Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Theatre Arts B.A.

Theatre Arts & Dance Dept
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 31 to 45
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Located in a large urban area with a vibrant theatre community, our BA in theatre arts offers rigorous practice-focused train­ing with a nationally recognized faculty of working artists and scholars. Our students learn to be versatile, cross-disciplinary thinkers and artists, adept in collaboration and critique, and committed to a practice of cultural citizenship that sees theatre as an act of political and social consequence. Students benefit from access to an eclectic range of local theatres, and from our unique emphasis on devised, ensemble-created theatre, and physical approaches to performance. The BA curriculum provides students with the opportunity to both grow fundamental skills and challenge traditional forms and to understand the history and theory of theatre art and innovate its future. The BA offers five tracks: generalist, performance creation, design and technology, history/literature, and social justice/applied drama.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
All CLA BA degrees require 18 upper division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the theatre arts BA is TH. The theatre arts BA consists of base requirements, common across all sub-plans, and a choice between specialization in one of five sub-plans: generalist, social justice/applied drama, history/literature, design/technology, or performance creation. Each sub-plan carries a separate set of requirements to be completed in addition to the base requirements. At least 14 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students may earn no more than one undergraduate degree from the theatre arts program: a BA in theatre arts, a BFA in acting, or a minor in theatre arts. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
Foundation Courses
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling exactly 12 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 1321 - Fundamentals of Acting & Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 1322 - Creating the Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 1501 - Introduction to Design and Technology for Live Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 1101W - Introduction to the Theatre [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 1101V - Honors Section: Introduction to the Theater [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
Core Courses
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 11 or more credit(s) from the following:
History of the Theatre
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism (3.0 cr)
· TH 3172 - History of the Theatre: Age of Enlightenment to Present (3.0 cr)
· Stage Technology
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology (3.0 cr)
· Theatre Practicum
At least one credit must be a production (not performance) credit.
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 2 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum (1.0 cr)
Capstone
Seniors execute and document a project of their own design over the course of a year. Projects may take of the form of, but are not limited to: a research paper, an internship with an arts organization, creation of an original work – play, dance, lighting, set design, sound score, etc., advanced technical position on a production, grant writing, portfolio development and presentation, educational curriculum development, film and/or software projects. A faculty advisor will serve as a resource.
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Theater Arts BA capstone, but they do need to replace the 2 credits with a theatre arts elective.
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling exactly 2 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 4901 - Capstone Project for Theater (2.0 cr)
or Honors Option
University Honors Program students must complete this capstone requirement.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 2 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 4905H - Honors: Tutorial Seminar in Theatre Arts (2.0-4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· DBLN 3010W - The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5179W - Text and Performance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Generalist
Design/Technology
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 3716 - Stage Management (4.0 cr)
· TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater (3.0 cr)
Performance
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3321 - Acting I (3.0 cr)
· TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3711 - Beginning Directing (3.0 cr)
· TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera (3.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
Social Justice/Applied Drama
Electives
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3442 - Performing Arts in Japan and Their Cultural Backgrounds [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3832 - The Politics of Arabic Poetry [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 5446 - Kabuki: A Pop, Queer, and Classical Theater in Japan (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 1002 - Art and Life: Thinking About Ethics Through Art [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CI 1032 - Creating Identities: Learning In and Through the Arts [AH] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3231 - Comedy: Media, Politics & Society [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· DNCE 3411 - Dance and Popular Culture: Choreographing Race, Class, and Gender [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· DNCE 3487W - Dance and Citizenship: Land, Migration, and Diaspora [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 3302 - Women and the Arts [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators [AH, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3581 - Art for Social Change: Art and Culture in Political, Social, and Historical Context [AH] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3582 - Art for Social Change: Arts Praxis - Social Justice Theory and Practice in the Field [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· HECU 3583 - Art for Social Change: Intersections of Art, Identity and Advocacy Internship & Integration Seminar [CIV] (8.0 cr)
· HSEM 2009H - Contemporary Art and Politics: From Marcel Duchamp to Ai Weiwei [GP] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3234 - Knowledge and Society (4.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice [DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing (4.0 cr)
· TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· TH 3711 - Beginning Directing (3.0 cr)
· TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 5103 - The Theatre Dramaturg (3.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
· TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama (3.0 cr)
· TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· YOST 1366 - Stories of Resistance & Change: Youth, Race, Power & Privilege in the U.S. [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3250 - Art + Performance (4.0 cr)
or ARTS 5250 - Art + Performance (4.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education (2.0 cr)
or YOST 5314 - Theatre Activities in Youthwork and Education (2.0 cr)
History/Literature
Electives
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3441 - Japanese Theater [AH] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3442 - Performing Arts in Japan and Their Cultural Backgrounds [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 5446 - Kabuki: A Pop, Queer, and Classical Theater in Japan (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3231 - American Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama (3.0 cr)
· TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice (3.0 cr)
· TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5103 - The Theatre Dramaturg (3.0 cr)
· TH 5179W - Text and Performance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama (3.0 cr)
· TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
Design/Technology
Theatre Practicum
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 1 credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum (1.0 cr)
Electives
Take 5 or more course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 3711 - Beginning Directing (3.0 cr)
· TH 3716 - Stage Management (4.0 cr)
· TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor (2.0 cr)
· TH 4555 - Audio Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 5100 - Theatre Practicum (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 5500 - Theatre Design Practicum (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5510 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer I (3.0 cr)
· TH 5520 - Scene Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 5530 - Costume Design (3.0 cr)
· TH 5540 - Lighting Design for the Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 5545 - Stage Lighting Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 5554 - Multimedia Production for Live Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 5556 - Audio Engineering (3.0 cr)
· TH 5559 - Sound Design for Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 5560 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer II (3.0 cr)
· TH 5570 - Properties/Scenery Technology (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5580 - Costume Technology (3.0 cr)
· TH 5590 - Theatre Technology Practicum (1.0-3.0 cr)
· TH 5716 - Stage Management for the Theatre (4.0 cr)
· TH 5760 - Advanced Stage Management (2.0 cr)
· TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
Performance Creation
BA Masterclass
Take exactly 4 course(s) totaling 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· DBLN 3013 - Performance in Irish Context (3.0 cr)
· DNCE 1345 - Alexander Technique for Movement Artists (2.0 cr)
· TH 3332 - Circus Performance (1.0 cr)
· TH 3370 - BA Masterclass (1.0 cr)
Creative Collaboration
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling 4 or more credit(s) from the following:
· TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration (1.0-3.0 cr)
· DBLN 3014 - Dublin Internship: Learning through Experience (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· DBLN 3010W - The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland [WI] (3.0 cr)
· DBLN 3011 - Storytelling: Writing Irish Cultural Narratives (3.0 cr)
· DBLN 3013 - Performance in Irish Context (3.0 cr)
· TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3314 - Text and the Actor (3.0 cr)
· TH 3316 - Voice for the Actor (3.0 cr)
· TH 3321 - Acting I (3.0 cr)
· TH 3322 - Acting II (3.0 cr)
· TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting (3.0 cr)
· TH 3332 - Circus Performance (1.0 cr)
· TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 3365 - Intermediate Musical Theatre (3.0 cr)
· TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 3711 - Beginning Directing (3.0 cr)
· TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting (3.0 cr)
· TH 4321 - Career Preparation for the Theatre Artist (3.0 cr)
· TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera (3.0 cr)
· TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor (2.0 cr)
· TH 4711 - Intermediate Stage Direction (3.0 cr)
· TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change (3.0 cr)
· TH 5330 - Comedy: Advanced Physical Performance Studio (3.0 cr)
· TH 5340 - Tragedy/Poetry: Advanced Physical Performance Studio (3.0 cr)
· TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater (3.0 cr)
· TH 5370 - Hand, Mind, and Gesture: An Independent Study in the Creation of Image Driven Performance (3.0 cr)
· TH 5711 - Advanced Stage Direction (3.0 cr)
· TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre (1.0-4.0 cr)
· TH 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Generalist Sample Plan
· Social Justice/Applied Drama Sample Plan
· History/Literature Sample Plan
· Design/Technology Sample Plan
· Performance Creation Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Theatre Arts B.A.
