Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Global Studies B.A.

Global Studies Department
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2023
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 36
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Global Studies students use a wide-angle lens to cultivate broad perspectives on the contemporary world. For example, you will learn to think of climate change not only in terms of CO2 levels in the atmosphere, but also in terms of politics, ecologies, social movements, and global inequalities. When you examine migration, you will study not only laws and non-governmental organizations analyses of mobility trends, but the geopolitical upheavals and food systems failures that drive these trends. And students will always keep in view the grassroots and community initiatives that address these problems on the ground, since that is where the impacts of these issues are most powerfully felt and creative solutions worked out. In short, Global Studies is a major for students who are committed both to understanding the world they live in, and to making that world a better place. Global Studies courses traverse geography and time. Some analyze the workings of global institutions and explore the operations of the global health, food, and financial systems. Others use works of art and philosophy from around the world to expose students to cultural forms like indigenous art and prison literature. Still others explore long term historical trajectories, such as the growth of global communications, media, and tourism industries. You will also have the opportunity to study abroad, intern, and engage deeply with on and off campus communities. In capstone projects you will bring together what you’ve studied to define, explore, and create new visions of the world. You will learn both critical thinking and practice the empathy needed to construct global citizenship for the 21st century. All learning experiences offer ample opportunities for developing the communications and organizational skills that support success in future careers in any number of sectors including nonprofits, government, and industry, as well as for graduate study in a number of arenas in law, policy, social sciences, and the humanities.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
CLA BA degrees require 18 upper-division (3xxx-level or higher) credits outside the major designator. These credits must be taken in designators different from the major designator and cannot include courses that are cross-listed with the major designator. The major designator for the Global Studies BA is GLOS. Students must formally enroll in the major at the advising office, 206 Social Sciences Building. Students must meet with an advisor to develop a program that meets major guidelines. At least 14 upper-division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus. A given course may only count towards one major requirement. Students may earn a BA or a minor in global studies, but not both. All students must complete a capstone in at least one CLA major. The requirements for double majors completing the capstone in a different CLA major will be clearly stated. Students must also complete all major requirements in both majors to allow the additional capstone to be waived. Students completing an additional degree must complete the Capstone in each degree area. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) must complete the First-Year Experience course sequence. All incoming CLA first-year (freshmen) students earning a BA, BS, or BIS degree must complete the second-year career management course CLA 3002.
Core Courses
Take exactly 2 course(s) totaling exactly 6 credit(s) from the following:
· GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism (3.0 cr)
Methods/Readiness
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling 3 - 4 credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3003 - Introduction to Applied Econometrics (4.0 cr)
· ARCH 4674 - World Heritage Conservation (3.0 cr)
· CI 3611W - Basics in Teaching English as a Second Language [WI] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4211 - Principles of Econometrics (4.0 cr)
· EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems (3.0 cr)
· FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources [TS] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science (4.0 cr)
· GLOS 3105 - Exploring the World: The Practice of Interdisciplinary Research (3.0 cr)
· LAW 3000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning (3.0 cr)
· LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· OLPD 3202 - Introduction to Strategies for Teaching Adults (3.0 cr)
· PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management (3.0 cr)
· PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance (3.0 cr)
· POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
· STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections (3.0 cr)
· BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
or BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing (3.0 cr)
Global Studies
Take exactly 5 course(s) totaling exactly 15 credit(s) from the following:
· GLOS 1112 - Social Justice and Globalization [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3105 - Exploring the World: The Practice of Interdisciplinary Research (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3143 - Place, Community, Culture [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3305 - Science for Sale: Environment, Capital, and Medicine (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3606 - Art and Incarceration: Prison Voices and Visions (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3609 - Novels and Nations [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3707 - Disposable People?: Surplus Value, Surplus Humanity (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3900 - Topics in Global Studies (1.0-5.0 cr)
· GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3225 - The Power of the 1%: Global Philanthropy and the Making of a New World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3225 - The Power of the 1%: Global Philanthropy and the Making of a New World (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3407 - Global Islamophobia (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3207 - Global Islamophobia (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3969 - Democracy and popular politics in India (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3489 - Democracy and popular politics in India (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins (3.0 cr)
Electives in a Concentration
Students should pick 1 concentration and take 3 courses from that concentration.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Study Abroad
We encourage our students to pursue a wide variety of study abroad locations and program models.
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ARGN 3003 - Politics and Society in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3006 - Topics in Argentine History (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3008 - Latin American Literature and Cinema [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3009 - Argentina: Stereotypes and Identity (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3011 - Buenos Aires - City of the Arts: Spanish (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3640 - Service Learning in Buenos Aires: ENG (3.0 cr)
· ARGN 3896 - Internship in Buenos Aires [GP] (3.0 cr)
· BCLA 3001 - Nationalism in Comparative Perspective [SOCS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· BCLA 3005 - Analyzing and Exploring the Global City [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· BCLA 3006 - Architectural History of Spain [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· BCLA 3011 -  The Birth of Modern Art: Matisse, Picasso, Dalí [AH] (3.0 cr)
· BCLA 3014 - Spain As Seen Through Its Movies: 1980s to Today [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ECDR 4001 - International Development: Human Rights: Policy & Practice [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4002 - International Development: Social Entrepreneurship & Microfinance [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4003 - International Development: Public Health & Traditional Andean Medicine [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4004 - International Development: Environmental Challenges from the Andes to the Amazon [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Ecuador (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4201 - Research in Ecuador (4.0 cr)
· ECDR 4896 - Internship in Ecuador (4.0 cr)
· FLOR 3005 - History and Sociology of Modern Consumerism (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3010W - Literary Representations of Florence: Space, Self & Other [WI] (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3012 - Florence and the Mediterranean: A Sea of Culture (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3015 - Food & Identity in the Mediterranean: A Cultural History [GP] (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3346 - Sociology of Crime: Mafia and the Media in Italy (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3002 - Ecology of Spain (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3012 - Internships in Spain (3.0-6.0 cr)
· MADR 3013 - Spanish Civilization (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3019 - Culture, Globalization & Media (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3021 - Art at the Prado Museum [AH] (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3025 - Modern Masters: Goya, Picasso, Dalí & Miró [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MADR 3027 - Contemporary Spanish History through Film [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3302 - Civilization of the South (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3303 - Internship (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3308 - French Art History (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3312 - Contemporary French Civilization (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3313 - Masculine/Feminine: France through the Lens of Cinema (3.0 cr)
· MONT 3886 - Community Engagement in Montpellier [CIV, GP] (3.0 cr)
· SNGL 4001 - International Development: Human Rights: Policy, & Practice [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4002 - International Development: Entrepreneurship & Inclusive Finance [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4003 - International Development: Public & Community Health [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4004 - International Development: Sustainable Development & Climate Change [SOCS, ENV] (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Senegal [HIS] (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4201 - Research in Senegal (4.0 cr)
· SNGL 4896 - Internship in Senegal (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4001 - International Development: Human Rights & Marginalized Communities [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4002 - International Development: Entrepreneurship & Sustainable Food Systems [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4003 - International Development: OneHealth: Humans, Animals, & Environment [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4004 - International Development: Sustainable Architecture & Design [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Thailand (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4201 - Research in Thailand (4.0 cr)
· THAI 4896 - Internship in Thailand (4.0 cr)
· TLDO 3001 - 20th Century Spanish Literature (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3006 - The Camino de Santiago: Past and Present (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3007 - Comparative Public Health [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3009 - Diversity in Global Health [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3012 - Global Bioethics [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3024 - Tracing Three Cultures in Spain (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3105W - Cultural Heritage of Spain [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3211 - Writers of the Spanish Empire and Its Decline (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3232 - Art and Architecture in Spain: Periods and Styles (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3233 - Christian, Muslim, Jewish Art: Toledo (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3234 - Master Painters of Spain (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3237 - Spanish Transition Toward Democracy (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3238 - Spain and the European Union (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3242 - History and Memory (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3302 - Ethnology and Folklore of the Iberian Peninsula (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3314 - 20th Century Spanish Art (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3502 - Spain Since 1936 (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3517 - Introduction to the History and Present Situation of Spanish Women (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3810 - Seminar: Spanish Language Film (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3970 - Internships in Spain (3.0-6.0 cr)
· TLDO 3975 - Service-Learning and the Immigrant Experience in Spain (3.0-4.0 cr)
· Human Rights
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality (3.0 cr)
· POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4275 - Domination, Exclusion, and Justice: Contemporary Political Thought [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3606 - Human Rights Issues in the Americas (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3728 - The History of Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5728 - The History of Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Revolutions and Social Movements
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3771 - Latino Social Power and Social Movements in the U.S. (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3122 - Movements and Manifestos [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· GWSS 4490 - Topics: Political Economy and Global Studies (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· POL 3252W - Revolution, Democracy, and Empire: Modern Political Thought [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3423 - Politics of Disruption: Violence and Its Alternatives [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4463 - The Cuban Revolution Through the Words of Cuban Revolutionaries [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4487 - The Struggle for Democratization and Citizenship (3.0 cr)
· POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· Global Political Economy
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMIN 4511 - Indigenous Political Economies (3.0 cr)
· AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3007 - Applied Macroeconomics: Policy, Trade, and Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3071 - Microeconomics of International Development (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4317 - The Chinese Economy (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4331W - Economic Development [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4431W - International Trade [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4432W - International Finance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 5385 - Globalization and Development: Political Economy (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3283 - Marx, Capital, and History: An Introduction to Marxist Theory and History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500 (3.0 cr)
· POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy (3.0 cr)
· POL 4481 - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger [GP] (3.0 cr)
· Environmental Justice
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment [AH, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action [LITR, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World [SOCS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics [ENV] (4.0 cr)
· PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse (2.0 cr)
· SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SUST 3017 - Environmental Justice [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
or ESPM 5603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy [TS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3032 - Ecosystem Health: Leadership at the Intersection of Humans, Animals, and the Environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5032 - Ecosystems Health: Leadership at the intersection of humans, animals and the environment [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (3.0 cr)
· HSCI 3246 - History of (Un)Natural Disasters [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
or HSCI 5246 - History of (Un)Natural Disasters (3.0 cr)
· Migration & Displacement
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3352 - Transborder Theory: Global Views/Borderland Spaces (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3335 - Aliens: Science Fiction to Social Theory [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents [GP] (3.0 cr)
· FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families [SOCS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3862 - American Immigration History [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· PA 3481 - Cedar Riverside: Where The World Meets MN (2.0 cr)
· CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
or CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· Global Health
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
· SOC 3241 - Sociology of Women's Health: Experiences from Around the World (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers [HIS, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse [TS] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse [TS] (3.0 cr)
· GCC 3028 - Harnessing the power of research, community, clinic and policy to build a culture of health [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GCC 5028 - Harnessing the Power of Research, Community, Clinic and Policy to Build a Culture of Health [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Globalization, Culture, and the Arts
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4049 - Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3206W - Art + Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 3676W - Communicating Terrorism [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3681W - Rhetorical Fictions and 20th Century Conflicts [LITR, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3251 - Popular Music and Mass Culture [AH] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3093 - Law and Literature [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3377 - Music in the City [DSJ, AH] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3388 - Going Places: Geographies of Travel and Tourism [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3418 - Drink in History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· JOUR 3552 - Technology, Communication & Global Society [GP] (3.0 cr)
· LING 3101W - Languages of the World [WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
or SCMC 3211 - Global and Transnational Cinemas [GP] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3627 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· Race/Ethnicity in Global Perspective
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3006 - Impact of African Migrations in the Atlantic World (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3120 - Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 4105 - Ways of Knowing in Africa and the African Diaspora (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3462 - The Politics of Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the United States, South Africa and Cuba (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4461 - Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3341 - Asian American Images [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3351 - Asian Americans and Popular Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3341 - Black Geographies (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 3341 - Black Geographies (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3446 - Chicana and Chicano History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· Gender/Sexuality in Global Perspective
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 4232 - Chicana/o - Latina/o Gender and Sexuality Studies [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLBT 3404 - Transnational Sexualities [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3003 - Gender and Global Politics [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3404 - Transnational Sexualities [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 4001 - Nations, Empires, Feminisms (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 4406 - Black Feminist Thought in the American and African Diasporas (3.0 cr)
· SW 3703 - Gender Violence in Global Perspective (3.0 cr)
· AMIN 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMST 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3412 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3515 - Comparative Indigenous Feminisms [GP] (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3212 - Chicana Feminism: La Chicana in Contemporary Society [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3716 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3681 - Gender and the Family in the Islamic World (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3505W - Girls, Girlhood, and Resistance [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3505V - Girls, Girlhood, and Resistance [WI] (0.0-3.0 cr)
· GWSS 4103 - Transnational Feminist Theory [GP] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 5104 - Transnational Feminist Theory (3.0 cr)
· Latin America
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4311 - Economy of Latin America (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· LAS 3429 - Latin American History in Film and Text [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3479 - Latin American Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· POL 5492 - Law and (In)Justice in Latin America (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3221 - Interpreting Colonial Latin America: Empire and Early Modernity (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3222 - Interpreting Modern and Contemporary Latin America (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3401 - Latino Immigration and Community Engagement [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3512 - Modern Latin America (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3920 - Topics in Spanish-American Literature (3.0 cr)
· CHIC 3425 - History of Modern Mexico (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3425 - History of Modern Mexico (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Europe
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GEOG 3161 - Europe: A Geographic Perspective [GP] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3014 - German Media (3.0 cr)
· GER 3604W - Introduction to German Cinema [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3655 - Cultures of Control and Surveillance in Germany and the US [HIS, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· GLBT 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe (3.0 cr)
· GSD 3512W - Imagined Communities: German and European, Culture and Controversies, 1700 to Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3211 - History of Sexuality in Europe (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3244 - History of Eastern Europe [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3283 - Marx, Capital, and History: An Introduction to Marxist Theory and History (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3615W - Women in European History: 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3691W - The British Empire [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3721 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the Turn of the Century to the End of World War II: 1900-45 (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3722 - Studies in 20th-Century Europe From the End of World War II to the End of the Cold War: 1945-91 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ITAL 3837 - Imagining Italy: Italian and Italian-American Culture, History, and Society through Film [AH, GP] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3265 - Ideas and Protest in French Postwar Thought [AH, CIV] (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 3501W - Scandinavian Culture Past and Present [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SCAN 3504 - Emigration, Immigration, Integration: The Nordic Experience [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· SPAN 3910 - Topics in Spanish Peninsular Literature (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3315 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5315 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3708 -  The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5708 - The Age of Curiosity: Art, Science & Technology in Europe, 1400-1800 [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3123 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
or GER 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3631 - Jewish and German Writing at the Margins: Multilingualism, Race, Memory (3.0 cr)
· GER 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3633 - The Holocaust: Memory, Narrative, History [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3727 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3520 - History of the Holocaust (3.0 cr)
· Middle East & N Africa
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3820 - Topics in Middle Eastern Cultures (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3832 - The Politics of Arabic Poetry [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3833 - Jinn, Ghosts, and Demons in Arabic Literature [GP, LITR] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3867 - Orientalism and the Arab World [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 5866 - Gender and Sexuality in Modern Arabic Literature (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3504 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3505 - Survey of the Modern Middle East [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3507 - History of Modern Egypt (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3509 - Approaches to the Study of the Middle East (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3514W - Water and Oil: An Environmental History of the Middle East [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3546 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· JWST 3515 - Multiculturalism in Modern Israel: how communities, ideologies, and identities intersect (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3205 - Women, Gender, and the Hebrew Bible [AH] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3708 - The Cultures of the Silk Road (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3714 - Islam and the West (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3871 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3493 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3712 - Islam: Religion and Culture (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3877 - The Arab Renaissance: Narrating Modernity [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 5877 - The Arab Renaissance: Narrating Modernity (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3145 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3711 - The Islamic World [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3511 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3079 - Muslims and Jews: Conflict and Co-existence in the Middle East and North Africa since 1700 [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or JWST 3512 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3113 - History of Modern Israel/Palestine: Society, Culture, and Politics [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or HIST 5513 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3721 - North Africa since 1500: Islam, Colonialism, and Independence (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3547 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3722 - The Ottoman Empire [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· Africa
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3002 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3103 - World History and Africa [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· AFRO 3578 - Contemporary Sub-Saharan African Popular Art Forms [AH, TS] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3601W - African Literature [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3654 - African Cinema [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· FREN 3471 - Topics in Francophone African Literature and Cultures [GP] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World [HIS, GP] (3.0-4.0 cr)
· HIST 3455 - West African History: 1800 to Present [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3435 - Political Dynamics in the Horn of Africa [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3435 - Political Dynamics in the Horn of Africa [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3205 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3435 - History of South Africa from 1910: Anti-Racism, Youth Politics, Pandemics & Gender (Based Violence) [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3431 - Early Africa and Its Global Connections [HIS, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3433 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa [SOCS, GP] (3.0 cr)
APEC 3061 - Economic Development in Contemporary Africa [GP, SOCS] (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3436 - Fighting for History:Historical Roots of Contemporary Crises in Africa (3.0 cr)
· AFRO 3478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or POL 3478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· East Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3232W - "Short" Poetry in China and Japan [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3265W - The Fantastic in East Asia: Ghosts, Foxes, and the Alien [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3336 - Revolution and Modernity in Chinese Literature and Culture [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3337 - Contemporary Chinese Literature and Popular Culture [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3351 - Martial Arts in Chinese Literature and Film [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3356W - Chinese Film [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3357 - Taiwan Film (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3362 - Women Writers in Chinese History [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3372 - History of Women and Family in China, 1600-2000 (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3374 - Patterns in Chinese Cultural History (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3436 - Postwar Japanese Literature in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3437 - The Japanese Novel [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3441W - Japanese Theater [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3456 - Japanese Film [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3458 - Japanese Animation [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3467 - Science Fiction, Empire, Japan (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3468 - Environment, Technology and Culture in Modern Japan [ENV] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3471 - Introduction to Japanese Religions (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3478 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3520 - Topics in Korean Culture (1.0-3.0 cr)
· AMES 3536 - Modern Korean Literature [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3558 - Korean Popular Culture [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3576 - Language & Society of the Two Koreas (3.0 cr)
· EAS 3468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
· EAS 3471 - Modern Japan, Meiji to the Present (1868-2000) [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3477 - Samurai, Geisha, and How They Became Japanese (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5468 - Social Change in Modern China (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3671 - Chinese Society: Culture, Networks, & Inequality (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3377 - A Thousand Years of Buddhism in China: Beliefs, Practices, and Culture (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3556 - Korean Film and Media [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or AMES 5556 - Korean Film and Media (3.0 cr)
· Russia
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3637 - Modern Russia: From Peter the Great to the Present (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3767 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5264 - Imperial Russia: Formation and Expansion of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th Centuries (3.0 cr)
· HIST 5265 - 20th-Century Russia: The Collapse of Imperial Russia, the Revolutions, and the Soviet Regime (3.0 cr)
· POL 4474W - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State [WI] (3.0 cr)
· RELS 3611 - Eastern Orthodoxy: History and Culture (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3105 - Russian Poetry and Prose (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3404 - Tolstoy in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3421 - Literature: Middle Ages to Dostoevsky in Translation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3512 - Russian Art and Culture [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 5404 - Tolstoy in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 5421 - Literature: Middle Ages to Dostoevsky in Translation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3411 - Dostoevsky in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RUSS 5411 - Dostoevsky in Translation [LITR, GP] (3.0 cr)
· RUSS 3422 - Literature: Tolstoy to the Present in Translation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or RUSS 5422 - Literature: Tolstoy to the Present in Translation [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· South Asia
Take 0 or more course(s) totaling 0 or more credit(s) from the following:
· AMES 3637W - Modern Indian Literature [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3638 - Islam and Modernity in South Asia (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3651 - Ghosts of India [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3673 - Voices of India: Languages, Literature, and Film [GP] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3431 - Politics of India [GP] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3636 - South Asian Women Writers (3.0 cr)
or AMES 5636 - South Asian Women Writers (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
or HIST 3492 - Hinduism: Traditions, Texts, Politics [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3671 - Hinduism (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3679 - Religion and Society in Modern South Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3679 - Religion and Society in Modern South Asia [AH, GP] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 5778 - Traditions of South Asian Painting: Past to Present (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3779 - Visions of Paradise: The Indian Temple (3.0 cr)
Experiential Learning
Students must participate in a relevant experiential learning opportunity through study abroad (at least 6 weeks) or an internship (at least 100 hours). Work completed in meeting these requirements may count toward the thematic or regional concentrations. Prior approval by a Global Studies advisor is required.
Capstone
Students who double major and choose to complete the capstone requirement in their other major may waive the Global Studies BA capstone, and they do not need to replace the 3 credits.
