Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

English B.A.

English Language & Literature
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 34 to 35
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
Students who major in English study literature and other forms of verbal expression, literary history and criticism, critical theory, linguistics, and creative writing. Courses offered by the department explore a wide range of discourses written in English, including poetry, drama, fiction, film, popular culture, and electronic media. Students examine the cultural, social, political, and economic contexts that condition a variety of texts. Majors write extensively and learn to express themselves effectively, both orally and in writing. They gain practical insight into the words that they speak, read, and write. The English department supports an engaged, civic-oriented curriculum and teaches the critical skills of reading and writing in the context of community involvement and real public spheres by incorporating community and service-learning components into literature classes. Students transferring courses from other colleges and universities must complete five University of Minnesota three- or four-credit English courses in residence. These courses must include ENGL 3960W, ENGW 3960W, or ENGL 3883V (the senior project course), and at least four other upper division courses (3xxx or higher). Students wishing to transfer English courses from outside the University of Minnesota and apply them to the English major requirements should discuss this with the undergraduate advisor. Note: All English courses completed at two-year community colleges are accepted as equivalent to University lower division (1xxx) courses, regardless of content. Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits are not included in the major.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Prospective majors are encouraged to complete an introductory course in literature, creative writing, and/or English language, chosen from ENGL 1001-1701 and ENGW 1101-1104, before officially declaring the major. To declare a major, a student schedules an appointment with the Undergraduate Studies Office (227 Lind Hall; 612-625-4592; englmaj@umn.edu), and completes a Major Program form which is filed in CLA, the department, and with the student. Advisors recommend that students declare the major during the second semester of the freshman year.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
Students are required to complete 4 semester(s) of any second language. with a grade of C-, or better, or S, or demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) as defined by the department or college.
The major is fulfilled by a minimum of 34 credits and 10 courses. At least 31 of these 34 credits must be upper division (3xxx or higher). Students may count one ENGL/W 1xxx course toward the electives sub-requirement. Independent study is limited to 12 credits of directed study, directed instruction, or independent and distance learning (IDL) courses. Students may earn a BA or a minor in English, but not both.English majors are encouraged to study in other countries before their senior year, to increase understanding of English language and literatures from diverse cultural perspectives. Advanced planning facilitates academic success and progress. See the Learning Abroad Center Web site at www.UMabroad.umn.edu for more information. English majors are also encouraged to incorporate courses that address racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, religious, economic, and ideological diversity. The Undergraduate Studies Office maintains a list of such courses. All incoming CLA freshmen must complete the First Year Experience course sequence. CLA BA degrees require 4 semesters or the equivalent of a second language. CLA degrees require students to complete 48 credits of upper division coursework taken at the 3xxx, 4xxx, or 5xxx level. For a BA at least 18 of the 48 upper division credits must be outside of the major. For some specific majors, there are exceptions to this requirement. This program requires 18 upper-division credits outside the major. See your adviser for a list of courses that can or cannot be used to meet this requirement.
Textual Analysis
The methods course provides skills in close and critical reading, background in history and culture, and multiple approaches to literary works.
ENGL 3001W - Textual Analysis: Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3001V - Honors: Textual Analysis: Methods [WI] (4.0 cr)
Shakespeare
A 3xxx Shakespeare course, together with the required historical literature courses, situates literary works in historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives.
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or Department-approved Shakespeare course at the 3xxx-level.
American/British Surveys and Historically-oriented Literature
The surveys and historically-oriented literature courses, together with a 3xxx Shakespeare course, situate literary works in historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. A third survey may be used to satisfy the historically-oriented literature requirement. A course used to satisfy the historically-oriented literature requirement may not also satisfy an elective requirement.
Take 3 or more course(s) from the following:
American/British Surveys
Take both courses in Option I or Option II for a total of 2 courses and 8 credits.
Option I
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or Option II
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· Historically-oriented Literature
Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3116 - Early Modern Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3133 - Stuart England: 17th-Century Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3134 - Milton and Rebellion (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3175 - 20th-Century British Literatures and Cultures I (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3212 - American Poetry from 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3222 - American Novel from 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3231 - American Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
Language, Theory, and Criticism
Take one course for a minimum of 3 credits. This requirement allows students to deepen their understanding of the English language or to concentrate on theoretical questions that shape readers' understanding of texts.
ENGL 3002 - Modern Literary Criticism and Theory (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3741 - Literacy and American Cultural Diversity [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 4003 - History of Literary Theory (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies (3.0 cr)
or Take both of the following internship courses.
ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
Electives
Electives are devoted to in-depth study of particular authors, topics, periods, or genres. Any ENGL/W 3xxx-5xxx not used to fulfill other major requirements may be used as an elective. A course used as an elective may not be used to satisfy the historically-oriented literature requirement.
Take 3 or more course(s) totaling 9 or more credit(s) from the following:
Lower-division Elective
Students may, but are not required to, count one ENGL/W 1xxx toward the major.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ENGL 1xxx
· ENGL 1003W - Women Write the World [LITR, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1172 - The Story of King Arthur [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1181W - Introduction to Shakespeare [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 1201W - Contemporary American Literature [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 1301W - Introduction to Multicultural Literatures of the United States [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 1501W - Literature and Public Life [LITR, CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 1xxx
· ENGW 1101W - Introduction to Creative Writing [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 1102 - Introduction to Fiction Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 1103 - Introduction to Poetry Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 1104 - Introduction to Literary Nonfiction Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1001W - Introduction to Literature: Poetry, Drama, Narrative [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 1001V {Inactive} [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 1401W - Introduction to World Literatures in English [LITR, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 1401V {Inactive} [LITR, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 1701 - Modern Fiction [LITR] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1701H - Honors: Modern Fiction [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 1902 {Inactive} [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1904 {Inactive} [GP] (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1905 {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 1910W {Inactive} [WI] (3.0 cr)
· Upper-division Electives
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3xxx
· ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Toward a Poetics of Diasporic Identity [HIS, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3013 - Poems about Cities (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3021 - Captivity in Literature and Film: From the Barbary Coast to Guantanamo Bay (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3022 - Science Fiction and Fantasy (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3024 - The Graphic Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History [HIS] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents [GP] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3027W - The Essay [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3030 - Studies in Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3032 - Shakespeare in London (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3061 - Literature and Music [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3070 - Studies in Literary and Cultural Modes (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3071 - The American Food Revolution in Literature and Television [CIV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3090 - General Topics (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3091 - The Literature and Film of Baseball [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3116 - Early Modern Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3122 - Shakespeare II: The Major Themes (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3133 - Stuart England: 17th-Century Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3134 - Milton and Rebellion (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3175 - 20th-Century British Literatures and Cultures I (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3180 - Contemporary Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3181 - Contemporary Literary Nonfiction [LITR] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3212 - American Poetry from 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3222 - American Novel from 1900 (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3231 - American Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3330 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Literature (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment [LITR, ENV] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action [LITR, CIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education [CIV] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3711 - Literary Magazine Production Lab I (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3712 - Literary Magazine Production Lab II (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3741 - Literacy and American Cultural Diversity [DSJ] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3993 - Directed Study (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4xxx
· ENGL 4003 - History of Literary Theory (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4090 - General Topics (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4603W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4711 - Introduction to Editing and Publishing (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4721 - Electronic Text (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5xxx
· ENGL 5040 - Theories of Film (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5090 - Readings in Special Subjects (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ENGL 5121 - Readings in Early Modern Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5140 - Readings in 18th Century Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5150 - Readings in 19th-Century Literature and Culture (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5510 - Readings in Criticism and Theory (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5743 - History of Rhetoric and Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5790 - Topics in Rhetoric, Composition, and Language (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5805 - Writing for Publication (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5992 - Directed Readings, Study, or Research (1.0-3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3xxx
· ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 3110 - Topics in Creative Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 4xxx
· ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 5xxx
· ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5104 - Graduate Poetry Writing (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5130 - Topics in Advanced Creative Writing (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5202 - Journal and Memoir Writing (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 5310 - Reading as Writers (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5993 - Directed Study in Writing (1.0-4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3060 - Studies in Literature and the Other Arts (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3002 - Modern Literary Criticism and Theory (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3002H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3010 - Studies In Poetry (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3010H - Honors: Studies in Poetry (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3020 - Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3020H - Honors: Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5020 - Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3023 - Children's Literature (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3023H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3040 - Studies in Film (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3040H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3350 - Women Writers (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3350H {Inactive} (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3020 - Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 3020H - Honors: Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5020 - Studies in Narrative (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture [AH, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color [DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
or CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 5597 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 5627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
or ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance (3.0 cr)
· ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama [LITR, DSJ] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
or MEST 3102 - Chaucer (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4612 - Old English I (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
or MEST 4613 - Old English II (3.0 cr)
Senior Project
The program of study culminates in a writing project (4 credits), completed either in a rigorous and intensive seminar in which students produce an extended, scholarly essay (ENGL 3960W), or in an advanced creative writing workshop (ENGW 3960W) in which students produce a substantial manuscript of poetry, literary fiction, or literary nonfiction, or in a 2-semester, 4-credit honors thesis (ENGL 3883V). ENGL 3883V is usually taken in 2 semesters of 2 credits each.