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TH 1321 - Fundamentals of Acting & Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
A fundamental overview of acting that focuses on strengthening the vital connection between physical and vocal expression and uniting instinct and intellectual analysis. Classes focus on ensemble awareness, situation and script analysis, character development and dramaturgical skills. In this course students develop their ?acting instrument?: body, voice and imagination; they learn to make bold, specific choices in scripted and improvisational circumstances, they explore a range of physical and vocal expression, they develop the ability to respond and adapt to other performers onstage, and intensify their focus and presence in performance. Technique, theory and structured improvisation are incorporated with scene work and collaborative performance projects, offering an opportunity to assimilate the principles covered. The course explores scripted scenes and monologues as well as original-student generated work.
TH 1322 - Creating the Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Responsibilities/techniques of modern stage director as creative/interpretive artist. Creation of directed performance of invented/pre-existing forms, from happenings to traditional psychological/poetic realism. prereq: 1321 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1321 or 1501 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1501
TH 1501 - Introduction to Design and Technology for Live Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles, processes, and possibilities in all areas of stage design and production. Process and relationship between artistic and production staff members. Collaboration, compromise, creation. Student are assigned to a lab in a technical area. prereq: 1101 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1101
TH 1101W - Introduction to the Theatre (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Th 1101W/Th 1101V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to art/craft of theatre. Appreciation/critical analysis of plays/performances. Examples of theatre's diverse interactions with society considered from various cultural perspectives.
TH 1101V - Honors Section: Introduction to the Theater (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Th 1101W/Th 1101V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to art/craft of theater. Appreciation/critical analysis of plays/performances. Examples of theater's diverse interactions with society considered from various cultural perspectives. prereq: Honors student
TH 3171 - History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through Neo-Classicism
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
History of Western theatre and drama; theatrical practices, staging conventions, and dramatic structure of plays. Ancient to mid-18th century. prereq: Th major or instr consent
TH 3172 - History of the Theatre: Age of Enlightenment to Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theatrical practices, staging conventions, dramatic structure of plays. prereq: Th major or instr consent
TH 3571 - Introduction to Stage Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Hands-on techniques. Stage lighting technology in a lab (theater) setting. Electricity, optics, color, control (dimming). Construction/rigging of scenery. Operation of counter weight fly systems and power tools. Constructing a garment. Hand/machine sewing, pinning, marking, measuring, seam finishes, fabric identification. prereq: 1501
TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Participation in University Theatre main stage play as actor, construction/running crew personnel, or theatre management operations personnel. prereq: 1101; only two enrollments as actor may count toward a major
TH 4901 - Capstone Project for Theater
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Dnce 4901/Th 4901
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Development of senior project, alone or in groups, under guidance of faculty members. prereq: Sr, [Th or Dnce major]
TH 4905H - Honors: Tutorial Seminar in Theatre Arts
Credits: 2.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Independent reading/research in preparing honors thesis or selected creative project. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: 4905; honors, theatre arts, dept consent; limit [2 cr for [cum laude or magna cum laude], 4 cr for summa cum laude]
DBLN 3010W - The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Irish playwrights have contributed disproportionately to the output of English-language drama over the course of the 20th century, creating some of the most memorable dramatic literature of the last hundred years. With that in mind, this intensive practical playwriting course will interrogate the tradition of theatrical writing in the Irish capital of Dublin by engaging comprehensively with a variety of modes and disciplines specific to the act of writing for the Irish stage. Contemporary Dublin has undergone an unprecedented process of modernization rarely seen in the developed world, with the city becoming in just twenty years a multicultural, cosmopolitan space that is embracing provocative ways of seeing and creating work meant for theatrical performance. Questions about the relevancy of the practice of writing in creating performance, how authorship of a play is determined, and the slipperiness of language are now at the heart of Irish theatre?s drive to redefine itself. Challenged by a wide range of disciplinary approaches to writing and rewriting, students will be exposed to a host of methodologies for creating dramatic literature for the stage specific to this unique moment in Irish theatrical history and, in the process, gain an appreciation for the important role writers still play in making theatrical performance.
TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage practice from traditional/postmodern approaches. Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion, critical writing, performance. prereq: [[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
TH 5179W - Text and Performance (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to read texts toward performance in various dramatic/nondramatic material. Method of unlocking metaphoric energy of texts. Vocabulary/techniques of analysis that transform text from page to stage. prereq: [1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5182W/Th 5182W
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of space/illusion to create environments for theater/performance. Collaborative vocabulary through script interpretation/analysis. Visual literacy through sketching, painting, and drafting. Individual/group projects. prereq: 3571
TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Costume design process, including, researching, script analysis, the costume designer's role throughout the production process, and design problems. prereq: TH 3571
TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Composition, color theory, instrumentation, and control (dimming) as they apply to theater, opera, and dance. Collaborative process of the lighting designer through individual and group projects in a lab setting (i.e., a theater.) prereq: 3571
TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basics of audio design for theatre. Script analysis, audio editing, music research, basic system design, paperwork, cue building. Basic components of audio design. Final project will involve applying skills to partially realized design. prereq: 1501
TH 3716 - Stage Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Production process, pre-production to maintaining/closing. Managing rehearsals, communication, conflict resolution. Individual/group projects: promptbook building, blocking notation, Cue placement/execution, scene breakdowns, creating/maintaining checklist, building a form library. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/performance are introduced through traditional/contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short works for in-class performance. prereq: [[3513 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3513], instr consent] or grad student
TH 3321 - Acting I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acting I explores the acting process using the canon of 20th century realism. The class will cover the basics of embodiment for the actor, observation as the root of character creation, analysis of text from an actors perspective, and rehearsal techniques. The core of the course is the preparation of scenes and monologues in class. Students will also complete a variety of class compositions, readings, and will see and analyze live performances.
TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Dynamic physical approach to acting. Expanding expressiveness/creativity. Strengthening connections between physical/vocal expression. Uniting instinct and intellectual analysis. Techniques as advanced by Delsarte, Meyerhold, Grotowski, Kantor, Suzuki, Barba, etc., and structured improvisation, are incorporated in solo/collaborative performance projects. prereq: 1322, [3314 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3314], audition, instr consent
TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of American musical theater. Videos/discussions, basic music theory, voice, dance, acting, audition techniques. Solo/ensemble presentations for public class performance.
TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Live storytelling and solo performance as theatrical art form. How to turn personal experiences into stage stories. Guests perform, discuss their work, and critique student work. Students develop short monologues/performances and conclude with original solo theater performance/story.
TH 3711 - Beginning Directing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to/application of techniques/theories of stage direction. Script analysis, composition, blocking, rehearsal methods, improvisation, actor coaching, scene production. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differences between stage acting and acting for camera. Hands-on experience with film equipment. Scenes/monologues rehearsed/performed for camera. Videotape playback for class critique. prereq: 1301 or 3321
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
AMES 3442 - Performing Arts in Japan and Their Cultural Backgrounds (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Taught entirely overseas in Japan, this instructor-led Learning Abroad Center course engages a diverse and representational range of Japanese theatrical traditions including but not limited to Noh, Kyogen, Bunraku, Kabuki, Takarazuka, and Butoh. We explore the links among medieval traditions of "performance of offering" to Buddhist and Shinto deities, entertainment of elite audiences, and new theatrical work based on anime, manga, and martial arts. We will experience, firsthand and in person, Japanese performing arts in their original cultural locations, such as Tokyo, Nara, and Osaka. This course consists of class discussions and lecture, attending theatrical productions at playhouses and vaudeville theaters, special lectures by prominent guest speakers, and observation of several kinds of "performance of offering" at temples and shrines. As a winter-term course, our seminar takes place during an exciting time of year for this topic: we begin with "new-year count down" ("joya no kane") at a temple where the giant bell rings 108 times. In addition, playhouses will be filled with a special, new-year atmosphere, thus offering a unique opportunity to learn about New Year celebrations in Japan and about the Japanese performing arts highlighting these celebrations.
AMES 3832 - The Politics of Arabic Poetry (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course engages with Arabic poetry in its socio-political context. How have Arab poets from the pre-Islamic era till the present time used their verse as a tool to affirm the structure of their society, or to struggle with it? What roles did Arabic poetry play at the Abbasid imperial courts? How does Arabic poetry participate in the constitution and promulgation or subversion of political ideologies? And what presence has it had in Arab peoples' struggles for independence or reform, historically and today as part of the Arab Spring?
AMES 5446 - Kabuki: A Pop, Queer, and Classical Theater in Japan
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Kabuki, an all-male theater of "song (ka)/dance (bu)/acting (ki)" that came into being in the 17th century, still boasts popularity in Japan. This course explores kabuki in several contexts: historical, theatrical, literary, and theoretical. It aims to historicize this performing art in its four-hundred-year dynamic trajectory against the static understanding that it is a national, high culture. No less importantly, we inquire into theoretical implications of subject matter, such as citationality, gender construction, and the like. Furthermore, this course attends to what is usually marginalized and overlooked in kabuki historiography: koshibai (unlicensed small troupes of kabuki); onna yakusha (women kabuki actors who mastered the acting techniques established by male kabuki actors--including the technique of female impersonation). Open to anyone with an interest, no previous knowledge of Japanese studies, theater studies, or Japanese is required. All of the readings will be available in English. Audio-visual materials will be used whenever available and appropriate.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ARTH 3401 - Art on Trial (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Analysis of visual representations in fine arts and popular media, in context of social issues. Obscenity, censorship, democracy, technology, commerce, the museum, propaganda, social role of artist. Understanding the contemporary world through analysis of dominant aesthetic values.
ARTS 1002 - Art and Life: Thinking About Ethics Through Art (AH, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Case examples from visual arts. Ethical theories. Philosophical take on relationship between art, life, ethics.
CI 1032 - Creating Identities: Learning In and Through the Arts (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 1032, GC 1312, PSTL 1312
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
?Creating Identities: Learning In and Through the Arts? gives you opportunities to create art in different mediums including storytelling, photomontage, movement, as well as a creative medium of your choice in order to reflect your understanding of a social justice issue. In CI 1032 you join a learning community for discussing, analyzing, and making meaning of this artistic production. No prior experience is needed; come with an open mind and imagination as well as a willingness to experiment. An important emphasis in the class will be on finding your own ways to transform ordinary materials. We will introduce you to specific artistic techniques and in turn you will learn to take creative risks, think metaphorically, explore the unknown, improvise, brainstorm, and invent your own methods of working. Each of you bring to the class different kinds of knowledge and abilities. To be successful in this course you need to be willing to work hard, to explore territory that may not be familiar to you, to be reflective about what you are doing, and to learn from your diverse classmates and in turn help them achieve the same goals. The instructors of ?Creating Identities: Learning In and Through the Arts? shape the course with the assumption that identity is at the heart of educational experiences and that the habits of mind associated with the artistic production are primary vehicles for multimodal learning. We will experience how arts-based learning engenders higher order thinking, the creative process, reflection and perseverance. This course gives you the opportunity to both produce as well as analyze art in order to experience how creative expressions reveal aspects of our personal and social identities that have an impact on how we learn. Through mediums including photography, film, performance, music, painting and sculpture, we will explore how artists are influenced by cultural elements such as the built and natural environments, gender, religion, nationality, and socioeconomic status, and how artists, in turn, shape our perceptions of culture and identity. Through writing and discussion, we will consider how the arts can both reflect and impact our perceptions of identity and our reflections of ourselves as learners. As you move further into your academic studies and your career, you will intersect with people from differing cultures and places. The work in this class will help you become more comfortable with and welcome the benefits that come with intercultural learning. Interactions with classmates and cultural production of indigenous, immigrant, international and Western artists, allows you to have a greater understanding of, appreciation for and acceptance of the ways of knowing a variety of cultures can provide, and the confidence that you can reciprocate in kind.
CSCL 3120 - Poetry as Cultural Critique
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3012/CSCL 3174
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Examines the status of "poetry" in several cultures of the Americas bringing together techniques of close reading and broad cultural inquiry.
