Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Human Physiology B.A.

Integrative Biology and Physiology
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 55 to 74
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The human physiology major concentrates on understanding the functions of the human body from individual cells to organ systems. The program is based upon principles from chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biological sciences. This major is particularly appropriate for students who intend to enter medical school or graduate study in any of a variety of biological, health, or biomedical sciences. The required courses form a strong core in biomedical science. Many of the required courses are identical to those required for admission to medical school. Students may tailor the overall degree program to specific needs and may choose additional science courses in preparation for medical school, other health sciences professional schools, or graduate school. Students may also take advantage of the freedom to pursue a more diverse undergraduate experience in CLA. Others may benefit from an opportunity to pursue a double major. For the latest information, visit the human physiology major website: https://www.physiology.umn.edu/degrees-and-programs/undergraduate-program.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
All CLA BA degrees require 18 upper division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the human physiology BA is PHSL. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. At least 11 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Foundation Courses
Take 11 - 13 course(s) totaling 32 - 41 credit(s) from the following:
Quantitative Sequence
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MATH 1271 - Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· MATH 1272 - Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)
· Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology (3.0 cr)
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· Chemistry Sequence
Chemistry
Take exactly 7 course(s) totaling exactly 18 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab (4.0 cr)
or Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Take exactly 6 course(s) totaling exactly 13 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)
or Honors Chemistry
Take exactly 7 course(s) totaling exactly 19 credit(s) from the following:
· CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
· CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab (5.0 cr)
· CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)
· Physics Sequence
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· General Biology
General Biology (Preferred)
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or Foundations of Biology
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
· BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)
Core Courses
Take exactly 6 course(s) totaling 16 - 22 credit(s) from the following:
Physiology
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· Advanced Physiology Elective
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 1 - 6 credit(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PHSL 4021 - Advanced Physiology and Bioengineering: Bionic Human (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 4031 - Physiological Discussions: Contemporary Topics (2.0 cr)
· PHSL 4242 - Professional Skills Development for Biomedical Scientists (2.0 cr)
· PHSL 4900 - Advanced Physiology Teaching Laboratory (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PHSL 5061 - Principles of Physiology for Biomedical Engineering (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 5096 - Integrative Biology and Physiology Research Advances (1.0 cr)
· PHSL 5115 - Clinical Physiology I (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5116 - Clinical Physiology II (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5197 - Stress Physiology (1.0-3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5510 - Advanced Cardiac Physiology and Anatomy (2.0-3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5511 - Advanced Neuromuscular Junction Physiology (2.0-3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System (1.0-2.0 cr)
· PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology (3.0 cr)
or PHSL 5702 - Cell Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 5444 - Muscle (3.0 cr)
or BIOC 5444 - Muscle (3.0 cr)
· Biochemistry
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)
· Genetics
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· GCD 3022 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4003 - Genetics (3.0 cr)
· Cell Biology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
or GCD 4005W - Cell Biology-Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take exactly 3 course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
· ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory (2.0 cr)
· ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy (1.0-6.0 cr)
· BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry [WI] (2.0 cr)
· BIOC 4225 - Laboratory in NMR Techniques (1.0 cr)
· BIOC 4325 - Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry (1.0 cr)
· BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)
· BIOC 4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression (4.0 cr)
· BIOC 4351 - Protein Engineering (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4521 - Introduction to Physical Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOC 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOC 4960 - Special Topics in Biochemistry (3.0 cr)
· BIOC 4993 - Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOC 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOL 4993 - Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)
· BIOL 4994 - Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)
· CHEM 4001 - Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 4011 - Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4021 - Computational Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4066 - Chemistry of Industry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4094W - Directed Research [WI] (1.0-5.0 cr)
· CHEM 4101 - Modern Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4111W - Modern Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis Lab [WI] (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 4201 - Materials Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4221 - Introduction to Polymer Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4301 - Applied Surface and Colloid Science (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4311W - Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CHEM 4321 - Organic Synthesis (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4322 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4352 - Physical Organic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4361 - Interpretation of Organic Spectra (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4411 - Introduction to Chemical Biology (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4412 - Chemical Biology of Enzymes (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4423W - Foundations of Chemical Biology Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· CHEM 4501 - Introduction to Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Statistical Mechanics (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4502 - Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4511W - Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4601 - Green Chemistry [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4701 - Inorganic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4711W - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4715 - Physical Inorganic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4725 - Organometallic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4735 - Bioinorganic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4745 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 3041 - Introduction to Discrete Structures and Algorithms (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3061 - Introduction to Computer Systems (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3081W - Program Design and Development [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 3970 - Industrial Student Co-op Assignment (2.0 cr)
· CSCI 4011 - Formal Languages and Automata Theory (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4041 - Algorithms and Data Structures (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4061 - Introduction to Operating Systems (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4131 - Internet Programming (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 4211 - Introduction to Computer Networks (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 4271W - Development of Secure Software Systems [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4511W - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4611 - Programming Interactive Computer Graphics and Games (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 4707 - Practice of Database Systems (3.0 cr)
· CSCI 4970W - Advanced Project Laboratory [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)
· GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)
· GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)
· GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2066 - Elementary Differential Equations (1.0-4.0 cr)
· MATH 2142 - Elementary Linear Algebra (4.0 cr)
· MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2283 - Sequences, Series, and Foundations (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2472 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus III, First Semester [MATH] (2.0 cr)
· MATH 2474 - Advanced Topics for Secondary Students (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology (1.0-5.0 cr)
· PHSL 4021 - Advanced Physiology and Bioengineering: Bionic Human (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 4031 - Physiological Discussions: Contemporary Topics (2.0 cr)
· PHSL 4095H - Honors Problems in Physiology (2.0-4.0 cr)
· PHSL 4242 - Professional Skills Development for Biomedical Scientists (2.0 cr)
· PHSL 4900 - Advanced Physiology Teaching Laboratory (1.0-6.0 cr)
· PHSL 5061 - Principles of Physiology for Biomedical Engineering (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 5096 - Integrative Biology and Physiology Research Advances (1.0 cr)
· PHSL 5115 - Clinical Physiology I (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5116 - Clinical Physiology II (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5197 - Stress Physiology (1.0-3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5444 - Muscle (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 5510 - Advanced Cardiac Physiology and Anatomy (2.0-3.0 cr)
· PSY 3011 - Introduction to Learning and Behavior (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5036W - Computational Vision [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics (3.0 cr)
· STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3022 - Data Analysis (4.0 cr)
· STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis (4.0 cr)
· BIOC 4125 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (3.0 cr)
or BIOC 4185 - Laboratory in Molecular Genetics (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4214 - Polymers (3.0 cr)
or CHEN 4214 - Polymers (3.0 cr)
or MATS 4214 - Polymers (3.0 cr)
· CHEM 4223W - Polymer Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
or CHEN 4223W - Polymer Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
or MATS 4223W - Polymer Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)
· CSCI 4203 - Computer Architecture (4.0 cr)
or EE 4363 - Computer Architecture and Machine Organization (4.0 cr)
· CSCI 4921 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 4321 - History of Computing [TS, HIS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3007 - Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5007 - Toward Conquest of Disease [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century [TS] (3.0 cr)
· MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2471 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus II, Second Semester [MATH] (2.0 cr)
· MATH 2263 - Multivariable Calculus (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2374 - CSE Multivariable Calculus and Vector Analysis (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2573H - Honors Calculus III (4.0 cr)
or MATH 2473 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus III, Second Semester [MATH] (2.0 cr)
or MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV (4.0 cr)
· MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)
or VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory (5.0 cr)
· MICB 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
or VPM 4131 - Immunology (3.0 cr)
· PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology (3.0 cr)
or PHSL 5702 - Cell Physiology (4.0 cr)
· PHSL 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System (1.0-2.0 cr)
or ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System (1.0-2.0 cr)
· PSY 5031W - Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)
or NSC 5031W - Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Intercultural Competency Electives
These classes provide a cultural perspective on healthcare and/or society and can be taken to fulfill the electives requirement for the major. No more than one 1xxx-level course may count as an elective.
