Note: students in the special education major must complete fieldwork related to disabilities and/or special education.
EPSY 5661 - Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Knowledge/skills needed to promote learning/success for school age children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Definition, etiology, and characteristics of ASD. Current research/issues. Collaborative problem solving, family-professional partnerships, educational programming.
EPSY 5625 - Education of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children with Disabilities: Introduction
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Overview of the issues, problems, and practical applications in designing early intervention services for young children with disabilities and their families.
EPSY 5641 - Foundations of Deaf Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical foundations of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) education. Engage in discussion, debates and processes that have influenced deaf education, communication methodologies and placement options in the US. Considered from the perspective of deaf children, adults and their families.
ASL 3001 - Cultural and Sociolingual Views within the Deaf Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course investigates the Deaf community using an ethnocentric view of culture. Students will explore cultural readings and various sources in class discussion using multi-disciplinary approaches: sociological, educational, and linguistic views. Can be taken concurrently with ASL 1701-3704. Class instruction conducted entirely in ASL with an English interpreter.
CPSY 1334 - Global Issues on Children and Youth in Society (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Study of hot topic issues currently faced by children around the world. Provides an introduction to science, ethics, and ramifications in civic life of controversial issues concerning child or youth development in contemporary societies. Examines topics of ethical and civic concern and interest to parents, society, and young people and how developmental science informs these issues and policies as well as the decisions and actions of citizens in society. Students gain a basic understanding of how developmental research and theory inform policy and practices of societies as well as the individual decisions of parents, teachers, community members, and other citizens that influence the lives of children and youth. This course also examines how social issues influence science and its translation to action. Students will be exposed to a wide range of issues about children and youth that currently confront many societies around the world, and the state of the research evidence pertinent to these issues. Students will also learn how research is translated and disseminated so that it can inform policy and practice.
CPSY 2301 - Introduction to Child Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01677 - CPsy 2301/CPsy 3301
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will examine normative physical, social, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The major goals include fostering an understanding of the usefulness of a developmental approach to psychological issues, familiarizing students with current research and methodology in child psychology, and engaging students in the experiences of developmental psychology through observation and analysis of child behavior. PSY majors should take the cross-listed course CPSY 3301.
CPSY 4302 - Infant Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Perceptual, motor, emotional, social, and cognitive development during the first two years of life; the developing infant in his or her social and physical environment. prereq: CPSY 2301 or equivalent or instructor consent
CPSY 4303 - Adolescent Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Overview of development in the teenage years/second decade of life. Interactions of adolescents with family, school, and society. prereq: PSY 1001 or equivalent
NURS 2001 - Human Growth and Development: A Life Span Approach
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02668 - Nurs 2001/Nurs 3690/Nurs 3691
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical, personal, and culturally determined theories on life span development, from prenatal period through death/dying. Psychoanalytical, behaviorism, cognitive, sociocultural, and epigenetic categories of biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains.
EPSY 3132 - Psychology of Multiculturalism in Education (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course critically examines social and cultural diversity in the United States, confronting social issues of poverty, handicappism, homophobia, racism, sexism, victim-blaming, violence, and so on, and presenting models for change. Students examine how and why prejudices develop.
AAS 3875W - Comparative Race and Ethnicity in U.S. History (HIS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02074 - AAS 3875W/Hist 3875W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course examines the racial history of modern America. The focus is placed on how American Indians, African Americans, and immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Latin America struggle over identity, place, and meanings of these categories in society where racial hierarchy not only determined every aspect of how they lived, but also functioned as a lever to reconstitute a new nation and empire in the aftermath of the Civil War. We are interested in studying how these diverse groups experienced racialization not in the same way but in various and distinct ways in relation to each other.
CI 3101 - Issues in Urban Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Issues in urban education examines and critiques contemporary commentary on urban education through texts, social media, case studies, and service-learning in schools. Through examination of socio-cultural and socio-political contexts of urban education, this course considers the role of teachers, curriculum, and community in urban schooling.