Take exactly 1 course(s) totaling exactly 3 credit(s) from the following:
Capstone Seminar
· GLOS 3981W - Capstone Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Honors Capstone
· GLOS 3985V - Honors Capstone Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the major
Students are required to take one upper-division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· AFRO 3601W - African Literature [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3232W - "Short" Poetry in China and Japan [WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3265W - The Fantastic in East Asia: Ghosts, Foxes, and the Alien [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3356W - Chinese Film [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3441W - Japanese Theater [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMES 3637W - Modern Indian Literature [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ANTH 3047W - Anthropology of Sex, Gender and Sexuality [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4029W - Anthropology of Social Class [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTS 3206W - Art + Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CI 3611W - Basics in Teaching English as a Second Language [WI] (4.0 cr)
· CNRC 3082W - Greek Tragedy in Translation [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3451W - Intercultural Communication: Theory and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3676W - Communicating Terrorism [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· COMM 3681W - Rhetorical Fictions and 20th Century Conflicts [LITR, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· COMM 4404W - Language Borderlands [WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3130W - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Theory: 1700 to the Present [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3351W - The Body and the Politics of Representation [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3352W - Queer Aesthetics & Queer Critique [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3425W - Critical Theory and Social Change [AH, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4331W - Economic Development [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4431W - International Trade [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ECON 4432W - International Finance [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· FLOR 3010W - Literary Representations of Florence: Space, Self & Other [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3374W - The City in Film [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3104W - Reading and Analysis of German Literature [LITR, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GER 3604W - Introduction to German Cinema [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3981W - Capstone Seminar [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GSD 3511W - Vikings, Knights, and Reformers: German and European Culture and Controversies to 1700 [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GSD 3512W - Imagined Communities: German and European, Culture and Controversies, 1700 to Present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science [TS, SOCS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3417W - Food in History [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3514W - Water and Oil: An Environmental History of the Middle East [HIS, ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3615W - Women in European History: 1500 to the Present [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3691W - The British Empire [WI] (3.0 cr)
· HIST 3704W - Daily Life in Europe: 1300-1800 [HIS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· LING 3101W - Languages of the World [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PHIL 3001W - General History of Western Philosophy: Ancient Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· PHIL 3005W - General History of Western Philosophy: Modern Period [AH, WI] (4.0 cr)
· POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3252W - Revolution, Democracy, and Empire: Modern Political Thought [AH, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3451W - Politics and Society in the New Europe [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4461W - European Government and Politics [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4474W - Russian Politics: From Soviet Empire to Post-Soviet State [WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 4885W - International Conflict and Security [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· PORT 3502W - Global Portuguese: 1900-present [WI] (3.0 cr)
· PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCAN 3011W - Readings in Scandinavian Languages [WI] (4.0 cr)
· SCAN 3501W - Scandinavian Culture Past and Present [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· TH 3152W - Global Avant-Gardes: Theatre, Music, Modernity [HIS, WI] (3.0 cr)
· TLDO 3105W - Cultural Heritage of Spain [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3014W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3415W - Art of India [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ANTH 3021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ANTH 5021W - Anthropology of the Middle East [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or ARCH 3711V - Honors: Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context [SOCS, CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ARTH 3015W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3706W - Art of Islam [AH, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· CSCL 3350W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GLBT 3456W - Sexuality and Culture [DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 5401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· GWSS 3505W - Girls, Girlhood, and Resistance [WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3505V - Girls, Girlhood, and Resistance [WI] (0.0-3.0 cr)
· HIST 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3401W - Early Latin America to 1825 [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or LAS 3402W - Modern Latin America 1825 to Present [HIS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· HIST 3494W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
or RELS 3718W - Christ in Islamic Thought [WI] (3.0 cr)
· POL 3478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3478W - Contemporary Politics in Africa and the Colonial Legacy [GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
or SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· Global Studies B.A. Sample Plan

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· Global Studies B.A.
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GLOS 3144 - Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3144/GloS 3144H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3144H - Honors: Knowledge, Power, and the Politics of Representation in Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3144/GloS 3144H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to how representations of the modern world in popular media and academic writing contribute to, reaffirm, and often challenge relations of inequality and division tied to such categories as ethnicity, gender, and race. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including magazines, novels, films, and digital media, these questions may include: How do cultural representations of the Global South reinforce European imperial and colonial projects? What role do mass-market magazines and newspapers have in constructing difference and producing stereotypes that justify imperialist attitudes? How does the development of technologies, from railroads to the internet, affect collective experiences of time and space? How is 'fake news' and intentional misrepresentation a threat to democracy and to the ecological security of the Earth? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises and/or weekly Canvas posts and a midterm and final examination. This course will show how the politics of representation and knowledge production relate to changing formations of power, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3145 - Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3145/GloS 3415H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section, with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
GLOS 3145H - Honors: Global Modernity, the Nation-State, and Capitalism
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3145/GloS 3415H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides an introductory overview of core theories and concepts that prepare students for successful completion of the Global Studies curriculum. In this half of the Global Studies core course sequence, students will investigate questions pertaining to the emergence of global modernity, capitalism, and the nation-state, with particular focus on theoretical concepts and institutional forms. Drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources including critical theory, philosophy, and texts from the social sciences, these questions may include: How did reason and culture emerge as key concepts in modernity, and how were they associated with transformations in time and space? How did the nation-state become a dominant political unit in the West, and how do postcolonial African states challenge its structure? What is the relationship between the Western liberal tradition, secularity, and violence? What are the histories and internal dynamics of the capitalist economy? Students will meet twice a week for lecture and attend a weekly recitation section with assignments that include short writing exercises, a group project, and midterm and final examinations. This course will contextualize and trouble aspects of the global that are easily abstracted and taken for granted, while giving students the conceptual vocabulary and critical skills to prepare for subsequent Global Studies courses. Prereq: Honors soph, jr, or sr Units: 3.00
ANTH 3001 - Introduction to Archaeology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Archaeology is the study of humans in the past, primarily through the material remains they left behind. It seeks to answer fundamental questions, such as ?When did humans first become dependent on fire??, ?What factors led to the development of agriculture??, or ?How can we explain the rise and fall of early civilizations?? The study of each of these big questions relies on answering many small questions that are asked in the context of archaeological excavations and laboratory analyses. A common theme underlies them: archaeology aims to reconstruct and understand why past human cultures changed. The goal of this class is to provide an understanding of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their investigations. It includes not only hands-on learning of specific analytical techniques, such as faunal and lithic analysis as well as site survey and excavation strategies, but also focuses on the theoretical approaches that guide the questions we ask and the methods we apply to answer them. This class, therefore, prepares students for more upper-level classes in archaeology. It also leads to a new way of thinking. This way of thinking is primarily critical and analytical. It leads one to think about how data are interpreted, and how theoretical frameworks as well as innate biases color these interpretations. Seeking solutions to interpretive problems requires the creative application of multidisciplinary approaches. Therefore, the study of archaeology leads to a new way of thinking about and doing science.
ANTH 4035 - Ethnographic Research Methods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
History of and current issues in ethnographic research. Research projects, including participant observation, interviewing, research design, note taking, life history, and other ethnographic methods. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or grad student
ANTH 4101 - Decolonizing Archives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Archives are not neutral. In order to decolonize them, scholars in anthropology and other disciplines must first understand the ways in which Western settler values have structured them. Who decides acquisition policy? How are items indexed, described, and related to one another? Who has access, and under what conditions? And who is structurally excluded? In this course we decolonize by recontextualizing both the archives as institutions and their contents. In other words, we use methods appropriate for contemporary anthropological archival research. We will consider preservation, curation, organizational bias in archives, analytic scale, voice, and how historical texts are material culture. Students engage in original archival research.
APEC 3003 - Introduction to Applied Econometrics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Econometrics is the core empirical methodology used in economics. It allows economists (and others) to learn about the world through data in non-experimental situations. This course teaches student how to use common types of econometric analysis to answer research questions in an experiential learning environment. prereq: APEC 1101 or equiv., STAT 3011 or equiv.
ARCH 4674 - World Heritage Conservation
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Design/planning options for conservation of historic buildings/cultural heritage sites. Case studies link current practices, methods/solutions with expert preservationists, site conservationists, local communities in development/design of conservation proposals. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
CI 3611W - Basics in Teaching English as a Second Language (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CI 3611W/SLS 3001
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing intensive course that combines service learning internship with classroom lectures, discussions, group work, experiential activities. In this course, service learning requires students to act as teachers and professional leaders with students for 30 hours a semester. Prepares students for teaching ESL to adults in community programs. prereq: Have studied another language.
COMM 3201 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work as a team to plan, script, and shoot video productions in a hands-on multi-camera television studio. By creating their own productions and reviewing the productions of others, students learn how media aesthetics shape the presentation of themes and messages.
COMM 3422 - Interviewing and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Application of communication concepts in information interview. Planning, conducting, and evaluating informational, journalistic/elite, helping, persuasive, appraisal, and employment interviews. Class training, field experience.
ECON 4211 - Principles of Econometrics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Data analysis/quantitative methods in economics. Violation of classical regression model assumptions, modified estimation procedures that retain desirable properties. Multi-equation models. Computer applications/interpretation of empirical results. prereq: (ECON 1101 or ECON 1165, APEC 1101), (ECON 1102 or APEC 1102), ECON 3101, MATH 1271, (STAT 3011 or 3021), (STAT 3022 or 3032) or equivalent courses approved by the Economics Department
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EPsy 3264/EPsy 5261
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
ESPM 3012 - Statistical Methods for Environmental Scientists and Managers (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to statistical principles, foundations, and methods for examining data and drawing conclusions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression modeling of relationships in environmental and natural resource science and management problems. prereq: Two yrs of high school math
ESPM 3031 - Applied Global Positioning Systems for Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3031/ESPM 5031
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
GPS principles, operations, techniques to improve accuracy. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems. Differential correction, accuracy assessments discussed/applied in lab exercises. Code/carrier phase GPS used in exercises. GPS handheld units, PDA based ArcPad/GPS equipment. Transferring field data to/from desktop systems, integrating GPS data with GIS. prereq: Intro GIS course
FNRM 3131 - Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Natural Resources (TS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Spatial data development/analysis in science/management of natural resources. Data structures/sources/collection/quality. Geodesy, map projections, spatial/tabular data analysis. Digital terrain analysis, cartographic modeling, modeling perspectives, limits of technology. Lab exercises. Both onsite and fully online options for course enrollment. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or UHP fr
GEOG 3531 - Numerical Spatial Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3531/5531
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
"Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." The First Law of Geography proposed by Waldo Tobler implies the complex yet fascinating nature of the geospatial world. Spatial analysis in order to understand geographic numbers is becoming increasingly necessary to support knowledge discovery and decision-making. The objective of this course is to teach the fundamental theory and quantitative methods within the scope of geospatial analysis. The course starts with basic statistics, matrix, the background of spatial analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis. Then, we will dive into the special nature of our spatial world, with fundamental geographic ideas and theories being introduced. The focus will be on numerical methods and models including descriptive statistics, pattern analysis, interpolation, and regression models. Finally, some advanced topics regarding spatial complexities and spatial networks will be introduced to arouse further interest in this realm. To sum, this is an introductory course that makes use of quantitative analytics such as linear algebra, statistics, and econometrics for spatial data analysis. By taking this course you will: -quantitatively understand critical concepts behind geospatial processes, such as scale, spatial weights, spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence, spatial pattern. -learn key methods of analyzing spatial data: e.g., point pattern analysis, spatial autocorrelation statistics, spatial prediction, and spatial regression. -examine the lectured methods/models with data from geographic scenarios using Python and related programming packages. (Prereq: high-school algebra; Basic stats and linear algebra recommended)
GEOG 3561 - Principles of Geographic Information Science
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3561/ Geog 5561
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to study of geographic information systems (GIS) for geography and non-geography students. Topics include GIS application domains, data models and sources, analysis methods and output techniques. Lectures, readings and hands-on experience with GIS software. prereq: Jr or sr
GLOS 3105 - Exploring the World: The Practice of Interdisciplinary Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3105/GloS 3105H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class introduces Global Studies students to some of the major disciplines and methods used to make knowledge about the social world. The course first addresses fascinating philosophical questions, such as how is knowledge a social product? How are knowing and understanding different? How might we think of ignorance, too, as something constructed? We then turn from theory to practice, and to the question, how can we frame our questions, and enact our research in humble and ethically principled ways? Students will respond to this task by designing collaborative research projects. They will first identify and define a real world issue; they will review different disciplines' methods for defining and approaching the issue, and then they will jointly create a collaborative research design. The course will help Global Studies students understand the interdisciplinary nature of the Global Studies major, and it will help them begin to think about the goals, interests, and methods of their senior projects.
LAW 3000 - Introduction to American Law and Legal Reasoning
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Law 3000/Law 5000
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Law pervades all areas of modern life. Yet it remains mysterious to those without legal training. This course will equip you to better answer such questions by exploring the tools that lawyers use to interpret and apply the law. Students will learn to think like lawyers through a series of contemporary case studies that require reading, writing, thinking, and problem solving like a lawyer. Cases will be drawn from topics such as contracts, torts, civil procedure, property, business law, criminal law, sports law, privacy, and law and science.
LING 3001 - Introduction to Linguistics (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ling 3001/3001H/5001
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The ability to acquire and use language is a biological trait of the human species. This capacity for language manifests itself as thousands of particular languages spoken around the world in communities large and small. But what is language? What does it mean for a human to ?know? a particular language? How do children acquire this knowledge? How do we use language to communicate? These are some of the important questions addressed by the field of linguistics, the scientific study of the human capacity for language in its physiological, cognitive, historical, and social manifestations. This course introduces some of the essential findings of linguistics: first and foremost, that all varieties of all languages are intricately structured at multiple distinct but related levels. Second, that this intricate structure can be described in terms that are not only precise, but which apply to all human languages. We will work to replicate some of these findings by deploying simple analytical methods on data from a variety of languages. These methods allow us to answer questions about the different structural components of language: phonology (how do speech sounds pattern?), morphology (what are possible words and how are they built?), and syntax (what is the hierarchical structure underlying sequences of words?). In all instances these methods require that we pay attention to basic notions of semantics, from which more complex conceptions of meaning will emerge. Having characterized language as an intricately-structured system of knowledge, we will then possess the tools to ask a number of additional questions about language and cognition. How does such complex knowledge play into the actual task of sentence production or comprehension? What do we know about the neural implementation of this knowledge in human brains? How does child language acquisition proceed, and what makes it so much more robust than language acquisition later in life? Do animals have languages of their own? Can they learn human languages? Finally, we will turn our attention to variation in language patterns observed over the passage of time, across geographical space, and within social systems. How and why do languages change over historical time? What can we know about languages spoken before the invention of writing? What distinctions exist between languages spoken in different places, and how can we tell whether similarities are due to genealogical relationships? How do new languages emerge? How do languages disappear? How does language use vary between individuals from the same place or the same community? How do socioeconomic class, ethnicity, and gender relate to the linguistic behavior of individuals? How does language policy affect educational outcomes? What about social cohesion and conflict? Although we will find that most of these questions lack definitive answers, we will develop an understanding of what it takes to ask them meaningfully and precisely. In particular, we will be able to eliminate false or misleading answers, especially when they fail to take into account the observable and describable properties of the human capacity for language.
OLPD 3202 - Introduction to Strategies for Teaching Adults
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of adult learning, learning/teaching styles, methods/perspectives of teaching, applications of teaching in various settings.
PA 3002 - Basic Methods of Policy Analysis (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to policy analysis. Theoretical foundations/practical methods of analysis. Tools for problem definition, data collection/analysis, presentation techniques, implementation strategies. Multidisciplinary case-study approach.
PA 3003 - Nonprofit and Public Financial Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Concepts/tools for project/budget planning. Program analysis. Interpreting financial reports. Identifying/resolving organizational performance issues. Case studies, real-world exercises. prereq: Jr or sr
PA 4101 - Nonprofit Management and Governance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Managing/governing nonprofit/public organizations. Theories, concepts, real-world examples. Governance systems, strategic management practices, effect of different funding environments, management of multiple constituencies.
POL 3085 - Quantitative Analysis in Political Science (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
POL 3085 teaches students how to study politics scientifically and introduces them to how to use quantitative analysis to answer political questions. The first part of the class covers how to formulate a theory (a possible answer to a question), specify testable hypotheses (what you would see if the theory is correct or incorrect), and set up a research design to test those hypotheses. In the second part of the class, we cover quantitative data analysis, beginning from preliminary statistical analysis to multivariate linear regression. There is no mathematical or statistical background required for this course. By the end of the class, students should be able to ask and answer political questions using quantitative data and fluently evaluate statistical analyses of political phenomena in the media and many academic articles.
PSY 3001W - Introduction to Research Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Psy 3001W/Psy 3001V/3005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Concepts/procedures used to conduct/evaluate research, especially in social sciences. Benefits/limitations of traditional research methods. Evaluating scientific claims. prereq: [1001, [2801 or 3801 or equiv]] or dept consent
SCMC 3201 - Fundamentals of Digital Filmmaking
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Practice of digital filmmaking. Digital techniques, practical tools required to produce films. Optical/digital devices as artistic tools. Historical/theoretical issues of cinema, its relation to other art forms.
SOC 3801 - Sociological Research Methods
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an introduction to the materials and methods of social science research in a comprehensive and critical way. The course begins by introducing social science research, including philosophical and theoretical foundations. The course then covers the primary components of research design, including conceptualization, operationalization and measurement, primary and secondary data collection and sources, sampling, and the logic of comparison(s). prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors must register A-F
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: STAT 3021/STAT 3021H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
ANTH 3028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 5028 - Historical Archaeology
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3028/Anth 5028
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
In this course, we will explore the theories and methods of historical archaeology ? such as material culture studies, landscape perspectives, archival, and oral historical interpretation - as a means of intervening in contemporary discussions of diversity in the United States. Historical archaeology can be a very effective means to challenge some of the standard American narratives about our diverse past. Our aim is to move beyond either a simplistic ethnic pluralism or the superficial ?melting pot? progressive history and instead grapple with the materiality of settler colonialism, white supremacy, and capitalism. In learning about this field, we will consider what has distinguished historical archaeology from American archaeology more broadly, and how those differences are parlayed into specific research strengths. This includes several themes: colonialism; the modern world and globalizing economies; intersectional identities (race and ethnicity, class, sex and gender, religion, age, ability/disability) and social movements; public memory and commemoration; landscapes and social space; citizenship and subjectivity. Although historical archaeology until recently has been restrictively defined as addressing the European-colonized New World, the discipline in the past twenty years has significantly broadened its scope and impact on the practice of archaeology as a whole. Throughout the course we will discuss these developments, and what directions archaeology may take in the future as a result. Course work includes both reading/discussion and learning methods through practical exercises, and handling of archaeological material.
ANTH 3501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 5501.
ANTH 5501 - Managing Museum Collections
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3501/Anth 5501
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
This course provides a hands-on and research experience in collections management utilizing artifact, archival, and digital collections. Museum collections, the objects or specimens they contain, the information associated with them, and their care and maintenance are a crucial part of both the sciences and the humanities. While seemingly disparate, many of the issues faced by those responsible for collections are quite similar: how to preserve and care for those collections, legal issues surrounding the materials they contain, how to organize and classify the items, how to facilitate discovery and access, and how to make the information contained in them available to the broadest audience possible. The course includes lectures by museum professionals, hands-on activities, and selected readings. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ANTH 3501.
BIOL 3272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended
BIOL 3272H - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
BIOL 5272 - Applied Biostatistics
Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.
GEOG 3541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational approaches, termed computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lot of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GEOG 5541 - Principles of Geocomputing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3541/Geog 5541
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
The availability of computing infrastructures such as high-performance and cloud computing, high-speed networks, and rich data has led to a new scientific paradigm using computational science. Geocomputation is the "application of a computational science paradigm to study a wide range of problems in geographical and earth systems (the geo) contexts" (Openshaw, 2014). This course will introduce students to geocomputation as well as related areas including big spatial data, and cyberinfrastructure. Students will engage in hands-on-exercises learning principles and best-practices in geocomputing. The ability to program is an essential skill for GIScientists. Learning to program takes time and a lost of practice, and in this course students will learn how to develop programs in the Python programming language to solve geospatial problems.
GLOS 1112 - Social Justice and Globalization (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course focuses on the relationship between two highly charged terms: globalization and social justice. We will explore questions such as: What is social justice, and how is it different from political justice or economic justice? When does the free flow of capital and commodities involved in globalizing processes endanger possibilities for social justice, and how might we check this danger? What about the mass migrations occurring now to Europe and elsewhere? To what extent are these the result of historic injustices, what new social injustices might they create, what new possibilities for social justice might they enable? How and when does the emergence of social media, network technologies and the like assist in the fight for human rights and equality, and thus enable social justice? And under what circumstances do these technologies empower phenomena like authoritarian populism, thus undermining social justice? This course will examine theoretical texts, literature, and empirical studies from the social sciences to investigate these questions.
GLOS 3105 - Exploring the World: The Practice of Interdisciplinary Research
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3105/GloS 3105H
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class introduces Global Studies students to some of the major disciplines and methods used to make knowledge about the social world. The course first addresses fascinating philosophical questions, such as how is knowledge a social product? How are knowing and understanding different? How might we think of ignorance, too, as something constructed? We then turn from theory to practice, and to the question, how can we frame our questions, and enact our research in humble and ethically principled ways? Students will respond to this task by designing collaborative research projects. They will first identify and define a real world issue; they will review different disciplines' methods for defining and approaching the issue, and then they will jointly create a collaborative research design. The course will help Global Studies students understand the interdisciplinary nature of the Global Studies major, and it will help them begin to think about the goals, interests, and methods of their senior projects.