Take 0 or more course(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4.0 cr)
· ECON 5890 - Economics of the Health-Care System (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3464 - The Politics of Economic Inequality (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3301 - Introduction to Cultural Psychology (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3205 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science and Society (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· 1xxx-level
Take no more than 1 course(s) totaling at most 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or HIST 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges [GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
Capstone
Students who double major within CLA and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major are still required to take the human physiology BA capstone.
Take 1 - 2 course(s) totaling 1 - 5 credit(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors [WI] (1.0 cr)
· Honors students
Cum Laude and Magna Cum Laude candidates must register for a minimum of 3 credits. Summa Cum Laude candidates must register for a minimum of 4 credits.
· PHSL 4095H - Honors Problems in Physiology (2.0-4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors [WI] (1.0 cr)
 
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MATH 1271 - Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems. prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]
MATH 1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory. prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 1272 - Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates. prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-
MATH 1572H - Honors Calculus II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra. prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program
ANSC 3011 - Statistics for Animal Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basic statistical concepts. Develop statistical reasoning/critical thinking skills. Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, experimental design, linear correlation, linear regression and multiple regression. How to make sound arguments/decisions based on statistics when reviewing news articles or scientific publications with statistical content. Explore/draw conclusions from data using a basic statistical software package.
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
CSCI 1113 - Introduction to C/C++ Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Programming for scientists/engineers. C/C++ programming constructs, object-oriented programming, software development, fundamental numerical techniques. Exercises/examples from various scientific fields. prereq: Math 1271 or Math 1371 or Math 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent
CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3003/CSci 5465
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
This course builds computational skills needed to carry out basic data analysis tasks common in modern biology. Students will learn computing concepts (algorithm development, data structures, complexity analysis) along with practical programming skills in Python and R. No previous programming knowledge assumed. Prereq: introductory biology course.
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 2301 - Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules. prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H
CHEM 2302 - Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301
CHEM 2311 - Organic Lab
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies. prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302
CHEM 1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.
CHEM 1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals. prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H
CHEM 1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.
CHEM 1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry. prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H
CHEM 1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H
CHEM 2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules. prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student
CHEM 2312H - Honors Organic Lab
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Honors organic chemistry lab. prereq: [2301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2301], [Chem or ChemE or BioC] major, instr consent
CHEM 2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids. prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
PHYS 1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus. prereq: High School or College Calculus
PHYS 1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1571
PHYS 1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.
PHYS 1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered. prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent
PHYS 1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena. prereq: 1301W, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572
PHYS 1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena. prereq: 1401V, honors student or permission of University Honors Program
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1009H - Honors: General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.
BIOL 1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
BIOL 1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS honors students
BIOL 1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE. This course is required for all CBS majors
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phsl 3063/Phsl 3071
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHSL 3701 - Physiology Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: BMEn 3701/Phsl 3701/Phsl 3063/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiments in physiology. Emphasizes quantitative aspects, including analysis of organ systems. prereq: Physiology major
PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individualized study in physiology. Students address a selected problem in physiology through library or lab research, supervised by physiology faculty. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in college physiology, instr consent
PHSL 4021 - Advanced Physiology and Bioengineering: Bionic Human
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Is "Iron Man" technology just around the corner? This course will examine how, and if, biomedical devices can address the needs of humans suffering from various pathologies and/or disabilities, or enhance human performance. Advanced discussion of the physiology of organs/organ systems and relevant devices past, present, and future. Emphasis will be on an in-depth understanding of normal physiology including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, liver, motor, sensory, and pancreatic physiology. Classes will involve review of the physiology of organ systems, design considerations for medical devices, and discussions of published papers about basic science and clinical trials. Classes will be a combination of content presentation and discussion.
PHSL 4031 - Physiological Discussions: Contemporary Topics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students read, critically evaluate, present, and discuss research in cellular and organ system physiology. Journal club setting led by faculty members. prereq: 3061 or 3063 or 5061 or instr consent
PHSL 4242 - Professional Skills Development for Biomedical Scientists
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Students will gain valuable experience in professional development for bio-medical science, applicable to academic, clinical, biotech, pharma, medical and other career paths. This course features essential professional skills development, including critical evaluation of the scientific literature, oral short presentations, development of research project specific aims, and development of individual WOW statements (aka the Bill Gates elevator pitch). Students will gain knowledge of grant mechanisms and on strategies and mechanics to writing a winning grant. Students will evaluate funded research projects, develop and write their own grant, (possibly based on their previous PHSL 3062W paper or other experiences) and perform peer review critiques of their submitted grants. There are no conventional tests in this class. prereq: PHSL 3062W is recommended.
PHSL 4900 - Advanced Physiology Teaching Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Teaching in undergrad physiology labs. Instructional sessions, hands-on teaching experiences. prereq: [3051 or [3061, 3071]], instr consent
PHSL 5061 - Principles of Physiology for Biomedical Engineering
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, muscle, central and peripheral nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: Biomedical engineering grad, one yr college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHSL 5096 - Integrative Biology and Physiology Research Advances
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Attend/participate in IBP Fall/Spring seminar series. Seminars given by faculty, invited speakers, students. Exposure to key topics. How to present seminars. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5115 - Clinical Physiology I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cellular mechanisms, disease states and clinical applications of excitable tissues: cellular transport, neurophysiology, skeletal muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5116 - Clinical Physiology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cellular mechanisms, disease states and clinical applications of metabolic systems: respiratory physiology, renal physiology, acid base physiology, metabolism, gastrointestinal physiology, endocrine physiology, physiology of pregnancy and labor. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5197 - Stress Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journal club format. Meets weekly to examine foundations of stress, historical progress, development of stress, modern stress physiology. Focus on stress-induced pathology with attention to cardiovascular, metabolic, neuroendocrine disorders. Students participating in the weekly discussion are assessed on discussion participation, completion of weekly writing assignments and quality of the presentation in the class, are eligible for 1 credit. Students completing a midterm (test) and a final project (specific aims page of an NIH RO1 grant) in addition to the criteria described above are eligible for 3 credits. Prerequisite: instructor consent is required. Graduate student standing, master students, and post-doctoral fellows (if they are eligible for credits). Undergraduate students must have taken PHSL 3061 or equivalent, and have previous laboratory research experience.
