Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Classics B.A.

Classical & Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2021
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 35 to 65
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The field of classics encompasses the study of ancient Greek and Roman cultures and their political, social, artistic, and intellectual legacies. With its broadly conceived chronological (the Bronze age through late antiquity) and geographical (ancient Mediterranean and Near East) boundaries, the Classics program involves the study of cultural contact and hybridization, as well as the exploration of the dynamic relationships between past and present. With its wide range of courses in language, literature, religion, social and political history, as well as art and archaeology, the program enables students to investigate ancient cultures from different perspectives and become acquainted with the aims and methods of several disciplines. Four degree sub-plans (Greek; Latin; Greek and Latin; Classical Civilization) are designed to accommodate students' specific interests and needs. Greek is the Western language with the longest continuous history, from the poetry of Homer in the first millennium BCE to the present. The Greek sub-plan focuses on literature, philosophy, religion, archaeology, and art associated with the Greek language from its earliest appearance through the rise of the Greek city-state in the 5th century BCE and into the Roman Empire. The Latin sub-plan allows students to explore a large range of literature written over more than a millennium and a half. It is concerned with the language and literature of the Roman Republic and Empire and later Latin literature from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, as well as with Roman religion, history, archaeology, and art. Modern "Romance" languages (French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese) are derived from Latin. The Greek and Latin sub-plan offers the most comprehensive and comparative approach to Greco-Roman antiquity with its broad focus on the languages and literature of both ancient Greece and Rome. Students explore a wide range of ancient texts and gain a heightened awareness of inter-cultural appropriation and interpretation. Majors interested in graduate work in classics are encouraged to consider this sub-plan as it offers especially strong preparation for advanced academic training in the field. The Classical Civilization sub-plan offers students the opportunity to explore the art, literature, religion, and social and political history of ancient Greece and Rome from interdisciplinary perspectives with less required work in the ancient languages. This sub-plan is also an attractive option as a double major for students studying in fields engaged with the reception of the classical past, like English, Art History, French, Italian, German, History, and Philosophy.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Refer to your chosen sub-plan for more information on what preparatory courses you must complete.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
All CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Classics BA is CNES. No course may be used to fulfill more than one major requirement. At least 18 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. Students earning a BA in Classics may not earn minors in Greek, Latin, or Classical Civilization. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Student completing an addition degree must complete the capstone in each degree area.
CNES Core Courses
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
Capstone
Students conduct independent research under a faculty member and produce a substantial, original research paper. Using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources, students show their mastery of disciplinary methodologies and their knowledge and understanding of ancient sources and modern scholarship related to their chosen topic.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Classics BA capstone, but they do need to replace the 4 credits with another upper-division CNES elective.
· CNES 3951W - Capstone [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3951W - Capstone [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile [WI] (3.0 cr)
Program Sub-plans
Students are required to complete one of the following sub-plans.
Classical Civilization
Depending on a student's language placement, the Classical Civilization track requires 35-50 total credits of coursework, including 9 credits of core courses and the capstone.
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 1002 - World of Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1003 - World of Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
Preparatory Greek or Latin
Take either the Latin or Greek 3-course language sequence for 14 credits. In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking one or both of these courses. Placement is determined by the Director of Classical Language Instruction.
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 14 credit(s) from the following:
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I (5.0 cr)
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II (5.0 cr)
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose (4.0 cr)
or LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I (5.0 cr)
LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II (5.0 cr)
LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose (4.0 cr)
Intermediate Greek or Latin Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 4 credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry (4.0 cr)
or LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry (4.0 cr)
Electives
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling 15 or more credit(s) including 3 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:
Language and Literature
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5701 - Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5703 - Epigraphy (3.0 cr)
· Art and Material Culture
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3221 - Field School (6.0 cr)
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· FRIT 3600 - The Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· History, Philosophy and Religion
Take 1 or more course(s) totaling 3 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3609 -  Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3009 - Medieval Art [AH] (3.0 cr)
Greek
Depending on a student's language placement, the Greek track requires 35-50 total credits of coursework, including 9 credits of core courses and the capstone.