ENGL 3883V - Honors Thesis [WI] (1.0-4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3960W - Capstone Seminar in English [WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGW 3960W - Capstone Seminar in Creative Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied within the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements. Honors courses ending with V will also count.
Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:
· ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II [HIS, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3027W - The Essay [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 4603W {Inactive} [WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
or ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II [LITR, DSJ, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or GWSS 4303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing [LITR, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
· ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
or AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II [LITR, WI] (4.0 cr)
· ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
or JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism [WI] (3.0 cr)
 
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· College of Liberal Arts

View future requirement(s):
· Fall 2017

View sample plan(s):
· Creative Writing
· English (general)
· MEd Initial Licensure (Pre-teaching English)

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· English B.A.
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ENGL 3001W - Textual Analysis: Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00153 - EngL 3001W/3001V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed for English majors and minors, as well any students interested in and attracted to literature and reading. Our concern will be to develop the intellectual foundations to move past our base, instinctive reactions to literature to deeper modes of reading, interpretation, and written analysis/argument. Our goal will be to develop the skills of slow-motion, skeptical reading: to savor the crafting of literary form and to explore how literary rhetoric engages our intellect and emotions; to read not simply for superficial content, but to engage and question the multi-faceted operation of literary texts. In terms of foundational writing skills for the English major, we will work on the development of compelling written literary arguments by breaking the writing process down into various phases. We will work with the basics of argumentation: developing a strong, coherent thesis, drafting, the logic of argument, revision, proper citation and effective use of primary and secondary sources, and more. prereq: [English major or minor or approved BIS or IDIM program with English area]
ENGL 3001V - Honors: Textual Analysis: Methods (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00153 - EngL 3001W/3001V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed for English majors and minors, as well any students interested in and attracted to literature and reading. Our concern will be to develop the intellectual foundations to move past our base, instinctive reactions to literature to deeper modes of reading, interpretation, and written analysis/argument. Our goal will be to develop the skills of slow-motion, skeptical reading: to savor the crafting of literary form and to explore how literary rhetoric engages our intellect and emotions; to read not simply for superficial content, but to engage and question the multi-faceted operation of literary texts. In terms of foundational writing skills for the English major, we will work on the development of compelling written literary arguments by breaking the writing process down into various phases. We will work with the basics of argumentation: developing a strong, coherent thesis, drafting, the logic of argument, revision, proper citation and effective use of primary and secondary sources, and more. prereq: Honors, [English major or minor or approved BIS or IDIM program with English area]
ENGL 3007 - Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01603 - EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is a sampling of Shakespeare’s corpus designed for English majors and minors and for other students who wish to study his works in depth. Our goal will be to view these works simultaneously as cultural artifacts of sixteenth and seventeenth-century England and as enduring classics of world literature that seem to transcend their cultural moment. To this end, we will apply various biographical, social, linguistic, generic, theatrical, political, and intellectual contexts to the plays. We will attempt to understand how these documents from early modern England have spoken so profoundly about the enduring mysteries of human experience from the moment of their inceptive genesis to the present day. English majors/minors must take this course A-F only grading basis.
ENGL 3007H - Honors: Shakespeare (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01603 - EngL 3007/EngL 3007H
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Plays from all of Shakespeare's periods, including at least A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, the history plays, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello, and The Winter's Tale. prereq: Honors or instr consent
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will provide a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Our focus will be on tracing the interactions between literature and wider British culture as well as on tracing the development of literary form during this period. You should leave this course being able to identify major literary trends and authors and link them to corresponding formal techniques and innovations. You should also have a sense of the major historical and political events, rulers, and social conditions in Britain at this time. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will leave this class familiar with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this wide-ranging survey of British and post-colonial literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, we will explore representative literary texts and genres from British Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and the postwar era. Besides analyzing the language, aesthetic features, and technical construction of these literary artifacts, we will examine our readings as reflections of and reactions to social upheavals like the Industrial Revolution, challenges to the traditional role of women, scientific discoveries that sparked religious doubt, and the First World War. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will familiarize yourself with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This writing-intensive course will survey the Anglophone literature of what would become the United States from the arrival of English settlers to the Civil War. We will define "literature" broadly to not only include fiction and poetry but also the sermon, the letter, the essay, the autobiography, and other non-fictional forms. Course topics will include the Puritan theology that cast such a long shadow over the American cultural imagination; the fraught literary construction in the Revolutionary era of a national identity under the influence of such Enlightenment ideals as reason, civility, cosmopolitanism, and sympathy; the Gothic doubts about democracy that attended the literature of the early republic; the rise in the mid-nineteenth century of a radical intellectual and social movement in Transcendentalism; the antebellum ideological struggles over such political issues as slavery, industrialism, women's rights, and Native American rights; and the self-conscious cultivation of a national literary aesthetic in the Romantic prose and poetry of the period later critics would come (controversially) to call "the American Renaissance."
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will provide a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Our focus will be on tracing the interactions between literature and wider British culture as well as on tracing the development of literary form during this period. You should leave this course being able to identify major literary trends and authors and link them to corresponding formal techniques and innovations. You should also have a sense of the major historical and political events, rulers, and social conditions in Britain at this time. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will leave this class familiar with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this wide-ranging survey of British and post-colonial literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, we will explore representative literary texts and genres from British Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and the postwar era. Besides analyzing the language, aesthetic features, and technical construction of these literary artifacts, we will examine our readings as reflections of and reactions to social upheavals like the Industrial Revolution, challenges to the traditional role of women, scientific discoveries that sparked religious doubt, and the First World War. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will familiarize yourself with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This writing-intensive course will survey the Anglophone literature of what would become the United States from the arrival of English settlers to the Civil War. We will define "literature" broadly to not only include fiction and poetry but also the sermon, the letter, the essay, the autobiography, and other non-fictional forms. Course topics will include the Puritan theology that cast such a long shadow over the American cultural imagination; the fraught literary construction in the Revolutionary era of a national identity under the influence of such Enlightenment ideals as reason, civility, cosmopolitanism, and sympathy; the Gothic doubts about democracy that attended the literature of the early republic; the rise in the mid-nineteenth century of a radical intellectual and social movement in Transcendentalism; the antebellum ideological struggles over such political issues as slavery, industrialism, women's rights, and Native American rights; and the self-conscious cultivation of a national literary aesthetic in the Romantic prose and poetry of the period later critics would come (controversially) to call "the American Renaissance."
ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02549 - EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Situated between three continents and at the intersection of numerous ethnic and national cultures, the Mediterranean is like no other place on earth. A place of diverse languages, religions, economies, governments, and ways of daily life, it serves as a microcosm for the world itself imagined as an integrated global system. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean with particular emphasis on the literatures it has produced over the last three millennia. As the protagonists of these epic poems, religious texts, and novels travel from one shore to another, they experience the Mediterranean as a place of violence, cultural accommodation, hope, ethnic and linguistic bewilderment, and endless moral challenge. This course will place as much emphasis on the region's history as its cultural productions. With that in mind, reading may include David Abulafia's The Great Sea in addition to The Odyssey, The Aeneid, the biblical books of Joshua and Acts, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata (an epic set during the first crusade), Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Antony and Cleopatra, Flaubert's Salammbo, Akli Tadjer's Les ANI du Tassali, A.b. Yehoshua's Mr. Mani, and Pamuk's The White Castle.
ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02494
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
ENGL 3116 - Early Modern Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reading of selected British plays ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution. Plays show the evolution of English society and reflect changing social mores from the era of Shakespeare and Jonson to the rise of the bourgeoisie.
ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literature of Jewish Bible ("Old Testament"). Narratives (Torah through Kings), prophets (including Isaiah), writings (including Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes). God's words/deeds as reported by editors/translators.
ENGL 3133 - Stuart England: 17th-Century Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01475 - EngL 3133/EngL 3133H
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major/representative works of the Restoration and 18th century (1660-1798). Typical authors: Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, Fielding.
ENGL 3134 - Milton and Rebellion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01612
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Milton's prose/minor poems from the Revolution (1641-1660). Post-revolutionary works (Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes). Emphasizes Milton's lifelong effort to bring about reform ("change").
ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will introduce you to some of the best literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century in England. Think of this course as a challenge: how can you, as someone who will spend most of your life in the 21st century, learn to appreciate and learn from literature written in far different times and places? A lot depends on your willingness to empathize with ways of thinking and being that are quite different from your own and your comfort with believing that other ages were just as complicated and as interesting as the one you live in. Typical authors include Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Fielding, and Burney.
ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British literature written between 1780 and 1830. Concept of Romanticism. Effects of French Revolution on literary production. Role of romantic artist.
ENGL 3175 - 20th-Century British Literatures and Cultures I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01618 - EngL 3175/EngL 5175
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey of principal writers, intellectual currents, conventions, and genres/themes in Britain/Ireland, from 1900 to 1945. Fiction/nonfiction by Conrad, Richardson, Forster, Joyce, Mansfield, Rhys, West, Woolf, Lawrence, and Huxley. Poetry by Hardy, Hopkins, Loy, H.D., Yeats, Pound and Eliot. Drama by Synge and Shaw.