PHSL 5510 - Advanced Cardiac Physiology and Anatomy
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts, advanced topics related to clinical/biomedical cardiac physiology. Lectures, laboratories, workshops, anatomical dissections. Intense, one week course. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5511 - Advanced Neuromuscular Junction Physiology
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Summer
Fundamental concepts and advanced topics related to clinical/biomedical aspects of neuromuscular junction physiology. Lectures, laboratories, workshops, anatomical dissections. Intense, one week course. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 5525/Phsl 5525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-day intensive course. Pelvis, perineum, and urinary system with cadaveric dissection. Structure/function of pelvic and urinary organs, including common dysfunction and pathophysiology. Laboratory dissections, including kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, pelvic viscera and perineum (male or female), pelvic floor, vascular and nervous structures. Grand rounds section. prereq: One undergrad anatomy course, one undergrad physiology course, instr consent
PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 5702/Phsl 4702/Phsl 5702
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell Physiology involves the study of control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis with respect to a variety of parameters including regulation of pH, volume, nutrient content, intracellular electrolyte composition, membrane potential, receptor signaling and aspects of intercellular communication. The first half of this team-taught course is organized in a partially on-line format where students learn from on-line materials and then take an on-line quiz each week before meeting with the instructor to review key concepts in class. The second half of the course is presented in lecture format. Student evaluation is based on quiz scores, in-class exams and graded problem sets. prereq: [3051 or 3061 or BIOL 3211], [CHEM 1022 or equiv], [MATH 1272 or equiv]
PHSL 5702 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 5702/Phsl 4702/Phsl 5702
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell Physiology involves the study of control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis with respect to a variety of parameters including regulation of pH, volume, nutrient content, intracellular electrolyte composition, membrane potential, receptor signaling and aspects of intercellular communication. The first half of this team-taught course is organized in a partially on-line format where students learn from on-line materials and then take an on-line quiz each week before meeting with the instructor to review key concepts in class. The second half of the course is presented in lecture format. Student evaluation is based on quiz scores, in-class exams and graded problem sets. prereq: [Two semesters of physics/chemistry, calculus, one semester of systems-level physiology] or instr consent
PHSL 5444 - Muscle
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5444/Phsl 5444/BMEN 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring
Muscle membranes: structures, mechanisms, and physiological roles of channels/pumps. Muscle contraction: force generation by actin/myosin. prereq: 3061 or 3071 or 5061 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or instr consent
BIOC 5444 - Muscle
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5444/Phsl 5444/BMEN 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring
Muscle molecular structure/function and disease. Muscle regulation, ion transport, and force generation. Muscular dystrophy and heart disease. prereq: 3021 or BIOL 3021 or 4331 or BIOL 4331 or PHSL 3061 or instr consent
BIOC 3021 - Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Fundamentals of biochemistry. Structure/function of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates. Enzymes. Metabolism. DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein synthesis. Recommended prerequisites: Introductory biology (BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003 or equivalent), organic chemistry (CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent). Note: CBS students should take BIOC 3022 not 3021.
BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics. prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)
GCD 3022 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Mechanisms of heredity, implications for biological populations. Applications to practical problems. prereq: Introductory biology course such as Biol 1009
BIOL 4003 - Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations. prereq: Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad MSB
GCD 3033 - Principles of Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Components and activities common to eukaryotic cells. Chromosomes, membranes, organelles and the cytoskeleton, and processes including cellular communication, replication, motility, transport and gene expression. Relevance to human health and medicine. Appropriate for non-CBS majors. prereq: BIOL 1009 or equiv
PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 5702/Phsl 4702/Phsl 5702
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell Physiology involves the study of control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis with respect to a variety of parameters including regulation of pH, volume, nutrient content, intracellular electrolyte composition, membrane potential, receptor signaling and aspects of intercellular communication. The first half of this team-taught course is organized in a partially on-line format where students learn from on-line materials and then take an on-line quiz each week before meeting with the instructor to review key concepts in class. The second half of the course is presented in lecture format. Student evaluation is based on quiz scores, in-class exams and graded problem sets. prereq: [3051 or 3061 or BIOL 3211], [CHEM 1022 or equiv], [MATH 1272 or equiv]
BIOL 4004 - Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: Biol 4003 or Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Biol 3015 or grad
GCD 4005W - Cell Biology-Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells. prereq: GCD major,3020, 4003
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3602 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 3608H - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory for Honors Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab work required for 3602 or 3612. Additional dissection of human cadavers/related projects. Supplements 3001 or 3601 or 3611. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611] or 3001], sophomore, junior or senior, honors
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
ANAT 3612 - Principles of Human Anatomy Laboratory
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 3002/Anat 3302/Anat 3602
Typically offered: Every Spring
Complements 3601 or 3611. prereq: 3001 or 3301 or INMD 3001 or 3301 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3601 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3611
ANAT 4900 - Directed Studies in Anatomy
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 18.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
x prereq: instr consent
BIOC 4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theory, principles, and use of fundamental techniques in modern biochemistry labs. prereq: 3021, 3022, or 4331 or equiv
BIOC 4225 - Laboratory in NMR Techniques
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Summer
Practical aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Hands-on experience with 500/600 MHz instruments. Sample preparation/handling, contamination sources, tube/probe options, experiment selection, experimental procedures, software, data processing. prereq: 4331; 4521 recommended; intended for biochemistry majors
BIOC 4325 - Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience with techniques/instruments. Sample preparation/handling, 2-dimenstioal gels, MS-MS, MALDI-TOF, electrospray/LC-MS, experiment selection/procedures, software, data processing. prereq: 4332, 4521
BIOC 4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics. prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)
BIOC 4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced survey of molecular biology. Mechanisms of gene action/biological regulation. prereq: BioC 4331 or Bioc 3201 or BioC 3022
BIOC 4351 - Protein Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Key properties of enzymes/molecular basis, computer modeling strategies, mutagenesis strategies to create protein variants, expression/screening of protein variants. Evaluate research papers, identify unsolved practical/theoretical problems, plan protein engineering experiment. prereq: 4331 or instr consent
BIOC 4521 - Introduction to Physical Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical chemical principles, their applications in biochemistry. Thermodynamics, kinetics, spectroscopy, solution dynamics as applied to biochemical reactions/ biopolymers. prereq: 4331 recommended, (Chem 1081 or 1061 and 1065) AND (Physics 1221 or 1201W or 1301W) required
BIOC 4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOC 4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOC 4960 - Special Topics in Biochemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In-depth study of a topic in biochemistry. prereq: [[3021 or equiv], CHEM 2301]] or instr consent
BIOC 4993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOC 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOL 4993 - Directed Studies
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
BIOL 4994 - Directed Research
Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.
CHEM 4001 - Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4001/BBE 5001/Chem 4001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemical principles underlying structure, properties, processing, performance of plant materials. prereq: 2301, [jr or sr or instr consent]
CHEM 4011 - Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Reaction mechanisms, methods of study. Mechanistic concepts. Gas phase reactions. "Electron pushing" mechanisms in organic/enzymatic reactions. Kinetic schemes, other strategies. prereq: [2302, 4501] or equiv
CHEM 4021 - Computational Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Theoretical methods for study of molecular structure, bonding, and reactivity. Ab initio/semi-empirical calculations. Theoretical determination of molecular electronic structure/spectra, relation to experimental techniques. Molecular mechanics. Structure determination for large systems. Molecular properties/reactivity. Computational tools. Critical assessment of methods/theoretical work in the literature. Lab. prereq: [4502 or equiv], instr consent
CHEM 4066 - Chemistry of Industry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Industrial and polymer chemistry technology. Relation of basic properties to industrial utility. Economics, social problems, industrial environment. prereq: Chem sr or grad student or instr consent
CHEM 4094W - Directed Research (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 30.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Learning experience in areas not covered by regular courses. Individually arranged with faculty member. prereq: Any 3xxx or 4xxx chem course, instr consent
CHEM 4101 - Modern Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Basic electronic, optical, computer technologies in design of chemical instrumentation. Advanced topics in spectroscopy (e.g., FT-NMR, FT-IR, atomic absorption/emission). Electrochemistry. Mass spectrometry. prereq: 2101, 2111