GLOS 3143 - Place, Community, Culture (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Students in the Global Studies program study not only the powerful political institutions and economic processes that shape our world, they also acquire the skills to perceive and investigate their own place and identities, and to interpret creative work that express different ways of being. In GLOS 3143 'Place, Community, Culture' students will explore their own locations, identities, and experiences in the context of our fraught and ethically complex times. The emphasis is on practice, on seeing one's own life as something to be enriched by seeing and feeling the world in new ways. Students will encounter a mix of philosophical works, artistic texts (novels, films, poetry, painting, music, and other forms of media) and scholarly texts that together will help students expand their ingrained and conditioned ways of seeing the world. Class themes might include self and other, community and alienation, place and placelessness, home and homelessness. Students will examine the place of ethics and politics in the negotiation of their identities and experiences. Assignments might include essays that ask students to interpret artistic works that present different avenues of insight, or creative assignments that ask you to reflect on your own experiences in relation to course readings and themes. Students will conclude the class more confident of their ability to notice and negotiate the dilemmas they will encounter in their personal and professional lives.
GLOS 3305 - Science for Sale: Environment, Capital, and Medicine
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This class uses a social justice lens to explore the interrelations of scientific discoveries, unequal global economies, and commodification. We will look at practices, new technologies, and policies that are trenchant for the negative impacts they have on environments broadly defined, and for human and non-human populations. We will ask how these practices, technologies, and policies - and the social and economic contexts that produce them - variably impact the health, well being, and valuation of particular populations. In a series of interconnected themes, we will examine what factors produce food insecurity and for whom; where and why pollution of resources such as water happens; the history and current state of antibiotic resistance; climate change and its various effects; and how new technologies can be life-saving and life-denying according to the ways national and global policies determine who gains access and who does not. We will also look at the innovative ways grassroots movements tackle issues confronting particular groups, what constitutes positive social change and by whose definition, and potential ways forward. Final projects focus on website construction or policy documents that have application beyond the classroom. Prereq: soph or jr or sr
GLOS 3401W - International Human Rights Law (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course presents an introductory overview of the idea of human rights, its social and legal foundations and contemporary global issues. In the class, students will learn about the laws and procedures designed to protect the human rights of individuals and groups, with a special focus on the United Nations system. The course explores the conceptual underpinnings of human rights such as who is eligible to have rights, where those rights come from and who is responsible for guaranteeing them. Students will learn about how international laws are made and interpreted, and will consider the geo-political context which shapes human rights laws and procedures. Because of the evolving nature of the laws and issues in this field, students are encouraged to think analytically and ethically about how to address the many human rights challenges in the world today. The course will cover current human rights issues, including the right to health care, housing and other economic and social rights; and the right to life, freedom from torture and other civil and political rights. The course is writing intensive. The required paper for the class is a model complaint to the United Nations about a country and issue of the student's choosing. The class invites discussion and uses class exercises to engage students in the course material by shaping arguments for various legal fora.
GLOS 3412 - What is Equality? (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3412/GloS 5412
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Course explores debates about equality. Equality has many dimensions--e.g.: economic, social, political. These forms cannot be reconciled. Liberal democracies affirm the principle of political equality but defend, even in principle, social and economic inequalities. Animal rights add another wrinkle: very few of those who fight for these rights would claim political equality for animals.
GLOS 3602 - Other Worlds: Globalization and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
'Globalization' and 'Culture' are both terms that have been defined and understood in a variety of ways and the significance of which continues to be debated to the present, both inside and outside the academy. Globalization has been talked about both as an irresistible historical force, tending toward the creation of an increasingly interconnected, or, as is sometimes claimed, an increasingly homogeneous world, and as a set of processes, the outcome of which remains open-ended and uncertain, as likely to produce new kinds of differences as universal sameness. Culture meanwhile has been variously defined as that which distinguishes humans from other species (and which all humans therefore share) and as that which divides communities of humans from one another on the basis of different beliefs, customs, values etc. This course reflects on some of the possible meanings of both "Globalization" and "Culture" and asks what we can learn by considering them in relation to one another. How do the phenomena associated with globalization, such as increasing flows of people, capital, goods and information across increasing distances challenge our understandings of culture, including the idea that the world is composed of so many discrete and bounded "cultures"? At the same time, does culture and its associated expressive forms, including narrative fiction, poetry and film, furnish us with new possibilities for thinking about globalization? Does global interconnection produce a single, unified world, or multiple worlds? Are the movements of people, goods, ideas and information across distances associated with new developments caused by contemporary globalization, or have they been going on for centuries or even millennia? Might contemporary debates about climate change and environmental crisis compel us to consider these phenomena in new ways? The course addresses these questions as they have been discussed by scholars from a variety of disciplines and as they have been imagined by artists, poets, novelists and filmmakers. In doing so, it considers whether the distinctiveness of present day globalization is to be sought in part in the new forms of imagining and creative expression to which it has given rise.
GLOS 3606 - Art and Incarceration: Prison Voices and Visions
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Prisons are noisy places: clanking of metal, echoing voices, violence, laughter, and all the sounds of people living their lives in overcrowded congregate facilities without privacy or control over their surroundings. But the sounds of prisons -- the voices, the stories - are not often heard outside the prison walls. This course is meant to provide a corrective - a small corrective - to that silence. In GLOS 3606, Art and Incarceration: Prison Voices and Visions, we will read, view, and listen to creative work by incarcerated artists from around the world, and we will consider: (1) what these artists have to say about the(ir) world(s), (2) how art provides a space for resistance and survival within the walls of the prison, and (3) how the conditions of incarceration impact the creative process and affect our access to this important body of work. Because the purpose of this course is to amplify and analyze the voices and visions of incarcerated artists, this course requires substantial reading, viewing, and listening. There are weekly writing assignments, but they are short and informal. There are no longer papers. There is a final take-home essay exam.
GLOS 3609 - Novels and Nations (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3609/GWSS 3304
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How do emerging and postcolonial nations enlist fiction in their claims to sovereignty and autonomy? How do the novel's literary techniques and strategies perform a unique brand of political and social critique vis a vis nations and nationalisms? We will focus on novels from a variety of national contexts from the Global North and South to show how literary analysis can be a companion to the social sciences in illuminating the historical and social contexts of the nation-state. In addition, we will consider the function of literature in allowing stateless nations to imagine a shared connection. We will also focus on the inner workings of the novel in order to understand the conventions and mechanisms of the genre and how it interconnects with related forms such as cinema, performance, and the visual arts.
GLOS 3707 - Disposable People?: Surplus Value, Surplus Humanity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The world today confronts a volatile scenario shaped by three intertwined political-economic processes: First, growth in surplus value or corporate profits fueled by monopoly capitalism, wage stagnation, and automation-driven improvements in productivity; second, growth in surplus or discarded matter fueled by rising consumerism and planned obsolescence in products and services; and finally, growth in surplus humanity or under-employed, unwanted populations fueled by structural transformations in the world economy with declining opportunities for good quality jobs. The combined result manifests as widening economic inequality between the 'haves' and 'have nots'; a politically volatile situation of racialized polarization in which huge numbers of people in entire regions, countries, or sectors of the globe, have little, declining, or no access to secure waged work; and an ecological crisis where the planet finds itself ill equipped to handle growing quantities of waste matter, including greenhouse gases. Our primary focus in the course will be to understand populations that are "cast out" of society, the forces that produce this condition, the mechanisms of rule by which surplus populations are managed, and the way people live and cope with their superfluity. Class sessions are a combination of lectures, debates, student-led discussions, and audio-visual materials. 60-70 pages of weekly reading, bi-weekly commentaries, take-home midterms, short presentation, and final paper.
GLOS 3896 - Global Studies Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Hands-on experience at Twin Cities organizations working at the nexus of the local and the global. Work 100 hours in non-governmental organization. Substantive coursework in Global Studies is required. prereq: dept consent
GLOS 3900 - Topics in Global Studies
Credits: 1.0 -5.0 [max 15.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Topics vary each semester. See Class Schedule.
GLOS 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3215/Soc 3215
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
From the jeans you buy online to the place mats you purchase at Target, most of the items we consume are made somewhere else. Global production networks link consumers of fresh green beans in Britain with growers, pickers, and packers in Zambia. And it isn't only products that move around the globe; so do people. Thanks to immense economic inequalities, wealthy families in the global North enjoy the cheap labor of Eastern European, Filipino, and Honduran nannies, house cleaners, and gardeners. How did this global economy come to be, how has it impacted workers, consumers, and ecosystems, and what are its ethical and political implications? This course focuses on the changes that have occurred over the last 70 years in the realms of labor, consumption, and the environment. We'll examine the movement away from regulated national economies to an integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, distribution, consumption, and waste disposal; and new forms of capital-labor-state relations. Some of the topics we explore include the global trade in body parts; the rise of shareholder capitalism; the new "platform" economy; the growing insecurity of work; and the environmental changes global capitalism has wrought. We end by considering alternatives to the "business-as-usual" (BAU) economy.
SOC 3215 - Supercapitalism: Labor, Consumption & the Environment in the New Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3215/Soc 3215
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
From the jeans you buy online to the place mats you purchase at Target, most of the items we consume are made somewhere else. Global production networks link consumers of fresh green beans in Britain with growers, pickers, and packers in Zambia. And it isn't only products that move around the globe; so do people. Thanks to immense economic inequalities, wealthy families in the global North enjoy the cheap labor of Eastern European, Filipino, and Honduran nannies, house cleaners, and gardeners. How did this global economy come to be, how has it impacted workers, consumers, and ecosystems, and what are its ethical and political implications? This course focuses on the changes that have occurred over the last 70 years in the realms of labor, consumption, and the environment. We'll examine the movement away from regulated national economies to an integrated global economy; changing patterns and organization of production, distribution, consumption, and waste disposal; and new forms of capital-labor-state relations. Some of the topics we explore include the global trade in body parts; the rise of shareholder capitalism; the new "platform" economy; the growing insecurity of work; and the environmental changes global capitalism has wrought. We end by considering alternatives to the "business-as-usual" (BAU) economy.
GLOS 3225 - The Power of the 1%: Global Philanthropy and the Making of a New World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3225/ Soc 3225
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Philanthropy has come to play an increasingly important role in the economy and society, on both a national and global level. Americans gave away $450 billion in 2019, or a little over 2 percent of our country's GDP (Giving USA 2020). A few mega-philanthropists, such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Michael Bloomberg and others donated mind-boggling sums of money. These individuals and their foundations are having a significant impact around the world, changing the way public education is carried out in many countries, how global health priorities are defined, how public policies are made, and how African agricultural systems are organized. Forbes magazine reports that there are 1,645 billionaires in the world today, 80% more than a decade ago. While some observers look positively on this philanthropic outpouring, others suggest it may be eroding democracy. In this course, we study philanthropy from a variety of perspectives, exploring who gives away money and why, how this "gift" impacts givers, receivers, and taxpayers, and what the relationship is between global philanthropy and power. Specific topics include the history of foundations; religion and charity; philanthropy and politics; consumption-based giving (or "brand aid"), and philanthropy and social policy. We'll examine case studies such as the Gates Foundation's role in African agriculture. Students will do "participant observation" in a local charity, and a research project on the philanthropic foundation or giving practice of their choice.
SOC 3225 - The Power of the 1%: Global Philanthropy and the Making of a New World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3225/ Soc 3225
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Philanthropy has come to play an increasingly important role in the economy and society, on both a national and global level. Americans gave away $450 billion in 2019, or a little over 2 percent of our country's GDP (Giving USA 2020). A few mega-philanthropists, such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Michael Bloomberg, and others donated mind-boggling sums of money. These individuals and their foundations are having a significant impact around the world, changing the way public education is carried out in many countries, how global health priorities are defined, how public policies are made, and how African agricultural systems are organized. Forbes magazine reports that there are 1,645 billionaires in the world today, 80% more than a decade ago. While some observers look positively on this philanthropic outpouring, others suggest it may be eroding democracy. In this course, we study philanthropy from a variety of perspectives, exploring who gives away money and why, how this "gift" impacts givers, receivers, and taxpayers, and what the relationship is between global philanthropy and power. Specific topics include the history of foundations; religion and charity; philanthropy and politics; consumption-based giving (or "brand aid"), and philanthropy and social policy. We'll examine case studies such as the Gates Foundation's role in African agriculture. Students will do "participant observation" in a local charity, and a research project on the philanthropic foundation or giving practice of their choice. Pre-req: Soc Majors must register A-F.
GLOS 3231 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
Geographical distribution of resources affecting development. Location of agriculture, industry, services. Agglomeration of economic activities, urbanization, regional growth. International trade. Changing global development inequalities. Impact on nations, regions, cities.
GEOG 3331 - Geography of the World Economy (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3331/GloS 3231
Typically offered: Every Fall
An invisible, not-quite-dead, not-quite-alive entity?the coronavirus?forced us, rudely and tragically, to reckon with space. As we try and maintain social distance from other bodies, wear masks to disrupt the virus? pathways of diffusion, confront shortages in grocery stores, home supply outlets, and car dealerships, adjust to interruptions in many services, and either choose to, or are forced to stay at home, in our cities, in our countries, we are thinking and acting spatially. And we are reminded that ?stuff??food, medicines, toilet paper?reaches us often through geographically extensive and logistically intricate webs of economic production and distribution. We will learn what it means to think geographically about the capitalist economy as a spatial, relational formation. In doing so, we will challenge dominant ways of understanding and analyzing the economy, and of what counts as economic. We will also examine two simultaneous aspects of the world economy?fixity and flow. On the one hand, the economy propels and is propelled by flows?of goods, of services, of people, of labor, and of finance. On the other hand, physical infrastructures are rooted in place on the earth. After all, even the digital worlds of Facebook, Google, and Amazon are enabled by vast server farms. The course will also highlight the production and proliferation of inequalities?between social groups, states, countries, and regions?in and by the world economy. In fact, we will ask: Is economic unevenness a mere byproduct of capitalist economic growth, or the condition of possibility for it? Finally, we will discuss the relationships between global phenomena and local events. Crises like global climate change, overflows of waste matter, COVID19, and the 2008 financial meltdown make it clear that the global and the local are intimately entangled. Not only do global events impact individual livelihoods, including yours and mine, but economic jitters in one place can escalate, sending shockwaves across the world.
GLOS 3407 - Global Islamophobia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3407/Soc 3207
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Throughout the world, anti-Muslim activists and politicians have been increasingly attacking Muslims and Islam. And, international organizations have reported human rights violations against Muslims worldwide. Recently, in the United States, there have been calls to ban Muslims, as well as register American Muslims. In France, Muslim women are prohibited to wear a headscarf in high school. And in Myanmar, a genocide against Muslim minorities is currently underway. While anti-Islamic discourses have a long history in many societies worldwide (including Muslim-majority countries), the course seeks to explore the global rise of these discourses since September 11, 2001. The course examines the cultural, political, and historical origins of Islamophobic discourses that cast Muslims as "violent," "hateful," and "uncivilized." Class sessions will include some lecture but will be largely discussion based. Assignments will ask students to think and write critically about course concepts, debate and participate in simulation exercises, and reflect on personal thoughts and feelings about course content.
SOC 3207 - Global Islamophobia
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3407/Soc 3207
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Throughout the world, anti-Muslim activists and politicians have been increasingly attacking Muslims and Islam. And, international organizations have reported human rights violations against Muslims worldwide. Recently, in the United States, there have been calls to ban Muslims, as well as register American Muslims. In France, Muslim women are prohibited to wear a headscarf in high school. And in Myanmar, a genocide against Muslim minorities is currently underway. While anti-Islamic discourses have a long history in many societies worldwide (including Muslim-majority countries), the course seeks to explore the global rise of these discourses since September 11, 2001. The course examines the cultural, political, and historical origins of Islamophobic discourses that cast Muslims as "violent," "hateful," and "uncivilized." Class sessions will include some lecture but will be largely discussion based. Assignments will ask students to think and write critically about course concepts, debate and participate in simulation exercises, and reflect on personal thoughts and feelings about course content.
GLOS 3415W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3415W/ Soc 3417W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how peoples strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
SOC 3417W - Global Institutions of Power: World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3415W/ Soc 3417W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course will introduce students to some of the world's most powerful global institutions -- such as the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the United Nations, and affiliated agencies such as UNHCR (for refugee support). We will follow their efforts to promote a style of global development practices -- large-scale capital lending and global expertise building -- that has crystallized into a common understanding of how global north-south dynamics should progress. Cases pursued in class may include their lending and debt policies, dam building and energy projects, climate resilience and water loans, and the ways they mediate free trade agreements among competing countries. We will also hear from the multitude of voices, theories, and practices that offer alternative visions as to how people strive to produce a more just, socially equitable, and climate-safe world. We will use books, articles, films, in-class debates, case study exploration, small-group projects, and guest speakers to create a lively discussion-based classroom environment.
GLOS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3611/GloS 5611/GWSS 3611
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For most of us, stories seem to simply 'happen.' We listen to stories, we tell stories, we are moved by stories, and we retell stories. However, every act of telling stories involves making decisions or moves, and each re-telling of a familiar story may either give birth to new meanings, nuances, and affects, or, it may erase their possibility. Thus, each storyteller can be seen as a translator of stories with a responsibility to retell stories ethically. It is precisely through these translational acts that all politics become politics of storytelling. In this course, we will consider the ways in which the politics of the global and the intimate derive their meanings, effects, and affects from the circulation, transaction, and re-tellings of stories within and across borders. We will ask how a praxis of ethical engagement with politics can be imagined as a praxis of receiving and retelling stories. By immersing ourselves in the process of remembering, telling, listening, trimming, interweaving, distilling, and performing stories, we will consider how ethical receiving and retelling of stories involves continuous revising, repositioning, and re-theorizing of such vexed and entangled terrains and terminologies as identity, community, rights, and justice, as well as the contingent meanings of knowledge, truth, and ethics. This course engages this terrain through a mode of active learning in which all the participants will read and reflect, listen and discuss, tell and retell, watch and play, move and perform collectively. By becoming aware of the ways in which our minds-bodies-souls are inserted in the receiving and translation of stories, we will grapple together with the ways in which our bodies--as our embodiments--help to relationally shape not only our own performances but also our responses to the performances of other living and moving bodies around us. We will learn from writings, film, songs, and plays by writers, artists, activists, and thinkers from a range of historical and contemporary locations and struggles. These include: Marie Lily Cerat, W. E. B. Du Bois, Suheir Hammad, Sterlin Harjo, Naeem Inayatullah, June Jordan, AnaLouise Keating, Kauanui, J. Kehaulani, Audre Lorde, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Middle East Research and Information Project, Alok Rai, Nina Simone, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Sangtin Writers, Standing Rock Collective, Eve Tuck, Patrick Wolfe, and K. Wayne Yang. Many of the 'Acts' in this course will be co-facilitated with local or international artists and writers. Grading Basis: A/F. The course requires all the participants to do sustained work and deep reflections, enjoy the process of imagining and creating with peers in a non-competitive environment. prereq: GLOS 3611 is for jr or sr only. People from all kinds of locations and journeys are invited to join us in this collective exploration. For further information, email: nagar@umn.edu.
GLOS 5611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3611/GloS 5611/GWSS 3611
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For most of us, stories seem to simply 'happen.' We listen to stories, we tell stories, we are moved by stories, and we retell stories. However, every act of telling stories involves making decisions or moves, and each re-telling of a familiar story may either give birth to new meanings, nuances, and affects, or, it may erase their possibility. Thus, each storyteller can be seen as a translator of stories with a responsibility to retell stories ethically. It is precisely through these translational acts that all politics become politics of storytelling. In this course, we will consider the ways in which the politics of the global and the intimate derive their meanings, effects, and affects from the circulation, transaction, and re-tellings of stories within and across borders. We will ask how a praxis of ethical engagement with politics can be imagined as a praxis of receiving and retelling stories. By immersing ourselves in the process of remembering, telling, listening, trimming, interweaving, distilling, and performing stories, we will consider how ethical receiving and retelling of stories involves continuous revising, repositioning, and re-theorizing of such vexed and entangled terrains and terminologies as identity, community, rights, and justice, as well as the contingent meanings of knowledge, truth, and ethics. This course engages this terrain through a mode of active learning in which all the participants will read and reflect, listen and discuss, tell and retell, watch and play, move and perform collectively. By becoming aware of the ways in which our minds-bodies-souls are inserted in the receiving and translation of stories, we will grapple together with the ways in which our bodies--as our embodiments--help to relationally shape not only our own performances but also our responses to the performances of other living and moving bodies around us. We will learn from writings, film, songs, and plays by writers, artists, activists, and thinkers from a range of historical and contemporary locations and struggles. These include: Marie Lily Cerat, W. E. B. Du Bois, Suheir Hammad, Sterlin Harjo, Naeem Inayatullah, June Jordan, AnaLouise Keating, Kauanui, J. Kehaulani, Audre Lorde, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Middle East Research and Information Project, Munshi Premchand, Alok Rai, Nina Simone, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Sangtin Writers, Standing Rock Collective, Eve Tuck, Patrick Wolfe, and K. Wayne Yang. Many of the 'Acts' in this course will be co-facilitated with local or international artists and writers. Grading Basis: A/F. The course requires all the participants to do sustained work and deep reflections, enjoy the process of imagining and creating with peers in a non-competitive environment. Prereq: For graduate students only, or with instructor consent. People from all kinds of locations and journeys are invited to join us in this collective exploration. For further information, email: nagar@umn.edu.