ENGL 3212 - American Poetry from 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Famous and lesser-known poems from the Modernist era, the time of Frost, HD, Pound, Eliot and the Harlem Renaissance. The course attends to the intellectual and cultural background of the poets, poetic theory and form.
ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Novels, from early Republic, through Hawthorne, Melville, and Stowe, to writers at end of 19th century (e.g., Howells, Twain, James, Chopin, Crane). Development of a national literature. Tension between realism and romance. Changing role of women as writers and as fictional characters.
ENGL 3222 - American Novel from 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this course, we will read and study novels of twentieth and twenty-first century American writers, from early 1900's realism through Modernists (e.g., Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald) to more contemporary writers (e.g., Baldwin, Ellison, Erdrich, Roth, Pynchon). We will explore each text in relation to literary, cultural, and historical developments and question the narrative and stylistic strategies specific to each work.
ENGL 3231 - American Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3231/3231H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Representative dramas from 18th through 20th centuries. Topics include staging of national identities, aesthetics of modern/contemporary drama. Production concerns of mainstream, regional, community theaters.
ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British novel during the century in which it became widely recognized as a major vehicle for cultural expression. Possible topics include the relation of novel to contemporary historical concerns: rise of British empire, developments in science, and changing roles for women; formal challenges of the novel; definition of realism.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Works written for theater in 19th/20th century. Emphasizes how major aesthetic forms of modern drama (the well-made play, realism, expressionism, symbolism, epic theater, absurdism) presented not just distinctive theatrical styles, but also new ways of .seeing. for the theatrical spectator. How social differences, as informed by gender, class, and race, inform content/presentation.
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions and modern literature from various tribal cultures.
AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions, modern literature from various tribal cultures.
ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative nonfiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817 - Chic 3507W/EngL 3507W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative non-fiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 5593
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century black novelists, including Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Petry, Morrison, and Reed.
AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
MEST 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073 - EngL 3102/MeSt 3102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
ENGL 3002 - Modern Literary Criticism and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00523 - EngL 3002/3002H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to contemporary literary criticism and theory. The goal is to provide you with a foundation in theory's terminologies, the different methodologies used in literary and cultural analysis, and a sense of the various schools of criticism that have developed in the postwar period. We will look at the ways that various texts perform as texts; they are not transparent or one dimensional, but rather open themselves to many different readings and styles of engagement.
ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to structure of English. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. pragmatics. Language variation/usage.
ENGL 3741 - Literacy and American Cultural Diversity (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nature, acquisition, institutionalization, state of literacy in United States. Focuses on issues of culturally diverse, disadvantaged members of society. Service-learning component requires tutoring of children/adults in community service agencies.
ENGL 4003 - History of Literary Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
How thinkers from classical to modern times posed/answered questions about language (how words mean), audience (to whom they mean), and the literary (how literary writing differs from other forms of writing). Works by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Christine de Pizan, Dante, Sidney, Behn, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Woolf.
ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Equivocal relation of memory and writing. Literacy, power, control. Secrecy and publicity. Alphabetization and other ways of ordering world. Material bases of writing. Typographical design/expression. Theories of technological determinism.
ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course combines academic analysis and experiential learning to understand, in both theory and practice, different perspectives on the power of ?protest? in civic life. We will read a selection from the vast genre of progressive protest literature (pamphlets, poems, polemics, lists of demands, teaching philosophies, organizing principles, cultural histories, newsletter articles, movement chronicles, and excerpts from novels and biographies) from four key social-justice movements: the American Indian Movement, the Black Power movement, the post-Great Recession struggle for economic power, and the battle for immigrant rights. We?ll also learn about this experientially as we roll up our sleeves and get involved in local community-based education initiatives and local social-justice organizations through our service-learning. Students receive initial training from CLA Career Services, The Center for Community-Engaged Learning, the Minnesota Literacy Council, as well as orientations at community sites.
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we’ll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the antiracist feminism branch of the women’s movement, often referred to as “third-wave feminism.” We’ll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we’ll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, “the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another.” As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with – and confront – the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they’re doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they’d like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We’ll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, “political education,” reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we’ll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we’ll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we’ll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we’ll get a feel for what it’s like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we’ll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning – details will be provided in class.
ENGL 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the language through 1150 A.D. Culture of Anglo-Saxons. Selected readings in prose/poetry.
MEST 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00401 - EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the language through 1150 A.D. Culture of Anglo-Saxons. Selected readings in prose/poetry.
MEST 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02362 - EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
ENGL 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02362 - EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
ENGL 1003W - Women Write the World (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02326 - EngL 1003W/GWSS 1003W
Typically offered: Every Fall
Concepts in literary studies. Poems, plays, short stories, novels, essays, letters by women from different parts of world. Focuses on lives, experiences, and literary expression of women, including basic concepts of women's studies.
ENGL 1172 - The Story of King Arthur (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Of all the stories familiar to the western world, few have exerted a greater influence on literary, pictorial, and musical productions than the legend of King Arthur and his Round Table. Although thousands of years have passed since the earliest versions of the story appeared, creative artists and their audiences continue to be fascinated by stories about Arthur, Merlin, Lancelot, Guinevere, Gawain, and Tristan. In this course, we will study adaptations of the legend in order to understand how literary writers and their readers remade the story to fit specific, historical circumstances. The course will pay particular attention to two related aspects of the legend. The first is the way that stories about Arthur emphasize the importance of personal integrity as a shaping force of history. The second is the relationship between personal responsibility and communal or civic order. We will see how these ideas are reshaped by writers in various times and places (ranging from early medieval Wales and England to twenty-first-century America). We will think comparatively about these times and places by paying close attention to the literary traditions and forms that are employed by writers who remake the story of Arthur.
ENGL 1181W - Introduction to Shakespeare (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
William Shakespeare is still one of the most widely read authors in the English language, and one of the most frequently performed playwrights; additionally, his works have been translated into nearly every language around the globe. Whether or not we are comfortable with his place atop the canon of English literature, we cannot ignore the scope and depth of his influence on Western art and culture. At a time when Europe was undergoing massive, fundamental changes, from the level of the nation down to the level of individual experience, Shakespeare wrote more prolifically and more widely than almost any of his peers. Simply put, no other single author can tell us so much about life in Early Modern England. Nor is his vision limited to that time and place; if his worldwide appeal is in part owing to England's imperial dominance of the last few centuries, it is also (it has been argued) because his plays and poems 'seem' to express 'truths' about the human condition that rise above nation and period.
ENGL 1201W - Contemporary American Literature (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
In this course, we will focus on the analysis of literature, specifically novels and short stories published since 1960 by American authors. We will emphasize close reading, consistently and specifically addressing issues of language and meaning. Our books will also fuel an ongoing discussion of the formal aspects of literature, including style, characterization, plot, theme, tone, and symbolism, and their capacity to evoke a powerful response from readers. This four-credit writing intensive class requires attendance at a twice-weekly lecture and once-weekly discussion section.
ENGL 1301W - Introduction to Multicultural Literatures of the United States (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will include representative works by American Indian, African American, Asian American, Chicano/Chicana writers, and/or Jewish American writers, ranging from Nobel and Pulitzer prize-winning masters to upcoming genre authors and debut authors. In reading these works, we will discuss social and cultural factors informing America's literary past and present. As these authors honor identity, celebrate community, and deal with the complexities of the modern age, they also explore America's shared and problematic past. Because this course is Writing Intensive, we will spend considerable time drafting, discussing, and revising papers. Techniques for writing a paper, close reading strategies, and relevant critical approaches will be discussed. As we tease out the meanings and methods of our texts, we'll also identify and analyze key literary devices.
ENGL 1501W - Literature and Public Life (LITR, CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores how literary language builds the collective knowledge, shared reality, and civic relationships that make up public life. Literature's power in the public sphere goes far beyond the quiet, solitary experience of reading. We will investigate how telling stories, documenting events, imagining possibilities, communicating ideals, representing conflict, and even creating fictional characters contribute to public life. Through a wide variety of texts, we will reflect on the nature of public life and on how reading and writing build civic relationships and democratic potential. This course will also offer you two tracks for actively engaging in public life. A service-­learning option will give you the experience of building literacy, developing skills in communication and public media, and strengthening roles in work and family. This recommended learning framework can engage your role as a citizen, broaden the impact of your education, and help you explore potential professional interests. Alternatively, an individually designed public project will prompt you to consider the links between literary/media culture, personal action, and public life, and to make your own intervention in these fields. To succeed in all areas of this class you must display active engagement, independent thinking and motivation, and organization.
ENGW 1101W - Introduction to Creative Writing (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Writing poetry/prose. Small group workshops, lectures by visiting writers. prereq: Students may not audit this course
ENGW 1102 - Introduction to Fiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Beginning instruction in art of fiction: characterization, plot, dialogue, and style. Writing exercises to generate ideas. Students read/discuss published fiction and their own writing.
ENGW 1103 - Introduction to Poetry Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Beginning instruction in art of poetry. Discussion of student poems and contemporary poetry. Ideas for generating material. Writing exercises in/out of class.