CHEM 4111W - Modern Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis Lab (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Instrumental techniques, including spectroscopic methods, electrochemical methods, and analysis based on separation. Use of computers in data collection and reduction. prereq: 4101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed)
CHEM 4201 - Materials Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4201/Chem 8201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Crystal systems/unit cells, phase diagrams, defects/interfaces, optical/dielectric properties, electrical/thermal conductivity, X-ray diffraction, thin film analysis, electronic structure, polarons/phonons, solid state chemistry, liquid/molecular crystals, polymers, magnetic/optical materials, porous materials, ceramics, piezoelectric materials, biomedical materials, catalysts. prereq: [[4502 or equiv], 4701] or instr consent
CHEM 4221 - Introduction to Polymer Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ChEn 8221/MatS 8221/Chem 8221
Typically offered: Every Fall
Condensation, radical, ionic, emulsion, ring-opening, metal-catalyzed polymerizations. Chain conformation, solution thermodynamics, molecular weight characterization, physical properties. prereq: [2302, 4501] or instr consent
CHEM 4301 - Applied Surface and Colloid Science
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4301/BBE 5301/Chem 4301
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to surface/colloid science concepts. Surface tension, wetting, adsorption, capillarity. Formation/stability of sols, emulsions, and foams. Water solubility. Partition coefficients of organic species. Properties of both surfactants and water soluble polymers. Focuses on interdisciplinary applications. prereq: 3043 or BMEN 2101 or CHEN 3101 or CHEM 4501 or instr consent
CHEM 4311W - Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reactions, techniques, and instrumental methods in synthetic organic chemistry. prereq: 2311
CHEM 4321 - Organic Synthesis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Fundamental concepts, reactions, reagents, structural/stereochemical issues, mechanistic skills for organic chemistry. prereq: [2302 or equiv], 4501, instr consent
CHEM 4322 - Advanced Organic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics vary by instructor. Examples: natural products, heterocycles, asymmetric synthesis, organometallic chemistry, polymer chemistry. prereq: [2302 or equiv], 4501, instr consent
CHEM 4352 - Physical Organic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts and mechanistic tools for analysis of organic reaction mechanisms. Solvation, reactive intermediates, gas phase chemistry. Photochemistry/strained-ring chemistry. prereq: 4501, [4011 or 8011]
CHEM 4361 - Interpretation of Organic Spectra
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass, ultraviolet, and infrared spectral analyses to organic structural problems. prereq: [2302 or equiv], 4501, instr consent
CHEM 4411 - Introduction to Chemical Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Chemistry of amino acids, peptides, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Structure, nomenclature, synthesis, reactivity. Techniques to characterize biomolecules. prereq: [2302 or 2081 equiv]
CHEM 4412 - Chemical Biology of Enzymes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Enzyme classification with examples from current literature. Strategies to decipher enzyme mechanisms. Chemical approaches to control enzyme catalysis. prereq: [2302 or equiv], 4501
CHEM 4423W - Foundations of Chemical Biology Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Experimental techniques from all areas of chemistry applied to biological problems. Experiments to highlight techniques and concepts used in modern Chemical Biology research. Emphasis on connections between classroom/laboratory learning and experimental science, health, disease and medical research. prereq: [2302 or 2304], 2311, 2111
CHEM 4501 - Introduction to Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Statistical Mechanics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 3501/4501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Physical chemistry as it relates to macroscopic descriptions of chemical systems. Chemical thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibria. Statistical mechanics. Phenomenological reaction kinetics. Kinetic theory of gases. Collision, statistical theories of reaction rates. prereq: [1062/1066 or 1071H/1075H], [MATH 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2263 or MATH 2374 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2374], [PHYS 1302 or PHYS 1402V or PHYS 1502V]
CHEM 4502 - Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 3502/4502
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Microscopic descriptions of chemical systems. Quantum theory. Applications to atomic/molecular structure. Molecular spectroscopy. Quantum statistical mechanics. Discussion of solutions to several differential equations. prereq: [1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H of 1082/1086], [MATH 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2263 or MATH 2374 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2374 or MATH 2243 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2243 or MATH 2373 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 2373], [PHYS 1302 or PHYS 1402V or PHYS 1502V]
CHEM 4511W - Advanced Physical Chemistry Lab (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Experiments illustrating principles and methods of thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and quantum mechanics. prereq: 4501, 4502, chemistry major
CHEM 4601 - Green Chemistry (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey key aspects of green chemistry in modern research and development both in academia and industry, as well as relevant implications for the environment, technology, and public policy. prereq: [2302 or 2081 or equiv]
CHEM 4701 - Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Periodic trends. Structure/bonding in compounds where s and p electrons are important. Descriptive chemistry of solids and transition metal compounds. Transition metal chemistry. Topics in main group and materials chemistry. prereq: [2311 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2311], [4501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4501 or 4502 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 4502]
CHEM 4711W - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Lab experiments in inorganic/organometallic chemistry illustrating synthetic/spectroscopic techniques. prereq: 4701, chem major
CHEM 4715 - Physical Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Physical methods (e.g., IR, UV-VIS, ESR, Mossbauer and mass spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, X-ray diffraction) and concepts applied to inorganic and organometallic systems. prereq: 4701 or equiv, chem major or instr consent
CHEM 4725 - Organometallic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Synthesis, reactions, structures, and other properties of main group and transition metal organometallic compounds; electronic and structural theory, emphasizing their use as stoichiometric and homogeneous catalytic reagents in organic and inorganic systems. prereq: 4701 or equiv, chem major or instr consent
CHEM 4735 - Bioinorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Role of metal ions in biology. Emphasizes structure, function, and spectroscopy of metalloproteins and their synthetic analogs. prereq: 4701 or equiv, chem grad or instr consent
CHEM 4745 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Topics in main group and transition metal chemistry. Emphasizes synthesis, structure, physical properties, and chemical reactivity. prereq: 4701, chem major, instr consent
CSCI 3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3003/CSci 5465
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
This course builds computational skills needed to carry out basic data analysis tasks common in modern biology. Students will learn computing concepts (algorithm development, data structures, complexity analysis) along with practical programming skills in Python and R. No previous programming knowledge assumed. Prereq: introductory biology course.
CSCI 3041 - Introduction to Discrete Structures and Algorithms
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Overview of strategies and techniques for the design and analysis of algorithms. Logic and proof techniques, asymptotic notation, recurrences, graphs and relations. Algorithm design strategies and examples from graph algorithms, greedy, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming. This course is intended for non-CS Majors. Prerequisite: CSci 2081 or instructor permission
CSCI 3061 - Introduction to Computer Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Overview of the organization and interfaces of computing systems. Basics of machine organization, data representation, memory hierarchy and assembly language/ISA. Systems programming in C/C++, including memory management, files, processes and interprocess communication. This course is intended for non-CS Majors. prereq: CSci 2081 or instructor permission
CSCI 3081W - Program Design and Development (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3081W/CSci 4018W/CSci4089
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles of programming design/analysis. Concepts in software development. Uses a programming project to illustrate key ideas in program design/development, data structures, debugging, files, I/O, testing, and coding standards. prereq: [2021, 2041]; CS upper div, CS grad, or dept. permission
CSCI 3921W - Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Impact of computers on society. Computer science perspective of ethical, legal, social, philosophical, political, and economic aspects of computing. prereq: At least soph or instr consent
CSCI 3970 - Industrial Student Co-op Assignment
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Industrial work assignment in a co-op program involving advanced computer technology. Reviewed by a faculty member. Grade based on final written report. prereq: CSci, in co-op program, instr consent
CSCI 4011 - Formal Languages and Automata Theory
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Logical/mathematical foundations of computer science. Formal languages, their correspondence to machine models. Lexical analysis, string matching, parsing. Decidability, undecidability, limits of computability. Computational complexity. prereq: 2041 or instr consent
CSCI 4041 - Algorithms and Data Structures
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4041/CSci 4041H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Rigorous analysis of algorithms/implementation. Algorithm analysis, sorting algorithms, binary trees, heaps, priority queues, heapsort, balanced binary search trees, AVL trees, hash tables and hashing, graphs, graph traversal, single source shortest path, minimum cost spanning trees. prereq: [(1913 or 1933) and 2011] or instr consent; cannot be taken for grad CSci cr
CSCI 4061 - Introduction to Operating Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4061/INet 4001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Processes/threads, process coordination, interprocess communication, asynchronous events, memory management/file systems. Systems programming projects using operating system interfaces and program development tools. prereq: 2021 or EE 2361; CS upper div, CS minor, CompE upper div., EE upper div., EE grad, ITI upper div., Univ. honors student, or dept. permission; no cr for grads in CSci.