GWSS 3611 - Stories, Bodies, Movements
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3611/GloS 5611/GWSS 3611
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For most of us, stories seem to simply 'happen.' We listen to stories, we tell stories, we are moved by stories, and we retell stories. However, every act of telling stories involves making decisions or moves, and each re-telling of a familiar story may either give birth to new meanings, nuances, and affects, or, it may erase their possibility. Thus, each storyteller can be seen as a translator of stories with a responsibility to retell stories ethically. It is precisely through these translational acts that all politics become politics of storytelling. In this course, we will consider the ways in which the politics of the global and the intimate derive their meanings, effects, and affects from the circulation, transaction, and re-tellings of stories within and across borders. We will ask how a praxis of ethical engagement with politics can be imagined as a praxis of receiving and retelling stories. By immersing ourselves in the process of remembering, telling, listening, trimming, interweaving, distilling, and performing stories, we will consider how ethical receiving and retelling of stories involves continuous revising, repositioning, and re-theorizing of such vexed and entangled terrains and terminologies as identity, community, rights, and justice, as well as the contingent meanings of knowledge, truth, and ethics. This course engages this terrain through a mode of active learning in which all the participants will read and reflect, listen and discuss, tell and retell, watch and play, move and perform collectively. By becoming aware of the ways in which our minds-bodies-souls are inserted in the receiving and translation of stories, we will grapple together with the ways in which our bodies--as our embodiments--help to relationally shape not only our own performances but also our responses to the performances of other living and moving bodies around us. We will learn from writings, film, songs, and plays by writers, artists, activists, and thinkers from a range of historical and contemporary locations and struggles. These include: Marie Lily Cerat, W. E. B. Du Bois, Suheir Hammad, Sterlin Harjo, Naeem Inayatullah, June Jordan, AnaLouise Keating, Kauanui, J. Kehaulani, Audre Lorde, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Middle East Research and Information Project, Alok Rai, Nina Simone, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Sangtin Writers, Standing Rock Collective, Eve Tuck, Patrick Wolfe, and K. Wayne Yang. Many of the 'Acts' in this course will be co-facilitated with local or international artists and writers. There are no prerequisites for this course. We invite people from all kinds of locations and journeys to join us in this collective exploration. For further information, email: nagar@umn.edu. Grading Basis: A/F. The course requires all the participants to do sustained work and deep reflections, enjoy the process of imagining and creating with peers in a non-competitive environment.
GLOS 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production.
SOC 3613W - Stuffed and Starved: The Politics of Eating (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3613W/GloS 3613V/Soc 3613
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a cross-cultural, historical, and transnational perspective to the study of the global food system. Themes explored include: different cultural and social meanings attached to food; social class and consumption; the global food economy; global food chains; work in the food sector; the alternative food movement; food justice; environmental consequences of food production. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 3705 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: soph, jr, or sr
SOC 3505 - Migrations: People in Motion (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3705/Soc 3505
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Students in this course will tackle debates related to migration from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will compare and connect diverse migration trends around the world (Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America). Students will critically engage with various paradigms on the geopolitical, racial, and gender power dynamics that anchor migration processes and outcomes. Why would the movement of individuals from some parts of the world (often from the least developed regions to the highly developed Western nations) create such strong and highly charged debates? How are cross border social and economic relations of individuals and households maintained and perpetuated? What are particular governments doing to either encourage or hinder these movements? How are current migrations different from earlier eras? Is this gendered, and if so, how and why? The objective of this course is to explore the above questions through academic and policy published literature. prereq: Soph, jr, or sr
GLOS 3969 - Democracy and popular politics in India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3489/GloS 3969
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Democracy is not only a political order; it is also a popular culture and politics. This course explores three tumultuous moments of this politics and culture in India: the pluralist nationalism which characterized Gandhian nonviolence and the Indian constitution, the majoritarianism that was often this pluralism's undertow, and Hindutva or Hindu supremacism, the now dominant populist ideology.
HIST 3489 - Democracy and popular politics in India
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3489/GloS 3969
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Democracy is not only a political order; it is also a popular culture and politics. This course explores three tumultuous moments of this politics and culture in India: the pluralist nationalism which characterized Gandhian nonviolence and the Indian constitution, the majoritarianism that was often this pluralism?s undertow, and Hindutva or Hindu supremacism, the now dominant populist ideology.
GLOS 4221 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization Through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4321 - Globalize This! Understanding Globalization through Sociology (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4221/Soc 4321
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
From the city streets of Bangalore to the high plateaus of La Paz to the trading floors of New York City, people from around the world are becoming increasingly interdependent, creating new and revitalizing old forms of power and opportunity, exploitation and politics, social organizing and social justice. This course offers an overview of the processes that are forcing and encouraging people?s lives to intertwine economically, politically, and culturally. prereq: Soc majors/minors must register A-F
GLOS 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
SOC 4311 - Power, Justice & the Environment (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4311/Soc 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of environmental racism and environmental inequality more broadly. We will examine and interrogate both the social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. We will consider the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice prereq: SOC 1001 recommended
GLOS 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
JWST 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 4315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
SOC 5315 - Never Again! Memory & Politics after Genocide (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4315/Soc 5315/JwSt 4315/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Course focuses on the social repercussions and political consequences of large-scale political violence, such as genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Students learn how communities and states balance the demands for justice and memory with the need for peace and reconciliation and addresses cases from around the globe and different historical settings. prereq: SOC 1001 or 1011V recommended, A-F required for Majors/Minors.
GLOS 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
ANTH 4344 - Europe and its Margins
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4344/GloS 4344
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course explores some of the forms of human imagining (literary, artistic, political, social scientific) engendered by the notoriously hard to define entity known as "Europe." It does so by focusing on regions and populations that have been thought of at various times as marking Europe's inner and outer cultural and/or geographical limits. Topics addressed include: the relationship between physical geography, cultural memory, and the formation (or subversion) of identity claims; the reconfigured political landscapes of post-socialism and European integration; immigration, refugee flows, and the rise of far-right ethno-nationalisms; and the effects of pandemics past and present. prereq: One course in [ANTH or GLOS]
ARGN 3003 - Politics and Society in Latin America
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative analysis of social/political structures of Argentina and Latin America in 20th century. Taught in English.
ARGN 3006 - Topics in Argentine History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Study Argentina's history. Main topics include the legacy of Peron, the army in politics and government, the return of democracy, and current events. Taught in English.
ARGN 3008 - Latin American Literature and Cinema (LITR, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Offered jointly by Fundación Jose Ortega y Gasset and Learning Abroad Center. Located in downtown Buenos Aires. Spanish language. Global/cultural issues. Sampling food, reading literature, experiencing music/dance. Argentine culture.
ARGN 3009 - Argentina: Stereotypes and Identity
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Intercultural perspectives on Argentina. How others perceive Argentines and how Argentines perceive themselves, through literature, humor, art, music, and history. prereq: 1004
ARGN 3011 - Buenos Aires - City of the Arts: Spanish
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course focuses on the art and architecture of Argentina. Learn about the different artistic movements in the country and visit museums, private art collections, and public monuments. The city becomes your classroom. At the same time, get a broader perspective of world art that serves as a background for a better understanding of the art and architectural scene in Argentina throughout the past 300 years.
ARGN 3640 - Service Learning in Buenos Aires: ENG
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students work with non-governmental and community service organizations devoted to helping children/adults in impoverished urban areas, immigrants from border countries, and groups at high risk (women, children, seniors).
ARGN 3896 - Internship in Buenos Aires (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Buenos Aires internship course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to become more knowledgeable regarding the local culture, organizational cultures, and the professional environment. Through practical internship experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host country?s cultural context and critically examine their own worldview. The course is designed to guide students in the internship experience and create a foundation for a successful professional career. In addition to gaining a cross-cultural comparative view on work, the topics and assignments will deepen students? insights about themselves, professional expectations, and being successful in the workplace. Students are expected to make a valuable contribution to the internship site through the completion of major projects or tasks. This course focuses on themes students are expected to develop and enhance over the course of the semester through class seminars and on-the-job experience, particularly characteristics of work dynamics in Argentina; work relations, work protocol, and hierarchy; differences between Argentina and the US, notions of leadership in Argentina, and local cultural traits that are unique to the country; and multiculturalism, age, gender, and communication in the workplace.
BCLA 3001 - Nationalism in Comparative Perspective (SOCS, CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course studies the relationship between states and nations in both a theoretical and comparative perspective with a particular focus on the Catalan, Basque and Spanish experiences. It analyzes state building processes and the development of nationalism, as well as the social, economic and technological conditions behind its emergence, transformation and contrasting discourse. The course aims at providing a solid theoretical background on the subject of nationalism as well as introducing the students into the social and political reality that permeates in Spain’s daily life and shapes Spaniard’s political mind-frames and identities.
BCLA 3005 - Analyzing and Exploring the Global City (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cities around the world are striving to be ?global,? and Barcelona, the capital of Catalunya, is one of the largest and most cosmopolitan cities in Spain. It is globally renowned for its art and architecture, possessing no fewer than nine UNESCO World Heritage sites, and has become a major destination for global tourism. This interdisciplinary course examines the emergence of this elegant, creative city as Spain?s gateway to the Mediterranean, and analyzes its history and evolution since its foundation by the Romans. Students will explore the role of population dynamics, industrial change, and globalization in shaping the city and the lives of its inhabitants, examining the ways in which the interplay of urbanism, politics, and society has addressed challenges of social, political, and technological change in the past and today. The course also traces the changing nature of Barcelona?s relationship with the rest of Spain, Europe, and the wider world. Topics will include ancient and Medieval Barcelona; nationalism and innovations in art and architecture; the role of the 1992 Olympics as a catalyst for urban regeneration; the impacts of gentrification, tourism, and the recent economic crisis on the city and its inhabitants; and future scenarios of urban change.
BCLA 3006 - Architectural History of Spain (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will look at the history of architecture and urban design in Spain. Beginning with a brief introduction to the ancient styles (from the first civilization of the Iberian Peninsula), it will focus upon developments in architecture and urban planning in Spain from the 1st Century AD to the present. Special attention will be paid to the 19th and 20th Centuries in Barcelona, and several relevant field visits will be made.
BCLA 3011 - The Birth of Modern Art: Matisse, Picasso, Dalí (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The work of these three international artists with distinct cultural roots is explored on an individual basis within the wider framework of European art movements. In each case, we will study the acceptance and/or rejection of tradition, the interaction with French art and artists, and personal experience. We will also pay attention to the role of both outside stimuli (war, relationships) and inner forces (memory, imagination). The course will include course related excursions to the Picasso Museum, the MNAC (Catalan National Museum of Art) as well as a trip to the Dalí Theatre Museum in Figueres.
BCLA 3014 - Spain As Seen Through Its Movies: 1980s to Today (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The main goal of this course is to provide students with a general understanding of Spain, taking into consideration its recent past, but focusing mainly on some of the most relevant and controversial issues of the current situation. The use of movies as a vehicular tool allows not only for the introduction of the cultural factor, but also the very Spanish perspective(s) that helps explain how the country sees and understands itself. The course will address the following general questions: a) what it means to speak of a "national cinema;" b) how cinema constructs and/or contests of his or her story; c) cinema's impact on shifting notions of what constitutes the human condition; d) how the formal qualities of cinematic narrative shape on-screen stories; e) where and how issues of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity surface in cinematic articulations of the relationship between national identity, global trends, and personal history. There are five sections or blocks to this course. The first block will cover the Spanish Civil War and the subsequent dictatorship, indispensable to understand the last 40 years of democracy in Spain. The second block is almost a monography to the figure of Pedro Almodóvar, his time, and the ?España? his movies depict. The third focuses on the genre of horror, very rich in the recent Spanish production and quite ?imitated? by Hollywood. These last two blocks serve as a good opportunity to reflect about the political/national/identity aspects of the cinema industry. In an attempt to reverse the perspective, the last two blocks approach current Spanish issues with an important impact in the society as a whole and its citizens as individuals. The fourth block discusses Spanish politics and its most recent developments. And the fifth one is a gender approach to the demographics of the country.
ECDR 4001 - International Development: Human Rights: Policy & Practice (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students will critically analyze theories of development and the impact of development models throughout the world, but specifically Latin America and Ecuador. They will address development theories, assumptions of development, and alternatives to development through the lens of social services. This course starts by investigating the concept of globalization within international development and its prevalence in Latin America, and in particular Ecuador. There is an emphasis throughout the course on contrasting Western thinking with Andean thought processes and connecting the global to the local. The course will have a multidisciplinary approach, and will focus on how individuals, institutions, events, and ideas are connected. This course will focus on the critical analysis of social problems and will address the issue of social services as instruments for social inclusion through the restitution of rights and empowerment. The concept of social exclusion (discrimination, inequality, inequity, poverty) will be discussed, as well as how development has led to social inclusion or exclusion, and how social services have contributed. The course will focus on the priority care groups?children and adolescents, women, older adults, and people with disabilities?and the policies, programs, and services for them in Ecuador today.
ECDR 4002 - International Development: Social Entrepreneurship & Microfinance (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students will critically analyze theories of development, and the impact of development models throughout the world, but specifically Latin America and Ecuador. They will address development theories, assumptions of development, and alternatives to development through the lens of social entrepreneurship. This course starts by investigating the concept of globalization within international development and its prevalence in Latin America, and in particular Ecuador. There is an emphasis throughout the course on contrasting Western thinking with Andean thought processes and connecting the global to the local. The course will have a multidisciplinary approach, and will focus on how individuals, institutions, events, and ideas are connected. Students will identify the impacts of development on the Ecuadorian economy, specifically focusing on the concept of social entrepreneurship, which is recognized in the Ecuadorian constitution. They will study the history of this specific form of entrepreneurship, its relationship with local development, and as an alternate form of distribution and production of goods and services. Students will also analyze the economic impacts generated by these practices and how public, private, and community actors interface with this type of economy.
ECDR 4003 - International Development: Public Health & Traditional Andean Medicine (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students will critically analyze theories of development, and the impact of development models throughout the world, but specifically Latin America and Ecuador. They will address development theories, assumptions of development, and alternatives to development through the lens of social entrepreneurship. This course starts by investigating the concept of globalization within international development and its prevalence in Latin America, and in particular Ecuador. There is an emphasis throughout the course on contrasting Western thinking with Andean thought processes and connecting the global to the local. The course will have a multidisciplinary approach, and will focus on how individuals, institutions, events, and ideas are connected. Students will begin to address social, economic, cultural, and environmental determinants of health as a mechanism for understanding the main health problems in Ecuador. There is an emphasis throughout the course on contrasting Western thinking and medicine with Andean worldviews and ancestral medicine. The course will discuss intercultural health processes to improve the health conditions of diverse cultural groups. The course will focus on the indigenous movement in Ecuador and the recovery of the Andean culture as it relates to health and traditional health practices. Understanding the new Ecuadorian constitution, which includes the right to health, will lead into discussions of the complex political and social dimensions of health. A comparative analysis of health reform processes in Ecuador and the United States will allow the students to identify the contrasting dimensions in the search to improve the collective health in both countries.
ECDR 4004 - International Development: Environmental Challenges from the Andes to the Amazon (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students will critically analyze theories of development and the impact of development models throughout the world, but specifically Latin America and Ecuador. They will address development theories, assumptions of development, and alternatives to development through the lens of the environment and sustainability. This course starts by investigating the concept of globalization within international development and its prevalence in Latin America, and in particular Ecuador. There is an emphasis throughout the course on contrasting Western thinking with Andean thought processes and connecting the global to the local. The course will have a multidisciplinary approach, and will focus on how individuals, institutions, events, and ideas are connected. Students will identify the impacts of development on environmental challenges in Ecuador, and the relationship between environment, use and management of natural resources, and local communities. Examination of cases that involve people?s rights over the environment, food sovereignty, water management, climate change, sustainable development, and local alternatives for natural resource management and conservation will be studied.
ECDR 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Ecuador
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Ecdr 4101/Span 3510
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will begin with a historical review from the European conquest, moving to independence and the construction of a nation state, and finally the republican era until today. Main events and characteristics from each timeframe will be highlighted. Students will discuss the ?discovery of America? from the Ecuadorian and South American context, as well as the process and impact of conquering this continent. History and politics will come together when discussing the 20th Century. Topics such as liberal revolution, plutocracy, the uprising known as the Juliana Revolution, the populist velasquista phenomenon, dictatorships, and the return to democracy will all be examined. Additionally, the central elements of the so-called Citizen Revolution will be addressed. Current events such as the government of Moreno and his turn to the right will be discussed as well as political opposition, main actors in the political sphere, etc. The current state will be analyzed based on identifying the main elements that shape the country?s cultural diversity, its nationalities, and peoples. A comparative analysis between the western culture and the Andean culture will be carried out.
ECDR 4201 - Research in Ecuador
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The goal of this course is to introduce the MSID student to various research concepts and practices, helping them select their study topic and title for their study, develop statements of problems and choose research questions and appropriate research design, study issues related to research ethics, develop their skills in choosing data collection instruments, and analyze the data they collect for their research. The course introduces various topics in the research cycle and provides a forum in which students can share with one another their research experience at each stage of the process. Research projects in this course are ideally projects that fit with the development agency?s goals and activities; therefore, the student?s research interests are expected to blend with what is realistically happening at the development agency. Students must have approved proposals before proceeding on to their research sites. They will then collect necessary data and complete data analysis before heading back to Quito at the end of the six-week field period. It is likely that students will participate in field activities, meetings, and other forms of engagement that will be indirectly related to and could inform their research projects. Through hands-on experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host-country cultural context and development work from an international perspective, as well as critically examine their own worldview in order to develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs.
ECDR 4896 - Internship in Ecuador
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides a cross-cultural experience of working on various development issues with a regional nonprofit organization. The course focuses on guiding students to understand their own identity as they integrate theory with reality by participation in local development sites. Students are prepared for entering into their community work through discussions on stakeholder and agency analysis, ethical considerations, culture specific gender and diversity context, and power and privilege. The mentoring continues while students are at their internship placement as they come in contact with social actors, community organizations, and local and national authorities, in various regions of Quito at the marginal urban and rural levels. The students are urged to play an active role in their internships by providing suggestions and solutions, discussing alternatives, and investigating all areas of their internship placement to garner a holistic experience on the realities of development work. Through practical internship experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host-country cultural context and development work from an international perspective, as well as critically examine their own worldview in order to develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs.
FLOR 3005 - History and Sociology of Modern Consumerism
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
FLOR 3010W - Literary Representations of Florence: Space, Self & Other (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
FLOR 3012 - Florence and the Mediterranean: A Sea of Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
During the Middle Ages and in the early Modern Age, three great civilizations clashed for the control of the Mediterranean basin: the Latin West, the Byzantine Empire, and the Muslim world. But the sea was not just a theatre of war, it was also a lively economic area, with trade routes crossing it from north to south, from east to west. Moreover, it was the place where different cultures met: This course will explore their reciprocal influence, with a special focus on art history and a mainly Italian and Florentine point of view. Topics will include: the impact of Islamic art on Western culture; the role of Byzantine art in the development of Florentine painting; the rediscovery of Greek classical culture and its importance in Renaissance civilization; the consequences of the fall of Constantinople and of the expansion of the Ottoman Empire. Students will explore Florentine churches, palaces, and museums in search of visual evidence of the links between the city and the diversity of Mediterranean culture.
FLOR 3015 - Food & Identity in the Mediterranean: A Cultural History (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is an investigation into how the identities of different peoples in the Mediterranean can be understood through the lens of the food they cultivate, trade, and eat. After an introduction to different definitions of identity, with a particular focus on the formation, maintenance, and evolution of group identity through cultural practices, the course will analyze the history and culture of food in different civilizations of the Mediterranean basin: Phoenicians, Ancient Hebrews, Greco-Romans, and others. Study of the different diets of the Byzantines and the Venetian merchants, and the influence of the spice trade and nascent Islam during the Middle Ages, will show how identities are formed, consolidated, and changed through food. The Renaissance, especially in Florence, will be the object of an in-depth analysis as a pivotal time in Western food culture and in the arts. The course will then investigate the relationship between Florentine and French elite identities via the birth of modern table manners (and dishes) and their connection with the rise of the first nation states. The last part of the course will consider modern states, migration, and how these interconnect with agricultural practices and industrial food processes that have changed the nature of food production in the Mediterranean.
