Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Physiology B.A.

Integrative Biology and Physiology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 60 to 69
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The physiology major concentrates on understanding the functions of the human body from individual cells to organ systems. The program is based upon principles from chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biological sciences. This major is particularly appropriate for students who intend to enter medical school or graduate study in any of a variety of biological, health, or biomedical sciences. The required courses form a strong core in biomedical science. Many of the required courses are identical to those required for admission to medical school. Students may tailor the overall degree program to specific needs and may choose additional science courses in preparation for medical school, other health sciences professional schools, or graduate school. Students may also take advantage of the freedom to pursue a more diverse undergraduate experience in CLA. Others may benefit from an opportunity to pursue a double major. For the latest information, visit the physiology major website: http://physiology.med.umn.edu/undergraduate-program.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 4 semesters or the equivalent of a second language. All CLA BA degrees require 18 upper division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Physiology BA is PHSL. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First Year Experience course sequence.
Preparatory Coursework
Take 27-30 credits of prerequisites for future physiology coursework, such as PHSL 3061 and 3701.
Quantitative Sequence
Take 2 courses for a total of 7-8 credits.
MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
or ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3270 - Introduction To Systems Biology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (3.0 cr)
or CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
or CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology (3.0 cr)
or EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry Sequence
Take 4 courses for a total of 8 credits.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
Physics Sequence
Take 2 courses for a total of 8-10 credits.
Physics I
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Physics II
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II [PHYS, WI] (5.0 cr)
or PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
General Biology
Take the following course for 4 credits.
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Major Core Curriculum
Take at least 10 courses for 27-33 credits.
Organic Chemistry
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
or CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences (3.0 cr)
Physiology
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors [WI] (1.0 cr)
PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory (2.0 cr)
Advanced Physiology Course(s)
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 1 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOC 5444 - Muscle (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PHSL 4xxx
· PHSL 5xxx
Biochemistry
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
or BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)
Genetics
GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
Cell Biology
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
or BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
or PHSL 4700 - Cell Physiology (3.0 cr)
Electives
A course taken as a major requirement cannot also count as an elective.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy (1.0-6.0 cr)
· ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System (1.0-2.0 cr)
· BIOC 4xxx
· BIOC 5444 - Muscle (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4993 - Directed Studies (1.0-6.0 cr)
· BIOL 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-6.0 cr)
· CHEM 4xxx
· CSCI 3xxx
· CSCI 4xxx
· GCC 3016 - Grand Challenge: Antibiotic resistance - How can we avoid the apocalypse? [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2xxx
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PHSL 4xxx
· PHSL 5xxx
· PSY 3011 - Introduction to Learning and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5031W - Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5036W - Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5037 - Psychology of Hearing (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics (3.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GCC 3007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3014 - Grand Challenge: The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5014 - Grand Challenge: The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
· Intercultural Competency Electives
These classes provide a cultural perspective on healthcare and/or society and can be taken to fulfill the Electives requirement for the major.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4071 - Race, Culture, and Vision (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 5890 - Economics of the Health-Care System (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3301 - Introduction to Cultural Psychology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ALL 3676 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors [WI] (1.0 cr)
· PSY 5031W - Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5036W - Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - American Race Relations [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00067 - Math 1142/1271/1281/1371/1571H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00068 - Math 1272/1282/1252/1372/1572
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00258 - AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
BIOL 3270 - Introduction To Systems Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Emergent properties of metabolic networks; Computational modeling of metabolism; Parameter estimation from high-throughput measurements; Prediction of metabolic phenotypes for knockout mutants; Flux balance analysis; Metabolic control analysis. prereq: Recommended prereq MATH1241, BIOC3021
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; 2003 recommended
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01933
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: One semester of college-level [[calculus or statistics or computer programming], general biology]
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02133 - CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Emphasizes computing tasks common in biology. Programming techniques: variables, flow control, input/output, strings, pattern matching, arrays, hash tables, functions, subroutines. Concepts in computing: algorithms, complexity, documentation, regular expressions/grammars, local variables, encapsulation. Students complete lab projects in Perl language. prereq: 1002H or Biol 1002 or 1009H or Biol 1009 or equiv or instr consent
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01316 - Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
PHYS 1201W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078 - Phys 1101W/1201W/1301W/1401V/1
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems, including fluids, waves, heat. Lab. prereq: [High school or college calculus], trigonometry, algebra
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00078
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
PHYS 1202W - Introductory Physics for Biology and Pre-medicine II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental principles of physics. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena, including optics, atomic structure. Lab. prereq: 1201W
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00079
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. prereq: 1401V, honors student or permission of University Honors Program
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry, honors; one term of college chemistry recommended
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01929 - Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02108 - Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab techniques in synthesis, purification, and characterization of typical organic compounds. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302, 2304] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2304]
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2304 - Organic Chemistry II for the Life Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01741 - Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conjugation, aromaticity, chemistry of carbonyls/amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins. Enzyme mechanisms, lipids, nucleic acids. Focuses on biological significance of organic molecules/mechanisms. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301; designed for life sciences majors
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01354
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: &3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Students write a research paper on a topic of interest, mentored by a faculty member. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus
PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00317 - BMEn 3701/Phsl 3701/Phsl 3063/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiments in physiology. Emphasizes quantitative aspects, including analysis of organ systems. prereq: Physiology major
BIOC 5444 - Muscle
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC/Phsl 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring
Muscle molecular structure/function and disease. Muscle regulation, ion transport, and force generation. Muscular dystrophy and heart disease. prereq: 3021 or BIOL 3021 or 4331 or BIOL 4331 or PHSL 3061 or instr consent
PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individualized study in physiology. Students address a selected problem in physiology through library or lab research, supervised by physiology faculty. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in college physiology, instr consent
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Metabolism/regulation of metabolism. Quantitative treatments of chemical equilibria, enzyme catalysis, and bioenergetics. Chemical basis of genetic information flow. prereq:(BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003) and (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085) or equivalent AND not a CBS student
BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00467 - BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics. prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: BIOL 2002 or BIOL 1009
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00052 - Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: [[Biol 3020 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331], [any CBS major or major in [animal science or applied plant science or BA biology or BA microbiology or nutrition or physiology or biology/society/environment or biomedical engineering] or Grad MBS major]] or instr consent
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01965 - Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: - [(CBS major or CSE major) and (BIOL 3020 or BIOL 4003)] or grad MSB
PHSL 4700 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Critical cell functions. Regulation of pH, volume, intracellular electrolyte composition, calcium signaling, membrane potential dynamics, motility, aspects of intercellular communication. prereq: [3051 or 3061 or BIOL 3211], [CHEM 1022 or equiv], [MATH 1272 or equiv]
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01226 - Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 18.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
x prereq: instr consent
ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01795
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-day intensive course. Pelvis, perineum, and urinary system with cadaveric dissection. Structure/function of pelvic and urinary organs, including common dysfunction and pathophysiology. Laboratory dissections, including kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, pelvic viscera and perineum (male or female), pelvic floor, vascular and nervous structures. Grand rounds section. prereq: One undergrad anatomy course, one undergrad physiology course, instr consent
BIOC 5444 - Muscle
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC/Phsl 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring
Muscle molecular structure/function and disease. Muscle regulation, ion transport, and force generation. Muscular dystrophy and heart disease. prereq: 3021 or BIOL 3021 or 4331 or BIOL 4331 or PHSL 3061 or instr consent
BIOL 4993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 36.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual study on selected topics or problems. Emphasizes selected readings, use of scientific literature or literature on biology education. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
BIOL 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 36.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. prereq: instr consent, dept consent
GCC 3016 - Grand Challenge: Antibiotic resistance - How can we avoid the apocalypse? (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid “antibiotic apocalypse.” The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs.
GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for juniors and seniors to learn experimental approaches and techniques to study cellular processes and stem cell biology during animal development and tissue regeneration. Students will be exposed to the advantages of different model systems that include cultured cells, chick, C. elegans and zebrafish. Students will learn to manipulate the cytoskeleton, perform cell differentiation, RNAi and regeneration assays, and to image both fixed tissue and live animal samples with conventional light microscopes as well as cutting edge technology, including super-resolution and multi-photon microscopes. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: 3033 or Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms that govern development from gametogenesis through fertilization. Embryogenesis/postembryonic development. Mechanisms of morphogenesis/differentiation. Classical/molecular approaches in various model organisms. Genetic models such as bacteriophage, yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, and the mouse. prereq: Biol 4003; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BIOL 4004 irecommended
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern, integrative approaches combining cell/molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics to investigate cell organization/function. Membranes, signaling, extracellular matrix, secretion, endocytosis, cytoskeleton, nucleus. Analysis of scientific papers to illustrate new concepts in and experimental approaches to cell organization/function. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent; [sr or grad student] recommended
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00431 - Biol 2032/MicB 3301/MicB 3303/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or instructor consent
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01727 - /MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic, cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innate immunity. Antigen recognition by B/T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes/other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology. prereq: [2022 or VPB 2022 or BIOL 2032 or VPB 2032 or VBS 2032 or 3301 or MicB 3301], [BIOC 3021 or BIOL 3021 or BIOC 4331]
PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individualized study in physiology. Students address a selected problem in physiology through library or lab research, supervised by physiology faculty. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in college physiology, instr consent
PSY 3011 - Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods/findings of research on learning and behavior change. Twentieth-century theoretical perspectives, including contemporary models. Emphasizes animal learning and behavioral psychology. prereq: 1001
PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02597 - Madr 3031/Psy 3031
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychological, biological, and physical bases of sensory experience in humans and animals. Emphasizes senses of vision/hearing. prereq: PSY 1001
PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00083 - Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 5031W - Perception (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5031
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Topics include color vision, pattern vision, image formation in the eye, object recognition, reading, and impaired vision. prereq: 3031 or 3051 or instr consent
PSY 5036W - Computational Vision (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control. prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5037 - Psychology of Hearing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5037
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Biological and physical aspects of hearing, auditory psychophysics, theories and models of hearing, perception of complex sounds including music and speech. Clinical/other applications. prereq: [MATH 1271, [3031 or 3051 or 3061]] or grad student
PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory. prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent
PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genetic methods for studying human/animal behavior. Emphasizes nature/origin of individual differences in behavior. Twin and adoption methods. Cytogenetics, molecular genetics, linkage/association studies. prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: : 3011; College algebra or instr consent; Stat course recommended
GCC 3007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02320
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen---vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5007 - Grand Challenge: Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02320 - GCC 3007/GCC 5007
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen---vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
GCC 3014 - Grand Challenge: The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265 - GCC 3014/GCC 5014
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century.