ENGW 1104 - Introduction to Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Art of literary nonfiction. Discussion of student work and contemporary creative nonfiction. Ideas for generating material. Writing exercises. prereq: Students not allowed to audit this course
ENGL 1001W - Introduction to Literature: Poetry, Drama, Narrative (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00148 - EngL 1001W/1001V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course is designed for students who wish to develop a foundational understanding of literary study, inquiry, and analysis. This course is organized around literary genres, and thus will introduce students to the fundamentals of fiction, poetry, and drama. This course will also question the boundaries of genre and of the category "literature" itself. Throughout the semester, we will reflect on the central questions: "What is Literature" and "Why do we study it"? After successfully completing this class, students will be equipped with the basic critical vocabulary and toolset for engaging in literary study. They will be prepared to analyze literary voice, tone, symbol, motif, theme, imagery, narrative, and form, among other literary aspects. They will also be equipped with several critical cultural lenses, among them gender, race, ethnicity, class, language, and national identity.
ENGL 1401W - Introduction to World Literatures in English (LITR, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00152 - EngL 1401W/1401V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This writing-intensive course will introduce you to texts from geographical locations such as Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean with the aim of examining the impact that colonialism has had on previously colonized nations, as well as the world as a whole. Through close readings of these texts, we will examine questions related to concepts such as "third world," nationalism, difference, representation, and displacement.
ENGL 1701 - Modern Fiction (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01602 - EngL 1701/EngL 1701H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In Modern Fiction, we will study a selection of novels and short stories by some of the most compelling and original writers of our time. We will read work by contemporary authors and classic modernists whose stylistic innovations influenced a generation. Because literature is a continuum in which the present responds to the past, we'll note evolutions and developments in the genre over time. We will identify and analyze such elements of fiction as theme, genre, structure, form, language, and context.
ENGL 1701H - Honors: Modern Fiction (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01602 - EngL 1701/EngL 1701H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In Modern Fiction, we will study a selection of novels and short stories by some of the most compelling and original writers of our time. We will read work by contemporary authors and classic modernists whose stylistic innovations influenced a generation. Because literature is a continuum in which the present responds to the past, we'll note evolutions and developments in the genre over time. We will identify and analyze such elements of fiction as theme, genre, structure, form, language, and context. prereq: Honors or instr consent
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will provide a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Our focus will be on tracing the interactions between literature and wider British culture as well as on tracing the development of literary form during this period. You should leave this course being able to identify major literary trends and authors and link them to corresponding formal techniques and innovations. You should also have a sense of the major historical and political events, rulers, and social conditions in Britain at this time. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will leave this class familiar with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this wide-ranging survey of British and post-colonial literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, we will explore representative literary texts and genres from British Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and the postwar era. Besides analyzing the language, aesthetic features, and technical construction of these literary artifacts, we will examine our readings as reflections of and reactions to social upheavals like the Industrial Revolution, challenges to the traditional role of women, scientific discoveries that sparked religious doubt, and the First World War. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will familiarize yourself with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This writing-intensive course will survey the Anglophone literature of what would become the United States from the arrival of English settlers to the Civil War. We will define "literature" broadly to not only include fiction and poetry but also the sermon, the letter, the essay, the autobiography, and other non-fictional forms. Course topics will include the Puritan theology that cast such a long shadow over the American cultural imagination; the fraught literary construction in the Revolutionary era of a national identity under the influence of such Enlightenment ideals as reason, civility, cosmopolitanism, and sympathy; the Gothic doubts about democracy that attended the literature of the early republic; the rise in the mid-nineteenth century of a radical intellectual and social movement in Transcendentalism; the antebellum ideological struggles over such political issues as slavery, industrialism, women's rights, and Native American rights; and the self-conscious cultivation of a national literary aesthetic in the Romantic prose and poetry of the period later critics would come (controversially) to call "the American Renaissance."
ENGL 3011 - Jewish American Literature: Toward a Poetics of Diasporic Identity (HIS, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02594 - EngL 3011/JwSt 3011
Typically offered: Every Spring
Why is it frequently asked whether Saul Bellow was really a Jewish writer, but it is impossible to read Philip Roth as anything other than that? How does Grace Paley's Jewishness come through even when she is writing about non-Jewish characters? We will address these issues and others by employing two terms that frame this course in Jewish American literature. "Poetics" refers to the structural and functional principles of literary works, and more broadly to the process by which meaning is made. Diaspora, used for millennia to describe the experience of the Jewish people after the expulsion from their Holy Land, has emerged as a term attached more generally to migrant and displaced peoples who maintain meaningful connections to their ancestral region and culture, while also creating meaningful identities in a new land. Metaphorically, the term implies a point of view that is displaced, meanings created by an outsider. In this course we will combine the critical paradigms associated with these terms to engage in a highly contextualized and historicized study of Jewish American literature from the 19th century to today. We will discover in these texts how inherited Jewish culture and literary imaginings, developed over centuries of diasporic interaction between Jewish communities and the outside world? get reexamined, questioned, rejected, reimagined, reintegrated, and transformed within the crucible of American experience. The meanings and literary modes that develop through the creative engagement of Jewish with American are fascinating in and of themselves in their specifically Jewish context, and even more so in their interrogation of core understandings of identity?and indeed of the boundaries of such a thing as a specifically Jewish context. The literature we read in this course and the discussions that ensue will therefore also provide a framework and method for engaging with the creative energies and cultural productivity of more recent diasporic communities in the United States and beyond. Immigration and the experience of immigrant communities continues to be at the forefront of American consciousness, as immigrants work to create new meanings and new narratives for their lives, and as those who immigrated before them provide contested meanings for the impact of immigration on their own narratives. This course, though grounded in Jewish narratives, will provide students with an expanded vocabulary and perspective for engaging in this central debate within the American experience.
ENGL 3013 - Poems about Cities
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Read/respond to selection of poems about various cities. Emphasis on poetry written in English from 18th through 21st century. Some poetry in translation/from other periods.
ENGL 3021 - Captivity in Literature and Film: From the Barbary Coast to Guantanamo Bay
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01572 - EngL 3021/EngL 5021
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Whether there is a captivity genre in English/Global literature, from early modern period to 21st century. Texts/films from numerous civilizations/histories.
ENGL 3022 - Science Fiction and Fantasy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Science Fiction and Fantasy will introduce students to the study of classic and contemporary science fiction and fantasy literature. Using literary techniques, students will explore the alternate realities, characters, cultures, genders, races, ecologies, politics, settings, and technologies of science fiction and fantasy primarily through reading novels and stories. Questions may include: What does speculation about the future tell us about our present and past? What does the unreal reveal about our real lives? To what extent does science fiction function as both escapist fantasy and prophetic reality?
ENGL 3024 - The Graphic Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course aims to read and study a specific kind of narrative we call "graphic novel." The term itself is often a point of contention, but the purpose of this course is not to defend the validity of the term or the medium. "Comic books" and "graphic novels" are not endangered animals. Rather, we will use this example of "sequential art" to think through the ways this genre intersects, uses, and informs various other narrative and artistic forms as well as the way the genre may be unique with its own way of producing meaning. Comics involve a hybrid strategy of image and text, so we will attempt to keep both aspects in mind throughout the semester, never forgetting that comics are neither purely "visual" nor purely "textual." Since comics are often wedded-in mainstream culture-with certain kinds of content (e.g. superheroes), we will also investigate the characteristics of different "genres" within comics, as well as various questions about literariness.
ENGL 3025 - The End of the World in Literature and History (HIS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02549 - EngL 3025/RelS 3627
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
For at least two and a half millennia, prophets, politicians, and poets have crafted terrifying accounts about the end of the world. This comparatist seminar examines the way different cultures have imagined a final apocalypse with particular attention to the political and social consequences of their visions. Students will read texts that focus on pandemic, extraterrestrial attack, nuclear holocaust, prophecy, cybernetic revolt, divine judgment, resource depletion, meteoric impact, or one of the many other ways in which humans write of their demise. They will use literary analysis to explore the many historical and contemporary wastelands they will encounter. They will write short papers and give in-class presentations on different kinds of apocalypse.
ENGL 3026 - Mediterranean Wanderings: Literature and History on the Borders of Three Continents (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Situated between three continents and at the intersection of numerous ethnic and national cultures, the Mediterranean is like no other place on earth. A place of diverse languages, religions, economies, governments, and ways of daily life, it serves as a microcosm for the world itself imagined as an integrated global system. This course explores the history of the Mediterranean with particular emphasis on the literatures it has produced over the last three millennia. As the protagonists of these epic poems, religious texts, and novels travel from one shore to another, they experience the Mediterranean as a place of violence, cultural accommodation, hope, ethnic and linguistic bewilderment, and endless moral challenge. This course will place as much emphasis on the region's history as its cultural productions. With that in mind, reading may include David Abulafia's The Great Sea in addition to The Odyssey, The Aeneid, the biblical books of Joshua and Acts, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata (an epic set during the first crusade), Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice and Antony and Cleopatra, Flaubert's Salammbo, Akli Tadjer's Les ANI du Tassali, A.b. Yehoshua's Mr. Mani, and Pamuk's The White Castle.