FLOR 3346 - Sociology of Crime: Mafia and the Media in Italy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
MADR 3002 - Ecology of Spain
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MADR 3012 - Internships in Spain
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MADR 3013 - Spanish Civilization
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Madr 3013/Madr 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course aims to offer a general view of Spanish culture and society through readings, lectures, and cultural activities. This semester will focus on a few topics portraying the transformations experienced in the country during the last years: the political system, social and economic problems, multi-ethnic society, new role of women, new family models, and present image of Spain. We will combine lectures, PowerPoint presentations, videos, discussions of required readings, and group debates. Being in Spain gives you a great opportunity to widen your approach to culture through language, and one of the aims of this class is to help you achieve this goal. All students are expected to come to all sessions prepared, with all indicated assignments completed beforehand.
MADR 3019 - Culture, Globalization & Media
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The aim of this course is to introduce the notion of “culture” as the set of mental, socially mediated constructs employed by individuals and groups to interpret reality. From that basis, this course examines the set of conflicts currently underway both within Western societies—as seen, for instance, in the “Culture Wars” as well as in the latest US presidential election—as well as the tensions between the Western and non-Western cultures—such as those of India, China, and the Arab worlds—with an emphasis in the role played by the media and the cultural industries.
MADR 3021 - Art at the Prado Museum (AH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The aim of this course is to make students familiar with the most relevant and internationally outstanding Spanish and European artists within the Prado Museum Permanent Collections. The course will help students to fully understand and assimilate art history fundamental concepts and movements such as Renaissance, Baroque, and Neoclassicism, with a specific concentration on Spanish masters such as El Greco, Velázquez, and Goya. Simultaneously, it will help students confront Spain’s and Europe most controversial history: from the dark Medieval Ages to the beginning of the 19th Century. Two observations will be fundamental to our investigations. The first is that art history involves the study not simply of formal concepts. A work of art has a physical presence that is offered by the artist but his/her ideas, convictions, and claims are shaped in large measure by specific social circumstances. The relevance of the latter are those that turn an artwork into a masterpiece. Thus, techniques and styles of representation are just the beginning of art history research. The second observation has to do with the relationship between art and culture: Art does not simply (or passively) reflect a given culture, but rather actively participates in its formation and development. A work of art, then, is the deepest expression of a social, religious, political, as well as intellectual context. Thus, thorough the artworks’ analysis, students will develop critical and intellectual thinking by the means of observation, research, and interpretation.
MADR 3025 - Modern Masters: Goya, Picasso, Dalí & Miró (AH, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The aim of this course is to make students familiar with the most relevant and internationally outstanding Spanish Modern artists: Goya, Picasso, Dalí & Miró. With a specific concentration on these Spanish masters, the course will bring students to fully understand and assimilate such fundamental concepts and movements of art history as Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, Abstraction, and Minimalism. Simultaneously, it will explore one of the most controversial periods of Spanish and European history, from the 19th through the dawn of the 20th Century. Two observations will be fundamental to our investigations. The first is that art history involves the study of more than simply formal concepts. A work of art has a physical presence that is offered by the artist, but his/her ideas, convictions, and claims are shaped in large measure by specific social circumstances. The relevance of the latter are those that turn an artwork into a masterpiece. Thus, techniques and styles of representation are just the beginning of art history research. The second observation has to do with the relationship between art and culture. Art does not simply (or passively) reflect a given culture, but rather actively participates in its formation and development. A work of art, then, is the deepest expression of a social, religious, political, and intellectual context. Thus, through the analysis of works of art, students will develop critical and intellectual thinking by the means of observation, research, and interpretation.
MADR 3027 - Contemporary Spanish History through Film (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Spanish cinema provides an excellent route for understanding social and political change throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. As the most important artistic medium of modernity, cinema allows one to construct and deconstruct many myths and identities. This course will analyze the most relevant Spanish film productions primarily as socio-historical documents (content). Topics in Spain may include the Republic and Civil War (Fernán Gómez and Buñuel), the ?60s comic criticism of dictatorship (García Berlanga), and censorship (Lazaga), the transition to democracy (Garci and Almodóvar), and the new ?90s cinema (Amenábar, de la Iglesia, Medem, Coixet, and Bollaín).
MONT 3302 - Civilization of the South
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MONT 3303 - Internship
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Fren 3896/Mont 3303
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MONT 3308 - French Art History
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MONT 3312 - Contemporary French Civilization
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MONT 3313 - Masculine/Feminine: France through the Lens of Cinema
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
MONT 3886 - Community Engagement in Montpellier (CIV, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will explore the historical, sociological, and political context of the French community but also in relation to Europe and with a comparison with the American system. It will provide an opportunity for students to reflect on their community engagement in the host country environment. Students will engage in charities/French schools and then share their experience in a classroom. They will discuss topics linked to French society at large, approaching diverse subjects such as the youth in French society, the way the education system works in France and how it differs from the US, the French social system, the concept of ?laïcité? (secularism) in France, the history of immigration from the 19th Century until today with the new waves of immigrant population, and race and gender issues. Students will have a closer look at French charity organization, NGO, and see how they work here in France. They will also examine leadership values in their country and see how they can adapt and develop them in their new environment. This course and students' engagement in the community will deepen their understanding of the host country cultural context and will lead them to critically examine their own worldviews. Topics explored will include ethic and social responsibility, leadership, French social systems, multiculturalism in the French society, place of secularism (laïcité) in the French society, history of immigration, and gender equality.
SNGL 4001 - International Development: Human Rights: Policy, & Practice (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Political Economy of International Development (PIED) critically explores the role of the international development agenda, with a specific focus on its impact on the African continent. Students will acquire knowledge on the foundation of this agenda while capturing the complexity and paradoxes of its implementation. Students will also build on this understanding to analyze the power relationships at stake between the various actors (donors, governments, international institutions, development beneficiaries, private sector, etc.). Grounded in a theoretical approach, this course will nevertheless explore practical case studies and experiences to favor in-depth analysis. This course will dedicate particular attention to the social experiences of the populations in developing countries from a political and historical perspective. Furthermore, students will be better inclined to critically appreciate the contribution of institutional mechanisms in the bi-lateral, multilateral, and non-government sectors in the development of Sub-Saharan African nations. Students will examine multidisciplinary ways of thinking that can be used to synthesize and analyze local, national, and global issues, and the connections among these experiences. Students will then examine constructs of human rights and services in developing countries in general and Senegal in particular. As background to the course, we will attempt to create a common understanding of key concepts such as human rights, social justice, human services, social services, social welfare, community development, and social work. Students will then look at how these ideals are implemented in Senegal and the limitations and challenges of the implementation.
SNGL 4002 - International Development: Entrepreneurship & Inclusive Finance (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Political Economy of International Development (PIED) critically explores the role of the international development agenda, with a specific focus on its impact on the African continent. Students will acquire knowledge on the foundation of this agenda while capturing the complexity and paradoxes of its implementation. Students will also build on this understanding to analyze the power relationships at stake between the various actors (donors, governments, international institutions, development beneficiaries, private sector, etc.). Grounded in a theoretical approach, this course will nevertheless explore practical case studies and experiences to favor in-depth analysis. This course will dedicate particular attention to the social experiences of the populations in developing countries from a political and historical perspective. Furthermore, students will be better inclined to critically appreciate the contribution of institutional mechanisms in the bi-lateral, multilateral, and non-government sectors in the development of Sub-Saharan African nations. Students will examine multidisciplinary ways of thinking that can be used to synthesize and analyze local, national, and global issues, and the connections among these experiences. This course will then examine constructs of inclusive finance in developing countries in general and Senegal in particular. It will challenge students to understand development policy tools that use microfinance as a strategy for economic growth in the war on poverty. A critical reflection on the limits of microfinance as a durable development approach will allow students to better understand attempts at innovation that respond to specific problems related to microfinance, and the course will introduce them to diverse perspectives on microfinance in the contemporary global economy. Students will engage with topics such as microfinance, social entrepreneurship, access to capital, and financial services.
SNGL 4003 - International Development: Public & Community Health (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Political Economy of International Development (PIED) critically explores the role of the international development agenda, with a specific focus on its impact on the African continent. Students will acquire knowledge on the foundation of this agenda while capturing the complexity and paradoxes of its implementation. Students will also build on this understanding to analyze the power relationships at stake between the various actors (donors, governments, international institutions, development beneficiaries, private sector, etc.). Grounded in a theoretical approach, this course will nevertheless explore practical case studies and experiences to favor in-depth analysis. This course will dedicate particular attention to the social experiences of the populations in developing countries from a political and historical perspective. Furthermore, students will be better inclined to critically appreciate the contribution of institutional mechanisms in the bi-lateral, multilateral, and non-government sectors in the development of Sub-Saharan African nations. Students will examine multidisciplinary ways of thinking that can be used to synthesize and analyze local, national, and global issues, and the connections among these experiences. Students will then examine constructs of public and community health in developing countries in general and Senegal in particular. This course will present students with an overview of the social-health system in Senegal and critically discuss the main obstacles that Senegal has had to overcome in the realm of public health. It will highlight health determinants, explain the choice of the Senegalese to prioritize the fight against certain illnesses, and present the organization of its public health services.
SNGL 4004 - International Development: Sustainable Development & Climate Change (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The Political Economy of International Development (PIED) critically explores the role of the international development agenda, with a specific focus on its impact on the African continent. Students will acquire knowledge on the foundation of this agenda while capturing the complexity and paradoxes of its implementation. Students will also build on this understanding to analyze the power relationships at stake between the various actors (donors, governments, international institutions, development beneficiaries, private sector, etc.). Grounded in a theoretical approach, this course will nevertheless explore practical case studies and experiences to favor in-depth analysis. This course will dedicate particular attention to the social experiences of the populations in developing countries from a political and historical perspective. Furthermore, students will be better inclined to critically appreciate the contribution of institutional mechanisms in the bi-lateral, multilateral, and non-government sectors in the development of Sub-Saharan African nations. Students will examine multidisciplinary ways of thinking that can be used to synthesize and analyze local, national, and global issues, and the connections among these experiences. Students will then examine constructs of sustainable development and climate change in developing countries in general and Senegal in particular. Students will look at the human and natural environments in urban and rural Dakar. Students will engage with topics such as waste management in urban settings, mangrove swamps, coastal preservation in Senegal (maritime erosion, the loss of biodiversity, difficulties accessing fishing waters), flooding in Dakar neighborhoods, recycling, and the repurposing of waste objects. Students will consider a variety of solutions to these challenges, wrestle with the questions of balance between practical needs and preservation, and propose ways to best implement these solutions in the Senegalese value context.
SNGL 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Senegal (HIS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides a broad historical overview of Senegal and in-depth analysis of the cultural underpinnings that have shaped the country. Using this rich history and diverse culture, students will explore and analyze the structure of the political, socio-economic, and social policies that characterize Senegal today. The course will look at Senegalese history and culture from the original Kingdoms and cover more modern periods from the slave trade to colonization through decolonization. Students will examine the human past, study the beliefs, practices, and relationships that shaped the human experience over time in Senegal. Students will analyze the place of Senegal in the broader West African sub region; discuss the physical and human resources available for Senegal?s development and the major challenges and constraints it faces; and take a critical look at the country?s economic policy and political system. Students will discuss Senegalese cultures, cultural values, arts, and lifestyles using literature, visuals, and the performing arts. They will consider how literature forges the conscience of a nation and how the encouragement of thriving artistic expression can help the development efforts and the carving of a national identity.
SNGL 4201 - Research in Senegal
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course, the MSID student will learn about various research concepts and practices; make decisions involved in research, including selecting a topic and title for their study, developing statements of problems, and choosing research questions and appropriate research design; learn about issues related to research ethics; and develop their skills in choosing data collection instruments and analysis of the data they collect for their research. The course does this by introducing various topics in the research cycle and providing a forum in which students can share with one another their research experience at each stage of the process. Students will learn to develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs Research projects in this course are ideally projects that fit with the development agency?s goals and activities; therefore, the student?s research interests must blend with what is realistically happening at the development agency. Students must have approved proposals before proceeding onto their research sites to allow them collect necessary data and complete data analysis before heading back to Dakar at the end of the six-week field period. It is likely that students will participate in field activities, meetings, and other forms of engagement that will be indirectly related to and could inform their research projects. Students will be presented with concrete opportunities to identify and apply their knowledge of ethics, both in solving short-term problems and in creating long-term forecasts. As stated on the MSID website, the governments of the United States and MSID countries have laws protecting human subjects of research. Due to the timeline for gaining the necessary permissions for doing research with human subjects, such research cannot be conducted while abroad on LAC programs. However, there are still a wide variety of projects, that include interaction with people, that are available. See more information on options for Undergraduate Research Abroad. The course will also include 15 hours of French or Wolof instruction to prepare students with practical vocabulary for the workplace.
SNGL 4896 - Internship in Senegal
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides a cross-cultural experience of working on various development issues with a regional nonprofit organization. The course focuses on guiding students to understand their own identity as they integrate theory with reality through participation in local development sites. Students are prepared for entering into their community work through discussions on stakeholder and agency analysis, culture specific gender and diversity context, and power and privilege. Students will learn to develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs The mentoring continues while students are at their internship placement. They come in contact with social actors, community organizations, and local and national authorities in various regions of Dakar at the marginal urban and rural levels. The students are urged to play an active role in their internships by providing suggestions and solutions, discussing alternatives, and investigating all areas of their internship placement to garner a holistic experience of the realities of development work. Through practical internship experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host-country cultural context and development work from an international perspective, as well as critically examine their own worldview. Students will be presented with concrete opportunities to identify and apply their knowledge of ethics, both in solving short-term problems and in creating long-term forecasts. The course will also include 15 hours of French or Wolof instruction to give students practical vocabulary for the workplace.
THAI 4001 - International Development: Human Rights & Marginalized Communities (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on human rights broadly defined, including social work as well as other efforts to educate and work with vulnerable populations. The course will look at the roles of local people, nonprofits, government agencies, and intergovernmental entities in determining how to best work with and serve vulnerable populations and how these different stakeholders collaborate while addressing complex, often sensitive situations. Course content will focus on citizenship and orphan/vulnerable children, as well as human trafficking, disabilities, migrant workers, and LGBT issues in the Thai context, as well as minority issues, especially with the hill tribes of Northern Thailand. Students in this course will utilize the content learned in this collaborative classroom setting and apply it individually toward a specific internship placement or research topic during the second half of the semester. This course encourages students to think critically about development theories and practices. For the majority of examples and reading, the course will draw on case studies from Thailand and links to global development issues. We will explore ?development? as a contested value and process on multiple scales?local, national, and global. We will place special emphasis on the practice of development: What does it mean to actually ?do? development in a cross-cultural international setting? We will examine the roles of outsiders and facilitators and how local communities and organizations can be empowered through the development process.
THAI 4002 - International Development: Entrepreneurship & Sustainable Food Systems (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Food systems and sustainability are critical environmental and economic issues in understanding development. This course focuses on two connected issues: food production and agriculturally based entrepreneurship, including but not limited to coffee growing and production, sustainable and organic food production, and related topics. A key part of the course will be understanding the natural interconnectedness between the environment, where crops are cultivated, and the business of selling these crops on a local and/or international scale. The course will examine agricultural commodity production (coffee) from bean to cup, examining the growing, production, selling, and business of coffee as both a local production process, international commodity, and local consumption. We will further explore spaces for innovation in sustainable food production, in particular around community-supported sustainable and organic agriculture, and the role of small-scale production in ensuring the resilience and sustainability of the global food supply. This course encourages students to think critically about development theories and practices. A majority of examples and reading will be drawn on case studies from Thailand and their links to global development issues. ?Development? as a contested value and process will be explored in multiple scales?local, national, and global. Special emphasis will be on the practice of development: What does it mean to actually ?do? development in a cross-cultural international setting? We will examine the roles of outsiders and facilitators and how local communities and organizations can be empowered through the development process.
THAI 4003 - International Development: OneHealth: Humans, Animals, & Environment (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will focus on the concept of ?One Health??integrating the health sciences so that health is understood as a broader concept rather than a narrow disciplinary focus. Issues related to this topic will include public health, community education about health, veterinary, and animal care issues and organizations (and how human and animal health are linked), clinics, local hospitals, and traditional medicine. Special emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues in Thailand, especially success with public health and family planning, as well as issues around HIV/AIDS education and prevention, zoonotic disease such as COVID-19, and related issues. Students in this course will utilize the content learned in this collaborative classroom setting and apply it individually toward a specific internship placement or research topic during that second half of the semester. This course encourages students to think critically about development theories and practices. A majority of examples and reading will be drawn on case studies from Thailand and their links to global development issues. ?Development? as a contested value and process will be explored in multiple scales?local, national, and global. Special emphasis will be on the practice of development: What does it mean to actually ?do? development in a cross-cultural international setting? We will examine the roles of outsiders and facilitators and how local communities and organizations can be empowered through the development process.
THAI 4004 - International Development: Sustainable Architecture & Design (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will examine sustainable design, including vernacular architecture, sustainable product design, urban planning, alternative (green) power (wind/solar/hydro), sustainable engineering, and sustainable and alternative architecture. It will focus on how design can be used in development to support sustainability, especially in the built and manufactured environment, drawing on culturally and ecologically appropriate design principles. This course encourages students to think critically about development theories and practices. A majority of examples and reading will be drawn on case studies from Thailand and their links to global development issues. ?Development? as a contested value and process will be explored in multiple scales?local, national, and global. Special emphasis will be one the practice of development: What does it mean to actually ?do? development in a cross-cultural international setting? We will examine the roles of outsiders and facilitators and how local communities and organizations can be empowered through the development process.
THAI 4101 - Historical & Political Context of Thailand
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores the history of modernization, conditions of social transition, and current issues that characterize Thailand and influence relationships among various social groups. Students will enhance their understanding of the process of modernization and multi-level adjustment of Thai society in different historical contexts. Cultural diversity, political transition, and economic development are integral in analyzing and understanding these topics. Thailand is unique in southeast Asia for its lack of colonization. It also has a long history of development in southeast Asia, serving as a regional hub for international development. This course will examine the development process in Thailand, its political and social history, and especially the current struggles of modernity and as an emerging economy in southeast Asia. While many of the basic issues of development have been successfully dealt with (literacy is high, clean water and basic needs are met, etc.), Thailand is now dealing with growing inequality, challenges of post-modernity, and increasing demand for popular participation in politics within a patron-client-based society.
THAI 4201 - Research in Thailand
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this course, the MSID student will learn about various research concepts and practices; make decisions involved in research, including selecting a topic and title for their study, developing statements of problems, and choosing ethical research questions and appropriate research design; learn about issues related to research ethics; and develop their skills in choosing data collection instruments and analysis of the data they collect for their research. The course does this by introducing various topics in the research cycle and providing a forum in which students can share with one another their research experience at each stage of the process. Through the course students will develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs. Research projects in this course are ideally projects that fit with the development agency?s goals and activities; therefore, the student?s research interests must blend with what is realistically happening at the development agency. Students must have approved proposals before proceeding onto their research sites to allow them to collect necessary data and complete data analysis before heading back to Chiang Mai at the end of the six-week field period. It is likely that students will participate in field activities, meetings, and other forms of engagement that will be indirectly related to and could inform their research projects. This course also includes an optional 10 hours of Thai language instruction as needed.
THAI 4896 - Internship in Thailand
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course provides a cross-cultural experience of working on various development issues with a regional nonprofit organization. The course focuses on guiding students to understand their own identity as they integrate theory with reality by participating in local development sites. Students are prepared for entering into their community work through discussions on stakeholder and agency analysis, culture-specific gender and diversity context, ethics, and power and privilege. Through the course students will develop, defend, and challenge their own values and beliefs. The mentoring continues while students are at their internship placement as they come in contact with social actors, community organizations, and local and national authorities in various regions of Chiang Mai province at the marginal urban and rural levels. The students are urged to play an active role in their internships by providing suggestions and solutions, discussing alternatives, and investigating all areas of their internship placement to garner a holistic view of the realities of development work. Through practical internship experiences as well as readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will deepen their understanding of the host-country cultural context and development work from an international perspective, as well as critically examine their own worldview. This course also includes an optional 10 hours of Thai language instruction as needed.
TLDO 3001 - 20th Century Spanish Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3212/Tldo 3001
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Spanish literature.
TLDO 3006 - The Camino de Santiago: Past and Present
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course
TLDO 3007 - Comparative Public Health (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public health systems are facing an increasing number of challenges: the pressures of globalization, aging populations, and the increase in patient lawsuits, as well as the high costs of medical research and treatments. With these issues in mind, we must critically analyze the manner in which medical care is provided in different systems so that we can design and adapt systems that provide high quality, effective, and efficient health care. Changes made to health care systems are frequently based on economic and political considerations, and many countries are currently experiencing significant challenges in health care that depart from the way their health care has been financed and provided in the past. This course will introduce students to the Spanish health care system and the context in which it is developing, studying the key changes that have taken place up to the present day. Based on a series of case studies, students will be able to compare the Spanish health care model with other models like those of the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Sweden, and/or developing nations. You will compare health care systems and performance on a variety of topics including morbidity and mortality, disease ranking, health system cost, quality, and safety to name a few. You will also develop your critical evaluation skills to analyze the quality of the evidence used to support the policies and practice of health care. This will enable you to critically observe the role governmental and non-governmental organizations play with regard to health care and health status. Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to comparisons between Spain and the United States with a focus on identifying and understanding health disparities and how each country and their health system are addressing elimination of health disparities. Health disparities exist for a variety of reasons, and this course will help you understand what those factors are, and how each country is attempting to improve the social determinants that directly contribute to health disparities.