GCC 5014 - Grand Challenge: The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02265 - GCC 3014/GCC 5014
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century.
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 4071 - Race, Culture, and Vision
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Evaluation of main trends in study of racism. Psychological, sociological, symbolic, and "critical" approaches that treat racism as a sociodiscursive phenomenon. Racist discourse as a practice that defines an "other" and subjugates that other to strategies of exclusion. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 3003 or instr consent
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00025 - Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Behavior of households, firms, and industries under competitive/monopolistic conditions. Factors influencing production, price, and other decisions. Applications of theory. Economic efficiency. Distribution of well-being. prereq: [[1101, 1102] or equiv], [MATH 1271 or equiv]
ECON 5890 - Economics of the Health-Care System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 5890/PubH 5893
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of U.S. health-care sector. Emphasizes problems of pricing, production, distribution. Health-care services as one factor contributing to nation's health. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01971
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contemporary condition of global connectedness. Ways our habits, tastes, and experiences involve a stream of encounters with the global. Terrains of interconnection, including tourism, music, the Internet, and mass culture.
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02573 - GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Biopiracy, vaccine trials, use/abuse of genetics, genetically modified organisms. Who determines direction of scientific/medical research? Impact on social thinking/practices and on globalization of science. Global economics of science.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Globalization produces complex, sometimes volatile, local responses. Course explores interconnectedness of the world, considering not one world, but many. Topics include colonialism, consumption, diasporic conditions, global media, nationalism, supra-national governance. Examines how globality is experienced and contested locally and specifically. prereq: [3101, 3144] or instr consent
GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Similarities/differences in women's experiences throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media (feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral history, autobiography).
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways in which modern biology has been site of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender demographics of scientific professions.
POL 3464 - Politics of Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Causes/consequences of economic inequality in the USA and Europe. America and European countries in contrast to one another. What differences there are and whether they matter.
PSY 3301 - Introduction to Cultural Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on how culture influences basic psychological processes (e.g., emotion, cognition, psychopathology) in domains that span different areas of psychology (e.g., social, clinical, developmental, industrial-organizational) and of other disciplines (e.g., anthropology, public health, sociology). prereq: 1001
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Context of social, political, economic, and cultural forces and medical knowledge. Social meanings. How people seek help and manage illnesses. How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social movements surrounding health. prereq: One sociology course or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00283 - AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
GLOS 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00412 - GloS 1015W,V/Hist 1015W,V,1019
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Increased global interconnections over past 50 years. Impact of information revolution on human rights, economic inequality, ecological challenges, and decolonization. Comparative cases from Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Middle East.
HIST 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00412 - GloS 1015W,V/Hist 1015W,V,1019
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Increased global interconnections over past 50 years. Impact of information revolution on human rights, economic inequality, ecological challenges, and decolonization. Cases in Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Middle East. prereq: Fr or soph or non-hist major
ALL 3676 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00465 - ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Contemporary society/culture in South Asia from anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship, and politics; religion; ethnicity; and Indian diaspora.
ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
AAS 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437 - AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
SOC 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02044 - Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph; SOC 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from a historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01847
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Experiences of Muslim women/families from historical/comparative perspective. Gender/family power relations in colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education/health, paid work, human rights, and Islamic feminism. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture.
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Globalization of organizations, political relations, and culture. Dependency, world systems theories. Growth of international nongovernmental organizations, their impact on state policies and civil society. Expansion of international norms. Globalization of popular culture. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013 - Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/Chic 4231
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01013
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
CSCL 3458W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3411W/5411W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ways in which modern biology has been site of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender demographics of scientific professions.
PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: &3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Students write a research paper on a topic of interest, mentored by a faculty member. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus
PSY 5031W - Perception (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5031
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Topics include color vision, pattern vision, image formation in the eye, object recognition, reading, and impaired vision. prereq: 3031 or 3051 or instr consent
PSY 5036W - Computational Vision (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control. prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory. prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GLOS 3701W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01064
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis/explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
AAS 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437 - AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
SOC 3211W - American Race Relations (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02437
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the contours of race in the post-civil rights era United States. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. The class will also class consider the future of race relations in the U.S. and evaluate remedies to racial inequality.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00581
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity, and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality, and reproduction. Possibilities for social change.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro/Soc 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity and as features of social organization. Experiences of women of color in the United States. Family life, work, violence, sexuality/reproduction. Possibilities for social change. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about and relate to food. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01131 - GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Food issues from sociological perspective. Cross-cultural differences in how groups/societies think about/relate to food.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
CSCL 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01555 - CSCL 3456W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.