ENGL 3027W - The Essay (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01352
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Incorporating narrative, descriptive, analytical, and persuasive techniques into writing on general topics. Effective argumentation through critical reading. Use of library resources. Awareness of context/audience.
ENGL 3030 - Studies in Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01609
Typically offered: Spring & Summer Odd Year
Topics may include English Renaissance tragedy, English Restoration and 18th century, or American drama by writers of color. Single-author courses focus on writers such as Tennessee Williams and Eugene O'Neill, or issues/themes such as gender/performance.
ENGL 3032 - Shakespeare in London
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Summer Odd Year
How are different interpretations of Shakespeare?s works embodied in the theater? How are they transformed by location/context? Students attend/discuss theatrical productions.
ENGL 3061 - Literature and Music (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we will explore the connections and parallels between music and literature, assessing both form and content and drawing upon various genres from both arts. We will examine some of the ways that musical and literary texts can change, subvert, or augment each other by applying critical and literary theories to intertextual readings. Among the subjects we may discuss are how authors use music in their work, both structurally and topically; how musicians use literature, both as lyric and as subject matter; and how members of each group engage the artistic assumptions of the other. Students will gain a greater appreciation of the varied forms of creative expression and an increased understanding of how they influence each other through close reading and listening, discussions, reflective writing, and presentations.
ENGL 3070 - Studies in Literary and Cultural Modes
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Modes of literary expression/representation that transcend conventional demarcations of genre and historical periods. Topics may include horror, romance, mystery, comedy, and satire.
ENGL 3071 - The American Food Revolution in Literature and Television (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Native food landscape in 1930s. Classic literature from rise of movement. Recent work that focuses on personal/environmental ethics of food.
ENGL 3090 - General Topics
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01611 - EngL 3090/EngL 3090H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 3091 - The Literature and Film of Baseball (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Baseball is the national pastime, often evoked with Mom and apple pie in a trinity of American-ness. How do Americans represent something they see as so quintessentially themselves? In this class, we will look at the variety and complexity of answers given to that question, from sunny nostalgia, to valorization of the individual, valorization of the team, depictions of the dark side of the American dream, critiques of racial relations, and an approach that strives to eliminate both the poetry and the hand-wringing with a long hard look at numbers and facts. In this journey, we will study and participate in a number of ways that literature teaches us to understand society and ourselves. We will examine the idea of American pastoral and anti-pastoral. We will use the great variety of ways to write about baseball as a platform to consider how we come to know and believe. Throughout the course, we will examine the way baseball writing treats race and gender. We will also look at excerpts of films made from some of the texts. Comparing the films to the literature allows us to discuss what representations of America seem more palatable to producers aiming for a larger audience than literature usually reaches and to highlight ways writing makes arguments that films cannot.
ENGL 3101 - Survey of Medieval English Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02494
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Major/representative Medieval English works, including Sir Gawain the Green Knight, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Book of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich's Revelations, and Malory's Morte D'Arthur.
ENGL 3116 - Early Modern Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Reading of selected British plays ranging from the Reformation to the French Revolution. Plays show the evolution of English society and reflect changing social mores from the era of Shakespeare and Jonson to the rise of the bourgeoisie.
ENGL 3122 - Shakespeare II: The Major Themes
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Shakespeare's intellectual community, its language/values. In-class readings from at least six plays. Quizzes on dramatic speeches. Written assignments. prereq: 3007 or instr consent
ENGL 3132 - The King James Bible as Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literature of Jewish Bible ("Old Testament"). Narratives (Torah through Kings), prophets (including Isaiah), writings (including Psalms, Job, Ecclesiastes). God's words/deeds as reported by editors/translators.
ENGL 3133 - Stuart England: 17th-Century Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01475 - EngL 3133/EngL 3133H
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Major/representative works of the Restoration and 18th century (1660-1798). Typical authors: Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, Fielding.
ENGL 3134 - Milton and Rebellion
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01612
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Milton's prose/minor poems from the Revolution (1641-1660). Post-revolutionary works (Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes). Emphasizes Milton's lifelong effort to bring about reform ("change").
ENGL 3141 - The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century: Sex, Satire, and Sentiment
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will introduce you to some of the best literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century in England. Think of this course as a challenge: how can you, as someone who will spend most of your life in the 21st century, learn to appreciate and learn from literature written in far different times and places? A lot depends on your willingness to empathize with ways of thinking and being that are quite different from your own and your comfort with believing that other ages were just as complicated and as interesting as the one you live in. Typical authors include Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Fielding, and Burney.
ENGL 3151 - Romantic Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British literature written between 1780 and 1830. Concept of Romanticism. Effects of French Revolution on literary production. Role of romantic artist.
ENGL 3175 - 20th-Century British Literatures and Cultures I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01618 - EngL 3175/EngL 5175
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Survey of principal writers, intellectual currents, conventions, and genres/themes in Britain/Ireland, from 1900 to 1945. Fiction/nonfiction by Conrad, Richardson, Forster, Joyce, Mansfield, Rhys, West, Woolf, Lawrence, and Huxley. Poetry by Hardy, Hopkins, Loy, H.D., Yeats, Pound and Eliot. Drama by Synge and Shaw.
ENGL 3180 - Contemporary Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
Examine issues related to the reading and understanding of British, American, and Anglophone fiction and poetry in a variety of interpretive contexts.
ENGL 3181 - Contemporary Literary Nonfiction (LITR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Contemporary literary nonfiction from the 1960s to the present, covering developments in narrative nonfiction, memoir, and personal essay.
ENGL 3212 - American Poetry from 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
Famous and lesser-known poems from the Modernist era, the time of Frost, HD, Pound, Eliot and the Harlem Renaissance. The course attends to the intellectual and cultural background of the poets, poetic theory and form.
ENGL 3221 - American Novel to 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Novels, from early Republic, through Hawthorne, Melville, and Stowe, to writers at end of 19th century (e.g., Howells, Twain, James, Chopin, Crane). Development of a national literature. Tension between realism and romance. Changing role of women as writers and as fictional characters.
ENGL 3222 - American Novel from 1900
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
In this course, we will read and study novels of twentieth and twenty-first century American writers, from early 1900's realism through Modernists (e.g., Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald) to more contemporary writers (e.g., Baldwin, Ellison, Erdrich, Roth, Pynchon). We will explore each text in relation to literary, cultural, and historical developments and question the narrative and stylistic strategies specific to each work.
ENGL 3231 - American Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngL 3231/3231H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Representative dramas from 18th through 20th centuries. Topics include staging of national identities, aesthetics of modern/contemporary drama. Production concerns of mainstream, regional, community theaters.
ENGL 3330 - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Literature/culture produced by/about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. Emphasizes importance of materials falsified/ignored in earlier literary/cultural studies. How traditional accounts need to be revised in light of significant contributions of GLBT people.
ENGL 3501 - Public Discourse: Coming to Terms with the Environment (LITR, ENV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course explores significant environmental issues (such as environmental justice, toxic chemicals, climate change) through the analysis of texts from diverse literary genres. It focuses as much on issues of language and meaning as it does on the subjects these texts concern. Students examine the formal dimensions of these texts, as well as their social and historical contexts. In addition, students are introduced to the underlying scientific principles, the limitations of technologies, and the public policy aspects of each of these issues, in order to judge what constitutes an appropriate response to them. Students also learn how to identify and evaluate credible information concerning the environment.
ENGL 3502 - Nature Stories: Environmental Discourse in Action (LITR, CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore contemporary texts from multiple disciplines to analyze the role of stories in interpreting nature. Emphasis on lived experience, civic motivation, and observational research that enrich effective nature writing. Optional service-learning component.
ENGL 3505 - Protest Literature and Community Action (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course combines academic analysis and experiential learning to understand, in both theory and practice, different perspectives on the power of ?protest? in civic life. We will read a selection from the vast genre of progressive protest literature (pamphlets, poems, polemics, lists of demands, teaching philosophies, organizing principles, cultural histories, newsletter articles, movement chronicles, and excerpts from novels and biographies) from four key social-justice movements: the American Indian Movement, the Black Power movement, the post-Great Recession struggle for economic power, and the battle for immigrant rights. We?ll also learn about this experientially as we roll up our sleeves and get involved in local community-based education initiatives and local social-justice organizations through our service-learning. Students receive initial training from CLA Career Services, The Center for Community-Engaged Learning, the Minnesota Literacy Council, as well as orientations at community sites.