TLDO 3009 - Diversity in Global Health (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will dive into sociological diversity and existing culture in order to reflect on the influence of global and local dynamics on the health of different populations. Beginning with a historical overview that will bring us to the paradigm of social determinants of health and its successive reformulations (Dahlgren & Whitehead, 1991; Acheson, 1998; OMS, 2005), we will begin to study the topic of equity in health, defined as ?the absence of potentially remediable, systematic differences in one or more aspects of health across socially, economically, demographically, or geographically defined population groups or subgroups.? (Maconko & Starfield, 2002). At the same time, we will study the topic of health inequities, which consist of ?health differences between different populations that are important, systematic, avoidable, and unjust? (Whitehead, 1992).1 We will learn about the ecological and sociological dimensions using models like Sustainable Development Goals or questioning supposedly universal constructs like the Human Development Index, while remembering to reflect on concrete social situations and the cultural setting in which they develop. The concept of health will be approached from its widest and most holistic dimension to introduce the contribution of the social sciences, from a global perspective on health to more specific contexts, and the differentiation between disease, discomfort, and illness. We will debate on the importance of terms like health care systems, pluralism, and alternative therapies and, finally, we will be introduced to a socio-cultural perspective to help us rethink concepts like health, hygiene, or care. The health care mechanism, the institutionalization of care, and the functioning of these institutions will be another focus of our attention, analyzing the characteristics of teamwork, leadership or the formation of stereotypes. In this sense, we will try to bring together a dual perspective which includes a reflection on society and patients, and the continual questioning of our function as professionals in the area of health care and research. In a more practical sense, we will analyze perspectives on determinants of health in groups made vulnerable by their condition or stigmatization in a determined society (we will focus on the local situation but also extend the comparison and reflection to other places), also questioning the acceptance of terms which we hear often as health care professionals and in coordination with other disciplines such as ?dependency? or ?normality.? ????????? 1 Quotation translated from Spanish by translator. Original English quotation could not be found and may differ somewhat from translation above.
TLDO 3012 - Global Bioethics (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Bioethics was initially projected with very wide objectives. V.R. Potter understood it as a dialogue between scientists and humanists to preserve humanity from its self-destruction and promote quality of life. In his words, ?Mankind is urgently in need of a new wisdom that will provide the ?knowledge of how to use knowledge? for man?s survival and for improvement in the quality of life?.I therefore propose the term bioethics in order to emphasize the two most important ingredients in achieving the new wisdom that is so desperately needed: biological knowledge and human values.? The Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Warren Reich in 1978, suggests the following definition of bioethics: ?systematic study of human conduct in the area of the life sciences and health care, insofar as this conduct is examined in the light of moral, values, and principles.? The complex, multi-disciplinary model of modern healthcare creates numerous ethical conflicts. When the values of all the actors are taken into account when making decisions, there is inevitably disparity of criteria. The conflicts generated are not merely technical; they are also ethical, because the values of the people or institutions involved can be in conflict. In these instances, it is important that the medical professional knows to consider technical issues (the medical facts) and the values at play (the preferences of those involved, principles, norms, etc.), in order to make a good decision. At present, bioethics is considered a practical or applied ethics (to biomedicine), that attempts to resolve ethical dilemmas present in biomedicine. There are various fields within bioethics. The most relevant are foundational bioethics (which deals with the philosophical foundations of bioethics), environmental bioethics, clinical bioethics, and the bioethics of research. Bioethical issues tend to be complex problems that extend beyond the limits of a sole profession, for which reason it is essential to consider the input of healthcare professionals, philosophers, lawyers, psychologists, social workers, sociologists, and any other profession involved in the most hot-button ethical issues relating to the life sciences. All the fields mentioned have great relevance due to the importance and prevalence of the issues taken on by bioethics. There are a great number of publications that indicate how numerous professionals confront common, difficult-to-regulate bioethical dilemmas in the clinical sphere as well as the in the area of research or in relation to the environment, but the formation needed to tackle these problems is insufficient. In a significant number of these articles, it is concluded that it is necessary to improve the bioethical formation of future professionals to be able to better address these issues. For this reason, education in bioethics has become a priority both in the United States and in Europe, as well as the rest of the world, as these issues are not limited to a specific area, but rather are global.
TLDO 3024 - Tracing Three Cultures in Spain
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Three-week intensive course. Lectures, discussions, field trips, including Madrid's 'Museo del Prado', 'El Escorial' Palace, Guided Tours of Judaic Toledo and Mozarabic Segovia. Christian, Muslim, and Jewish culture in literature/art, how they conform to identity of modern Spain. Sephardic heritage in literature/architecture in Toledo. Interaction between Islamic/Hispano-Mozarabic artists. Role of Epic/Reconquest in medieval Spanish literature. Religious painting, Christian iconography during Baroque/Counter-reformation periods.
TLDO 3105W - Cultural Heritage of Spain (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3105W/Span 3105V/Tldo 310
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Main periods of Spanish history. Political, social, anthropological, and economic characteristics of each. Spanish culture/society, from beginning of Franco regime in 1939 to present. Cultural trends in literature/arts in relation to social phenomena. prereq: Two yrs of college-level Spanish
TLDO 3211 - Writers of the Spanish Empire and Its Decline
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3211/Tldo 3211
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Masterpieces of Spain's most significant renaissance and golden age writers, including Lope de Vega, Calderon, Cervantes, Garcilaso, Gongora, Quevedo, and authors of picaresque novels and mystic poetry.
TLDO 3232 - Art and Architecture in Spain: Periods and Styles
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Characteristics of major periods in Spanish art/architecture. Greek, Roman, Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque, Neo-Classical, Romanticism, Modernism, 20th century avant-garde.
TLDO 3233 - Christian, Muslim, Jewish Art: Toledo
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Art of three cultures are studied in/around Toledo.
TLDO 3234 - Master Painters of Spain
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Development of Spanish painting studied in works of El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, and Dali. Visits to Madrid's Museo del Prado and Centro de Arte Reina Sofia.
TLDO 3237 - Spanish Transition Toward Democracy
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Changes in Spain from Franco's death in 1975 to Law for Political Reform and Constitution of 1978. Role of Monarchy, Army, political parties, and trade unions in shaping Constitution and defining Spain as semi-federal state.
TLDO 3238 - Spain and the European Union
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Formation of EU. Impact of building a single European market on Spanish and greater European economies. Readings from daily press.
TLDO 3242 - History and Memory
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Study abroad course.
TLDO 3302 - Ethnology and Folklore of the Iberian Peninsula
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Traditional forms of life in Iberian Peninsula in terms of social/economic features. Literary, artisitic, and religious aspects. prereq: Two yrs of college level Spanish
TLDO 3314 - 20th Century Spanish Art
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Spanish artists who were most affected by European avant-garde movements and have greatly affected art in/outside Spain (e.g., Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Juan Miro, Juan Gris).
TLDO 3502 - Spain Since 1936
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3502/Tldo 3502
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Main features and social significance of General Franco's authoritarian regime as opposed to German/Italian models. Origins of the Civil War. Later social/economic development Problems in political/constitutional transition since Franco. prereq: Two yrs of college level Spanish
TLDO 3517 - Introduction to the History and Present Situation of Spanish Women
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theoretical/practical approach to fundamental transformations that have conditioned lives of Spanish women, from Golden Age to present. Aspects of women's participation in economic world and in culture.
TLDO 3810 - Seminar: Spanish Language Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Contemporary cultural/aesthetic trends in Spanish film industry. Viewing/analysis of most significant films of Saura, Bardem, Gurierrez, Aragon, and other directors.
TLDO 3970 - Internships in Spain
Credits: 3.0 -6.0 [max 12.0]
Course Equivalencies: Span 3970/Tldo 3970
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Experiential learning in many fields. Classroom component on meaning of work in Spain and social organizational structure/culture of workplace. prereq: Two yrs of college-level Spanish
TLDO 3975 - Service-Learning and the Immigrant Experience in Spain
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Students volunteer at one of several Toledo institutions and collaborate with immigrant population or with Spaniards who work with the immigrant community. Weekly seminar, readings, discussion, reflection, presentations.
ANTH 4031W - Anthropology and Social Justice (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Practical application of theories/methods from social/cultural anthropology. Issues of policy, planning, implementation, and ethics as they relate to applied anthropology. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or 4003 or grad student or instr consent
CHIC 3375 - Folklore of Greater Mexico (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scholarly survey and exploration of the sociocultural function of various types of folklore in Greater Mexico. Ways in which folklore constructs and maintains community, as well as resists and engenders cultural shifts.
PHIL 3304 - Law and Morality
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What is law? Must true laws be just? When (if ever) are civil disobedience or legal punishment morally justified? Do good laws incorporate (or legislate) morality? Consider and debate these issues using philosophical texts, case law, and the occasional novel.
POL 3235W - Democracy and Citizenship (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course considers the nature of contemporary democracy and the role that members of the political community do, can, and should play. While approaches in teaching the class vary, students can expect to read historical and contemporary texts, see films and videos, to approach questions about the nature of democracy, justifications for democracy, and challenges faced by contemporary democracy as it relates to racial inequality, immigration, gender inequality, and ecological crises. Topics will include: the centrality of social movements for democracies; deliberative and participatory democracy; as well as questions about how members of political communities can best participate in democratic life to address structural inequalities. Students will write a longer essay that allows them to demonstrate their capacities to understand and explain complex ideas and to make a theoretically compelling argument, using appropriate supporting evidence. Suggested prerequisite 1201
POL 4275 - Domination, Exclusion, and Justice: Contemporary Political Thought (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Contemporary Political Theory systematically analyzes the meaning and significance of concepts central to current politics: domination, exclusion, and justice. Starting from basic concerns about the nature of politics, humans, power and justice, this course will explore how these basic starting assumptions organize the norms, practices, and institutions of political and social order. To explore these topics, the field turns to key texts, as well as to political and social events and other media (film, historical documents, etc.). Through this course, students will also be introduced to different interpretive approaches, ranging from democratic theory, feminist, queer and critical race theories, as well as ethics and moral philosophy. Organized around the politics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the course will pursue a range of questions about democratic legitimation, the exclusion of historically marginalized communities, systematic inequalities of different kinds, as well as ideals of democracy and justice. It will range from theoretical inquiry to practical questions of implementing different political projects. Through this course, students will develop skills in critical thinking, careful reading and clear writing, as well as recognizing and constructing arguments. These skills are basic for the critical, lifelong role that all of us play as members of political community. prereq: 1201 recommended
SPAN 3606 - Human Rights Issues in the Americas
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Human rights movement. International law of human rights and the justice system. Focuses on human rights cases in the Americas and on cultural practices related to human rights.
HIST 3728 - The History of Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3728 / HIST 5728
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
What are human rights? How and when did they originate? How were such rights promoted, protected, and contested at different historical junctures, and by whom? In this course, we will examine the historical processes through which human rights have been conceptualized, codified, violated, and vindicated. Throughout the semester, we will travel across the globe and trace events that span from the eighteenth century to the present day. Our search will take us through the multiple histories that have shaped what we nowadays recognize as the human rights framework ? its institutions, products, and norms. Integrating perspectives and readings from the humanities, social sciences and legal studies, this course explores how meanings of human rights have fluctuated in response to historical developments, and how human rights have come to gain their prominent role in contemporary politics, law, and culture.
HIST 5728 - The History of Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HIST 3728 / HIST 5728
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
What are human rights? How and when did they originate? How were such rights promoted, protected and contested at different historical junctures, and by whom? In this course, we will examine the historical processes through which human rights have been conceptualized, codified, violated, and vindicated. Throughout the semester, we will travel across the globe and trace events that span from the eighteenth century to the present day. Our search will take us through the multiple histories that have shaped what we nowadays recognize as the human rights framework ? its institutions, products and norms. Integrating perspectives and readings from the humanities, social sciences and legal studies, this course explores how meanings of human rights have fluctuated in response to historical developments, and how human rights have come to gain their prominent role in contemporary politics, law and culture.
POL 4403W - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 4403W / POL 5403
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Around the world, fundamental political questions are often debated and decided in constitutional terms, and in the United States, the constitution is invoked at almost every turn to endorse or condemn different policies. Is adhering to constitutional terms the best way to safeguard rights and to achieve a successful democracy? When and how do constitutions matter to political outcomes? This course centers on these questions as it moves from debates over how constitutional drafting processes should be structured and how detailed constitutions should be, to the risks and benefits of different institutional structures (federal v. unitary, and the distribution of powers between the executive, legislature, and judiciary), to which rights (if any) should be constitutionalized and when and why different rights are protected, closing with a discussion of what rules should guide constitutional amendment and rewrite. For each topic, we compare how these issues have been resolved in the U.S. with alternative approaches in a wide variety of other countries around the globe. The goal is not only to expose students to the variety of ways, successful or unsuccessful, that other political communities have addressed these issues, but also to gain a more contextualized and clearer understanding of the pros and cons of the U.S. model, its relevance for other democratic or democratizing countries, whether and how it might be reformed, and, generally speaking, when/how constitutions matter for democratic quality and stability.
POL 5403 - Constitutions, Democracy, and Rights: Comparative Perspectives
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: POL 4403W / POL 5403
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year
Around the world, fundamental political questions are often debated and decided in constitutional terms, and in the United States, the constitution is invoked at almost every turn to endorse or condemn different policies. Is adhering to constitutional terms the best way to safeguard rights and to achieve a successful democracy? When and how do constitutions matter to political outcomes? This course centers on these questions as it moves from debates over how constitutional drafting processes should be structured and how detailed constitutions should be, to the risks and benefits of different institutional structures (federal v. unitary, and the distribution of powers between the executive, legislature, and judiciary), to which rights (if any) should be constitutionalized and when and why different rights are protected, closing with a discussion of what rules should guide constitutional amendment and rewrite. For each topic, we compare how these issues have been resolved in the U.S. with alternative approaches in a wide variety of other countries around the globe. The goal is not only to expose students to the variety of ways, successful or unsuccessful, that other political communities have addressed these issues, but also to gain a more contextualized and clearer understanding of the pros and cons of the U.S. model, its relevance for other democratic or democratizing countries, whether and how it might be reformed, and, generally speaking, when/how constitutions matter for democratic quality and stability.
SOC 4101W - Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4101V - Honors: Sociology of Law (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the US legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between US law and global law and concepts of justice. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: - Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on a LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class power point presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates with themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. - Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. - Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). - Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news, or a two-page critique of a class reading - Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: honors student, [[SOC 1001] and [SOC 1101 or 3101 or 3102]] recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5101 - Sociology of Law
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 4101V/Soc 4101W/Soc 5101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course will consider the relationship between law and society, analyzing law as an expression of cultural values, a reflection of social and political structure, and an instrument of social control and social change. Emphasizing a comparative perspective, we begin by discussing theories about law and legal institutions. We then turn our attention to the legal process and legal actors, focusing on the impact of law, courts, and lawyers on the rights of individuals. Although this course focuses on the U.S. legal system, we will explore issues of the relationship between U.S. law and global law and concepts of justice. prereq: graduate student
SOC 4104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 4104H - Honors: Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. Additional special assignments will be discussed with honors participants who seek to earn honors credit toward the end of our first class session. Examples of additional requirements may include: · Honors students will be expected to interview a current Sociology graduate student working on an LCD topic. Following this, each student will individually be expected to do an in-class PowerPoint presentation explaining how the interviewees? research relates to themes presented in the course. Students will also be expected to meet as a group and individually with the professor four times during the course semester. · Sign up and prepare 3-4 discussion questions in advance of at least one class session. · Work with professor and TA on other small leadership tasks (class discussion, paper exchange, tour). · Write two brief (1-page) reflection papers on current news or a two-page critique of a class reading · Attend a presentation, workshop, or seminar on a related topic for this class and write a 2-page maximum reflective paper. prereq: SOC 1001, at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended, Sociology majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5104 - Crime and Human Rights
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4104/GloS 4104H/Soc 4104/
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course addresses serious violations of humanitarian and human rights law, efforts to criminalize those violations (laws and institutions), and consequences of these efforts. Special attention will be paid to the impact interventions have on representations and memories of atrocities on responses and the future of cycles of violence. Case studies on Holocaust, Balkan wars, Darfur, My Lai massacre, etc. Criminal justice, truth commissions, vetting, compensation programs. prereq: at least one 3xxx SOC course recommended
SOC 4171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: 1001 or 3101 or 3102 or instr consent; soc majors/minors must register A-F
SOC 5171 - Sociology of International Law: Human Rights & Trafficking (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4406/GloS 5171/Soc 4171/S
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course takes a sociological approach to international law, considering how history, institutions, power, and interests shape the phenomenon. What is international law, where does it come from, and how does it work? What does international law tell us about globalization and nation-states? Does it make a difference in the world? Does it have a real impact on the day-to-day lives of individuals? When is it followed; when is it ignored? This course takes a broad sociological view of international law. We analyze the actors and processes that constitute international law and then focus on particular substantive areas, including human rights, economic development,environmental concerns, trafficking, and drug interdiction. prereqs: Graduate student or instructor consent
AFRO 3866 - The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Afro 3866/Afro 5866/Hist 3856
Typically offered: Every Fall
Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.
CHIC 3771 - Latino Social Power and Social Movements in the U.S.
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
How Latinos have collectively resisted social domination. Theories of social power/movements. Resistance by Latinos during 60s/70s. Current organized efforts to curb immigration, establish English as official language, and limit immigrant rights.
CSCL 3122 - Movements and Manifestos (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Movements that emerge when a group of writers, filmmakers, artists, composers, or musicians puts forth a new definition of literature, film, art, or music?and sets in motion new relations (aesthetic and social) of word, image, sound. Manifestos?statements of position?that articulate or counter such definitions. Movements created by scholars or critics after the fact. Focuses on one or two related movements (e.g., romanticism and realism, surrealism and negritude, new wave and third cinema).
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we'll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the anti-racist feminism branch of the women's movement, often referred to as "third-wave feminism." We'll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we'll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, "the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another." As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with and confront the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they're doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they'd like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We'll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, "political education," reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we'll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we'll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we'll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we'll get a feel for what it's like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we'll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning-- details will be provided in class.
GWSS 4490 - Topics: Political Economy and Global Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Sr or grad student or instr consent
HIST 3432 - Modern Africa in a Changing World (HIS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3432/Afro 3432
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Survey of modern African history from early 19th century to present. Focuses on socioeconomic, political, and cultural development in Africa, from abolition of trans-Atlantic slave trade through postcolonial era.
POL 3252W - Revolution, Democracy, and Empire: Modern Political Thought (AH, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
From the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries, Europe and its colonies were wracked by large scale, sweeping changes: from the violent emergence of the sovereign state, to intense religious conflict, to geographic expansions at once transformative and brutal in search of new economic markets. These changes posed extraordinary challenges to usual ways of conceiving of political order and governance. Our course this semester will read these changes through three key concepts – revolution, democracy, and empire. Class discussion will seek to understand different meanings of these concepts, their political stakes, and ways of knowing how to move between political ideals and historical examples. Students will read a range of materials – from primary historical sources, to philosophic texts, political pamphlets and treatises, and travel journals – so as to study the effects on both the European context and beyond. prereq: Suggested prerequisite 1201
POL 3423 - Politics of Disruption: Violence and Its Alternatives (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Political struggles aimed at undermining the existing political order have been a pervasive feature of global politics. Modern states have constantly been sites of relentless challenges from their citizenry, which sometimes take the form of non-violent action while on other occasions manifest in terrorism and violence. This course introduces students to the politics of disruption and violent and non-violent struggles targeted at bringing about political change. We will study a range of manifestations of such struggles focusing on some well-known cases such as the US civil rights movement, the Arab Springs, the Ferguson riots and the Islamic State (ISIS). Can non-violent resistance succeed against a coercive state? Why do individuals and groups participate in high-risk political struggles? What explains patterns of violence in civil conflicts? What are the effects of violence? What facilitates peace? This course will enable you to answer these questions.
POL 4463 - The Cuban Revolution Through the Words of Cuban Revolutionaries (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Why do policy makers in Washington, D.C. continue to rail against the Cuban Revolution? Despite their best efforts, both Republican and Democratic administrations, the Revolution is still in place after six decades. How to explain? This is the central research question of the course. A definitive answer would require a thorough examination of the revolution from its initiation until today?which is beyond what can be done in a semester. The focus, rather, is more limited. First, how was the revolution made and consolidated?from 1953 until about 1969?and, second, how has it been able to survive and advance since the collapse of the Soviet Union, that is, since 1991? The emphasis here is on the role of leadership and strategy, how the Cubans and their leaders saw and see what they are doing?in their own words. This is an attempt to get into their heads, their understandings, through documents, speeches and writings. In keeping with the goals of liberal education, this course helps students to think outside the box of conventional wisdom. Why, for example, an underdeveloped society lacking many of the characteristics of a liberal democracy can do a better job in meeting the basic needs of its citizens than its far richer neighbor to the north? What the Cubans seek to do is reorganize human relations on the basis of solidarity and not individual self-interest. How successful they have been in that pursuit is exactly one of the questions to which the course seeks to provide an answer. These questions are not simply of intellectual interest. Given the deepening crisis of world capitalism with the accompanying human misery, to know about Cuba's reality can have life and death consequences. Given, also, that the U.S. government doesn?t make it easy for most of its citizens to travel to the island to make up their own minds about its reality, this course is a unique educational opportunity.