CSCL 3231 - Comedy: Media, Politics & Society (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
What makes some jokes so funny? And why do we laugh? In this course, we will approach the topic of comedy from every angle. We will study theories and philosophies of humor, and will survey many different forms of the genre?film, television, viral web videos, internet memes, stand-up, improv, sketch comedy, absurdist theater, and political satire. And, of course, we will write and perform our own comedy in the classroom. By studying the history and formations of comedy, we will think about how jokes can help us change the rules of everyday life and imagine a new way forward.
CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Is there such a thing as global queer aesthetic? If so, how do various modes of representation and expression (novels, poetry, and sophisticated uses of language across film, television and video, digital media, pop music and punk) elaborate and enact queerness in particular material ways while also helping to create a larger, intermedial queer culture?
DNCE 3411 - Dance and Popular Culture: Choreographing Race, Class, and Gender (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
How race, class, and gender become aestheticized and are put into motion as popular culture. Choreographic analysis of moving bodies. How "popular" affects understanding of culture. Exoticism, binary structures of stereotypes, identity, hegemony.
DNCE 3487W - Dance and Citizenship: Land, Migration, and Diaspora (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Dance/performance as practiced/transformed by minority groups in the United States. Migration as a global phenomenon, particularly pertaining to land disputes, labor distribution, political asylum, refugee, and dislocation.
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we'll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the anti-racist feminism branch of the women's movement, often referred to as "third-wave feminism." We'll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we'll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, "the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another." As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with and confront the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they're doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they'd like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We'll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, "political education," reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we'll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we'll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we'll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we'll get a feel for what it's like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we'll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning-- details will be provided in class.
GWSS 3302 - Women and the Arts (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Study of women in the arts, as represented and as participants (creators, audiences). Discussion of at least two different art forms and works from at least two different U.S. ethnic or cultural communities.
HECU 3555W - Making Media & Change: Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism From Consumers to Creators (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The From Consumers to Creators course is a critical exploration of the role of storytelling and media in social change efforts. In this course will examine the ways that story is both a lens through which one understand the world and a tool which can be used to shape it. Students will have the opportunity to learn about and evaluate media-based activist strategies in the context of competing theoretical perspectives on media and society. Students will use theory and field experiences to reflect upon and hone their own digital practices as an effective agent of social change. This course is one of two required linked courses taken concurrently which make up the Making Media, Making Change Digital Technologies, Storytelling, and Activism program taught through our institutional partnership with HECUA and their community partner, the Twin Cities public access media powerhouse St Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), which provides technical training, equipment, and video production support. Students are also enrolled in HECU 3556 Digital Laboratory and have the opportunity to register for an optional internship the following semester or summer at SPNN, where students can strengthen relationships with the diverse set of actors in the Twin Cities committed to using digital media to share their voices and build community. Interns contribute to public access and nonprofit programming and create professional quality video for community organizations in the Twin Cities. prereq: Departmental Consent Required.
HECU 3581 - Art for Social Change: Art and Culture in Political, Social, and Historical Context (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will combine new learning from field speakers, books, articles, guest speakers, and field trips to gain a deeper understanding of the need for and approach to effective community-based artistic engagement. Each student will participate in or facilitate engaged conversations with their peers to grapple with the themes of the course and have the chance to create artistic projects that help each other integrate their new learning and awareness. Concurrent registration is required in HECU 3582 and HECU 3583; Departmental Consent required.
HECU 3582 - Art for Social Change: Arts Praxis - Social Justice Theory and Practice in the Field (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, students will be immersed in the creative community in the Twin Cities to they can learn more about themselves, what social justice issues drive your passion and how to address these issues as an artist or arts advocate. Students will work with professional artists who will mentor each person through creative projects that allow each participant to interact with the communities surrounding Pillsbury House + Theatre. Concurrent registration is required in HECU 3582 and HECU 3583; Departmental Consent required. Offered each Spring semester.
HECU 3583 - Art for Social Change: Intersections of Art, Identity and Advocacy Internship & Integration Seminar (CIV)
Credits: 8.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this Art for Social Change Internship and Integration seminar students will work with HECUA to be placed in an internships which will offer them the chance to integrate and apply their learning in professional settings. As an intern, students will gain skills in communication, discipline, organization, project management, and turning theory into action. By completing a HECUA internship, students will have a critical competitive edge in the job market after graduating. In addition to professional development, students will also leave their internship experience with a better sense of the type of job and work environment they want to find and the steps needed to take to get there. Students are required to be concurrently registered in HECU 3581 and 3582. Spring semester offering.
HSEM 2009H - Contemporary Art and Politics: From Marcel Duchamp to Ai Weiwei (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will discuss the subject matters and practices of major contemporary artists all over the world - including Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Beuys, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Jeff Koons, Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono, Ilya Kabakov, Jasper Johns, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ai Weiwei, Shirin Neshat, Marina Abramovic, Kara Walker, etc. ? whose creative work frequently intertwines with commentaries on contemporary politics. As a strategy of being, these contemporary artists seem to use art to engage their audiences in a dynamic dialogue concerning certain aspects of contemporary life. These and other artists want to interpret political reality in order to change it; that is, to bring about social and political transformation through aesthetic means. This course will provide an overview of the ideas, strategies, and work of the artists as a critical lens for viewing the changing cultural and political landscape of an increasingly technological and globalized world. This course will take a comparative studies approach to the development of contemporary art in its historical, its social and political contexts, the increasing influence of the Western art in Asia, Africa, and other parts of the world, and the cross-cultural communication customs and protocols of international art practice and art criticism. Methodologically, this course first aims at integrating four major disciplinary approaches in discussing art history from post-WWII to the present day: historical studies, sociological studies, psychoanalytic studies and cultural studies. Such an integrated approach will provide a framework and a reference point for us to describe and understand contemporary art in certain historical and political contexts.
PHIL 3234 - Knowledge and Society
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Critical discussion of concepts such as knowledge, objectivity, justification, rationality, evidence, authority, expertise, and trust in relation to the norms and privileges of gender, race, class, and other social categories.
SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
We will examine conceptual and theoretical approaches to the sociological study of ethnic and racial conflict around the globe, looking at ethnicity and race as distinctive but overlapping social constructions of collective identity that underpin patterns of social conflict and systems of power and privilege. We will also explore the difference between race and ethnicity, the various ways in which racial, ethnic, and national identities are constructed in different countries, individual versus group approaches to the study of prejudice and discrimination, and the racialization of ethnic and religious groups prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SW 2501W - Introduction to Social Justice (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social justice advocates work for social change. Criminal justice, globalization, and social welfare. Students do service learning in a social justice organization.
SW 3501 - Theories and Practices of Social Change Organizing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change organizing. U.S. power relations. How people organize. Cross-class, multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do service learning in social justice organization.
TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introdution to diverse ways of thinking about theatre and its representational practices. Students explore traditional/non-traditional modes of performance through readings, discussions, and hands-on performance projects. Seminar-style course. prereq: 1101
TH 3711 - Beginning Directing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to/application of techniques/theories of stage direction. Script analysis, composition, blocking, rehearsal methods, improvisation, actor coaching, scene production. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 5103 - The Theatre Dramaturg
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theoretical/practical aspects of dramaturgy in American theater. Historical perspectives. Research/production history of classics. Development of new scripts. Dramaturgical structure and interpretive choices. Dramaturgy as it relates to playwrights/directors. Preparing/editing the rehearsal script. Production dramaturgy.
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 5483/ TH 5183
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course examines and embodies how storytelling and creative drama can be used as tools to help develop students? critical literacy and to assist them in becoming more fluent readers and writers. Critical literacy is the focus; theater and storytelling are the vehicles. Key topics to be covered include: 1) A historical background on fairy and folk tales, legends, fables, myths, and the different oral traditions; 2) Tools for developing a critical view of diverse tales; 3) Practical instruction on how to use storytelling and story genres in the classroom to develop critical literacy; 4) Assessing storytelling work in the classroom. Students will meet in the first week at the University to learn tools of the Neighborhood Bridges program and in the second week will practice and observe each other?s teaching with local school classrooms. In the past we have worked with 4th graders and 6th graders, though we will also discuss how course content applies to high school students. The class meets for two intensive weeks in person, however, we additionally assign pre-readings and post-class reflections and papers.
TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/performance are introduced through traditional/contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short works for in-class performance. prereq: [[3513 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3513], instr consent] or grad student
TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WRIT 3244W - Critical Literacies: How Words Change the World (AH, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Language as creating rather than simply describing "reality." Reading and writing as arenas of active human struggle over social group power. Techniques for analyzing, interpreting, and participating in the conversation of critical literacies.
YOST 1366 - Stories of Resistance & Change: Youth, Race, Power & Privilege in the U.S. (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PSTL 1365W/YoSt 1366/PSTL 1366
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Young people in their everyday lives often experience themselves as invisible, or as trouble, troubled, or in trouble with adult authority. This course will use literature as an opportunity to complement social sciences understandings of youth, to help those who work with children and adolescents to better understand their lived experiences. This course will use classic and contemporary literary texts that respond to the needs, wants, and existential questions that surround young people’s lives, and makes them visible to learners in the class who want to better understand children and adolescents in diverse settings across the United States.
AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3303W/ENGL 3303W/GWSS 3303
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, gender to her writings.
ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3303W/ENGL 3303W/GWSS 3303
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3303W/ENGL 3303W/GWSS 3303
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by Asian American, African American, American Indian, Latino, and Chicano playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ARTS 3250 - Art + Performance
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3250/ArtS 5250
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Studio practice, investigation of forms of expression involving narrative, performance, installation. Hybrid art forms introduced by Dada movement in 1920's, continued by Fluxus movement in 1950's, to contemporary performance/installation artists.
ARTS 5250 - Art + Performance
Credits: 4.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtS 3250/ArtS 5250
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Studio practice in performance art and installation; investigation of historical and contemporary methods and concepts of interdisciplinary expression. Development of personal imagery. Prereq: ARTS major
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
YOST 4314 - Theater Activities in Youthwork and Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: YoSt 4314/YoSt 5314
Typically offered: Every Spring
Empowering methods of personal/creative development using experiential learning and theater activities to enhance creativity/imagination. Approaches to working with youth in school and youth agency settings. Experiential learning, improvisational theater theory/practice. prereq: 1001 or 2101
YOST 5314 - Theatre Activities in Youthwork and Education
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: YoSt 4314/YoSt 5314
Typically offered: Every Spring
Using experiential learning and theater activities to enhance creativity and imagination of youth workers and educators. Approaches to working with youth in school and agency settings. Application of experiential learning and improvisational theater theory/praxis. prereq: 1001 or 2101
AMES 3441 - Japanese Theater (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Japanese performance traditions. Emphasizes noh, kabuki, and bunraku in their literary/cultural contexts. Relationship between these pre-modern traditions and modern theatrical forms (e.g., Takarazuka Revue).
AMES 3442 - Performing Arts in Japan and Their Cultural Backgrounds (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Taught entirely overseas in Japan, this instructor-led Learning Abroad Center course engages a diverse and representational range of Japanese theatrical traditions including but not limited to Noh, Kyogen, Bunraku, Kabuki, Takarazuka, and Butoh. We explore the links among medieval traditions of "performance of offering" to Buddhist and Shinto deities, entertainment of elite audiences, and new theatrical work based on anime, manga, and martial arts. We will experience, firsthand and in person, Japanese performing arts in their original cultural locations, such as Tokyo, Nara, and Osaka. This course consists of class discussions and lecture, attending theatrical productions at playhouses and vaudeville theaters, special lectures by prominent guest speakers, and observation of several kinds of "performance of offering" at temples and shrines. As a winter-term course, our seminar takes place during an exciting time of year for this topic: we begin with "new-year count down" ("joya no kane") at a temple where the giant bell rings 108 times. In addition, playhouses will be filled with a special, new-year atmosphere, thus offering a unique opportunity to learn about New Year celebrations in Japan and about the Japanese performing arts highlighting these celebrations.
AMES 5446 - Kabuki: A Pop, Queer, and Classical Theater in Japan
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Kabuki, an all-male theater of "song (ka)/dance (bu)/acting (ki)" that came into being in the 17th century, still boasts popularity in Japan. This course explores kabuki in several contexts: historical, theatrical, literary, and theoretical. It aims to historicize this performing art in its four-hundred-year dynamic trajectory against the static understanding that it is a national, high culture. No less importantly, we inquire into theoretical implications of subject matter, such as citationality, gender construction, and the like. Furthermore, this course attends to what is usually marginalized and overlooked in kabuki historiography: koshibai (unlicensed small troupes of kabuki); onna yakusha (women kabuki actors who mastered the acting techniques established by male kabuki actors--including the technique of female impersonation). Open to anyone with an interest, no previous knowledge of Japanese studies, theater studies, or Japanese is required. All of the readings will be available in English. Audio-visual materials will be used whenever available and appropriate.
ENGL 3231 - American Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3231/3231H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Representative dramas from 18th through 20th centuries. Topics include staging of national identities, aesthetics of modern/contemporary drama. Production concerns of mainstream, regional, community theaters.
ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Works written for theater in 19th/20th century. Emphasizes how major aesthetic forms of modern drama (the well-made play, realism, expressionism, symbolism, epic theater, absurdism) presented not just distinctive theatrical styles, but also new ways of .seeing. for the theatrical spectator. How social differences, as informed by gender, class, and race, inform content/presentation.
TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of traditional play structure, characterization, dialogue, dramatic action, and theme. Final project is a one-act play.
TH 3120 - Theatre: Theory and Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introdution to diverse ways of thinking about theatre and its representational practices. Students explore traditional/non-traditional modes of performance through readings, discussions, and hands-on performance projects. Seminar-style course. prereq: 1101
TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
New methods of play construction. How characteristic plays from particular contemporary styles create original theatrical effects by using/breaking dramatic conventions. Writing exercises, workshoping of student plays. prereq: 3115 or [writing sample, instr consent]
TH 4177W - Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic Interpretation (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage practice from traditional/postmodern approaches. Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion, critical writing, performance. prereq: [[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or instr consent
TH 5103 - The Theatre Dramaturg
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Theoretical/practical aspects of dramaturgy in American theater. Historical perspectives. Research/production history of classics. Development of new scripts. Dramaturgical structure and interpretive choices. Dramaturgy as it relates to playwrights/directors. Preparing/editing the rehearsal script. Production dramaturgy.
TH 5179W - Text and Performance (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
How to read texts toward performance in various dramatic/nondramatic material. Method of unlocking metaphoric energy of texts. Vocabulary/techniques of analysis that transform text from page to stage. prereq: [1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student
TH 5181W - Blacks in American Theatre (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5181W/Th 5181W
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Historical survey of significant events in the development of American black theatre traditions. Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early colonial references to the Black Arts Movement.
TH 5182W - Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 5182W/Th 5182W
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Essays, plays, playwrights, theatres that have contributed to contemporary Black theatre from beginning of Black Arts Movement to present.
TH 5183 - Critical Literacy, Storytelling, and Creative Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 5483/ TH 5183
Typically offered: Every Summer
This course examines and embodies how storytelling and creative drama can be used as tools to help develop students? critical literacy and to assist them in becoming more fluent readers and writers. Critical literacy is the focus; theater and storytelling are the vehicles. Key topics to be covered include: 1) A historical background on fairy and folk tales, legends, fables, myths, and the different oral traditions; 2) Tools for developing a critical view of diverse tales; 3) Practical instruction on how to use storytelling and story genres in the classroom to develop critical literacy; 4) Assessing storytelling work in the classroom. Students will meet in the first week at the University to learn tools of the Neighborhood Bridges program and in the second week will practice and observe each other?s teaching with local school classrooms. In the past we have worked with 4th graders and 6th graders, though we will also discuss how course content applies to high school students. The class meets for two intensive weeks in person, however, we additionally assign pre-readings and post-class reflections and papers.
TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by Asian American, African American, American Indian, Latino, and Chicano playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For over four hundred years, William Shakespeare has remained the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright in the world. From Nelson Mandela to Toni Morrison, from South African playwright Welcome Msomi to Kuwaiti playwright Sulayman Al-Bassam, Shakespeare's works have continued to influence and inspire authors and audiences everywhere. This course examines representative works of Shakespeare from a variety of critical perspectives, as cultural artifacts of their day, but also as texts that have had a long and enduring vitality. This is a required course for English majors and minors, but it should also interest any student who wants to understand why and how Shakespeare continues to be one of the most important literary figures in the English language. English majors/minors must take this course A-F only grading basis.
ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Plays from all of Shakespeare's periods, including at least A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, the history plays, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello, and The Winter's Tale. prereq: Honors or instr consent
TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens? identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant-gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
GLOS 5152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity (HIS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3152W/Th 3152W/Th 5152W/
Typically offered: Every Spring
What does it mean to be an avant-garde artist in the Global South? In postcolonial Africa and Asia, where arts were linked to national modernization projects, artists have played a key role in shaping citizens' identity, alongside schools and universities. While participating in modernizing projects, avant-garde artists maintained independence from state institutions and voiced criticism of dictators. This course examines avant-garde performance in several locations of the Global South, analyzing dramas of national history, modernist music, activist theater, cosmopolitan dance, transnational cultural circuits, and politically radical performances. Reading historical, social, and performance studies, we will develop methods for analyzing performances that aim to make transformative social interventions. These include textual analysis, ethnography, performance analysis, and tracking transnational cultural exchange. You will apply select methods in your final research paper, which centers on an avant gardist cultural phenomenon in the contemporary Global South.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
TH 3100 - Theatre Practicum
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Participation in University Theatre main stage play as actor, construction/running crew personnel, or theatre management operations personnel. prereq: 1101; only two enrollments as actor may count toward a major
TH 3521 - Introduction to Scenic Design for Theater and Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Use of space/illusion to create environments for theater/performance. Collaborative vocabulary through script interpretation/analysis. Visual literacy through sketching, painting, and drafting. Individual/group projects. prereq: 3571
TH 3531 - Introduction to Theatrical Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Costume design process, including, researching, script analysis, the costume designer's role throughout the production process, and design problems. prereq: TH 3571
TH 3541 - Introduction to Stage Lighting Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Composition, color theory, instrumentation, and control (dimming) as they apply to theater, opera, and dance. Collaborative process of the lighting designer through individual and group projects in a lab setting (i.e., a theater.) prereq: 3571
TH 3559 - Introduction to Sound Design for the Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Basics of audio design for theatre. Script analysis, audio editing, music research, basic system design, paperwork, cue building. Basic components of audio design. Final project will involve applying skills to partially realized design. prereq: 1501
TH 3711 - Beginning Directing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to/application of techniques/theories of stage direction. Script analysis, composition, blocking, rehearsal methods, improvisation, actor coaching, scene production. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3716 - Stage Management
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Production process, pre-production to maintaining/closing. Managing rehearsals, communication, conflict resolution. Individual/group projects: promptbook building, blocking notation, Cue placement/execution, scene breakdowns, creating/maintaining checklist, building a form library. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ensemble creation of a single theatre performance work. Creative/dramaturgical work. Public showing of work, completed or in-progress. Students work collaboratively with faculty or affiliate guest artists. prereq: Audition, interview, instr consent
TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. May include functions/aesthetics of stage makeup, application techniques, prosthetics, and facial hair.