ENGL 3506 - Social Movements & Community Education (CIV)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
In this course, we’ll examine four progressive social movements. After beginning with a foundational civil rights movement example, we will learn about the antiracist feminism branch of the women’s movement, often referred to as “third-wave feminism.” We’ll also study the Occupy movement that arose in response to the Great Recession (the financial crisis beginning in 2008). Then we’ll take a look at two social movements that, while by no means underground, tend to fly below the radar: the prison abolition movement and the fight for public schools. While all of these social movements have different emphases, they also overlap quite a bit in their systemic analysis of society and their strategies for action. As activist, organizer, and trainer Rinku Sen observes, “the history of community organizing and social movements is replete with tactics learned in one movement being applied to another.” As we study these social movements, community organizing will be of particular interest to us. How do the groups, collectives, nonprofits, and communities propelling these different social movements organize themselves, their leadership, their strategies, and their activities? How do they make decisions? What do meetings and planning processes look like? What do they do when they disagree? How do they recruit and mobilize? How do they communicate with – and confront – the general public, elected officials, and the more powerful elements of the ruling class? How do they talk about the work they’re doing? How do they develop a vision of the world they’d like to live in while still inhabiting the present one, with all its flaws and injustices? We’ll also examine the role of education in organizations working for social change. Whether through trainings, “political education,” reading groups, or small group activities associated with popular education, many of the social-movement groups we’ll study have developed educational strategies and curricula. Hands-On Learning through Community Education: As we study these social movements and their approaches to organizing and educating in the comfortable confines of our university classroom, we’ll also learn about them experientially through our service-learning. That is, we’ll work 2 hours per week at local education initiatives in K-12 schools, adult programs, and social-justice organizations in the non-profit and grassroots sectors, comprising a total of 24 hours by the end of the semester. This hands-on learning will strengthen our academic grasp of social movements, organizational dynamics, and teaching and community organizing by providing us with grounded perspectives. More broadly, we’ll get a feel for what it’s like to get involved as citizens, activists, teachers, and learners attempting to build cross-organizational coalitions. And we’ll share what we learn with each other. Representatives from the Center for Community-Engaged Learning (the U's service-learning office) and various community organizations will attend our second class session to tell you about their respective sites and how you can get involved. For our third class session, you will rank the top three community sites you'd like to work at. You will then be "matched" with a community organization, and your community education work will begin as soon as this matching process is complete. (We try to honor students' first and second choices, while also making sure that you also have some fellow classmates at your site.) To help prepare you, at a time convenient for you, you will also attend a training session facilitated by the Minnesota Literacy Council (MLC) or the Center for Community-Engaged Learning – details will be provided in class.
ENGL 3601 - Analysis of the English Language
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to structure of English. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics. pragmatics. Language variation/usage.
ENGL 3711 - Literary Magazine Production Lab I
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Prerequisites: [instructor consent required, #]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
First of two courses. Students produce undergraduate art/literary magazine Ivory Tower. Students decide upon identity, tone, and direction of the issue. They take on magazine staff responsibilities, call for submissions, make selections, edit/design, set budget, and begin fund-raising. prereq: [instructor consent required, instr consent]
ENGL 3712 - Literary Magazine Production Lab II
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
ENGL 3712 is the second of a two-semester course. In this hands-on, experiential lab, we solicit, acquire, edit, copyedit, design, typeset, proofread, print, publicize and distribute the upcoming edition of The Tower, the magazine of undergraduate art and creative writing by University of Minnesota students. This is the semester in which we bring out the finished, printed magazine, and in which we host a launch party on campus. We'll continue to apply and expand the lessons from our exploration in ENGL 3711 of the theory and history of literary magazine production in any number of ways: we'll revise our mission and theme as we draft and revise ancillary copy for the issue itself and as we refresh the marketing copy for our social media, blog, and website; we'll hone our design and typesetting skills as we lay out the issue; we'll refine our aesthetic sensibilities as we collaborate on final selections, strengthening our willingness to revise our opinions as compromise for the greater good; we'll add to our firsthand valuable on-the-job skills of budgeting, scheduling, and vendor relations; and we will deepen our understanding of the publishing profession as it exists today, locally, and nationally. prereq: [3711, instr consent]
ENGL 3741 - Literacy and American Cultural Diversity (DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nature, acquisition, institutionalization, state of literacy in United States. Focuses on issues of culturally diverse, disadvantaged members of society. Service-learning component requires tutoring of children/adults in community service agencies.
ENGL 3993 - Directed Study
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Guided individual reading or study. Prereq-One 3xxx, [English major or minor or [BIS or IDIM or ICP] with English concentration], [jr or sr], instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
ENGL 4003 - History of Literary Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
How thinkers from classical to modern times posed/answered questions about language (how words mean), audience (to whom they mean), and the literary (how literary writing differs from other forms of writing). Works by Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Christine de Pizan, Dante, Sidney, Behn, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Woolf.
ENGL 4090 - General Topics
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 4152 - Nineteenth Century British Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
British novel during the century in which it became widely recognized as a major vehicle for cultural expression. Possible topics include the relation of novel to contemporary historical concerns: rise of British empire, developments in science, and changing roles for women; formal challenges of the novel; definition of realism.
ENGL 4233 - Modern and Contemporary Drama
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Works written for theater in 19th/20th century. Emphasizes how major aesthetic forms of modern drama (the well-made play, realism, expressionism, symbolism, epic theater, absurdism) presented not just distinctive theatrical styles, but also new ways of .seeing. for the theatrical spectator. How social differences, as informed by gender, class, and race, inform content/presentation.
ENGL 4711 - Introduction to Editing and Publishing
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
So, you want to learn how to chisel cuneiform? Have we got a class for you! If the media doomsayers are right, editing is a dying craft. Right now, polytechnic institutes are training the next generation of copyeditors in far-off lands. Newspapers are shedding weight like dueling celebs in an US photo spread. And the Twits are inventing the 140-character news story. But someone, somewhere, has to generate that alumni magazine, the St. Paul Saints season guide, and the co-op newsletter. In other words, a demand persists in the American marketplace for someone who knows how to turn pulp into paper. In this class, we will study editing as a process, a protocol, and a philosophy. To elaborate, we will study the conventions of editing (grammar, story, and style) and we will meet professionals who do it well. (Recent guests have included a super freelancer and founding editor at Thirty Two magazine, a political reporter for Politics in Minnesota, and a first-time novelist and page proofer with a book on Coffee House Press.) We will analyze why creative collaboration can feel like a playground brawl. Mostly, using real, raw manuscripts from newspapers, magazines, and books, we will practice how to screw up the written word--with the ultimate goal of screwing up a little less. prereq: jr or senior or grad student Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for ENGW 5401, ENGL 5711, or ENGL 5401
ENGL 4721 - Electronic Text
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Status/function of text, related questions as framed by electronic text.
ENGL 4722 - Alphabet to Internet: History of Writing Technologies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Equivocal relation of memory and writing. Literacy, power, control. Secrecy and publicity. Alphabetization and other ways of ordering world. Material bases of writing. Typographical design/expression. Theories of technological determinism.
ENGL 5040 - Theories of Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Advanced topics regarding film in a variety of interpretive contexts, from the range and historic development of American, English, and Anglophone film (e.g., "Fascism and Film," "Queer Cinemas"). Topics and viewing times announced in Class Schedule. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5090 - Readings in Special Subjects
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
General background preparation for advanced study. Diverse selection of literatures written in English, usually bridging national cultures and time periods. Readings specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 5121 - Readings in Early Modern Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topical readings in early modern poetry, prose, fiction, and drama. Attention to relevant scholarship or criticism. Preparation for work in other courses or seminars. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5140 - Readings in 18th Century Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literature written in English, 1660-1798. Topics may include British literature of Reformation and 18th century, 18-century American literature, a genre (e.g., 18th-century novel). prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5150 - Readings in 19th-Century Literature and Culture
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics may include British Romantic or Victorian literatures, American literature, important writers from a particular literary school, a genre (e.g., the novel). Readings.
ENGL 5510 - Readings in Criticism and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Major works of classical criticism in the English critical tradition from Renaissance to 1920. Leading theories of criticism from 1920 to present. Theories of fiction, narratology. Feminist criticisms. Marxist criticisms. Psychoanalytic criticisms. Theories of postmodernism.
ENGL 5743 - History of Rhetoric and Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Assumptions of classical/contemporary rhetorical theory, especially as they influence interdisciplinary field of composition studies. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5790 - Topics in Rhetoric, Composition, and Language
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5805 - Writing for Publication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
Conference presentations, book reviews, revision of seminar papers for journal publication, and preparation of a scholarly monograph. Style, goals, and politics of journal and university press editors/readers. Electronic publication. Professional concerns. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ENGL 5992 - Directed Readings, Study, or Research
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 45.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
TBD Prereq-Grad student or instr consent.
ENGW 3102 - Intermediate Fiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [EngW 1101 OR 1102 OR 1103 OR 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3104 - Intermediate Poetry Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3106 - Intermediate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Exercises, experiments, assigned readings, discussion of student work. prereq: [1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104], students cannot audit course
ENGW 3110 - Topics in Creative Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: 1101 or 1102 or 1103 or 1104 or dept consent
ENGW 4205 - Screenwriting
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
An introductory workshop to screenwriting basics, including formatting, style and structure. In-class and take-home exercises will assist the students in learning techniques for developing engaging characters, writing concise description and vivid dialogue, and outlining a usable plot. prereq: One EngW or EngL 3xxx course, [permission number available in creative writing office]
ENGW 5102 - Graduate Fiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing fiction.
ENGW 5104 - Graduate Poetry Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing poetry. Students will explore new poetic possibilities while studying contemporary poetry and poetics.