POL 4487 - The Struggle for Democratization and Citizenship
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
How best to advance democracy?through the ballot box or in the streets? This question more than any other is what informs the course. As well as the streets, the barricades and the battlefields, it argues, are decisive in the democratic quest. If democracy means the rule of the demos, the people, then who gets to be included in ?the people"? An underlying assumption of the course is that the inclusion of previously disenfranchised layers of society into the category of the people, the citizens, is due to social struggles or the threat of such?an assumption to be examined in the course. Struggles refer to any kinds of movement for social change, from protests and strikes to revolutions broadly defined. This course seeks to see if there are lessons of struggle. The course traces the history of the democratic movement from its earliest moments in human history and attempts to draw a balance sheet. In the process it seeks to answer a number of questions. Did social inequality always exist? How do property rights figure in the inclusion process? What is the relationship between the state, social inequality and democracy? Which social layers played a decisive role in the democratic breakthrough? What are the effective strategies and tactics in the democratic struggle? How crucial is leadership? And lastly, can the lessons of the past inform current practice? A particular feature of the course is to read about the thinking and actions of activists on both sides of the democratic struggle in, as much as possible, their own words.
POL 4773W - Advocacy Organizations, Social Movements, and the Politics of Identity (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to the major theoretical concepts and empirical findings in the study of U.S interest group politics. Students will read books and articles from a wide range of topics that include how interest groups are formed and maintained; various strategies and tactics that groups use to influence Congress, the courts, and executive branch; and whether those strategies result in fair and effective representation for all citizens in society. Throughout the semester students will be exposed to research using a variety of methodologies and intellectual approaches. Further, the class discussions will emphasize general concepts that reoccur in the readings and in other classes. The goal is to assist students in mastering the key concepts in group politics. This is also a writing intensive course. Effective writing is encouraged through several writing assignments that require you to think clearly and express your thoughts concisely.
SOC 3322W - Social Movements, Protests, and Change (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3322W/Soc 3322W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Focusing on the origins, dynamics, and consequences of social movements, this course explores debates about the dilemmas and challenges facing movement organizations, the relationship between social movements and various institutions, and the role of social movements and protest in bringing about change. The course is organized around general theoretical issues concerning why people join movements, why they leave or remain in movements, how movements are organized, the strategies and tactics they use, and their long-term and short-run impact. prereq: 1001 recommended; soc majors/minors must register A-F
AMIN 4511 - Indigenous Political Economies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Sources, nature, consequences of social/economic development/change in Indian communities. Precontact Indian communities. Effect of European contact. Social movements into 20th century, including phenomenon of urban Indian communities. prereq: 1001
AMST 4301 - Workers and Consumers in the Global Economy (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Impact of global economy on workplaces/workers in the United states, Mexico, and Caribbean countries. Influence on consumption. Consequences for American culture/character. Effects on U.S./Mexican factory work, service sector, temporary working arrangements, offshore production jobs in Dominican Republic, and professional/managerial positions.
ANTH 4053 - Economy, Culture, and Critique (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4053/8205
Typically offered: Every Fall
Systems of production/distribution, especially in nonindustrial societies. Comparison, history, critique of major theories. Cross-cultural anthropological approach to material life that subsumes market/nonmarket processes.
APEC 3001 - Applied Microeconomics: Consumers, Producers, and Markets
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 3101/Econ 3101H/ApEc 3001
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Consumer/producer decisions. Theory of supply/demand. Markets, pricing, investment, effect regulation, market failures. prereq: [[1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271]] or instr consent; intended for undergrads in [Ag/Food Bus Mgmt, Appl Econ]
APEC 3007 - Applied Macroeconomics: Policy, Trade, and Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Indicators of economic development, growth in trade, and welfare of developing countries. Globalization. Drivers of growth, productivity, technical change, and research. Comparative advantage. Distribution consequences of trade. Trade policy instruments/institutions. prereq: [1101 or ECON 1101], [1101H or ECON 1101H], [1102 or ECON 1102], [1102H or ECON 1102H]; 3001, 3006 recommended
APEC 3071 - Microeconomics of International Development
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Characteristics and performance of peasant agriculture; potential role of agriculture in economic development, and design of economic policies to achieve agricultural and economic development; role of women in agricultural development. prereq: 1101, 1102, Econ 1101, 1102, or instr consent
CSCL 3405 - Marx for Today (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
A century and a half after the publication of Karl Marx?s Capital, Vol. 1 (1867), this course will reflect on the political urgency of our current moment in order to understand the relevance and complexity of Marx and the Marxist tradition. We will pursue an intensive study of primary readings written by Karl Marx himself, exploring the social, philosophical, and political history of Marxist thought and familiarizing ourselves with key concepts such as labor-power, primitive accumulation, the commodity, use value, exchange-value, surplus-value, crisis, money, and capital. As we study Marx as a theoretician, we will also examine his work as a political revolutionary, writer, and correspondent with many of the most important revolutionary figures of his day. Here we will foreground his analysis of the labor of enslaved Black persons in the plantation economies of the Southern United States?which he ties to the labor markets of capitalism in Europe?as well as his more explicit critiques of slavery and colonialism. Following this close reading of Marx and the Marxist tradition, we will consider the ways that critical thinkers and political activists, both in the United States and globally, continue to resist, create, and dream under the banner of Marxism throughout the twentieth century and into our own new century. We will center questions of racial justice through the writings of W. E. B. Du Bois and contemporary Marxist scholars of race, indigeneity, and diaspora, focusing on Du Bois?s attention to the links between race and social class in America. Alongside critical reappraisals of Marx?s thought, we shall think about the influence of Marx?s writings on political activists in the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement, and on American labor, as well as on South American revolutionaries like Carlos Marighella. We will then move to a study of Marxist feminism, linking race and gender in U.S. and global Marxisms through readings by Black Panther activist and intellectual Angela Davis, the social historian Nancy Fraser, and Italian Marxist feminist Silvia Federici. We will revisit the question of gender oppression and feminist resistance through a Marxist frame, with reference to the revival of socialist prospects in the work of Jodi Dean and Mackenzie Wark. Finally, we will examine the contemporary fight over reproductive rights and the history of the ?Wages for Housework? movement. From these readings and conversations we will think about how Marx?s ideas and their larger legacy can help us to understand our current moment and our political, social, and ecological futures. In as much as this is a course on theoretical perspectives, it will also be one that seeks to use Marx, and the Marxist tradition, to develop critical perspectives and solutions to pressing issues of racial injustice, social inequality, and environmental devastation.
ECON 4317 - The Chinese Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of the Chinese Economy; transition from command economy to a market-based one and effects on economic indicators; current economic issues and concerns of the Chinese economy; role of China in today's world economy. prereq: (ECON 1101or ECON 1165, APEC 1101), (ECON 1102 or APEC 1102), MATH 1271 or equivalent courses approved by the Economics Department.
ECON 4331W - Economic Development (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Economic growth in low income countries. Theory of aggregate and per capita income growth. Population growth, productivity increases, and capital formation. Allocation of resources between consumption and investment and among sectors. International assistance/trade. prereq: ECON 1101 (or ECON 1165, APEC 1101), ECON 1102 (or APEC 1102), ECON 3101, ECON 3102, MATH 1271 or equivalent courses approved by the Economics Department, and completion of freshman writing practice.
ECON 4431W - International Trade (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 4431W/Econ 4431V/Econ 443
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Theories of trade/trade patterns. Trade restrictions/commercial policy. International factor movements. Economic growth/development. Regional integration. prereq: ECON 1101 (or ECON 1165, APEC 1101), ECON 1102 (or APEC 1102), ECON 3101, ECON 3102, MATH 1271, or equivalent courses approved by the Economics Department, and completion of freshman writing practice.
ECON 4432W - International Finance (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Balance of payments; international financial markets; exchange rate determination; international monetary system; international investment and capital flows; financial management of the multinational firm; open economy macroeconomic policy. prereq: ECON 1101 (or ECON 1165, APEC 1101), ECON 1102 (or APEC 1102), ECON 3101, ECON 3102, MATH 1271 or equivalent courses approved by the Economics Department and first-writing course.
GEOG 5385 - Globalization and Development: Political Economy
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Nature/scope of modern world system (capitalism), its impact on regional development processes. Roles of state and of international financial institutions. prereq: Sr or grad or instr consent
HIST 3283 - Marx, Capital, and History: An Introduction to Marxist Theory and History
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Hist 3283/Hist 5283
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Explore Marx's understanding of capitalism/its history. Marx's argument regarding historical specificity of capitalism as economic/social condition.
HIST 3419 - History of Capitalism: Uneven Development Since 1500
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 3219/Hist 3419
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Causes of economic inequities in contemporary world. Long-term economic developments in cases taken from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North/South America. Various theoretical approaches to study of economic development. Introduction to key concepts.
POL 3477 - Political Economy of Development (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How can the vast disparities of wealth between countries be explained? Why have some countries in the post-colonial world, in particular, those of East Asia, experienced stunning economic growth, while those in other parts have not? We will explore inequality among nations through an engagement with competing explanations from multiple disciplines. Do free markets, the legacies of colonialism, state power, culture, or geography offer the most persuasive account of current patterns of global inequality? The course also examines what we mean by "development" and exposes students to cutting-edge debates in contemporary development studies. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of the causes of and possible solutions to global inequality.
POL 3489W - Citizens, Consumers, and Corporations (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Corporations are the most powerful actors in the global political economy. They employ millions of people, produce a wide variety of goods, and have massive effects on the communities where they do business. Although considered to be "legal persons," corporations are not living beings with a conscience. Milton Friedman famously proclaimed that the only moral obligation of corporations is the maximize shareholder returns. Yet maximizing financial returns may negatively affect humans, other living beings, and the planet. This potential conflict between profit and ethics is at the heart of this course, which focuses on how people have mobilized as citizens and consumers to demand ethical behavior from corporations. We will explore these different modes of action through an examination of corporate social responsibility for sweatshops, the industrial food system in the United States, and the privatization of life, water, and war. The course also considers how corporations exploit racial hierarchies and immigration status in their pursuit of profit.
POL 3833 - The United States and the Global Economy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
POL 3833 teaches students about the politics of the global economy with a focus on the role the United States plays within it. The class covers a variety of topics in international political economy, including international trade, international investment, and international finance. Students will learn about the factors that drive politicians' decision-making, interest-group stances, and citizens' preferences over such salient issues as tariffs and other forms of trade protection, trade and investment agreements, central banking, interest rates, international migration, and more. No background in economics is required or assumed.
POL 4481 - Comparative Political Economy: Governments and Markets
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Pol 3481H/Pol 4481
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course analyzes the compatibility of democracy and markets - whether democratic institutions undermine (enhance) the workings of market institutions and vice versa. Competing theoretical perspectives in political economy are critically evaluated. And the experiences of countries with different forms of democratic market systems are studied. Among the topics singled out for in-depth investigation are the economics of voting, producer group politics, the politics of monetary and fiscal policy, political business cycles, and trade politics.
GCC 3017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
GCC 5017 - World Food Problems: Agronomics, Economics and Hunger (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro 4103/ApEc 4103/GCC 3017
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
This course provides a multi-disciplinary look at problems (and some of the possible solutions) affecting food production, distribution, and requirements for the seven plus billion inhabitants of this planet. It is co-taught by a plant geneticist (Morrell) and an economist (Runge) who together have worked on international food production and policy issues for the past 40 years. Historical context, the present situation and future scenarios related to the human population and food production are examined. Presentations and discussions cover sometimes conflicting views from multiple perspectives on population growth, use of technology, as well as the ethical and cultural values of people in various parts of the world. The global challenge perspective is reflected in attention to issues of poverty, inequality, gender, the legacy of colonialism, and racial and ethnic prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the need for governments, international assistance agencies, international research and extension centers, as well as the private sector to assist in solving the complex problems associated with malnutrition, undernutrition, obesity, and sustainable food production. Through a better understanding of world food problems, this course enables students to reflect on the shared sense of responsibility by nations, the international community and ourselves to build and maintain a stronger sense of our roles as historical agents. Throughout the semester students are exposed to issues related to world food problems through the lenses of two instructors from different disciplinary backgrounds. The core issues of malnutrition and food production are approached simultaneously from a production perspective as well as an economic and policy perspective throughout the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
AGRO 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
AMIN 3312 - American Indian Environmental Issues and Ecological Perspectives (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
American Indian environmental issues in U.S./Canada. Analysis of social, political, economic, legal forces/institutions. Colonial histories/tribal sovereignty.
ANSC 3203W - Environment, Global Food Production, and the Citizen (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Agro/AnSc 3203/AgUM 2224
Typically offered: Every Spring
Ecological/ethical concerns of food production systems in global agriculture: past, present, and future. Underlying ethical positions about how agroecosystems should be configured. Interactive learning using decision cases, discussions, videos, other media.
APEC 3611W - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Concepts of resource use. Financial/economic feasibility. External effects, market failures. Resource use, environmental problems. Measuring impacts of resource development. Economics of alternative resource programs, environmental strategies. prereq: 1101 or ECON 1101 or 1101H or ECON 1101H
ARCH 3711W - Environmental Design and the Sociocultural Context (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Arch 3711W/Arch 3711V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Designed environment as cultural medium/product of sociocultural process/expression of values, ideas, behavioral patterns. Design/construction as complex political process. prereq: Soph or above
ARTH 3434 - Art and the Environment (AH, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Western art has a long tradition of depicting and directly engaging with the environment?from ancient earthworks such as Stonehenge and Avebury Stone Circle, to 18th and 19th century landscape paintings and 20th century photographs, to land and earth art of the 1960s and ?70s, and what is now called environmental or eco art. Such art has had a prominent place in art?s history, but do we really need art to save the environment? Studies repeatedly show that the arts are crucial to understanding and forestalling environmental disaster because, it turns out, human attitudes are shaped by the stories we tell, by our ability to imagine the unimaginable, to accept the inanimate as potentially coming to life, to picture things on a vast scale. In this course students learn the historical development of artistic movements from 1968, when the first exhibition of such art, called ?Earthworks,? took place at the Dwan Gallery in New York, up to the present day. The course tracks the changing aesthetic, political, and climatic forces that influenced such art, from the anti-institutionalism and participatory approaches of the 1960s to the more activist artistic engagement with environmentalism today. The class takes up two primary concerns: understanding the historical and scientific conditions that have given rise to such art and learning the ways in which artists have sought to intervene in and affect a changing environment. Students put historical knowledge, environmental research, and visual analysis skills to work in a culminating group project creating art that responds to a contemporary environmental problem.
CSCL 3322 - Visions of Nature: The Natural World and Political Thought (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Scientific and cultural theory concerning the organization of nature, human nature, and their significance for development of ethics, religion, political/economic philosophy, civics, and environmentalism in Western/other civilizations.
EEB 3001 - Ecology and Society (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic concepts in ecology. Organization, development, function of ecosystem. Population growth/regulation. Human effect on ecosystems. prereq: [Jr or sr] recommended; biological sciences students may not apply cr toward major
ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action (LITR, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore contemporary texts from multiple disciplines to analyze the role of stories in interpreting nature. Emphasis on lived experience, civic motivation, and observational research that enrich effective nature writing. Optional service-learning component.
ESPM 3011W - Ethics in Natural Resources (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Normative/professional ethics, and leadership considerations, applicable to managing natural resources and the environment. Readings, discussion.
ESPM 3241W - Natural Resource and Environmental Policy (SOCS, CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3241W/ESPM 5241
Typically offered: Every Spring
Political processes in management of the environment. How disagreements are addressed by different stakeholders, private-sector interests, government agencies, institutions, communities, and nonprofit organizations.
ESPM 3251 - Natural Resources in Sustainable International Development (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3251/ESPM 5251/LAS 3251
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
International perspectives on resource use and sustainable development. Integration of natural resource issues with social, economic, and policy considerations. Agriculture, forestry, agroforestry, non-timber forest products, water resources, certification, development issues. Global case studies. Impact of consumption in developed countries on sustainable development in lesser developed countries.
ESPM 3607 - Natural Resources Consumption and Sustainability (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Current world trends for industrial raw materials; environmental/other tradeoffs related to options for satisfying demand/needs; global and systemic thinking; provides a framework for beginning a process of thinking critically about complex environmental problems/potential solutions in a diverse global economy.
GEOG 3376 - Political Ecology (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Environmental problems and political economic processes are intimately connected. The latter shape where and how people encounter nature, who has access to resources, and which communities are exposed to or protected from environmental harms. In this course, you will join others in examining how environmental problems are produced and how people organize to address them. Through readings, video, film, and lectures you will learn to identify the racial and class dimensions of environmental change. You will also understand the goals and principles of the environmental justice movement and explore inspiring struggles to build socially just ecological relations. Over the course of the semester you will acquire robust analytical and theoretical tools for understanding the political and ecological dimensions of racial capitalism and settler colonialism and learn how alternative social and ecological worlds might be generated and sustained.
GEOG 3379 - Environment and Development in the Third World (SOCS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3379/GloS 3303
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Inequality in the form of extreme wealth and poverty in our world are major causes of environmental degradation. In addition, development failure as well as certain forms of economic growth always led to environment disasters. This course examines how our world?s economic and political systems and the livelihoods they engender have produced catastrophic local and global environmental conditions. Beyond this, the course explores alternative approaches of achieving sustainable environment and equitable development. prereq: Soph or jr or sr
GEOG 4002W - Environmental Thought and Practice (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Changing conceptions of nature, culture, and environment in Western social/political thought. How our understanding of humans/nonhumans has been transformed by scientific and technological practices. Interdisciplinary, reading intensive. prereq: Jr or sr
PHIL 3301 - Environmental Ethics (ENV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Philosophical basis for membership in moral community. Theories applied to specific problems (e.g., vegetarianism, wilderness preservation). Students defend their own reasoned views about moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.
PUBH 3003 - Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: PubH 3003/PubH 3004/PubH 3005/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of alcohol and other drug abuse problems. Emphasizes incidence, high-risk populations, prevention, and intervention.
SOC 4305 - Environment & Society: An Enduring Conflict (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GloS 4305/Soc 4305
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examines the interaction between human society and the natural environment, focusing on the contemporary and global situation. Takes the perspective of environmental sociology concerning the short-range profit-driven and ideological causes of ecological destruction. Investigates how society is reacting to that increasing destruction prereq: 1001 recommended or a course on the environment, soc majors/minors must register A-F
SUST 3017 - Environmental Justice (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
With a focus on understanding environmental justice, including interconnections between health, economic and environmental disparities, this course shows students how they can take action for sustainability. Students synthesize multiple disciplinary perspectives and participate in small group collaborative activities, service learning, and digital mapping, all related to contemporary challenges.
ESPM 3603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts/issues relating to inventory, subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "metabolic system."
ESPM 5603 - Environmental Life Cycle Analysis
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESPM 3603/ESPM 5603
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts, major issues relating to inventory and subsequent analysis of production systems. Production system from holistic point of view, using term commonly used in industrial ecology: "the metabolic system." prereq: [Math 1142 or [Math 1271, Math 1282]], [Econ 1101 or ApEc 1101]
GCC 3011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3011/GCC 5011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This interdisciplinary course will examine obstacles to energy transitions at different scales. It will explore the role of energy in society, the physics of energy, how energy systems were created and how they function, and how the markets, policies, and regulatory frameworks for energy systems in the US developed. The course will closely examine the Realpolitik of energy and the technical, legal, regulatory, and policy underpinnings of renewable energy in the US and Minnesota. Students will learn the drivers that can lead global systems to change despite powerful constraints and how local and institutional action enables broader reform. Students will put their learning into action by developing a proposal and then working on a project to accelerate the energy transition and to ensure that the energy transition benefits people in a just and equitable way. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: sophomore, junior, senior
GCC 5011 - Pathways to Renewable Energy (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3011/GCC 5011
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This interdisciplinary course will examine obstacles to energy transitions at different scales. It will explore the role of energy in society, the physics of energy, how energy systems were created and how they function, and how the markets, policies, and regulatory frameworks for energy systems in the US developed. The course will closely examine the Realpolitik of energy and the technical, legal, regulatory, and policy underpinnings of renewable energy in the US and Minnesota. Students will learn the drivers that can lead global systems to change despite powerful constraints and how local and institutional action enables broader reform. Students will put their learning into action by developing a proposal and then working on a project to accelerate the energy transition and to ensure that the energy transition benefits people in a just and equitable way. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3013/GCC 5013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester.