TH 4555 - Audio Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Sound as science. Technology to create/manipulate sound. Recording techniques. Effects/signal processing. Microphone/mixing techniques. prereq: 1501 or instr consent
TH 5100 - Theatre Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 20.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Individual creative projects in production of approved plays as an actor, director, dramaturg, or playwright. (See 5500 for design practicums.) prereq: instr consent, dept consent; 4 cr of 3100 for undergrads
TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/performance are introduced through traditional/contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short works for in-class performance. prereq: [[3513 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3513], instr consent] or grad student
TH 5500 - Theatre Design Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 20.0]
Prerequisites: Th 3521, 3531, or 3541
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual projects in production of approved plays as a designer of scenery/properties, costumes, lighting, or sound. (See 5100 for other creative practicums.) prereq: Th 3521, 3531, or 3541
TH 5510 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: 1501 or grad
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Development of skills necessary for presentation of theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and techniques in scene painting. Basic drawing/graphic skills. prereq: 1501 or grad
TH 5520 - Scene Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Prerequisites: 3521
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceiving/communicating design ideas in both two-dimensional sketches and three-dimensional models for theatre and allied venues. Drafting. prereq: 3521
TH 5530 - Costume Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theory and process of costume design for theatrical productions (e.g., dance, opera, film) through hypothetical productions. prereq: 3531
TH 5540 - Lighting Design for the Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Prerequisites: 3541
Typically offered: Every Spring
Design aesthetics and exploration of design for various stage forms and venues. Development of the lighting plot and paperwork; use of the computer in lighting design. prereq: 3541
TH 5545 - Stage Lighting Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The lighting technician's skills and crafts: equipment, techniques, control operation, wiring, and maintenance. prereq: 3515 or grad or instr consent
TH 5554 - Multimedia Production for Live Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Use of multimedia production technologies in actual production. Students apply knowledge/skill in conjunction with an artistic team on a production and are an integral part of the development/realization of that production. prereq: 5553 or instr consent
TH 5556 - Audio Engineering
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Miking/recording techniques specific to music/dramatic dialogue. Recording different styles of music. Hands-on recording of bands, doing final mixes to demo CD. Field trips to professional studios and club/concert recordings. prereq: 4555, instr consent
TH 5559 - Sound Design for Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Audio technology/psychology, their impact on audience in a performance. Communication, design process, psychoacoustics, script analysis. prereq: 4555 or instr consent
TH 5560 - Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the Theatre Designer II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Development of skills necessary for presentation of theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and techniques in scene painting. Rendering and scene painting skills. prereq: 5510
TH 5570 - Properties/Scenery Technology
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Management, structures, upholstery, mask-making, furniture construction, stage mechanics, soft properties, faux finishes. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 3515 or grad or instr consent
TH 5580 - Costume Technology
Credits: 3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fabric enhancement techniques, masks, wig-making, millinery, makeup prosthetics, pattern drafting, and draping. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 3571 or grad or instr consent
TH 5590 - Theatre Technology Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 15.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Individual creative project in technology/craft area of theatre. Practical work in costume, lighting, makeup, props, scenery, sound, or theatre management. prereq: 3515, instr consent, dept consent; 4 cr max for undergrads
TH 5716 - Stage Management for the Theatre
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Theories, practicalities, and techniques for rehearsal/performance. Organizing/managing various types of performance venues. prereq: [1101, 1321, soph] or grad
TH 5760 - Advanced Stage Management
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practical experience in stage management for specific productions of the University Theatre with emphasis on rehearsal and performance. prereq: 5716 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 5716, instr consent; [4 cr max for undergrads]
TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
DBLN 3013 - Performance in Irish Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Study abroad course. Students will study and actively participate in the art of performance, focusing on Irish writers like Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Conor McPherson, Martin McDonough and more. Actor training, and so this course, is physical, emotional and intellectual. The work will include vocal training and expression, dynamic conditioning of the instrument of the body, and textual analysis. In addition the course will help actors unlock the specific voices of Irish playwrights. Students will work on scenes and monologues as well as their own improvisations. This will be an acting class, and will require one previous fundamentals of acting or performance class at your home institution, or permission by the instructor.
DNCE 1345 - Alexander Technique for Movement Artists
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Increased kinesthetic awareness of habitual movement patterns in order to improve dance/movement technique and prevent related injuries.
TH 3332 - Circus Performance
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strength/conditioning, aerial techniques. Acrobatics to improve timing/muscular structure. Juggling to improve hand-eye coordination and showmanship.
TH 3370 - BA Masterclass
Credits: 1.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Prepare BA theatre performance majors/minors with essential skills that will enhance performing careers as actors, directors, playwrights. Attend non-traditional performances by national/international touring companies. Engage in vigorous discussions led by those artists who are at the forefront of creation models. Rigorous skill-building workshops led by artists, scholars, technicians.
TH 4380 - Creative Collaboration
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ensemble creation of a single theatre performance work. Creative/dramaturgical work. Public showing of work, completed or in-progress. Students work collaboratively with faculty or affiliate guest artists. prereq: Audition, interview, instr consent
DBLN 3014 - Dublin Internship: Learning through Experience
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Study abroad course. This course explores the world of work in Ireland and how students respond to the challenges that they can expect to encounter while interning in Dublin.
DBLN 3010W - The Playwright in Practice: Writing for the Stage in 21st Century Ireland (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Irish playwrights have contributed disproportionately to the output of English-language drama over the course of the 20th century, creating some of the most memorable dramatic literature of the last hundred years. With that in mind, this intensive practical playwriting course will interrogate the tradition of theatrical writing in the Irish capital of Dublin by engaging comprehensively with a variety of modes and disciplines specific to the act of writing for the Irish stage. Contemporary Dublin has undergone an unprecedented process of modernization rarely seen in the developed world, with the city becoming in just twenty years a multicultural, cosmopolitan space that is embracing provocative ways of seeing and creating work meant for theatrical performance. Questions about the relevancy of the practice of writing in creating performance, how authorship of a play is determined, and the slipperiness of language are now at the heart of Irish theatre?s drive to redefine itself. Challenged by a wide range of disciplinary approaches to writing and rewriting, students will be exposed to a host of methodologies for creating dramatic literature for the stage specific to this unique moment in Irish theatrical history and, in the process, gain an appreciation for the important role writers still play in making theatrical performance.
DBLN 3011 - Storytelling: Writing Irish Cultural Narratives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Study abroad course. What does it mean to tell a story? Does it matter why or how someone tells a story? Storytelling is an Irish oral tradition that dates back to Celtic mythology, but is also important to modern day Ireland. This course will examine how storytelling brings Ireland to life, and how Dublin and Ireland are represented in stories. How can you use a building, a street, a painting, or a performance to construct a story that can be shared with others, and that creates a narrative that resonates with the specific time and history of that place? The course will look at the tradition of the short story in Irish writing, and also the development of the Irish novel. Students will also think about their own stories, and how they can be told.
DBLN 3013 - Performance in Irish Context
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Study abroad course. Students will study and actively participate in the art of performance, focusing on Irish writers like Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Conor McPherson, Martin McDonough and more. Actor training, and so this course, is physical, emotional and intellectual. The work will include vocal training and expression, dynamic conditioning of the instrument of the body, and textual analysis. In addition the course will help actors unlock the specific voices of Irish playwrights. Students will work on scenes and monologues as well as their own improvisations. This will be an acting class, and will require one previous fundamentals of acting or performance class at your home institution, or permission by the instructor.
