Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Biblical Studies B.A.

Classical & Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 35 to 49
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The biblical studies major is centered on the study of ancient Mediterranean religious thought and practice, extending from the second millennium BCE into Late Antiquity, encompassing the Hebrew Bible and its ancient Near Eastern contexts, Greco-Roman polytheism, and the classical contexts in which rabbinic Judaism and Christianity developed. The major is rooted in ancient texts; it concentrates on the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and related texts by studying them in the ancient languages and by situating them in their broad historical, intellectual, and religious contexts. This interdisciplinary program covers a diverse range of religious traditions, focusing on pivotal cultural encounters and interchanges in the ancient world. Students also have an exceptional opportunity to explore the vital relationships between past and present as they examine the ancient origins of modern religions. Students in this program gain a solid grounding in at least one relevant ancient language (Greek, Hebrew) and also study different methods of textual interpretation, both ancient and modern.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 1082 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 1082 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 1082 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
Required prerequisites
Preparatory Greek or Hebrew
Take either the Greek or Hebrew 3-course language sequence for 14 credits. In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking one or more of these courses. Placement is determined by the Hebrew and Greek Language Coordinators.
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 14 credit(s) from the following:
Classical Greek
· GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I (5.0 cr)
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II (5.0 cr)
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose (4.0 cr)
· Biblical Hebrew
· HEBR 1101 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I (5.0 cr)
HEBR 1102 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew II (5.0 cr)
HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I (4.0 cr)
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Biblical Studies BA is CNES. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. At least 18 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn a BA or minor in biblical studies, but not both. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Intermediate Language Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry (4.0 cr)
or HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II (4.0 cr)
CNES Core Courses
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take a minimum of 15 credits in at least two of the following three content areas: Hebrew Bible, New Testament and Early Christianity, and Early Judaism.
Take 15 or more credit(s) including 2 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Hebrew Bible
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AKKA 5011 - Elementary Akkadian I (3.0 cr)
· AKKA 5012 - Elementary Akkadian II (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 5713 - Introduction to Ugaritic (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3051 - Ancient Civilization: Near East and Egypt [HIS] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· RELS 5504 - Development of Israelite Religion II (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· New Testament and Early Christianity
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· COPT 5001 - Elementary Coptic (3.0 cr)
· COPT 5002 - Elementary Coptic (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3092 - Jesus in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· Early Judaism
Take 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew (3.0 cr)
· HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures [HIS] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
Students conduct independent research under a faculty member and produce a substantial, original research paper. Using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources, students show their mastery of disciplinary methodologies and their knowledge and understanding of ancient sources and modern scholarship related to their chosen topic.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Biblical Studies BA capstone, but they do need to replace the 4 credits with another upper-division CNES elective.
· CNES 3951W - Capstone [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3951W - Capstone [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CNES 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Biblical Studies BA Sample Plan

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· Biblical Studies B.A.
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CNES 1082 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
RELS 1082 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
HIST 1082 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
CNES 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 1201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Greek as written in Athens in 5th/4th centuries BCE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Greek 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or dept consent
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
HEBR 1101 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1101/Hebr 4104
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Hebrew Bible is one of the most important literary texts in world history, and one of the most culturally and morally influential in the development of western civilization. Most of this influence, however, has been via translation. Have you ever wondered if you can trust the translation? Does the Adam and Eve story really say what you think it does? Does the Hebrew Bible really include all the strict moral pronouncements and prohibitions that are attributed to it? This course offers the tools you need to read simple narrative texts in the Bible for yourself, while also introducing you to multiple approaches in biblical scholarship. Biblical Hebrew also satisfies the CLA Language requirement.
HEBR 1102 - Beginning Biblical Hebrew II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 1102/Hebr 4105
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Progression to more sophisticated reading of narrative, prophetic, and legal texts. Presentation/discussion of multiple approaches to problems/issues in biblical scholarship. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1101 or 4104] or instr consent
HEBR 3101 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HEBR 3101/HEBR 4106
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible. Basic research tools/commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in [1102 or 4105] or instr consent
GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3004/Grk 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Greek epic poetry. Readings of selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Homer's poetry. prereq: dept consent
HEBR 3102 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hebr 3102/Hebr 4107
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Text of Hebrew Bible, basic research tools and commentaries. Close reading of narrative biblical texts. Reading fluency, methods of research in biblical studies. Meets with 4107. prereq: Grade of at least [C- or S] in 3101 or instr consent
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, woman, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Reading biblical texts from academic point of view.
JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
AKKA 5011 - Elementary Akkadian I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to cuneiform script. Basics of Old Babylonian morphology and syntax. Written drills, readings from Hammurabi laws, foundation inscriptions, annals, religious and epic literature. prereq: Adv undergrads with instr consent or grads
AKKA 5012 - Elementary Akkadian II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Continuation of 5011. Readings include The Gilgamesh Epic, The Descent of Ishtar, Mari Letters, Annals of Sennacherib and Essarhaddon, Sargon II. prereq: 5011
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 5713 - Introduction to Ugaritic
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Ugaritic alphabetic cuneiform script, morphology, and syntax. Reading of representative samples of Ugaritic literature. Attention to linguistic and cultural issues and links to biblical and other Ancient Near Eastern texts. prereq: Adv Hebrew, previous study of biblical texts or instr consent
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth reading, analysis, and discussion of classical Hebrew texts. Grammar, syntax. Introduction to text-criticism, history of scholarship, and scholarly tools. Format varies between survey of themes (e.g., law, wisdom, poetry) and extended concentration upon specific classical texts.
HIST 3051 - Ancient Civilization: Near East and Egypt (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
A broad survey of ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian history and culture from the prehistoric to the rise of Persia around 550 B.C.
RELS 5504 - Development of Israelite Religion II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Ancient Judaism from the Persian restoration (520 B.C.E.) to Roman times (2nd century C.E.). Religious, cultural, and historical developments are examined to understand Jewish life, work, and worship under a succession of foreign empires: Persian, Greek, Roman.
CNES 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course. Old: Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam. Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
JWST 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
RELS 3202 - Bible: Prophecy in Ancient Israel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3202/JwSt 3202/RelS 3202
Typically offered: Every Spring
Survey of Israelite prophets. Emphasizes Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion. Personality of prophets. Politics, prophetic reaction. Textual analysis, Biblical scholarship. Prophecy viewed cross-culturally. prereq: [RelS 1001] or [CNES 1201 or JWST 1201 or RELS 1201 or CNES 3201 or JWST 3201 or RELS 3201]
CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, woman, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Reading biblical texts from academic point of view.
JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. ? 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include "biblical" literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
COPT 5001 - Elementary Coptic
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to Coptic grammar and vocabulary, chiefly in the Sahidic dialect.
COPT 5002 - Elementary Coptic
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading a variety of Coptic literature, such as Gnostic, martyrological, or monastic texts. prereq: 5001 or equiv
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
HIST 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
RELS 3092 - Jesus in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1082/Hist 1082/RelS 1082/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Who was Jesus? While there has been some basic consistency in the depictions of Jesus throughout history, there has also been lots of variety. We will explore a whole host of portraits of Jesus at different points in history to demonstrate not only the varying ways that Jesus has been thought of but also to understand the relationship between these portraits and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were created. We will look at the gospels of the New Testament and some from outside the New Testament. We will look at ancient and medieval art. And we will look at modern film. Although we might not get to the bottom of who Jesus was, we might understand more fully how communities throughout history have thought about him. Intended as a course of interest to undergraduates in all colleges of the TC campus. Students of any, all, or no religious background are welcome.
CNES 3121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3221/CNES 5121/RelS 3121/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ancient Christians, like any other social group in the ancient world, represented themselves through images, stories, and discourses using the cultural tools available to them in their own contexts. In this course, we will explore two key texts of early Christianity (1 Corinthians and the Gospel of Mark) with special attention to how representations of the body and gender served to communicate the nature of what it meant to be Christian for these authors. The study of ancient material offers a space to acquire the skills of critical analysis of body and gender dynamics so that we can better understand the roles that the body and gender play in shaping our self-identity, social interaction, and societal structures.
CNES 5121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3221/CNES 5121/RelS 3121/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ancient Christians, like any other social group in the ancient world, represented themselves through images, stories, and discourses using the cultural tools available to them in their own contexts. In this course, we will explore two key texts of early Christianity (1 Corinthians and the Gospel of Mark) with special attention to how representations of the body and gender served to communicate the nature of what it meant to be Christian for these authors. The study of ancient material offers a space to acquire the skills of critical analysis of body and gender dynamics so that we can better understand the roles that the body and gender play in shaping our self-identity, social interaction, and societal structures.