ENGW 5106 - Graduate Literary Nonfiction Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Advanced workshop for graduate students with considerable experience in writing literary nonfiction.
ENGW 5130 - Topics in Advanced Creative Writing
Credits: 4.0 [max 16.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Workshop. Might include work in more than one genre. prereq: instr consent
ENGW 5202 - Journal and Memoir Writing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Using memory in writing, from brainstorming to drafting to revision, in several genres (poems, traditional memoir essays, fiction). How diverse cultures shape memory differently.
ENGW 5310 - Reading as Writers
Credits: 4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Special topics in reading fiction, literary nonfiction, poetry. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGW 5993 - Directed Study in Writing
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 18.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Projects in writing poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction, or study of ways to improve writing. Prereq-instr consent, dept consent, college consent.
ENGL 3060 - Studies in Literature and the Other Arts
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year
Examine literature's role in conjunction with other arts, including music, visual arts, dance, etc. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
ENGL 3002 - Modern Literary Criticism and Theory
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00523 - EngL 3002/3002H
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is an introduction to contemporary literary criticism and theory. The goal is to provide you with a foundation in theory's terminologies, the different methodologies used in literary and cultural analysis, and a sense of the various schools of criticism that have developed in the postwar period. We will look at the ways that various texts perform as texts; they are not transparent or one dimensional, but rather open themselves to many different readings and styles of engagement.
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3010 - Studies In Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Special topics related to reading poetry in various interpretive contexts.
ENGL 3010H - Honors: Studies in Poetry
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01607 - EngL 3010/EngL 3010H
Prerequisites: Honors or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
Special topics related to reading poetry in various interpretive contexts. prereq: Honors or instr consent
ENGL 3020 - Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examine issues related to reading and understanding narrative in a variety of interpretive contexts. Topics may include "The 19th-century English (American, Anglophone) Novel," "Introduction to Narrative," or "Techniques of the Novel." Topics specified in the Class Schedule
ENGL 3020H - Honors: Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01608 - EngL 3020/EngL 3020H/EngL 5020
Prerequisites: honors student
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Issues related to reading/understanding narrative in various interpretive contexts. Topics may include nineteenth-century English (American, Anglophone) novel, narrative, or techniques of the novel. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: honors student
ENGL 5020 - Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examine issues related to reading and understanding narrative in a variety of interpretive contexts. Topics may include "The 19th-century English (American, Anglophone) Novel," "Introduction to Narrative," or "Techniques of the Novel." Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 3023 - Children's Literature
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course provides an overview of the traditions of children's and young adult literature. The course will address the following questions among others: What is "children's literature"? What are some of its persistent themes and stylistic traits? In what ways may we say it has changed over time? What distinguishes children's literature, from, say, "grown-up" literature? Our readings will include classic and contemporary works with a focus on diversity regarding the authors, themes, and readership. In addition to becoming familiar with this body of knowledge, we will be developing critical reading skills within a "literary" context. We will also look into how, when, and where literature (specifically children's and young adult literature) and our everyday lives intersect, impact, and interact with each other.
ENGL 3040 - Studies in Film
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01610 - EngL 3040/EngL 3040H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Topics regarding film in variety of interpretive contexts, from range/historic development of American, English, Anglophone film.
ENGL 3110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 5110 - Medieval Literatures and Cultures: Intro to Medieval Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01617 - EngL 3110/EngL 5110
Typically offered: Every Spring
Major and representative works of the Middle Ages. Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 3161 - Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3161H - Honors: Victorian Literatures and Cultures
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01613 - EngL 3161/EngL 3161H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of the British Victorian period (1832-1901) in relation to its cultural and historical contexts. Typical authors include Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Arnold, Hopkins, and the Brontes.
ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions and modern literature from various tribal cultures.
AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions, modern literature from various tribal cultures.
ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, gender to her writings.
GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
ENGL 3350 - Women Writers
Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course is about women writing in English. We will focus either on writers from a single country or be comparative in nature. See topic information for more detailed description.
ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative nonfiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817 - Chic 3507W/EngL 3507W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative non-fiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 5593
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century black novelists, including Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Petry, Morrison, and Reed.
AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
ENGL 3020 - Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examine issues related to reading and understanding narrative in a variety of interpretive contexts. Topics may include "The 19th-century English (American, Anglophone) Novel," "Introduction to Narrative," or "Techniques of the Novel." Topics specified in the Class Schedule
ENGL 3020H - Honors: Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01608 - EngL 3020/EngL 3020H/EngL 5020
Prerequisites: honors student
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Issues related to reading/understanding narrative in various interpretive contexts. Topics may include nineteenth-century English (American, Anglophone) novel, narrative, or techniques of the novel. Topics specified in Class Schedule. prereq: honors student
ENGL 5020 - Studies in Narrative
Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Examine issues related to reading and understanding narrative in a variety of interpretive contexts. Topics may include "The 19th-century English (American, Anglophone) Novel," "Introduction to Narrative," or "Techniques of the Novel." Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
ENGL 3301 - Asian America through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
AAS 3301 - Asian America Through Arts and Culture (AH, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01863 - AAS 3301/EngL 3301
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
The course focuses on the close analysis and interpretation of individual works by a range of modern and contemporary artists. Students will analyze, critique, and interpret these works in light of the historical and social contexts in which they were produced, their creation and uses of aesthetic form, and their impact on individuals and communities. Discussion, writing assignments, and oral presentations will focus on different ways of encountering and evaluating artistic work; for instance, students will write critical analyses and production reviews as well as dialogue more informally through weekly journal entries and online discussion forums. We will examine what it means to define artists and their work as being "Asian American" and explore how other categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, or class intersect with race. We will study how art works not only as individual creativity but also as communal and social practice; for instance, we look at the history of theaters, such as East-West Players or Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, that have sustained Asian Americans as actors, playwrights, and designers.
AAS 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811 - AAS 4232/EngL 4232
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by Asian American, African American, American Indian, Latino, and Chicano playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright.
ENGL 4232 - American Drama by Writers of Color (DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01811
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Selected works by African American, Latinx, Native American, and Asian American playwrights. How racial/ethnic differences are integral to shaping different visions of American drama. History of minority/ethnic theaters, politics of casting, mainstreaming of the minority playwright. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in service-learning.
ENGL 5501 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02380 - CL 5401/CSCL 5401/EngL 5401/CS
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
CSCL 5401 - Origins of Cultural Studies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02380 - CL 5401/CSCL 5401/CSDS 5401/En
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Intellectual map of the creation of cultural studies as a unique approach to studying social meanings. Key figures and concepts, including nineteenth- and early twentieth century precursors.
ENGL 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 5593 - The African-American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 5593
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Contextual readings of 19th-/20th-century black novelists, including Chesnutt, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Petry, Morrison, and Reed.
AFRO 3593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
AFRO 5593 - The African American Novel
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00346 - Afro 3593/Afro 5593/EngL 3593/
Typically offered: Every Spring
Explore African American novelistic traditions. Plot patterns, character types, settings, symbols, themes, mythologies. Creative perspectives of authors themselves. Analytical frameworks from contemporary literary scholarship.
ENGL 5597 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Multidisciplinary review of Jazz Age's Harlem Renaissance: literature, popular culture, visual arts, political journalism, major black/white figures. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
AFRO 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703 - Afro 3627/Afro 5627/EngL 5597
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
AFRO 5627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "the Veil of Color." prereq: Grad student or instr consent
ARTH 3627 - Seminar: Harlem Renaissance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00703 - Afro 3627/Afro 5627/ArtH 3627/
Typically offered: Every Fall
Review Harlem Renaissance from variety of perspectives. Literary, historical, cultural, political, international. Explore complex patterns of permeation/interdependency between worlds inside/outside of what W.E.B. Du Bois called "Veil of Color."
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW/Jour 5606
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literary aspects of journalism. American and British writers, past and present. Lectures, discussions, weekly papers, critiques.
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngW/Jour 5606
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literary aspects of journalism. American/British writers, past/present. Lectures, discussions, weekly papers, critiques.
ENGL 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
AAS 4311 - Asian American Literature and Drama (LITR, DSJ)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01865 - AAS 4311/ENGL 4311
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Literary/dramatic works by Asian American writers. Historical past of Asian America through perspective of writers such as Sui Sin Far and Carlos Bulosan. Contemporary artists such as Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, David Henry Hwang, and Han Ong. Political/historical background of Asian American artists, their aesthetic choices.
ENGL 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
MEST 3102 - Chaucer
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02073 - EngL 3102/MeSt 3102
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Major/representative works written by Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and the dream visions. Historical, intellectual, and cultural background of the poems. Language, poetic theory, form.
ENGL 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00401
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the language through 1150 A.D. Culture of Anglo-Saxons. Selected readings in prose/poetry.
MEST 4612 - Old English I
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00401 - EngL 4612/EngL 5612/MeSt 4612
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Introduction to the language through 1150 A.D. Culture of Anglo-Saxons. Selected readings in prose/poetry.