CSCI 4131 - Internet Programming
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4131/CSci 5131
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Issues in internet programming. Internet history, architecture/protocols, network programming, Web architecture. Client-server architectures and protocols. Client-side programming, server-side programming, dynamic HTML, Java programming, object-oriented architecture/design, distributed object computing, Web applications. prereq: 4061, 4211 recommended, cannot be taken for grad CSci cr
CSCI 4211 - Introduction to Computer Networks
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4211/CSci 5211/INET 4002
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, principles, protocols, and applications of computer networks. Layered network architectures, data link protocols, local area networks, routing, transport, network programming interfaces, networked applications. Examples from Ethernet, Token Ring, TCP/IP, HTTP, WWW. prereq: 4061 or instr consent; basic knowledge of [computer architecture, operating systems] recommended, cannot be taken for grad CSci cr
CSCI 4271W - Development of Secure Software Systems (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of threat modeling and security assessment in the design and development of software systems. Techniques to identify, exploit, detect, mitigate and prevent software vulnerabilities at the design, coding, application, compiler, operating system, and networking layers. Methods for effectively communicating system designs and vulnerabilities. Prerequisites: 3081w
CSCI 4511W - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4511W/CSci 5511
Prerequisites: 2041 or #
Typically offered: Every Spring
Problem solving, search, inference techniques. Knowledge representation. Planning. Machine learning. Robotics. Lisp programming language. Cannot be taken for grad CSci credit. prereq: 2041 or instr consent
CSCI 4611 - Programming Interactive Computer Graphics and Games
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Tools/techniques for programming games/interactive computer graphics. Event loops, rendering/animation, polygonal models, texturing, physical simulation. Modern graphics toolkits. History/future of computer games technology. Social impact of interactive computer graphics. prereq: 2021 or instr consent
CSCI 4707 - Practice of Database Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4707/CSci 5707/INET 4707
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, conceptual data models, case studies, common data manipulation languages, logical data models, database design, facilities for database security/integrity, applications. prereq: 4041 or instr consent
CSCI 4970W - Advanced Project Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Formulate and solve open-ended project: design, implement, interface, document, test. Team work strongly encouraged. Arranged with CSci faculty. prereq: Upper div CSci, 4061, instr consent; cannot be taken for grad cr
GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3016/GCC 5016
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid "antibiotic apocalypse." The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCD 4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is designed for juniors and seniors to learn experimental approaches and techniques to study cellular processes and stem cell biology during animal development and tissue regeneration. Students will be exposed to the advantages of different model systems that include cultured cells, chick, C. elegans and zebrafish. Students will learn to manipulate the cytoskeleton, perform cell differentiation, RNAi and regeneration assays, and to image both fixed tissue and live animal samples with conventional light microscopes as well as cutting edge technology, including super-resolution and multi-photon microscopes. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.
GCD 4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues. prereq: 3033 or Biol 4004 or instr consent
GCD 4161 - Developmental Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Mechanisms that govern development from gametogenesis through fertilization. Embryogenesis/postembryonic development. Mechanisms of morphogenesis/differentiation. Classical/molecular approaches in various model organisms. Genetic models such as bacteriophage, yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, and the mouse. prereq: Biol 4003; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in BIOL 4004 irecommended
GCD 5036 - Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes. prereq: Biol 4004 or instr consent; [sr or grad student] recommended
MATH 2066 - Elementary Differential Equations
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Not taught: merely provides credit for transfer students who have taken a sophomore-level differential equations class that does not contain enough linear algebra to qualify for credit for 2243.
MATH 2142 - Elementary Linear Algebra
Credits: 4.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course has three primary objectives. (1) To present the basic theory of linear algebra, including: solving systems of linear equations; determinants; the theory of Euclidean vector spaces and general vector spaces; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices; inner products; diagonalization of quadratic forms; and linear transformations between vector spaces. (2) To introduce certain aspects of numerical linear algebra and computation. (3) To introduce applications of linear algebra to other domains such as data science. Objectives (2) and (3) will be taught with hands-on computer projects in a high-level programming language. Prerequisites: MATH 1272 or equivalent
MATH 2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Development, analysis and simulation of models for the dynamics of biological systems. Mathematical topics include discrete and continuous dynamical systems, linear algebra, and probability. Models from fields such as ecology, epidemiology, physiology, genetics, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [1241 or 1271 or 1371] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2283 - Sequences, Series, and Foundations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2283/3283W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Mathematical reasoning. Elements of logic. Mathematical induction. Real number system. General, monotone, recursively defined sequences. Convergence of infinite series/sequences. Taylor's series. Power series with applications to differential equations. Newton's method. prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2243 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2373 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2374] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2472 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus III, First Semester (MATH)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Accelerated honors sequence for selected mathematically talented high school students. Geometry of surfaces and curves in R^n. Multivariable calculus through differentation using linear algebra.
MATH 2474 - Advanced Topics for Secondary Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Topics may include linear algebra, combinatorics, advanced differential equations, probability/statistics, numerical analysis, dynamical systems, topology/geometry. Emphasizes concepts/explorations. prereq: 2473H
PHSL 3095 - Problems in Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individualized study in physiology. Students address a selected problem in physiology through library or lab research, supervised by physiology faculty. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in college physiology, instr consent
PHSL 4021 - Advanced Physiology and Bioengineering: Bionic Human
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Is "Iron Man" technology just around the corner? This course will examine how, and if, biomedical devices can address the needs of humans suffering from various pathologies and/or disabilities, or enhance human performance. Advanced discussion of the physiology of organs/organ systems and relevant devices past, present, and future. Emphasis will be on an in-depth understanding of normal physiology including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, liver, motor, sensory, and pancreatic physiology. Classes will involve review of the physiology of organ systems, design considerations for medical devices, and discussions of published papers about basic science and clinical trials. Classes will be a combination of content presentation and discussion.
PHSL 4031 - Physiological Discussions: Contemporary Topics
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students read, critically evaluate, present, and discuss research in cellular and organ system physiology. Journal club setting led by faculty members. prereq: 3061 or 3063 or 5061 or instr consent
PHSL 4095H - Honors Problems in Physiology
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students pursue a selected topic in physiology through library or lab research supervised by physiology faculty. Prereq &3061, physiology honors candidate, approval of director of undergrad studies in physiology.
PHSL 4242 - Professional Skills Development for Biomedical Scientists
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Students will gain valuable experience in professional development for bio-medical science, applicable to academic, clinical, biotech, pharma, medical and other career paths. This course features essential professional skills development, including critical evaluation of the scientific literature, oral short presentations, development of research project specific aims, and development of individual WOW statements (aka the Bill Gates elevator pitch). Students will gain knowledge of grant mechanisms and on strategies and mechanics to writing a winning grant. Students will evaluate funded research projects, develop and write their own grant, (possibly based on their previous PHSL 3062W paper or other experiences) and perform peer review critiques of their submitted grants. There are no conventional tests in this class. prereq: PHSL 3062W is recommended.
PHSL 4900 - Advanced Physiology Teaching Laboratory
Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Teaching in undergrad physiology labs. Instructional sessions, hands-on teaching experiences. prereq: [3051 or [3061, 3071]], instr consent
PHSL 5061 - Principles of Physiology for Biomedical Engineering
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine, muscle, central and peripheral nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: Biomedical engineering grad, one yr college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHSL 5096 - Integrative Biology and Physiology Research Advances
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Attend/participate in IBP Fall/Spring seminar series. Seminars given by faculty, invited speakers, students. Exposure to key topics. How to present seminars. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5115 - Clinical Physiology I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cellular mechanisms, disease states and clinical applications of excitable tissues: cellular transport, neurophysiology, skeletal muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5116 - Clinical Physiology II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Cellular mechanisms, disease states and clinical applications of metabolic systems: respiratory physiology, renal physiology, acid base physiology, metabolism, gastrointestinal physiology, endocrine physiology, physiology of pregnancy and labor. prereq: instr consent
PHSL 5197 - Stress Physiology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Journal club format. Meets weekly to examine foundations of stress, historical progress, development of stress, modern stress physiology. Focus on stress-induced pathology with attention to cardiovascular, metabolic, neuroendocrine disorders. Students participating in the weekly discussion are assessed on discussion participation, completion of weekly writing assignments and quality of the presentation in the class, are eligible for 1 credit. Students completing a midterm (test) and a final project (specific aims page of an NIH RO1 grant) in addition to the criteria described above are eligible for 3 credits. Prerequisite: instructor consent is required. Graduate student standing, master students, and post-doctoral fellows (if they are eligible for credits). Undergraduate students must have taken PHSL 3061 or equivalent, and have previous laboratory research experience.