RELS 3121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 30.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3221/CNES 5121/RelS 3121/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ancient Christians, like any other social group in the ancient world, represented themselves through images, stories, and discourses using the cultural tools available to them in their own contexts. In this course, we will explore two key texts of early Christianity (1 Corinthians and the Gospel of Mark) with special attention to how representations of the body and gender served to communicate the nature of what it meant to be Christian for these authors. The study of ancient material offers a space to acquire the skills of critical analysis of body and gender dynamics so that we can better understand the roles that the body and gender play in shaping our self-identity, social interaction, and societal structures.
RELS 5121 - Gender and Body in Early Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3221/CNES 5121/RelS 3121/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Ancient Christians, like any other social group in the ancient world, represented themselves through images, stories, and discourses using the cultural tools available to them in their own contexts. In this course, we will explore two key texts of early Christianity (1 Corinthians and the Gospel of Mark) with special attention to how representations of the body and gender served to communicate the nature of what it meant to be Christian for these authors. The study of ancient material offers a space to acquire the skills of critical analysis of body and gender dynamics so that we can better understand the roles that the body and gender play in shaping our self-identity, social interaction, and societal structures.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
HEBR 5200 - Advanced Classical Hebrew
Credits: 3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In-depth reading, analysis, and discussion of classical Hebrew texts. Grammar, syntax. Introduction to text-criticism, history of scholarship, and scholarly tools. Format varies between survey of themes (e.g., law, wisdom, poetry) and extended concentration upon specific classical texts.
HEBR 5300 - Post-Biblical Hebrew: Second Temple Period
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Readings in late-/post-biblical Hebrew literature of Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods (e.g., Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah, Ecclesiastes, Daniel, Dead Sea Scrolls, apocrypha, pseudepigrapha). Focuses on historical development of Hebrew language and literature in relation to earlier biblical sources. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNES 3074 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
RELS 3704 - Exploring the Quran: An intellectual odyssey with Islam's holy scripture (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3074/RelS 3704
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course explores the contents of the Quran and probes its place in the history of human civilization. Students will learn about, and critically reflect on, the following subjects: 1) the Quran's core ideas, stories, laws, parables, and arguments, 2) the historical context in which the Quran was first promulgated and codified, 3) the relationship between the Quran and the preceding literary traditions of the ancient world, in particular, the Bible and post-biblical Jewish and Christian writings, 4) Muslim utilization of the Quran towards intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and political ends, and 5) the pre-modern and modern scholarly traditions of interpreting the Quran.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, woman, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Reading biblical texts from academic point of view.
JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3205/JwSt 3205/RelS 3205
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
How men, women, gender, sexuality is portrayed in Hebrew Bible. Social/religious roles/status of women in ancient Israel. Read biblical texts from academic point of view.
CNES 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
JWST 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
RELS 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and of bodies to perceived pollutions caused by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to ancient Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
ANTH 3206 - Sex, Murder, and Bodily Discharges: Purity and Pollution in the Ancient World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3206/CNES 3206/RelS 3206
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
"Dirt is dangerous" wrote Mary Douglas more than 50 years ago in her groundbreaking study, Purity and Danger: an Analysis of the Concept of Pollution and Taboo. Her work has been influential in ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean studies when dealing with issues of sacred/profane, purity/pollution, and ritual sacrifice and purification. Douglas' work provides a framework within which to understand ancients' thinking about these concepts that range from the sacredness of space and bodies to perceived pollutions cause by bodily leakage or liminal stages of life and death. In this course, we will examine Douglas' theory in light of ancient evidence, with special attention to anceint Israelite literature (the Tanakh or Old Testament) and ancient Jewish literature (the Dead Sea Scrolls), but we will also analyze other ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean examples of purity and pollution (from epigraphical and documentary evidence).