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02193
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Manifestations of culture/power in education. How culture is mediating factor in educational achievement of students of color. Relationship between home/community, school cultures. Theories/research that show importance of integrating students' interests, knowledge, experience for increasing student engagement/achievement.
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social, psychological, economic, political aspects of social class/poverty. Implications for education as social institution/classroom pedagogy. Social class in U.S., working-class literature for adults/children, labor histories, economic systems.
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02469 - FSoS 1211/PsTL 1211
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to multicultural families using an ecological lens. The institution of the family is recognized globally as a basic unit of a society that produces, develops, socializes, and launches the next generation of its citizenry. This course will focus on families in contemporary America, a society that has grown increasingly diverse, and faces many complex challenges in today?s global environment. Using a human ecological lens allows us to examine families in their nested and interdependent environments--how individuals shape and are shaped by families, their human built environments, their socio-cultural environments, and their natural-physical environments. This is a service learning class.
FSOS 3102 - Family Systems and Diversity (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00529 - FSoS 3102/FSOS 5101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Family systems/theories applied to dynamics/processes relevant to family life. Diversity issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability. Divorce, single parenthood, remarriage. Family strengths/problems. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the impact of “immigration” (i.e., refugee vs. various types of immigration statuses) on family relationships, specifically how culture of origin and acculturation processes influence individuals and families over time; explores issues faced by various immigrant family systems, including a consideration of generational status, gender identities, social classes, and ethnic/racial group identities; develops intercultural interaction skills that prepare students to effectively engage with diverse immigrant families in multiple contexts; and builds practical skills that enhance students’ abilities to work in and collaborate with community-and faith-based organizations to strengthen cultural resources while overcoming barriers to increase service utilization.
LEAD 1961W - Personal Leadership in the University (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00296 - Lead 1961W/OLPD 1301W/OLPD 130
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Examine personal views of leadership, differences between personal/positional leadership, leadership ethics/values, personal leadership strengths/skills.
LEAD 3961 - Leadership, You, and Your Community
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00297 - Lead 3961//OLPD 3302W/PA 3961
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How do effective leaders create positive systemic change within complex systems? What is community and how does it shape the work of leadership? Students examine leadership from a multi-dimensional and multicultural perspective and critically examine leadership theories in authentic, complex community settings.
LEAD 4961W - Leadership for Global Citizenship (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00301
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this final, writing intensive capstone course, students pull together the threads of leadership theory and practice worked with over the course of the Leadership Minor. In addition, students gain experience working with diverse leaders from around the world, mapping political contexts, and planning their own global leadership path within their specific field.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
One feature of life in modern society is the presence of deep moral disagreement. Individuals must decide what actions are right, and societies must make political choices. How do we know what the right answer is? Which answers and approaches are rationally defensible? Philosophical reflection, rational argument, and systematic analysis can help us think about these problems more clearly and arrive at answers that are both useful and intellectually satisfying. This course will address various rotating topics, such as abortion, animal rights, criminal punishment, censorship, personal relationships, affirmative action, and other active areas of moral and social concern.
PHIL 3307 - Social Justice and Community Service (AH, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Exploration of concepts of justice, charity, equality, freedom, community service in connection with current social issues. Perspectives from philosophy, history, literature, and student involvement in the community. Community service for at least three hours per week.
SOC 3201 - Inequality: Introduction to Stratification
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Why does inequality exist? How does it work? These are the essential questions examined in this class. Topics range from welfare and poverty to the role of race and gender in getting ahead. We will pay particular attention to social inequities – why some people live longer and happier lives while others are burdened by worry, poverty, and ill health. prereq: soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3452 - Education and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Everyone thinks they know what "education" is. We've all been in schools, and we think we know how they work. We all have opinions about why some people go farther in school than others and why some people learn more than others. We all think we know what role education plays in shaping who gets good jobs, who has a good life, and who has more knowledge. This course is designed to challenge and expand what we think we know about all of these things. Students (and instructor) will critically engage scientific research in sociology, education, economics, public policy, and elsewhere. The goal will be to educate everyone about the current state of knowledge about how "education" works: what shapes educational achievement; where sex and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in educational achievements come from; what role education plays in economic development; how and why educational accomplishments result in better social and economic outcomes; and how educational institutions might be improved. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SW 1501 - Introduction to Peace Studies (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Interdisciplinary field that considers questions such as how human conflicts can be resolved in ways that promote justice/peace. Definitions, conditions, and causes of violence, nonviolence, war, and peace between nations, groups, or individuals.