ENGL 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02362 - EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
MEST 4613 - Old English II
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02362 - EngL 4613/MeSt 4613
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
The second semester of Old English is devoted to a full translation and study of the great Anglo-Saxon epic "Beowulf." J.R.R. Tolkien wrote of the poem that "its maker was telling of things already old and weighted with regret, and he expended his art in making keen that touch upon the heart which sorrows have that are both poignant and remote." "Beowulf" is an exciting tale of strife and heroism; but it is also a subtle meditation upon the character of humanity as it struggles to understand the hazards of a harsh world, the inscrutability of fate, and the nature of history itself. "Beowulf" is not only important for a detailed understanding of Anglo-Saxon culture, but it is also a significant and moving poetic achievement in the context of world literature. We will read and translate the poem in the original Old English; thus ENGL 4612 (or a similar course resulting in a basic reading knowledge of Old English) is a prerequisite. "Beowulf" has been the object of intensive scholarly study; we will delve into the debates over the poem's date, genesis, manuscript and historical context and critical interpretation. Spending an entire semester studying one complex work can be an invaluable experience. Please contact the instructor for any questions concerning the prerequisite.
ENGL 3883V - Honors Thesis (WI)
Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
See guidelines available from English honors adviser. Prereq-Honors candidacy in English, consent of English honors advisor.
ENGL 3960W - Capstone Seminar in English (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is devoted to the writing of the senior paper in English. To graduate with a BA in English, students must write a 13-17 page (4,000-5,500 word) senior paper that contains substantive and original analytical insights. In this rigorous and intensive seminar, students receive instruction on writing this paper from tenured and tenure-track faculty in English. Students learn how to choose a topic and formulate a research question, conduct primary and secondary research, and produce a written document that incorporates research and analysis. Faculty teach students to produce an extended, scholarly essay though discussions of method, research, and development; instruction in specific writing techniques; workshopping and revising drafts; solving problems; and creating a coherent and elegant final product. While the subjects about which students write vary depending on student interest and faculty expertise, at least 50% of the course grade is determined by students’ writing performance. Most students fulfill the senior paper requirement with a traditional seminar paper, but students sometimes complete alternative projects, such as blogs, analytic projects that incorporate creative or personal elements, collaborative projects, or projects that involve the creation of a podcast, video, web site, or some other means of documenting student learning and writing skills. The senior seminar also functions as a capstone experience that fulfills many of the Student Learning Outcomes for the English major. Prerequisites for Admission: Admission to ENGL 3960W requires English major status and completion of ENGL 3001W with a minimum grade of C-minus. Priority will be given to students with senior status who have completed the majority of the major requirements, as well as to students who plan to graduate in the term they are requesting to take the senior seminar.
ENGW 3960W - Capstone Seminar in Creative Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is devoted to the writing of the senior paper in creative writing. To graduate with a BA in English, students with an interest in creative writing may choose to produce a substantial manuscript of poetry, literary fiction, or literary nonfiction rather than an extended, scholarly essay. In this advanced creative writing workshop, students receive instruction on writing this manuscript from tenured and tenure-track faculty in English. Class sessions typically include in-class writing exercises, which are then expanded into more finished works of poetry or prose reviewed by the faculty and discussed in workshops by the students themselves. Writing exercises and assignments lead, at the end of the semester, to a finished, thoroughly revised manuscript of at least 2,500 words. Faculty teach students to produce a significant body of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction though discussions of method, craft, and development; instruction in specific writing techniques; workshopping and revising drafts; solving problems; and creating a coherent and elegant final product. While the subjects about which students write vary depending on student interest and faculty expertise, at least 50 percent of the course grade is determined by students’ writing performance. The senior seminar also functions as a capstone experience that fulfills many of the Student Learning Outcomes for the English major and the capstone course for those who are pursuing a Minor in Creative Writing. Prerequisites for Admission: Admission to ENGW 3960W requires: (1) English major status and completion of ENGL 3001W with a minimum grade of C-minus; (2) completion of at least six credits of creative writing courses, including one intermediate (ENGW 3xxx-level) or advanced creative writing workshop, preferably in the genre of the ENGW 3960W workshop to which you are applying; and (3) submission of a creative writing sample. Admission is by permission of the instructor. Priority will be given to students with senior status who have completed the majority of the major requirements, as well as to students who plan to graduate in the term they are requesting to take the senior seminar.
ENGL 3003W - Historical Survey of British Literatures I (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will provide a historical survey of British literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Our focus will be on tracing the interactions between literature and wider British culture as well as on tracing the development of literary form during this period. You should leave this course being able to identify major literary trends and authors and link them to corresponding formal techniques and innovations. You should also have a sense of the major historical and political events, rulers, and social conditions in Britain at this time. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will leave this class familiar with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3004W - Historical Survey of British Literatures II (HIS, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
In this wide-ranging survey of British and post-colonial literature from the late eighteenth century to the present, we will explore representative literary texts and genres from British Romanticism, the Victorian period, Modernism, and the postwar era. Besides analyzing the language, aesthetic features, and technical construction of these literary artifacts, we will examine our readings as reflections of and reactions to social upheavals like the Industrial Revolution, challenges to the traditional role of women, scientific discoveries that sparked religious doubt, and the First World War. Additionally, because this is a writing intensive course, you will familiarize yourself with the process of writing a research paper with a literary focus, which includes finding and successfully incorporating contemporary scholarly research about your topic into your paper, crafting an original argument, utilizing textual evidence, and evaluating existing scholarship.
ENGL 3005W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures I (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This writing-intensive course will survey the Anglophone literature of what would become the United States from the arrival of English settlers to the Civil War. We will define "literature" broadly to not only include fiction and poetry but also the sermon, the letter, the essay, the autobiography, and other non-fictional forms. Course topics will include the Puritan theology that cast such a long shadow over the American cultural imagination; the fraught literary construction in the Revolutionary era of a national identity under the influence of such Enlightenment ideals as reason, civility, cosmopolitanism, and sympathy; the Gothic doubts about democracy that attended the literature of the early republic; the rise in the mid-nineteenth century of a radical intellectual and social movement in Transcendentalism; the antebellum ideological struggles over such political issues as slavery, industrialism, women's rights, and Native American rights; and the self-conscious cultivation of a national literary aesthetic in the Romantic prose and poetry of the period later critics would come (controversially) to call "the American Renaissance."
ENGL 3027W - The Essay (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01352
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Incorporating narrative, descriptive, analytical, and persuasive techniques into writing on general topics. Effective argumentation through critical reading. Use of library resources. Awareness of context/audience.
ENGL 3006W - Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3006V - Honors: Survey of American Literatures and Cultures II (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02293 - EngL 3006W/EngL 3006V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
This course will survey some of the major literary figures, aesthetic movements, and thematic concerns of US literature from the Civil War to the present. Our investigation will identify common traits in the literature that causes it to fit within three very broad literary historical categories: realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We will explore what makes literature created by the people of the United States distinctly "American" during a period that extends from the Civil War and the outlawing of slavery to women's suffrage, workers' movements, the Great Depression, the First and Second World Wars, and the civil rights movement. In addition to reading and analyzing the literature itself in terms of style, form, genre, and language, we will study it in historical context: the complex interplay between the political, the social, the cultural, and the literary in the United States. This approach rests upon the notion that literature is not created in a vacuum; it is influenced by and influences the world in which it is created.
ENGL 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions and modern literature from various tribal cultures.
AMIN 3201W - American Indian Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02266
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comparative studies of oral traditions, modern literature from various tribal cultures.
ENGL 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
AAS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, gender to her writings.
GWSS 3303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her writings.
GWSS 4303W - Writing Differences: Literature by U.S. Women of Color (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02060
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, drama of U.S. women minority writers. Relationship of writer's history, ethnicity, race, class, gender to writings.
ENGL 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative nonfiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
CHIC 3507W - Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01817 - Chic 3507W/EngL 3507W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Cultural, intellectual, and sociopolitical traditions of Mexican Americans as they are represented in creative literature. Genres/forms of creative cultural expression and their significance as representations of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. Novels, short stories, creative non-fiction, drama, essay, poetry, and hybrid forms of literature.
ENGL 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
AFRO 3592W - Black Women's Life-Writing (LITR, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01616 - Afro 3592W/EngL 3592W
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
The literature of African American women writers explored in novels, short stories, essays, poetry, autobiographies, and drama from the 18th to the late-20th century.
ENGL 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
AFRO 3597W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture I (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01909
Typically offered: Every Fall
African American oral tradition, slave narrative, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, and drama, from colonial era through Harlem Renaissance.
ENGL 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
AFRO 3598W - Introduction to African American Literature and Culture II (LITR, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01910
Typically offered: Every Spring
African American oral tradition, autobiography, poetry, essay, fiction, oratory, drama. From after Harlem Renaissance to end of 20th century.
ENGW 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00203 - EngW/Jour 5606
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literary aspects of journalism. American and British writers, past and present. Lectures, discussions, weekly papers, critiques.
JOUR 5606W - Literary Aspects of Journalism (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EngW/Jour 5606
Typically offered: Every Spring
Literary aspects of journalism. American/British writers, past/present. Lectures, discussions, weekly papers, critiques.