CNES 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. ? 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
JWST 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include biblical literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
RELS 3504 - Apocalypticism, Cosmic Warfare, and the Maccabees: Jewish Strategies of Resistance in Antiquity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3504/JwSt 3504/RelS 3504
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The rise of Hellenistic kingdoms in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East created a variety of responses from local, subjugated peoples, and some of the most documented cases are those of Jewish populations in Koele-Syria/Palestine. The main objective of this course is to analyze Jewish responses to imperial rule and military conflict during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods (c. 300 B.C.E. - 150 C.E.), but we will also spend time examining the broader picture of how local, ancestral groups fared under foreign rule. Along with discussing pertinent archaeological evidence, we will discuss Jewish literature and documentary material from this period, including, the sectarian documents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Book of Judith (a Jewish "novel"), the Books of Daniel and the Maccabees (all of which provide historical information about the Maccabean revolt and rise of the Hasmoneans), and the writings of Josephus (a Jewish writer who witnessed the Roman takeover of Palestine in the first century C.E.). This course will stay within the confines of the ancient evidence and not examine later interpretations when analyzing each historical period; it will begin with Ptolemaic control of the region and conclude with the Bar Kokhba revolt, its aftermath, and the resilience of Jewish populations in northern Palestine. Topics that will be examined in depth are messianism and apocalypticism, the Jerusalem Temple, Jewish ancestral traditions (which include "biblical" literature), and theoretical models used by scholars to analyze power relationships in antiquity.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
JWST 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
RELS 3034 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
HIST 3534 - Introduction to Jewish History and Cultures (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 1534/JwSt 1034/RelS1034
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course traces the development of Judaism and Jewish civilizations from their beginnings to the present. With over three millennia as its subject, the course must of necessity be a general survey. Together we will explore the mythic structures, significant documents, historical experiences, narratives, practices, beliefs, and worldviews of the Jewish people. The course begins by examining the roots of Judaism in the Hebrew Bible and the history of ancient Israel but quickly focuses on the creative forces that developed within Judaism as a national narrative confronted the forces of history, especially in the forms of the Persian, Greek, and Roman empires. Rabbinic Judaism becomes the most dominant creative force and will receive our greatest attention, both in its formative years and as it encounters the rise of Christianity and Islam. After studying the Jewish experience in the medieval world, we will turn to Judaism?s encounter with the enlightenment and modernity. The historical survey concludes by attending to the transformations within Judaism and Jewish life of the last 150 years, including a confrontation with the experience of the Holocaust. Woven throughout this historical survey will be repeated engagements with core questions: ?Who is a Jew?? ?What do Jews believe?? ?What do Jews do?? ?What do we mean by ?religion??? ?How do Jews read texts within their tradition?? And perhaps most importantly, ?How many answers are there to a Jewish question?? Students in this course can expect to come away with some knowledge of the Bible in Judaism, rabbinic literature and law, Jewish mysticism and philosophy, Jewish nationalism and Zionism, Jewish culture, ritual, and worship in the synagogue, the home, and the community, and Jewish celebrations of life cycle events and the festivals.
CNES 3951W - Capstone (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research project pertaining to ancient world, using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources. Students select project in consultation with faculty member. prereq: course is open to second semester juniors and seniors, major in CNES or RelS], instr consent
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3951W - Capstone (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research project pertaining to ancient world, using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources. Students select project in consultation with faculty member. prereq: course is open to second semester juniors and seniors, major in CNES or RelS], instr consent
CNES 3016W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
JWST 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
RELS 3013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course. Old: Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam. Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
RELS 5013W - Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: JwSt 3013W/Cnes 3016W/RelS 301
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the original meaning and significance of religious law and ethics within Judaism. Law is the single most important part of Jewish history and identity. At the same time, law is also the least understood part of Judaism and has often been the source of criticism and hatred. We shall therefore confront one of the most important parts of Jewish civilization and seek to understand it on its own terms. In demonstrating how law becomes a fundamental religious and ethical ideal, the course will focus on the biblical and Rabbinic periods but spans the entire history of Judaism. Consistent with the First Amendment, the approach taken is secular. There are no prerequisites: the course is open to all qualified students. The course begins with ideas of law in ancient Babylon and then studies the ongoing history of those ideas. The biblical idea that a covenant binds Israel to God, along with its implications for human worth - including the view of woman as person - will be examined. Comparative cultural issues include the reinterpretations of covenant within Christianity and Islam. The course investigates the rabbinic concept of oral law, the use of law to maintain the civil and religious stability of the Jewish people, and the kabbalistic transformation of law. The course concludes with contemporary Jewish thinkers who return to the Bible while seeking to establish a modern system of universal ethics. The premise of the course is the discipline of academic religious studies. The assumptions of the course are therefore academic and secular, as required by the First Amendment. All texts and all religious traditions will be examined analytically and critically. Students are expected to understand and master this approach, which includes questioning conventional cultural assumptions about the composition and authorship of the Bible. Willingness to ask such questions and openness to new ways of thinking are essential to success in the course.
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.