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change organizing. U.S. power relations. How people organize. Cross-class, multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do service learning in social justice organization. prereq: 2501W
EPSY 5605W - Collaborative Practices for the Special Educator (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Skills/knowledge required to consult/collaborate with school personnel, families, other professionals to maintain effective educational support.
EPSY 5614W - Assessment and Due Process in Special Education (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Participants will learn basic standardized assessment and how it directly relates to special education. In addition, students will use the assessment as part of an ongoing process for making instructional programming decisions. Students will apply skills in designing and evaluating assessment plans and in making eligibility decisions.
EPSY 5616W - Classroom Management and Behavior Analytic Problem Solving (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Assumptions, principles, procedures of problem solving approach to analyzing behavior/programs for classroom management. Conducting observations, intervening, evaluating behavioral change.
ASL 1701 - American Sign Language I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
First of a 4-course sequence. American Sign Language (ASL), cultural values/rules of behavior of Deaf community in the United States. Receptive/expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary, grammatical structure, receptive/expressive fingerspelling, aspects of Deaf culture. Lab sessions.
ASL 1702 - American Sign Language II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Second of four-course sequence. American Sign Language (ASL), cultural values/rules of behavior of U.S. deaf community. Receptive/expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary, grammatical structure, receptive/expressive fingerspelling, aspects of Deaf culture. Lab. prereq: 1701 with grade of at least [S or C-] or dept consent
ASL 3703 - American Sign Language III
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Third of a four-course sequence. American Sign Language (ASL), cultural values/rules of behavior of U.S. deaf community. Receptive/expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary, grammatical structure, receptive/expressive fingerspelling, aspects of Deaf culture. Lab. prereq: 1702 with grade of at least [S or C-] or dept consent
ASL 3704 - American Sign Language IV
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fourth of a four-course sequence. American Sign Language (ASL), cultural values/rules of behavior of U.S. deaf community. Receptive/expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary, grammatical structure, receptive/expressive fingerspelling, aspects of deaf culture. Lab. prereq: 3703 with grade of at least [S or C-] or dept consent
EPSY 5641 - Foundations of Deaf Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Philosophical foundations of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) education. Engage in discussion, debates and processes that have influenced deaf education, communication methodologies and placement options in the US. Considered from the perspective of deaf children, adults and their families.
SLHS 1402 - The Talking Brain (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How the brain produces/understands speech/language, including various aspects of the nervous system involved in producing/understanding speech/language. Differences in brain structure/function among individuals with and without brain injury, based on scientific versus historical, mass media and literature portrayals.
SLHS 3303 - Language Acquisition and Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of typical language development, major theoretical perspectives about development, and analyses of children's language.
SLHS 1301W - The Physics and Biology of Spoken Language (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02488 - SLHS 1301W/SLHS 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physics and biology of spoken language, from the talker's production of sounds and words, to the transmission of sound, to the listener's perception of what was said. Computer analysis and synthesis of speech.
SLHS 1301V - The Physics and Biology of Spoken Language Honors (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02488
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physics/biology of spoken language, from talker's production of sounds/words, to transmission of sound, to listener's perception of what was said. Computer analysis/synthesis of speech.
SLHS 1401 - Communication Differences and Disorders (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SLHS 1401/3401
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to normal and disordered cognition and communication in regards to hearing, speech, and language in pediatric and adult populations. Specific focus on functional communication, assessment, and intervention as it relates to socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse populations.