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 1002 - World of Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
Preparatory Greek
In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking one or both of these courses. Placement is determined by the Director of Classical Language Instruction.
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 14 credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I (5.0 cr)
· GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II (5.0 cr)
· GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose (4.0 cr)
Intermediate and Advanced Greek Courses
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry (4.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5701 - Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5701 - Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
Greek and Latin
Depending on a student's language placement, the Latin and Greek track requires 36-65 total credits of coursework, including 9 credits of core courses and the capstone.
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 1002 - World of Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1003 - World of Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
Preparatory Greek and Latin
In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking one or both of these courses. Placement is determined by the Director of Classical Language Instruction.
Take 0 - 6 course(s) totaling 0 - 28 credit(s) from the following:
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I (5.0 cr)
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II (5.0 cr)
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose (4.0 cr)
or LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I (5.0 cr)
LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II (5.0 cr)
LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose (4.0 cr)
Intermediate and Advanced Greek or Latin Courses
Take either the Greek or Latin Emphasis sequence for a total of at least 14 credits.
Greek Emphasis
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry (4.0 cr)
· Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry (4.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5701 - Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
or Latin Emphasis
Take 14 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry (4.0 cr)
· Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry (4.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5703 - Epigraphy (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5701 - Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5703 - Epigraphy (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
Latin
Depending on a student's language placement, the Latin track requires 35-50 total credits of coursework, including 9 credits of core courses and the capstone.
Introductory Course
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· CNES 1003 - World of Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
or CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology [AH] (4.0 cr)
Preparatory Latin
In select cases, students with advanced proficiency may be exempt from taking one or both of these courses. Placement is determined by the Director of Classical Language Learning.
Take 0 - 3 course(s) totaling 0 - 14 credit(s) from the following:
· LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I (5.0 cr)
· LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II (5.0 cr)
· LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose (4.0 cr)
Intermediate and Advanced Latin Courses
Take 10 or more credit(s) from the following:
· LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry (4.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5703 - Epigraphy (3.0 cr)
· GRK 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (3.0 cr)
or LAT 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin (3.0 cr)
Electives
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition (3.0 cr)
· LAT 5703 - Epigraphy (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity [AH] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World [AH] (3.0 cr)
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Liberal Arts

View sample plan(s):
· Classical Civilization Sample Plan
· Greek Sample Plan
· Greek and Latin Sample Plan
· Latin Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
· Classics B.A.
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CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
JWST 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
RELS 3201 - The Bible: Context and Interpretation (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1201/JwSt 3201/RelS 3201
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to the modern academic study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible in the historical context of literature from ancient Mesopotamia. Read Babylonian Epic of Creation, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hammurabi, Genesis, Exodus, Psalms. Stories of creation, law, epic conflict, and conquest. prereq: Knowledge of Hebrew not required
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 3951W - Capstone (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research project pertaining to ancient world, using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources. Students select project in consultation with faculty member. prereq: course is open to second semester juniors and seniors, major in CNES or RelS], instr consent
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
CNES 3951W - Capstone (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Research project pertaining to ancient world, using documents or primary sources along with secondary sources. Students select project in consultation with faculty member. prereq: course is open to second semester juniors and seniors, major in CNES or RelS], instr consent
CNES 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 5502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
RELS 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
JWST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
HIST 3502W - Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3502W/Hist 3502/RelS 3502