PHSL 5444 - Muscle
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5444/Phsl 5444/BMEN 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring
Muscle membranes: structures, mechanisms, and physiological roles of channels/pumps. Muscle contraction: force generation by actin/myosin. prereq: 3061 or 3071 or 5061 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or instr consent
PHSL 5510 - Advanced Cardiac Physiology and Anatomy
Credits: 2.0 -3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Fundamental concepts, advanced topics related to clinical/biomedical cardiac physiology. Lectures, laboratories, workshops, anatomical dissections. Intense, one week course. prereq: instr consent
PSY 3011 - Introduction to Learning and Behavior
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Methods/findings of research on learning and behavior change. Twentieth-century theoretical perspectives, including contemporary models. Emphasizes animal learning and behavioral psychology. prereq: 1001
PSY 3031 - Introduction to Sensation and Perception
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3031/Psy 3031
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Psychological, biological, and physical bases of sensory experience in humans and animals. Emphasizes senses of vision/hearing. prereq: PSY 1001
PSY 3061 - Introduction to Biological Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3061/5061
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Neurophysiology/neuroanatomy, neural mechanisms of motivation, emotion, sleep-wakefulness cycle, learning/memory in animals/humans. Neural basis of abnormal behavior, drug abuse. prereq: 1001 or BIOL 1009 or NSci 1100
PSY 3604 - Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3604/Psy 3604/Psy 5604
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diagnosis, classification, etiologies of behavioral disorders. prereq: 1001
PSY 5036W - Computational Vision (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Applications of psychology, neuroscience, computer science to design principles underlying visual perception, visual cognition, action. Compares biological/physical processing of images with respect to image formation, perceptual organization, object perception, recognition, navigation, motor control. prereq: [[3031 or 3051], [Math 1272 or equiv]] or instr consent
PSY 5038W - Introduction to Neural Networks (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Parallel distributed processing models in neural/cognitive science. Linear models, Hebbian rules, self-organization, non-linear networks, optimization, representation of information. Applications to sensory processing, perception, learning, memory. prereq: [[3061 or NSC 3102], [MATH 1282 or 2243]] or instr consent
PSY 5137 - Introduction to Behavioral Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Genetic methods for studying human/animal behavior. Emphasizes nature/origin of individual differences in behavior. Twin and adoption methods. Cytogenetics, molecular genetics, linkage/association studies. prereq: 3001W or equiv or instr consent
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3022 - Data Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression. prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811
STAT 5021 - Statistical Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students needing statistics as a research technique. prereq: college algebra or instr consent; credit will not be granted if credit has been received for STAT 3011
BIOC 4125 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4125/BioC 4185/Biol 4125/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer
This molecular biology laboratory course is designed to give students hands-on experience performing common techniques used in modern molecular biology, as well as the background information needed to understand what kind of information can be obtained by using them. Because of the dual nature of this course, a portion of the laboratory time will be spent on lectures explaining the theory behind the techniques being used as well as practical aspects of experimental design. In addition, readings will be assigned that explain the history and principles behind some of the techniques used. Basic recombinant DNA techniques: methods for growing, isolating, and purifying recombinant DNA and cloning vectors, DNA sequencing and sequence analysis, gene expression, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), other current techniques. prereq: BIOC 3021 or BIOC 3022 or BIOC 4331
BIOC 4185 - Laboratory in Molecular Genetics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4125/BioC 4185/Biol 4125/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Basic recombinant DNA techniques. Methods for growing, isolating, and purifying recombinant DNA and cloning vectors. DNA sequencing, sequence analysis. Gene expression, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Current techniques. prereq: Enrollment in Life Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Program
CHEM 4214 - Polymers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4214/ChEn 4214/MatS 4214
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Structure/morphology of crystalline/amorphous states. Crystallization kinetics. Vitrification, glass transition. Mechanical properties, failure, permeability, optical/electrical properties, polymer composites, effect of processing. prereq: [MATS 3011, [CHEN 3101 or CHEN 4101 or MATS 4001], [upper div MatS or ChEn or CHEM]] or instr consent
CHEN 4214 - Polymers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4214/ChEn 4214/MatS 4214
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Polymer structure-property relations: structure/morphology of crystalline/amorphous states. Crystallization kinetics. Vitrification and the glass transition. Mechanical properties, failure, permeability, optical/electrical properties, polymer composites, effect of processing on properties. prereq: [[MATS 3011, [3101 or MATS 3001], [upper div MatS or ChEn]]] or instr consent
MATS 4214 - Polymers
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4214/ChEn 4214/MatS 4214
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Polymer structure-property relations: structure/morphology of crystalline/amorphous state. Crystallization kinetics. Vitrification and glass transition. Mechanical properties, failure, permeability, optical/electrical properties, polymer composites, effect of processing on properties. prereq: [3011, [3001 or CHEN 3101], [upper div MatS or ChEn]] or instr consent
CHEM 4223W - Polymer Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4223W/ChEn 4223/MatS4223W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of polymers. Free radical, condensation, emulsion, anionic polymerization. Infrared spectroscopy/gel permeation chromatography. Viscoelasticity, rubber elasticity, crystallization. prereq: 4221 or 4214 or CHEN 4214 or MATS 4214 or instr consent
CHEN 4223W - Polymer Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4223W/ChEn 4223/MatS4223W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of polymers. Free radical, condensation, emulsion, anionic polymerization. Infrared spectroscopy/gel permeation chromatography. Viscoelasticity, rubber elasticity, crystallization.
MATS 4223W - Polymer Laboratory (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 4223W/ChEn 4223/MatS4223W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of polymers. Free radical, condensation, emulsion, anionic polymerization. Infrared spectroscopy/gel permeation chromatography. Viscoelasticity, rubber elasticity, crystallization.
CSCI 4203 - Computer Architecture
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4203/EE 4363
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to computer architecture. Aspects of computer systems, such as pipelining, memory hierarchy, and input/output systems. Performance metrics. Examins each component of a complicated computer system. prereq: 2021 or instr consent
EE 4363 - Computer Architecture and Machine Organization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4203/EE 4363
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to computer architecture. Aspects of computer systems, such as pipelining, memory hierarchy, and input/output systems. Performance metrics. Examines each component of a complicated computer system. prereq: 2361
CSCI 4921 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Developments in last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other businesses; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
HSCI 4321 - History of Computing (TS, HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 4921/HSci 4321
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues.
GCC 3007 - Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3007/GCC 5007
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen--vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5007 - Toward Conquest of Disease (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3007/GCC 5007
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Since the rise of civilization, the large predators of humans have been subdued and the most dangerous predators remaining are those unseen--vastly smaller than our bodies. They are the microbial predators that cause disease. Infectious disease has devastated human populations and even caused global population declines. Subduing and managing disease is one of the grand challenges of our time. Through an enormous global effort, we have driven smallpox in humans and Rinderpest in livestock extinct from the natural world, and guinea worm is expected to follow. Other infectious diseases are in continual decline. In this course we will combine ecological thought and ecological models with historical and future perspectives to understand the fundamental dynamics of our miniscule predators, and relate this to similar miniscule predators of wild and domestic animals, to crops, and to other plants. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior, graduate student
GCC 3014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3014/GCC 5014
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5014 - The Future of Work and Life in the 21st Century (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3014/GCC 5014
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course seeks solutions to the technological, demographic, and economic forces that challenge taken-for-granted mindsets and existing policies around work, careers, and life. Students will consider positive and negative impacts of the forces that render the conventional education/work/retirement lockstep obsolete. What do these changes mean for men and women of different ages and backgrounds? What are alternative, sustainable ways of working and living in the 21st century? These questions reflect global challenges that touch the lives of people everywhere. Students will work in teams to begin to address these realities and formulate innovative solutions to better transform learning, working, caring, and community-building in the 21st century. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
MATH 2243 - Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: first-order linear, separable; second-order linear with constant coefficients; linear systems with constant coefficients. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2373 - CSE Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Linear algebra: basis, dimension, eigenvalues/eigenvectors. Differential equations: linear equations/systems, phase space, forcing/resonance, qualitative/numerical analysis of nonlinear systems, Laplace transforms. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bio Prod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2471 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus II, Second Semester (MATH)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Accelerated honors sequence for selected mathematically talented high school students. Theoretical and geometric linear algebra.