SLHS 3401 - Communication Differences and Disorders (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: SLHS 1401/3401
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to normal and disordered cognition and communication in regards to hearing, speech, and language in pediatric and adult populations. Specific focus on functional communication, assessment, and intervention as it relates to socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse populations.
EPSY 3801 - The Science of Human Resilience and Wellbeing: Foundational Knowledge for Career and Life Success (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is for any undergraduate student interested in learning about and applying the theory and practice as it relates to resilience and wellbeing. This course integrates key cross-cutting, scientific findings from a range of psychological disciplines, including positive psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, neuropsychology, and social psychology. Stated simply, resilience refers to the human capacity and ability to both survive and thrive in the face of life circumstances. Students will develop a deep understanding of the theoretical concepts of stress, resilience, and wellbeing, as well as specific resilience practices scientific research has shown enable people to better manage and bounce back from stressful situations and enhance their social, emotional, and behavioral functioning in career and personal aspects of life.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
HSM 3040 - Dying and Death in Contemporary Society: Implications for Intervention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00355
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides basic background information on concepts, attitudes, ethics, and lifestyle management related to dying, death, grief, and bereavement. The emphasis is on preparing teachers, community health professionals, and other helping professionals for educational activities in this area. Prerequisite: sophomore
PUBH 3107 - Global Public Health and the Environment
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental determinants of health and or well-being of populations. Role of environment in public health. Population burden of disease. Variation of environmental public health determinants across globe. Interconnectedness of activities and actions of people in different countries. prereq: public health minor, instr consent
PUBH 3123 - Violence Prevention and Control: Theory, Research and Application
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The course will cover a range of topics including: definitions and characteristics of various forms of violence, prevalence and risk factors, health effects, and prevention initiatives. Sources and limitations of existing epidemiologic data, analytic challenges, research quality and ethics will be examined throughout the course. prereq: None
PUBH 3950 - From Kid to Community: Personal, Social and Environmental Influences on Youth Obesity
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Public health strategies for prevention of pediatric obesity. Includes overview of epidemiology of child/adolescent obesity focusing on social-ecological risk factors. Discussion of implications of risk factors for developing environmentally-focused interventions/programs. prereq: Students should have completed one basic, introductory nutrition course or equivalent or permission by instructor
PUBH 3955 - Using Policy to Address the Weight-Related Health of Child and Adolescent Populations
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02368
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of federal, state, local policy approaches. National initiatives for prevention of child/adolescent obesity. Specific policies will be discussed at local, state, federal levels. Extensive discussion on evidence of impact of policies on child/adolescent weight.
CI 5413 - Foundations of Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Reading processes, development of readers. Assessment and tutoring of individual children in reading and other literacy practices. prereq: CI 3610 and concurrent registration with CI 5414
CI 5414 - Practicum: Working With Developing Readers
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Field-based practicum. Students apply learning from their University course to working with developing readers. Instructor provides specific assignment. prereq: CI 3610 and concurrent registration with CI 5413 required; elementary education foundations major
CI 5405 - Middle School Language Arts Methods
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to the unique needs of middle school students in the language arts classroom. Language arts content and pedagogical skills. Adolescent development/psychology. Field placement in a middle school language arts classroom. prereq: Elem ed licensure student
CI 3401W - Diversity in Children's Literature (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Classic/contemporary books for children in all genres, created by authors/illustrators. Research in transactional theory. Cultural authenticity. Reading, discussion, group activities, interactive lectures, projects.