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Israel and Judah were not states of great importance in the ancient Near East. Their population and territory were small, and they could not resist conquest by larger, more powerful states like Assyria and Rome. Yet their ancient history matters greatly today, out of proportion to its insignificance during the periods in which it transpired. The historical experiences of the people of Israel and Judah were accorded religious meaning and literary articulation in the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), which became a foundational text for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Essential features of Western as well as Islamic civilization are predicated on some element of Israel?s ancient past, as mediated through the Bible; therefore it behooves us to understand that past. But the Bible is a religious work, not a transcript of events, and the history of ancient Israel is not derived merely from reading the biblical accounts of it. Archaeological excavations have revealed the physical remains of the cultures of Israel and neighboring lands, as well as bringing to light inscriptions, documents, and literary works produced by those cultures. These sources, which complement and sometimes contradict the accounts conveyed in the Bible, provide the basis for reconstructing a comprehensive history of ancient Israel. This course covers the history of Israel and Judah from the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550-1200 BCE), by the end of which Israel had emerged as a distinct ethnic entity, to the period of Roman rule (63 BCE-330 CE), which saw the final extinction of ancient Israel, represented by the kingdom of Judea, as a political entity. Knowledge of this history is based on archaeological, epigraphic, and literary sources, including the Hebrew Bible. N.B.: Students should be aware that the study of history, like all the human and natural sciences, is predicated on inquiry, not a priori judgments. Accordingly, the Bible is not privileged as an intrinsically true or authoritative record. No text is presumed inerrant, and all sources are subject to scrutiny, in the context of scholarly discourse. Biblical texts are treated just like all other texts, as the products of human beings embedded in a historical context, and as the subject of analysis and interpretation. Persons of all faiths and of no faith are equally welcome to participate in such scholarly discourse. However, students who feel that their own religious beliefs require an understanding of the Bible that is antithetical to the foregoing statements are cautioned that they may find themselves uncomfortable with this course.
CNES 1002 - World of Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ancient Greek civilization, from second millenium BCE to Roman period. Art/archaeology, philosophy, science, literature, social/political institutions. Focuses on connections with contemporary cultures corresponding to Ancient Near East.
CNES 1003 - World of Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roman civilization, from Etruscan origins to late antiquity. Cultural diversity of Mediterranean civilization. Ways of life, social, and political institutions as evidenced by literature, art, architecture, history, and material culture.
CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology.
CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology. prereq: Honors or instr consent
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Greek as written in Athens in 5th/4th centuries BCE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Greek 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or dept consent
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1001/Lat 1111H/Lat 3111/La
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Latin as written in Rome in 1st centuries BCE/CE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1002/Lat 5002/Lat 1111H/La
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Latin 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or instr consent
LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3003/Lat 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Latin prose authors of 1st centuries BCE/CE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Latin texts (history, speeches, letters). Review of grammar/vocabulary as needed. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Roman culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3004/Grk 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Greek epic poetry. Readings of selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Homer's poetry. prereq: dept consent
LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3300/Lat 5004/Lat 3114/Lat
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Roman epic poetry. Readings of selections from Vergil's Aeneid. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Vergil's poetry.
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For over four hundred years, William Shakespeare has remained the most quoted poet and the most regularly produced playwright in the world. From Nelson Mandela to Toni Morrison, from South African playwright Welcome Msomi to Kuwaiti playwright Sulayman Al-Bassam, Shakespeare's works have continued to influence and inspire authors and audiences everywhere. This course examines representative works of Shakespeare from a variety of critical perspectives, as cultural artifacts of their day, but also as texts that have had a long and enduring vitality. This is a required course for English majors and minors, but it should also interest any student who wants to understand why and how Shakespeare continues to be one of the most important literary figures in the English language. English majors/minors must take this course A-F only grading basis.
ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literature of Jewish Bible ("Old Testament"). Narratives (Torah through Kings), prophets (including Isaiah), writings (including Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes). God's words/deeds as reported by editors/translators.
ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will introduce you to some of the best literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century in England. Think of this course as a challenge: how can you, as someone who will spend most of your life in the 21st century, learn to appreciate and learn from literature written in far different times and places? A lot depends on your willingness to empathize with ways of thinking and being that are quite different from your own and your comfort with believing that other ages were just as complicated and as interesting as the one you live in. Typical authors include Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Fielding, and Burney.