TH 3115 - Introduction to Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study of traditional play structure, characterization, dialogue, dramatic action, and theme. Final project is a one-act play.
TH 3314 - Text and the Actor
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Standard stage speech, international phonetic alphabet transcription, and textual analysis to perform heightened language texts such as Shakespearean/Shavian monologues, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Beowulf. Videos viewed/discussed. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3316 - Voice for the Actor
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Anatomy/physiology of vocal/respiratory mechanisms. Abdominal breathing, forward tonal placement, articulation of consonants, vocal projection. IPA phonetic transcription and vowel standardization for American Standard Stage Speech. Techniques applied to performance of monologues. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3321 - Acting I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Acting I explores the acting process using the canon of 20th century realism. The class will cover the basics of embodiment for the actor, observation as the root of character creation, analysis of text from an actors perspective, and rehearsal techniques. The core of the course is the preparation of scenes and monologues in class. Students will also complete a variety of class compositions, readings, and will see and analyze live performances.
TH 3322 - Acting II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Acting II explores the acting process using scripts from primarily heightened or non-realistic texts. This can include a range of genres from Shakespeare to absurdism to contemporary performance and plays. This course covers the basics of embodiment for the actor, creativity and observation as the roots of character creation, analysis of text from an actors perspective and rehearsal techniques. The core of the course is the preparation of scenes and monologues in class. Students will also complete a variety of class compositions, readings and will see and analyze live performances.
TH 3330 - Physical Approaches to Acting
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Dynamic physical approach to acting. Expanding expressiveness/creativity. Strengthening connections between physical/vocal expression. Uniting instinct and intellectual analysis. Techniques as advanced by Delsarte, Meyerhold, Grotowski, Kantor, Suzuki, Barba, etc., and structured improvisation, are incorporated in solo/collaborative performance projects. prereq: 1322, [3314 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3314], audition, instr consent
TH 3332 - Circus Performance
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Strength/conditioning, aerial techniques. Acrobatics to improve timing/muscular structure. Juggling to improve hand-eye coordination and showmanship.
TH 3361 - Introductory Musical Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
History of American musical theater. Videos/discussions, basic music theory, voice, dance, acting, audition techniques. Solo/ensemble presentations for public class performance.
TH 3365 - Intermediate Musical Theatre
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Musical theatre varying styles. Incorporating music into devised work, as well as strategies on updating traditional performance. Singing, interpretation, dance techniques. Culminates in presentations in public class performance. prereq: 3361 or instr consent
TH 3381 - Theater Storytelling and Solo Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Live storytelling and solo performance as theatrical art form. How to turn personal experiences into stage stories. Guests perform, discuss their work, and critique student work. Students develop short monologues/performances and conclude with original solo theater performance/story.
TH 3711 - Beginning Directing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to/application of techniques/theories of stage direction. Script analysis, composition, blocking, rehearsal methods, improvisation, actor coaching, scene production. prereq: 1101, 1321, 1322
TH 3950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 4115 - Intermediate Playwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
New methods of play construction. How characteristic plays from particular contemporary styles create original theatrical effects by using/breaking dramatic conventions. Writing exercises, workshoping of student plays. prereq: 3115 or [writing sample, instr consent]
TH 4321 - Career Preparation for the Theatre Artist
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
From personal reflection to real-world insights and hands-on experiences, this course will delve deeply into the skill sets and mindsets important for arts professionals in theater and related fields. I envision our time together as a combined exploration of philosophical, political, and practical questions, thinking through who you want to BE as an artist, what you want your art to DO, and the TOOLS you'll need to manifest that vision in the world. The course will connect you with resources on and off campus, introduce you to professionals working in various facets of the field, engage you in readings and hands-on workshops to deepen your thinking and expand your toolkit, and will culminate in a portfolio project that you can take with you as you transition to life after college. Most importantly, I want this course to be useful and valuable to you, so I will be seeking your input about what you most need, and we'll shape the course accordingly.
TH 4322 - Acting for the Camera
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Differences between stage acting and acting for camera. Hands-on experience with film equipment. Scenes/monologues rehearsed/performed for camera. Videotape playback for class critique. prereq: 1301 or 3321
TH 4532 - Makeup for the Actor
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary. May include functions/aesthetics of stage makeup, application techniques, prosthetics, and facial hair.
TH 4711 - Intermediate Stage Direction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Coordinating/guiding collaborative artistic team. Script selection, textural analysis, concept development, space use, composition, movement, dialogue. Final presentation of scene. Intensive research, textural examination, journal. prereq: 1322 or instr consent
TH 5117 - Performance and Social Change
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Reading, writing, research, presentations and workshops explore activist performance projects. Theories of social formation and ideology provide framework to discuss/animate theater's potential for social change. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
TH 5330 - Comedy: Advanced Physical Performance Studio
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Mechanics of creating physical comedy. Focuses on process using clown, Comedia dell'arte, Bouffons, or improvisational comedy. Exercises on how comedy is born from tragedy and state of conflict within one's self. prereq: 3330, audition
TH 5340 - Tragedy/Poetry: Advanced Physical Performance Studio
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Specific tragic/poetic training paradigms in physical theater employed by Stanislavski, Grotowski, Brecht, Lecoq, etc. Psychological, emotional, technical, and physical work. Tragic action in Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Melodrama, operatic characterization, Brecht. Original tragic/poetical work. prereq: [3322, 3331, grad student] or instr consent
TH 5355 - Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in Contemporary Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/performance are introduced through traditional/contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short works for in-class performance. prereq: [[3513 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3513], instr consent] or grad student
TH 5370 - Hand, Mind, and Gesture: An Independent Study in the Creation of Image Driven Performance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Create single or collaborative performance/event that lives in time/space. Work will draw from personal investigation, amplify personal signature, explore modalities of image driven forms. Propose, develop, construct, rehearse, present finished public performance. prereq: 5355, instr consent
TH 5711 - Advanced Stage Direction
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Realistic/nonrealistic dramatic forms. Theory/technique of rehearsal. Production problems. Includes directing of three one-act plays. prereq: [4711, instr consent] or grad student
TH 5950 - Topics in Theatre
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 80.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed, and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.
AAS 3311 - Asian American Theater
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3311/Th 3311
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Through submerging students in both theater history and practice, this class brings students closer to the history, experiences, and politics of Asian Americans. Why are Asian American stories needed and how do we tell them? What are the artistic and social agendas driving the making of Asian American theater? How have the styles of performance shifted? While we will be actively working on readings and original theater projects, you don't need to be a theater expert to enjoy this class. Topics will include reading plays by Frank Chin, David Henry Hwang, Wakako Yamauchi, Naomi Iizuka, and others; looking at the history of Asian American theater companies; discussing creative approaches to casting, acting, directing, and design; and building collaborations among companies, audiences, and communities.