MTHE 3101 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math content knowledge of K-6 in an environment modeling pedagogy for future implementation. Integrated content/methods. Problem solving, connections, communication, reasoning, representation. Functions, proportionality, number, numeration. prereq: [College algebra, elementary FOE or Early Childhood student, jr status or above] or instr consent
MTHE 3102 - Mathematics and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Math content knowledge of K-6 in an environment modeling pedagogy for future implementation. Integrated content/methods. Problem solving, connections, communication, reasoning, representation. Geometry, measurement, probability, statistics. prereq: 3101, college algebra
CI 5822 - Mathematics Instruction in the Elementary Grades
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of learning mathematics in elementary grades. Objectives, content, philosophy, instructional materials, methods of instruction/evaluation. prereq: Early Childhood or Elementary Education ILP
CI 4121 - Culture Power and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02193
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Manifestations of culture/power in education. How culture is mediating factor in educational achievement of students of color. Relationship between home/community, school cultures. Theories/research that show importance of integrating students' interests, knowledge, experience for increasing student engagement/achievement.
CI 4122 - Social Class Education and Pedagogy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Social, psychological, economic, political aspects of social class/poverty. Implications for education as social institution/classroom pedagogy. Social class in U.S., working-class literature for adults/children, labor histories, economic systems.
CI 1563 - Physics by Inquiry (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Laboratory-based introductory class where students learn by experimenting and model building and testing. Topics include electric circuits, light and color, and observational astronomy. Emphases include the nature of science and science learning, effective strategies for team-based learning, and logical reasoning skills.
EPSY 3302 - Introduction to Communication Skills for Educational and Community Settings
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Working with diverse individuals/groups in educational/community settings. Communication skills/concepts. Self-reflection on communication style.
EPSY 5401 - Counseling Procedures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Emphasis on the counseling relationship and principles of interviewing. Case studies, role playing, and demonstration. For individuals whose professional work includes counseling and interviewing. prereq: Upper div student
CI 3342 - Social Media & Connected Learning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course investigates current and potential future impacts of social media using connected learning (Ito) and participatory culture (Jenkins) as a theoretical lens to understand the ways in which it can be used for education. Connected learning focuses on learning "pathways" that move across formal and informal settings to transform the very nature of learning - what it means, how it occurs, and where it takes place. In addition to gaining a philosophical understanding of participatory practices in spaces of connected learning, students will develop conceptual and practical expertise in using social media applications and social networking platforms for learning, creative expression, forming connections, and interacting as global citizens. The overarching aim of this course is to help students become critical consumers and ethical producers of new media in various forms for learning purposes. A balanced analysis and critique of both the affordances and the challenges associated with social media use as a tool for learning will be an essential component of the course and will frame each social media application and network that is explored and authentically integrated into the course. An examination of social media practices and influences will include their use in both formal education as well as informal learning contexts.
CI 2311W - Introduction to Technology and Ethics in Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01754 - CI 2311W/CI 4311
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Values and ethical issues related to technology use in education, workplace, and family/community life.
CI 4311W - Technology and Ethics in Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01754
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Critique of values and ethical issues related to technology use in education, the workplace, and family and community life.
CI 2312 - Sex, Drugs, and the Internet: Educational Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01750
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Immersive exploration/critique of advantages/risks associated with society's pervasive use of the Internet. Dangers and strategies to combat them. The Internet's potential for teaching/learning.
CI 4312 - Sex, Drugs, and the Internet: Educational Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01750
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Immersive exploration/critique of advantages/risks associated with society's pervasive use of the Internet. Dangers and strategies to combat them. The Internet's potential for teaching/learning.
EPSY 5113 - Psychology of Instruction and Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Introduction to adult learning and instructional design. Application of core foundational knowledge to development of effective learning environments for adults. Topics include philosophy, learning theories, instructional models, development and experience, individual differences, evaluation, assessment, and technology.
EPSY 5119 - Mind, Brain, and Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
How educationally relevant skills/concepts develop in both typical/atypical children. prereq: 3301 or equiv
EPSY 5157 - Social & Developmental Psychology of Education
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Social and developmental psychology provide underpinnings for a range of methods for conducting research in real-world settings. They also lay conceptual foundations for understanding a range of social and developmental processes. The course will cover a full range of topics within social and developmental psychology, plus selected topics in personality psychology, and examine their implications for understanding and structuring educational and other professional settings. Discussions will include a strong focus on educator and practitioner applications of the research.