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5701 - Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Moving step by step through Ancient Greek grammar, starting with simple sentences and progressing to complex ones. Course ends with students translating short passages of modern English prose into Greek. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin grammar, syntax, diction, and prose style. Graduated exercises in prose composition. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5703 - Epigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Practical/theoretical introduction to Latin epigraphy (study/interpretation of inscriptions). Readings/discussion of epigraphic texts. Their value as historical documents, as evidence for development of Latin language, and as literary texts. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ANTH 3221 - Field School
Credits: 6.0 [max 18.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3221/Anth 8220
Typically offered: Every Summer
Field excavation, survey, and research. Intensive training in excavation techniques, recordation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological materials or prehistoric remains. prereq: instr consent
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
FRIT 3600 - The Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3600/CLA 3600/FrIt 3600/H
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Relationships between the visual arts, literature, science, philosophy, and politics in Europe from about 1300-1600. Works of artists, writers, and intellectuals (e.g., Michelangelo Buonarotti, Niccolo Machiavelli, Michel de Montaigne), different artistic and literary forms (e.g., portrait, sonnet, essay), and broad thematic issues, including the individual, antiquity, the state, and discovery. Team taught.
ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world, including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia and early Greece and Rome.
CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to art and material culture of Roman world: origin, change, continuity. Progress/decay in later empire, its legacy to modern world.
ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Introduction to history of Roman art, from formation of city-state of Rome under Etruscan domination, to transformation of visual culture in late antiquity under peoples influenced by the Romans.
CNES 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
RELS 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
ARTH 3182 - Egypt and Western Asia: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Western Asia (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3182/CNES 3182/RelS 3182
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in the art, architecture, and archaeology of Egypt, East Africa, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, Iran and Central Asia from the Neolithic through Late Antiquity (ca. 7,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the visual material and the social, intellectual, political, and religious contexts in which it developed and functioned. In this regard, students will also gain an understanding of the evolution of, and exchanges and differences among, the visual cultures of these time periods and regions. It will also expose them to the preconditions for contemporary geopolitics in the region.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A broad survey of ancient Greek culture and history from the third millennium B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.
HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
A broad survey of the culture and history of Rome from its origins to the decline and fall of the Roman Empire in the third and fourth centuries A.D.
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Survey of major scholarship in field of Roman history since Mommsen. Political, cultural, social, military, and economic history. Focuses on methodological problems posed by evidence. Ways in which these issues shape research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3609 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
ARTH 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
MEST 3009 - Medieval Art (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3009/MeSt 3009/RelS 3609
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Medieval art in Western Europe, from around 1000 to the mid-14th century. Works from France, Spain, Germany, Italy, and England examined in their historical context. Cross cultural relations, development of completely new forms of art and techniques, and the processes of realization.
CNES 1002 - World of Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ancient Greek civilization, from second millenium BCE to Roman period. Art/archaeology, philosophy, science, literature, social/political institutions. Focuses on connections with contemporary cultures corresponding to Ancient Near East.
CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology.
CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology. prereq: Honors or instr consent
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Greek as written in Athens in 5th/4th centuries BCE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Greek 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or dept consent
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3004/Grk 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Greek epic poetry. Readings of selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Homer's poetry. prereq: dept consent
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5701 - Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Moving step by step through Ancient Greek grammar, starting with simple sentences and progressing to complex ones. Course ends with students translating short passages of modern English prose into Greek. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5701 - Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Moving step by step through Ancient Greek grammar, starting with simple sentences and progressing to complex ones. Course ends with students translating short passages of modern English prose into Greek. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A broad survey of ancient Greek culture and history from the third millennium B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 1002 - World of Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ancient Greek civilization, from second millenium BCE to Roman period. Art/archaeology, philosophy, science, literature, social/political institutions. Focuses on connections with contemporary cultures corresponding to Ancient Near East.