GCC 5013 - Making Sense of Climate Change - Science, Art, and Agency (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3013/GCC 5013
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The overarching theme of the course is the role of artistic/humanistic ways of knowing as tools for making sense and meaning in the face of "grand challenges." Our culture tends to privilege science, and to isolate it from the "purposive" disciplines--arts and humanities--that help humanity ask and answer difficult questions about what should be done about our grand challenges. In this course, we will examine climate change science, with a particular focus on how climate change is expected to affect key ecological systems such as forests and farms and resources for vital biodiversity such as pollinators. We will study the work of artists who have responded to climate change science through their artistic practice to make sense and meaning of climate change. Finally, students create collaborative public art projects that will become part of local community festivals/events late in the semester. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3031/GCC 5031
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. prereq: soph, jr, sr
GCC 5031 - The Global Climate Challenge: Creating an Empowered Movement for Change (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3031/GCC 5031
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Students will explore ecological and human health consequences of climate change, the psychology of climate inaction, and will be invited to join us in the radical work of discovering not only their own leadership potential but that of others. We will unpack the old story of domination and hierarchy and invite the class to become part of a vibrant new story of human partnership that will not only help humanity deal with the physical threat of climate change but will help us create a world where we have the necessary skills and attitudes to engage the many other grand challenges facing us. Using a strategy of grassroots empowerment, the course will be organized to help us connect to the heart of what we really value; to understand the threat of climate change; to examine how we feel in the light of that threat; and to take powerful action together. Students will work in groups throughout the course to assess the global ecological threat posed by climate change, and they will be part of designing and executing an activity where they empower a community to take action. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. For: so, jr, sr, grad
GCC 3032 - Ecosystem Health: Leadership at the Intersection of Humans, Animals, and the Environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3032/GCC 5032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
What are the effects of climate change, disease emergence, food and water security, gender, conflict and poverty, and sustainability of ecosystem services on health, and how do we lead across boundaries for positive change? Unfortunately, these large-scale problems often become overwhelming, making single solution-based progress seem daunting and difficult to implement in policy. Fortunately, the emerging discipline of ecosystem health provides an approach to these problems grounded in trans-disciplinary science. Ecosystem health recognizes the interdependence of human, animal and environmental health, and merges theories and methods of ecological, health and political sciences. It poses that health threats can be prevented, monitored and controlled via a variety of approaches and technologies that guide management action as well as policy. Thus, balancing human and animal health with the management of our ecosystems. In this class, we will focus on the emerging discipline of ecosystem health, and how these theories, methods, and shared leadership approaches set the stage for solutions to grand challenges of health at the interface of humans, animals, and the environment. We will focus not only on the creation and evaluation of solutions but on their feasibility and implementation in the real world through policy and real-time decision making. This will be taught in the active learning style classroom, requiring pre-class readings to support didactic theory and case-based learning in class. Participation and both individual and group projects (written and oral presentation) will comprise most of the student evaluation. These projects may reflect innovative solutions, discoveries about unknowns, or development of methods useful for ecosystem health challenges. We envision that some of them will lead to peer-review publications, technical reports, or other forms of publication. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5032 - Ecosystems Health: Leadership at the intersection of humans, animals and the environment (ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3032/GCC 5032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
What are the effects of climate change, disease emergence, food and water security, gender, conflict and poverty, and sustainability of ecosystem services on health? Unfortunately, these large-scale problems often become overwhelming, making single solution-based progress seem daunting and difficult to implement in policy. Fortunately, the emerging discipline of ecosystem health provides an approach to these problems grounded in trans-disciplinary science. Ecosystem health recognizes the interdependence of human, animal and environmental health, and merges theories and methods of ecological, health and political sciences. It poses that health threats can be prevented, monitored and controlled via a variety of approaches and technologies that guide management action as well as policy. Thus, balancing human and animal health with management of our ecosystems. In this class, we will focus on the emerging discipline of ecosystem health, and how these theories, methods and computational technologies set the stage for solutions to grand challenges of health at the interface of humans, animals and the environment. We will focus not only on the creation and evaluation of solutions, but on their feasibility and implementation in the real world through policy and real time decision making. This will be taught in the active learning style classroom, requiring pre class readings to support didactic theory and case-based learning in class. Participation and both individual and group projects (written and oral presentation) will comprise most of the student evaluation. These projects may reflect innovative solutions, discoveries about unknowns, or development of methods useful for ecosystem health challenges. We envision that some of them will lead to peer-review publications, technical reports or other forms of publication. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GEOG 3401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Every Spring
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns.
GEOG 5401W - Geography of Environmental Systems and Global Change (ENV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3401W/5401W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Geographic patterns, dynamics, and interactions of atmospheric, hydrospheric, geomorphic, pedologic, and biologic systems as context for human population, development, and resource use patterns. prereq: grad student or instr consent
HSCI 3244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 5244 - Nature's History: Science, Humans, and the Environment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3244/5244
Typically offered: Every Fall
We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change.
HSCI 3246 - History of (Un)Natural Disasters (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3246/HSci 5246
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis, wildfires, epidemic disease, and technological failures? This course will examine large scale natural events in American and world history, the social, technological, and environmental conditions that underlie them, and their historical consequences. Human societies have long been embedded in physical landscapes where they are subject to specific environmental conditions and physical risks: eight thousand-year-old wall paintings in Turkey depict the eruption of Hasan Dag volcano over the city of Catal Huyuk, for example. But then and now, it takes a certain combination of social conditions and environmental events to create a natural disaster. In this course, we will use historical natural disasters to explore the interconnections between the structures and ideas of human society and environmental forces. Humans have not been simply the random victims of natural disasters; where and how they chose to live influenced the impact of any disastrous event. Examining these events in a historical context will help us see the social, technological, scientific, and environmental systems that have been constantly interacting, but which are normally taken for granted until they break down.
HSCI 5246 - History of (Un)Natural Disasters
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: HSci 3246/HSci 5246
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis, wildfires, epidemic disease, and technological failures. This course will examine large scale natural events in American and world history, the social, technological, and environmental conditions that underlie them, and their historical consequences. Human societies have long been embedded in physical landscapes where they are subject to specific environmental conditions and physical risks: eight thousand-year-old wall paintings in Turkey depict the eruption of Hasan Dag volcano over the city of Catal Huyuk, for example. But then and now, it takes a certain combination of social conditions and environmental events to create a natural disaster. In this course, we will use historical natural disasters to explore the interconnections between the structures and ideas of human society and environmental forces. Humans have not been simply the random victims of natural disasters; where and how they chose to live influenced the impact of any disastrous event. Examining these events in a historical context will help us see the social, technological, scientific, and environmental systems that have been constantly interacting, but which are normally taken for granted until they break down.
AAS 3486 - Hmong Refugees from the Secret War: Becoming Americans
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3486/Hist 3486
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Socio-economic, political, gender, cultural/religious changes in Hmong American community during last three decades. How Hmong are racialized in American society. Impact to first/second generations.
AAS 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
AMST 3113W - Global Minnesota: Diversity in the 21st Century (DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Diverse cultural (racial, ethnic, class) groups in America. Institutions/processes that shape their relations and create domination, resistance, hybridity, nationalism, racism, alliance. Specific content may vary.
CHIC 3352 - Transborder Theory: Global Views/Borderland Spaces
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Demographic realities, political/economic shifts, cultural exchanges that characterize U.S.-Mexico borderland spaces in global economy. Historically contextualized, transnational approach to cultures, politics, and economics of U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. Dynamics of borderland spaces.
CHIC 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin American, and Africa, from early 19th century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CSCL 3335 - Aliens: Science Fiction to Social Theory (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In English, the word ?alien? designates both immigrants from other countries and beings from other worlds. Aliens of all sorts are everywhere; they tend to provoke fascination, fantasy, and for many, fear and anxiety. But the deeper philosophical significance of aliens says as much about us as it does about them. In this course, we will explore these questions through a range of novels, films, and artworks from the 1890s to the present day, with an emphasis on science fiction and American popular culture.
ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Situated between three continents and at the intersection of numerous ethnic and national cultures, the Mediterranean is like no other place on earth. A place of diverse languages, religions, economies, governments, and ways of daily life, it serves as a microcosm for the world itself imagined as an integrated global system. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean with particular emphasis on the literatures it has produced over the last three millennia. As the protagonists of these epic poems, religious texts, and novels travel from one shore to another, they experience the Mediterranean as a place of violence, cultural accommodation, hope, ethnic and linguistic bewilderment, and endless moral challenge. This course will place as much emphasis on the region's history as its cultural productions. With that in mind, reading may include David Abulafia's The Great Sea in addition to The Odyssey, The Aeneid, the biblical books of Joshua and Acts, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata (an epic set during the first crusade), Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Antony and Cleopatra, Flaubert's Salammbo, Akli Tadjer's Les ANI du Tassali, A.b. Yehoshua's Mr. Mani, and Pamuk's The White Castle.
FSOS 4108 - Understanding and Working with Immigrants and Refugee Families (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course focuses on the impact of “immigration” (i.e., refugee vs. various types of immigration statuses) on family relationships, specifically how culture of origin and acculturation processes influence individuals and families over time; explores issues faced by various immigrant family systems, including a consideration of generational status, gender identities, social classes, and ethnic/racial group identities; develops intercultural interaction skills that prepare students to effectively engage with diverse immigrant families in multiple contexts; and builds practical skills that enhance students’ abilities to work in and collaborate with community-and faith-based organizations to strengthen cultural resources while overcoming barriers to increase service utilization.
GEOG 3381W - Population in an Interacting World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Geog 3381W/GLOS 3701W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Comparative analysis and explanation of trends in fertility, mortality, internal and international migration in different parts of the world; world population problems; population policies; theories of population growth; impact of population growth on food supply and the environment.
HIST 3483 - Hmong History Across the Globe
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3483//ALL 3776/Hist 3483
Typically offered: Fall Odd, Spring Even Year
Hmong interaction with lowland Southeast Asian states (Laos, Vietnam) and Western colonial powers (French, American) since 19th century. Changes to religious, social, political, and gender institutions. Aspirations for political autonomy.
HIST 3862 - American Immigration History (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AAS 3862/Chic 3862/Hist 3862
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Global migrations to U.S. from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, from early 19nth century to present. Causes/cultures of migration. Migrant communities, work, and families. Xenophobia, assimilation/integration, citizenship, ethnicity, race relations. Debates over immigration. Place of immigration in America's national identity.
PA 3481 - Cedar Riverside: Where The World Meets MN
Credits: 2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The Cedar Riverside Neighborhood; Where the World Meets Minnesota is an immersion course in our Cedar Riverside neighborhood that parallels the immersion experience of study abroad. The course encourages civic engagement and will provide opportunity to learn and work in the Cedar Riverside community while examining questions of leadership, power, cultural diversity and social change. Students will participate in class-based discussion seminars, neighborhood excursions and community work. Throughout the immersion experience, students are challenged to question, think, and respond thoughtfully to current issues facing the Cedar-Riverside community and cultivate leadership skills. Students can expect to gain new frameworks for understanding leadership and civic engagement in a domestic cultural context, deepened skill in identifying complex problems, strategic questioning, reflection and meaning making, as well as consciousness of relationship between self, world and text/theory.
CHIC 3374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
CHIC 5374 - Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chic 3374/Chic 5374
Typically offered: Every Spring
Socioeconomic/political forces that impact migrant farmworkers. Effects of the laws and policies on everyday life. Theoretical assumptions/strategies of unions and advocacy groups. Role/power of consumer. How consuming cheap food occurs at expense of farmworkers.
ANTH 3306W - Medical Anthropology (GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Relations among human affliction, health, healing, social institutions, and cultural representations cross-culturally. Human health/affliction. Medical knowledge/power. Healing. Body, international health, colonialism, and emerging diseases. Reproduction. Aging in a range of geographical settings. prereq: 1003 or 1005 or entry level soc sci course recommended
ANTH 4075 - Cultural Histories of Healing (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Introduction to historically informed anthropology of healing practice. Shift to biologically based medicine in Europe, colonialist dissemination of biomedicine, political/cultural collisions between biomedicine and "ethnomedicines," traffic of healing practices in a transnationalist world.
GEOG 3411W - Geography of Health and Health Care (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Application of human ecology, spatial analysis, political economy, and other geographical approaches to analyze problems of health and health care. Topics include distribution and diffusion of disease; impact of environmental, demographic, and social change on health; distribution, accessibility, and utilization of health practitioners and facilities.
GWSS 3203W - Blood, Bodies and Science (TS, SOCS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course examines the contemporary politics of health and medicine from a critical race theory, disability-oriented, and feminist/queer/trans perspective. Who is understood to be deserving of health and medical care? Who should decide how to govern the provision of care? Who, if anyone should profit from life-saving medical treatment or medicines? How did we come to have the health system we have now? How have Black, Indigenous, immigrant, and people of color communities fought for access to equitable health care in the context of the racial history of medicine and health? Struggles for justice and equity in health and medicine are integrally related to the question of how society treats people who are in need of care. Topics include the history of DIY health movements; trans health care bans; the science and history of pandemics, including Covid and HIV; the history of health insurance; struggles for global equity in vaccines and pharmaceuticals; disability; reproductive justice movements; and the history of eugenics.
HMED 3001W - Health, Disease, and Healing I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: HMED 3001W/HMED 3001V
Typically offered: Every Fall
Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century.
HMED 3040 - Human Health, Disease, and the Environment in History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health.
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
SOC 3241 - Sociology of Women's Health: Experiences from Around the World
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Health care is a fundamental right, but access to it is not shared evenly by all. This course considers women's and men's health needs, and how health systems assign priority to those needs. The course also covers how differences in health policy, national medical systems, levels of wealth, and cultural contexts around the world affect women's health and treatment and their experiences of wellness and illness. Women are taking an active role in shaping healthy societies. The final portion of this course looks at the goals and successes of women's movements in the health sphere. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on how sociological approaches to health differ from medical or epidemiological approaches, the advantages of the sociological approaches, and the respective advantages and disadvantages of qualitative versus quantitative approaches to studying women's health. Pre-req: Soc majors and minors must register A-F; Soc 1001 recommended.
SOC 3246 - Diseases, Disasters & Other Killers (HIS, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Soc 3246/Soc 5246
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course studies the social pattern of mortality, beginning with demographic transition theory. Students will study specific causes of death or theories of etiology, including theories about suicide, fundamental cause theory, and the role of early life conditions in mortality. Students learn tools for studying mortality, including cause of death classifications and life tables. Soc majors/minors must register A-F.
SOC 4246 - Sociology of Health and Illness
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course is an introduction to the importance of health and illness in people’s lives, how social structures impact who gets sick, how they are treated, and how the delivery of health care is organized. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the sociology of health and illness, and understand that health and illness are not just biological processes, but profoundly shaped by the organization of society. prereq: One sociology course recommended; soph or above; soc majors/minors must register A-F
GCC 3003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3003/GCC 5003/NURS 5040H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Often, the most progress on challenging issues such as health and equity is made when you apply an interdisciplinary perspective. The same is true for global health issues. Whether responding to emerging pandemics, food insecurity, maternal mortality, or civil society collapse during conflict, solutions often lie at the intersection of animal, environmental, and human health. In this course, students will work in teams to examine the fundamental challenges to addressing complex global health problems in East Africa and East African refugee communities here in the Twin Cities. Together we will seek practical solutions that take culture, equity, and sustainability into account. In-field professionals and experts will be available to mentor each team, including professionals based in Uganda and Somalia. This exploration will help students propose realistic actions that could be taken to resolve these issues. This course will help students gain the understanding and skills necessary for beginning to develop solutions to global health issues. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
GCC 5003 - Seeking Solutions to Global Health Issues (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Often, the most progress on challenging issues such as health and equity is made when you apply an interdisciplinary perspective. The same is true for global health issues. Whether responding to emerging pandemics, food insecurity, maternal mortality, or civil society collapse during conflict, solutions often lie at the intersection of animal, environmental, and human health. In this course, students will work in teams to examine the fundamental challenges to addressing complex global health problems in East Africa and East African refugee communities here in the Twin Cities. Together we will seek practical solutions that take culture, equity, and sustainability into account. In-field professionals and experts will be available to mentor each team, including professionals based in Uganda and Somalia. This exploration will help students propose realistic actions that could be taken to resolve these issues. This course will help students gain the understanding and skills necessary for beginning to develop solutions to global health issues. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course. GCC courses are open to all students and fulfill an honors experience for University Honors Program students.
GCC 3016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3016/GCC 5016
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid "antibiotic apocalypse." The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 5016 - Science and Society: Working Together to Avoid the Antibiotic Resistance Apocalypse (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3016/GCC 5016
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Before the discovery of antibiotics, even a simple thorn prick could lead to life threatening infection. Antibiotics are truly miracle drugs, making most bacterial infections relatively easy to cure. However, this landscape is rapidly changing with the advent of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics. This course will provide an overview of how antibiotic use invoked antibiotic resistance, including in depth discussions of antibiotic resistant microorganisms and the impact of globalization on this exploding problem. Societal and ethical implications associated with antibiotic use and restriction in humans and animals will be discussed, along with global issues of antibiotic regulation and population surveillance. The class will conclude with discussions of alternative therapeutic approaches that are essential to avoid "antibiotic apocalypse." The course will include lectures by world-renowned experts in various topics, and students will leverage this knowledge with their own presentations on important topics related to issues of personal freedom versus societal needs. This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.
GCC 3028 - Harnessing the power of research, community, clinic and policy to build a culture of health (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3028/GCC 5028
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Imagine a world where factors such as race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status had no bearing on a person's health status, quality of life, or longevity--a world where everyone had an equal opportunity to live a long and healthy life. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Despite decades of focused public health efforts, health inequities remain; individuals from low income and diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds are far more likely to, (1) struggle with chronic health conditions, (2) report lower quality of life, and (3) have a lower life expectancy, than others. Bold and innovative solutions are needed to address this grand challenge. Integration is one such method that can potentially increase the success and sustainability of approaches to reduce health disparities and create a culture of health for all. Integration is an approach to solving complex public health problems that merges academic research, clinical practice, policy and community resources in new ways. This interactive course will challenge students to identify root causes of health, including access to food, housing, transportation and education. Students will also focus on health disparities and barriers to eliminating these existing, disparate, negative outcomes. Students will be introduced to the concept of integration science and practice; will learn about the importance of integration across research, practice, community, and policy domains to address health disparities; and will cultivate the communication skills needed to intentionally and successfully facilitate integration practice. Course instructors with unique vantage points as concerned scientists, health practitioners, and policy wonks will engage students in class discussions and activities, individual writing assignments and small-group work aimed at unveiling the reasons health disparities persist globally--challenging them to consider opportunities for integration to alleviate existing disparities. The semester will culminate in students working in groups to create their own integrated projects aimed at addressing a health disparity.
GCC 5028 - Harnessing the Power of Research, Community, Clinic and Policy to Build a Culture of Health (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCC 3028/GCC 5028
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Imagine a world where factors such as race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status had no bearing on a person's health status, quality of life, or longevity--a world where everyone had an equal opportunity to live a long and healthy life. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Despite decades of focused public health efforts, health inequities remain; individuals from low income and diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds are far more likely to, (1) struggle with chronic health conditions, (2) report lower quality of life, and (3) have a lower life expectancy, than others. Bold and innovative solutions are needed to address this grand challenge. Integration is one such method that can potentially increase the success and sustainability of approaches to reduce health disparities and create a culture of health for all. Integration is an approach to solving complex public health problems that merges academic research, clinical practice, policy and community resources in new ways. This interactive course will challenge students to identify root causes of health, including access to food, housing, transportation and education. Students will also focus on health disparities and barriers to eliminating these existing, disparate, negative outcomes. Students will be introduced to the concept of integration science and practice; will learn about the importance of integration across research, practice, community, and policy domains to address health disparities; and will cultivate the communication skills needed to intentionally and successfully facilitate integration practice. Course instructors with unique vantage points as concerned scientists, health practitioners, and policy wonks will engage students in class discussions and activities, individual writing assignments and small-group work aimed at unveiling the reasons health disparities persist globally--challenging them to consider opportunities for integration to alleviate existing disparities. The semester will culminate in students working in groups to create their own integrated projects aimed at addressing a health disparity.
ANTH 3005W - Language, Culture, and Power (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Studying language as a social practice, students transcribe and analyze conversation they record themselves, and consider issues of identity and social power in daily talk.
ANTH 3036 - The Body in Society
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Body-related practices throughout the world. Readings, documentaries, mass media.
ANTH 3242W - Hero, Savage, or Equal? Representations of NonWestern Peoples in the Movies (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course will explore images of nonWestern peoples and cultures as they have appeared in the movies and in other popular media. It has four aims: l) to introduce the problem of nonWestern peoples in the West from historical points of view, 2) to discuss the relationship between mass media and issue of representation to the marketplace, 3) to introduce the concept of morality in and through collective representations as developed by Durkheim, and 4) to analyze the problem of moral agency in a series of Hollywood and Independent movies which portray nonwestern peoples and cultures. We will watch movies portraying three different groups of cultures, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and the Japanese. In each unit, we will first read important commentary on Western representations of each of these peoples, such as Bernard Smith on Pacific Islanders and Vine Deloria on images of Native Americans and Gina Marchetti on Hollywood?s Japanese.