MATH 2263 - Multivariable Calculus
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/Math 2374/Math 2573H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Derivative as linear map. Differential/integral calculus of functions of several variables, including change of coordinates using Jacobians. Line/surface integrals. Gauss, Green, Stokes Theorems. prereq: [1272 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-
MATH 2374 - CSE Multivariable Calculus and Vector Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/Math 2374/Math 2573H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Derivative as linear map. Differential/integral calculus of functions of several variables, including change of coordinates using Jacobians. Line/surface integrals. Gauss, Green, Stokes theorems. Use of computer technology. prereq: [1272 or 1282 or 1372 or 1572] w/grade of at least C-, CSE or pre-Bioprod/Biosys Engr
MATH 2573H - Honors Calculus III
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/Math 2374/Math 2573H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Integral calculus of several variables. Vector analysis, including theorems of Gauss, Green, Stokes. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2574H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MATH 2473 - UM Talented Youth Mathematics Program--Calculus III, Second Semester (MATH)
Credits: 2.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2263/Math 2374/Math 2573H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Accelerated honors sequence for selected mathematically talented high school students. Multivariable integration and classical vector analysis.
MATH 2574H - Honors Calculus IV
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2243/Math 2373/Math 2574H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Advanced linear algebra, differential equations. Additional topics as time permits. prereq: Math 1572H or Math 2573H, honors student and permission of University Honors Program
MICB 3301 - Biology of Microorganisms
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab. prereq: BIOL 3020 or BIOC 3021 or GCD 3022 or instructor consent (biochemistry/molecular biology background coursework)
VBS 2032 - General Microbiology With Laboratory
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Bacterial metabolism, growth/genetics, biology of viruses/fungi. Control of microorganisms. Host-microbe interactions, microorganisms/disease, applied microbiology. prereq: One semester each of college chemistry, biology
MICB 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall
Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease, cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies. recommended prereqs: microbiology, biochemistry, cell biology
VPM 4131 - Immunology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Spring
Molecular, genetic, and cellular bases for humoral/cell-mediated immunity. Innage immunity. Antigen recognition by B and T lymphocytes. Interactions between lymphocytes and other cells of immune system. Cytokines. Immunoregulation. Key aspects of clinical immunology.
PHSL 4702 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 5702/Phsl 4702/Phsl 5702
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell Physiology involves the study of control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis with respect to a variety of parameters including regulation of pH, volume, nutrient content, intracellular electrolyte composition, membrane potential, receptor signaling and aspects of intercellular communication. The first half of this team-taught course is organized in a partially on-line format where students learn from on-line materials and then take an on-line quiz each week before meeting with the instructor to review key concepts in class. The second half of the course is presented in lecture format. Student evaluation is based on quiz scores, in-class exams and graded problem sets. prereq: [3051 or 3061 or BIOL 3211], [CHEM 1022 or equiv], [MATH 1272 or equiv]
PHSL 5702 - Cell Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 5702/Phsl 4702/Phsl 5702
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Cell Physiology involves the study of control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis with respect to a variety of parameters including regulation of pH, volume, nutrient content, intracellular electrolyte composition, membrane potential, receptor signaling and aspects of intercellular communication. The first half of this team-taught course is organized in a partially on-line format where students learn from on-line materials and then take an on-line quiz each week before meeting with the instructor to review key concepts in class. The second half of the course is presented in lecture format. Student evaluation is based on quiz scores, in-class exams and graded problem sets. prereq: [Two semesters of physics/chemistry, calculus, one semester of systems-level physiology] or instr consent
PHSL 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 5525/Phsl 5525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-day intensive course. Pelvis, perineum, and urinary system with cadaveric dissection. Structure/function of pelvic and urinary organs, including common dysfunction and pathophysiology. Laboratory dissections, including kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, pelvic viscera and perineum (male or female), pelvic floor, vascular and nervous structures. Grand rounds section. prereq: One undergrad anatomy course, one undergrad physiology course, instr consent
ANAT 5525 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Pelvis and Urinary System
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anat 5525/Phsl 5525
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Two-day intensive course. Pelvis, perineum, and urinary system with cadaveric dissection. Structure/function of pelvic and urinary organs, including common dysfunction and pathophysiology. Laboratory dissections, including kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, pelvic viscera and perineum (male or female), pelvic floor, vascular and nervous structures. Grand rounds section. prereq: One undergrad anatomy course, one undergrad physiology course, instr consent
PSY 5031W - Perception (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc/Psy 5031
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Topics include color vision, pattern vision, image formation in the eye, object recognition, reading, and impaired vision. prereq: 3031 or 3051 or instr consent
NSC 5031W - Perception (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Color vision, pattern vision, image formation in eye, object recognition, reading, impaired vision. Course is biennial: offered fall of odd years. prereq: Psy 3031 or Psy 3051 or instr consent
ANTH 3003 - Cultural Anthropology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3003/GloS 3003
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics vary. Field research. Politics of ethnographic knowledge. Marxist/feminist theories of culture. Culture, language, and discourse. Psychological anthropology. Culture/transnational processes.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Western representation of the human body, 1500 to present. Body's appearance as a site and sight for production of social and cultural difference (race, ethnicity, class, gender). Visual arts, literature, music, medical treatises, courtesy literature, erotica. (previously 3458W)
ECON 3101 - Intermediate Microeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Behavior of households, firms, and industries under competitive/monopolistic conditions. Factors influencing production, price, and other decisions. Applications of theory. Economic efficiency. Distribution of well-being. prereq: [[1101, 1102] or equiv], [MATH 1271 or equiv]
ECON 5890 - Economics of the Health-Care System
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 5890/PubH 6832
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Economic analysis of U.S. health-care sector. Emphasizes problems of pricing, production, distribution. Health-care services as one factor contributing to nation's health. prereq: 3101 or instr consent
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GLOS 3143 - Living in the Global (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Living in the Global' is an interdisciplinary humanities course that examines human life and culture in and under globalization and asks students to consider how their own experiences, identities, and practices are embedded in systems of power. Topics vary, but have included: cultural foundations of social justice, humans and the environment, place, labor and capital, and forced migration. These themes are explored through poetry, novels, feature films, documentaries, visual art, philosophy, and critical theory.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Globalization' and 'Culture' are both terms that have been defined and understood in a variety of ways and the significance of which continues to be debated to the present, both inside and outside the academy. Globalization has been talked about both as an irresistible historical force, tending toward the creation of an increasingly interconnected, or, as is sometimes claimed, an increasingly homogeneous world, and as a set of processes, the outcome of which remains open-ended and uncertain, as likely to produce new kinds of differences as universal sameness. Culture meanwhile has been variously defined as that which distinguishes humans from other species (and which all humans therefore share) and as that which divides communities of humans from one another on the basis of different beliefs, customs, values etc. This course reflects on some of the possible meanings of both "Globalization" and "Culture" and asks what we can learn by considering them in relation to one another. How do the phenomena associated with globalization, such as increasing flows of people, capital, goods and information across increasing distances challenge our understandings of culture, including the idea that the world is composed of so many discrete and bounded "cultures"? At the same time, does culture and its associated expressive forms, including narrative fiction, poetry and film, furnish us with new possibilities for thinking about globalization? Does global interconnection produce a single, unified world, or multiple worlds? Are the movements of people, goods, ideas and information across distances associated with new developments caused by contemporary globalization, or have they been going on for centuries or even millennia? Might contemporary debates about climate change and environmental crisis compel us to consider these phenomena in new ways? The course addresses these questions as they have been discussed by scholars from a variety of disciplines and as they have been imagined by artists, poets, novelists and filmmakers. In doing so, it considers whether the distinctiveness of present day globalization is to be sought in part in the new forms of imagining and creative expression to which it has given rise.
GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Similarities/differences in women's experiences throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media (feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral history, autobiography).
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
What does the ?social life? of Coronavirus and Covid-19 look like? Do pandemics have politics? Are diseases biomedical or socio-political phenomena? Why are African-Americans disproportionately affected by Covid-19 and HIV in the US? Why did the US become a hotspot for the rapid transmission of Coronavirus and what does this reveal about the market-based healthcare system? What are the global stories, struggles, failures, and successes of the Covid-19 pandemic? What will a post-pandemic world look like? In this class, you will answer these questions as they learn about the intersections of science and technology with the politics of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability.
POL 3464 - The Politics of Economic Inequality
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Democracy is premised on formal political equality. Yet if economic wealth can be transformed into political influence, then we have good reason to worry about the quality of democracy. In this course students engage the question of the relationship between inequality and democracy in comparative perspective. The course first explores core conceptual and normative issues: how do we measure economic inequality, and why should we care about it? We then turn to the origins of inequality and explanations of its evolution, and then consider political efforts to redress inequalities, starting with the question of why the poor do not soak the rich under democracy ? the ?Robin Hood Paradox.? We then turn to efforts to explain real-world variation in economic redistribution around the world. Finally, we explore consequences of inequality for democracy: the extent to which the rich ?win? over everyone else in terms of policy representation, and the impact of economic inequality on the long-term evolution of democracy itself.
PSY 3301 - Introduction to Cultural Psychology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Argn 3301/Madr 3301/Psy 3301
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories/research on how culture influences basic psychological processes (e.g., emotion, cognition, psychopathology) in domains that span different areas of psychology (e.g., social, clinical, developmental, industrial-organizational) and of other disciplines (e.g., anthropology, public health, sociology). prereq: 1001
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 3211W - Race & Racism in the U.S. (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
SOC 3211W - Race and Racism in the US (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3211W/Soc 3211W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
We live in a society steeped in racial understandings that are often invisible?some that are hard to see, and others that we work hard not to see. This course will focus on race relations in today's society with a historical overview of the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in order to help explain their present-day social status. This course is designed to help students begin to develop their own informed perspectives on American racial ?problems? by introducing them to the ways that sociologists deal with race, ethnicity, race relations and racism. We will expand our understanding of racial and ethnic dynamics by exploring the experiences of specific groups in the U.S. and how race/ethnicity intersects with sources of stratification such as class, nationality, and gender. The course will conclude by re-considering ideas about assimilation, pluralism, and multiculturalism. Throughout, our goal will be to consider race both as a source of identity and social differentiation as well as a system of privilege, power, and inequality affecting everyone in the society albeit in different ways.
AAS 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality.
SOC 3251W - Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3251W/Afro 3251W/Soc 3251W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In the midst of social unrest, it is important for us to understand social inequality. In this course we will analyze the impact of three major forms of inequality in the United States: race, class, and gender. Through taking an intersectional approach at these topics, we will examine the ways these social forces work institutionally, conceptually, and in terms of our everyday realities. We will focus on these inequalities as intertwined and deeply embedded in the history of the country. Along with race, class, and gender we will focus on other axes of inequality including sexuality, citizenship, and dis/ability. We will analyze the meanings and values attached to these social categories, and the ways in which these social constructions help rationalize, justify, and reproduce social inequality. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
AAS 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AFRO 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
AMIN 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
CHIC 4231 - Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4231/Afro 4231/AmIn 4231/C
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.
ANTH 3023 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
GLOS 3961 - Culture and Society of India (GP, SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ALL 3676/Anth 3023/GloS 3961
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Contemporary society and culture in South Asia from an anthropological perspective with reference to nationalism; postcolonial identities; media and public culture; gender, kinship and politics; religion; ethnicity; and the Indian diaspora.
CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSCL 3350W/GLBT 3456W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/critical study of forms of modern sexuality (heterosexuality, homosexuality, romance, erotic domination, lynching). How discourses constitute/regulate sexuality. Scientific/scholarly literature, religious documents, fiction, personal narratives, films, advertisements.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development; location of agriculture, industry, services; geography of communications; agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth; international trade; changing global development inequalities; impact of globalizing production and finance on the welfare of nations, regions, and cities.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GLOS 3305 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science, and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GWSS 3205 - Life for Sale: Global Debates on Environment, Science and Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3305/GWSS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
GLOS 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current Sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the Professor.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 3613V - Honors: Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. - Interview a current sociology/Global Studies graduate student and present briefly in class or write a reflective piece, not more than 2 pages in length, to be submitted to the professor.
GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3681/GWSS 3681/RelS 3716/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course explores the experiences of Muslim women and Muslim families from a historical and comparative perspective. Expanding the discussion on Muslim women's lives and experiences beyond the Middle East, by also centralizing on the experiences of Muslim women and families outside of this geographical area highlights the complex and diverse everyday experiences of Muslim women around the world. This wider lens exposes the limitations intrinsic in the stereotypical representation of Muslims in general and Muslim women in particular. We will explore the intricate web of gender and family power relations, and how these are contested and negotiated in these societies. Some of the themes the course explores include the debates on Muslim women and colonial representations, sexual politics, family, education and health, women and paid work, gender and human rights, and Islamic feminisms debates. prereq: At least soph; 1001 recommended
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 1301W/Geog 1301V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
AMIN 1002 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
POL 1019 - Indigenous Peoples in Global Perspective (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AmIn 1002/Pol 1019
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Colonial experiences of selected indigenous peoples in Americas, Euroasia, Pacific Rim.
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
ANTH 1003V - Understanding Cultures: Honors (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 1003W/Anth 1003V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social/cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies/cultures around world. Adaptive strategies. Economic processes. Kinship, marriage, gender. Social stratification. Politics/conflicts. Religion/ritual. Personality/Culture. prereq: Honors
GLOS 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 1015W,V/Hist 1015W,V,1019
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Increased global interconnections over past 50 years. Impact of information revolution on human rights, economic inequality, ecological challenges, and decolonization. Comparative cases from Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Middle East.
HIST 1015W - Globalization: Issues and Challenges (GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 1015W,V/Hist 1015W,V,1019
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Increased global interconnections over past 50 years. Impact of information revolution on human rights, economic inequality, ecological challenges, and decolonization. Cases in Asia, Africa, Latin America, or Middle East. prereq: Fr or soph or non-hist major
PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students write a research review on a physiological topic. Students select an area of focus within the discipline of physiology, and complete a literature review of basic science papers published in the past 10 years in their topic area. All students will work with a faculty advisor, who will assist the student in selecting their topic area, refining the focus of their literature review, and provide guidance on writing a scientific review article. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus
PHSL 4095H - Honors Problems in Physiology
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students pursue a selected topic in physiology through library or lab research supervised by physiology faculty. Prereq &3061, physiology honors candidate, approval of director of undergrad studies in physiology.
PHSL 3062W - Research Paper for Physiology Majors (WI)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students write a research review on a physiological topic. Students select an area of focus within the discipline of physiology, and complete a literature review of basic science papers published in the past 10 years in their topic area. All students will work with a faculty advisor, who will assist the student in selecting their topic area, refining the focus of their literature review, and provide guidance on writing a scientific review article. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3061, physiology major, 1 yr [college chem, physics], math through integral calculus