CNES 1003 - World of Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roman civilization, from Etruscan origins to late antiquity. Cultural diversity of Mediterranean civilization. Ways of life, social, and political institutions as evidenced by literature, art, architecture, history, and material culture.
CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology.
CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology. prereq: Honors or instr consent
GRK 1001 - Beginning Classical Greek I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Greek as written in Athens in 5th/4th centuries BCE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
GRK 1002 - Beginning Classical Greek II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Greek 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or dept consent
GRK 3003 - Intermediate Greek Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3003/Grk 3113/Grk 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Athenian prose authors of 5th/4th centuries BCE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Greek texts (history, speeches). Review of grammar/vocabulary. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Greek culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1001/Lat 1111H/Lat 3111/La
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Latin as written in Rome in 1st centuries BCE/CE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1002/Lat 5002/Lat 1111H/La
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Latin 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or instr consent
LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3003/Lat 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Latin prose authors of 1st centuries BCE/CE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Latin texts (history, speeches, letters). Review of grammar/vocabulary as needed. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Roman culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3300/Lat 5004/Lat 3114/Lat
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Roman epic poetry. Readings of selections from Vergil's Aeneid. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Vergil's poetry.
GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3004/Grk 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Greek epic poetry. Readings of selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Homer's poetry. prereq: dept consent
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5701 - Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Moving step by step through Ancient Greek grammar, starting with simple sentences and progressing to complex ones. Course ends with students translating short passages of modern English prose into Greek. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GRK 3004 - Intermediate Greek Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 3004/Grk 5004
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Greek epic poetry. Readings of selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Homer's poetry. prereq: dept consent
LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3300/Lat 5004/Lat 3114/Lat
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Roman epic poetry. Readings of selections from Vergil's Aeneid. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Vergil's poetry.
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin grammar, syntax, diction, and prose style. Graduated exercises in prose composition. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5703 - Epigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Practical/theoretical introduction to Latin epigraphy (study/interpretation of inscriptions). Readings/discussion of epigraphic texts. Their value as historical documents, as evidence for development of Latin language, and as literary texts. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3082W/CNES 5082W
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Origins of tragedy. Ancient theatres. Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.
CNES 3103 - Ancient Greece: Alexander and the East (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Achievements of Alexander the Great, their effect on Greek-speaking world. Greek colonization of Egypt. Hellenistic art, literature, philosophy.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
GRK 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Greek texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5200 - Biblical Greek
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Readings from Gospels, epistles of Paul, related literature. Emphasizes proficiency in reading Greek New Testament. Selections vary. prereq: [GRK 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Greek. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
GRK 5701 - Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Moving step by step through Ancient Greek grammar, starting with simple sentences and progressing to complex ones. Course ends with students translating short passages of modern English prose into Greek. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
HIST 3052 - Ancient Civilization: Greece
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
A broad survey of ancient Greek culture and history from the third millennium B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C.
HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
A broad survey of the culture and history of Rome from its origins to the decline and fall of the Roman Empire in the third and fourth centuries A.D.
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Survey of major scholarship in field of Roman history since Mommsen. Political, cultural, social, military, and economic history. Focuses on methodological problems posed by evidence. Ways in which these issues shape research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin grammar, syntax, diction, and prose style. Graduated exercises in prose composition. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5703 - Epigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Practical/theoretical introduction to Latin epigraphy (study/interpretation of inscriptions). Readings/discussion of epigraphic texts. Their value as historical documents, as evidence for development of Latin language, and as literary texts. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Sources include literature, art, and archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities, ritual performance, prayer/sacrifice, temple architecture, death and the afterlife, mystery cults, philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions.
CNES 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
RELS 3071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3171.
RELS 5071 - Greek and Hellenistic Religions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3071/CNES 5071/RelS 3071/
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Greek religion from Bronze Age to Hellenistic times. Literature, art, archaeology. Homer/Olympian deities. Ritual performance, prayer, sacrifice. Temple architecture. Death/afterlife. Mystery cults. Philosophical religion. Near Eastern salvation religions. Meets with 3071.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
ARTH 3152 - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3152/CNES 3152
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art, architecture and archaeology from the formation of the Greek city states in the ninth century BCE, through the expansion of Greek culture across the Mediterranean and Asia in the Hellenistic period, to the coming of Rome in the first century BCE. While this survey concentrates on the main developments of Greek art, an important sub-theme of this course this is the changes Classical visual culture underwent as it served non-Greek peoples, including the role it played for Alexander and his successors in forging multiethnic, globally minded empires in Western, Central and South Asia. No background in the time period or discipline is expected and therefore this class will also serve as an introduction to interdisciplinary study of art history and the classical world. A number of art historical methodologies will be introduced in order to not only give students a useful background in art history but to give them the tools to think as art historians and incorporate related visual and textual evidence meaningfully into their writing.
CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to art and material culture of Roman world: origin, change, continuity. Progress/decay in later empire, its legacy to modern world.
ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Introduction to history of Roman art, from formation of city-state of Rome under Etruscan domination, to transformation of visual culture in late antiquity under peoples influenced by the Romans.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
CNES 1003 - World of Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Roman civilization, from Etruscan origins to late antiquity. Cultural diversity of Mediterranean civilization. Ways of life, social, and political institutions as evidenced by literature, art, architecture, history, and material culture.
CNES 1042 - Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology.
CNES 1042H - Honors Course: Greek and Roman Mythology (AH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 1042/CNES 1042H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to stories/study of Greek/Roman mythology. prereq: Honors or instr consent
LAT 1001 - Beginning Latin I
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1001/Lat 1111H/Lat 3111/La
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to grammar/vocabulary of classical Latin as written in Rome in 1st centuries BCE/CE. Forms/simple constructions. Some reading of simple, heavily adapted passages from ancient texts.
LAT 1002 - Beginning Latin II
Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 1002/Lat 5002/Lat 1111H/La
Typically offered: Every Spring
Continuation of Latin 1001. More complex constructions, including participles, clauses, indirect discourse. Some reading of adapted passages from ancient texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1001 or instr consent
LAT 3003 - Intermediate Latin Prose
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3003/Lat 5003
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to Latin prose authors of 1st centuries BCE/CE. Readings of continuous passages of unadapted Latin texts (history, speeches, letters). Review of grammar/vocabulary as needed. Some discussion of major themes/issues in Roman culture as illustrated by texts. prereq: Grade of at least C- or S in 1002 or 5001 or instr consent
LAT 3004 - Intermediate Latin Poetry
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Lat 3300/Lat 5004/Lat 3114/Lat
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to Roman epic poetry. Readings of selections from Vergil's Aeneid. Quantitative meter and poetic devices. Discussion of major themes and issues as developed in Vergil's poetry.
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin grammar, syntax, diction, and prose style. Graduated exercises in prose composition. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5703 - Epigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Practical/theoretical introduction to Latin epigraphy (study/interpretation of inscriptions). Readings/discussion of epigraphic texts. Their value as historical documents, as evidence for development of Latin language, and as literary texts. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
GRK 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 5715/Lat 5715
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/comparative grammar of Greek and Latin from their Proto-Indo-European origins to classical norms.
LAT 5705 - Introduction to the Historical-Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Grk 5715/Lat 5715
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Historical/comparative grammar of Greek and Latin from proto-Indo-European origins to classical norms. prereq: Two yrs college [Greek or Latin] or instr consent
ANTH 5442 - Archaeology of the British Isles
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Have you ever wondered how archaeologists interpret the vast amount of archaeological evidence from the British Isles, one of the most studied and best documented parts of the world? And how do archaeologists and governmental agencies protect the heritage of Britain, from major monuments such as Stonehenge, Roman forts, and Shakespeare?s theaters, to the minor products of craft industries such as personal ornaments and coins? This course teaches you about the archaeology of the British Isles, in all of its aspects. You learn how archaeologists study the changing societies of Britain and Ireland, from the first settlers about a million years ago to modern times. You learn about the strategies that public institutions employ to preserve and protect archaeological sites, and about the place of archaeology in tourism in the British Isles and in the formation of identities among the diverse peoples of modern Britain.
CNES 3081W - Classical Epic in Translation (LITR, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3081W/CNES 5081/CLCV 3081
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid. Cultural context of epic. Development of the hero. Epic style. Poetics of epic.
CNES 3106 - Ancient Rome: The Age of Nero
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
The Roman Empire. "Silver Age" of Latin literature, rise of Christianity. Art/architecture.
CNES 3601W - Sexuality and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3601/CNES 5601
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Evidence for Ancient Greek and Roman ideas about sexuality and gender roles. The methodologies by which it is analyzed. Norms of writing about ancient culture, gender, and sexuality.
HIST 3053 - Ancient Civilization: Rome (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
A broad survey of the culture and history of Rome from its origins to the decline and fall of the Roman Empire in the third and fourth centuries A.D.
HIST 5053 - Doing Roman History: Sources, Methods, and Trends
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Survey of major scholarship in field of Roman history since Mommsen. Political, cultural, social, military, and economic history. Focuses on methodological problems posed by evidence. Ways in which these issues shape research. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5100 - Advanced Reading
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Reading in Latin texts/authors. Texts/authors vary. prereq: [3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical/Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5200 - Advanced Reading in Later Latin
Credits: 3.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Authors of late antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: [LAT 3004 or equiv], at least two yrs of college level Latin. Must contact Classical and Near Eastern Studies department for permission to register.
LAT 5701 - Latin Prose Composition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Latin grammar, syntax, diction, and prose style. Graduated exercises in prose composition. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
LAT 5703 - Epigraphy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Practical/theoretical introduction to Latin epigraphy (study/interpretation of inscriptions). Readings/discussion of epigraphic texts. Their value as historical documents, as evidence for development of Latin language, and as literary texts. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ANTH 3009 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilizations (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia, and early Greece and Rome.
HIST 3066 - Prehistoric Pathways to World Civilization (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3009/Anth 8009/Hist 3066
Typically offered: Every Spring
How did complex urban societies first develop? This course addresses this question in ten regions of the world, including Maya Mesoamerica, Inca South America, Sumerian Near East, Shang Civilization in East Asia and early Greece and Rome.
CNES 3061 - "Bread and Circuses:" Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
HIST 3061 - "Bread and Circuses": Spectacles and Mass Culture in Antiquity (HIS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3061/Hist3061
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Development of large-scale public entertainments in ancient Mediterranean world, from athletic contests of Olympia and dramatic festivals of Athens to chariot races and gladiatorial games of Roman Empire. Wider significance of these spectacles in their impact on political, social, and economic life of the societies that supported them.
CNES 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 3072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
RELS 5072 - The Birth of Christianity (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RelS 3072/
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Early Jesus movement in cultural/historical setting. Origins in Judaism. Traditions about Jesus. Apostle Paul, controversies/interpreters. Authority, religious practice, structure. Emergence of canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament study. Biblical writings as history/narrative. CNES 3072/CNES 5072/RELS 3072/RELS 5072 meet together.
CNES 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Introduction to art and material culture of Roman world: origin, change, continuity. Progress/decay in later empire, its legacy to modern world.
ARTH 3162 - Roman Art and Archaeology (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ArtH 3162/CNES 3162
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Introduction to history of Roman art, from formation of city-state of Rome under Etruscan domination, to transformation of visual culture in late antiquity under peoples influenced by the Romans.
CNES 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and the afterlife found in the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.
RELS 3535 - Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CNES 3535/CNES 5535/RelS 3535/
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs. Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care of dead.