Twin Cities campus
 
Twin Cities Campus

Inter-College Program B.S.

CCE Individualized Degree and Inter-College Prog
College of Continuing Education
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 54 to 67
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science
Founded in 1930, the Inter-College Program (ICP) embodies the University of Minnesota's commitment to individualized undergraduate education by providing cross-college, course/credit-based degree options. Drawing upon the curricular offerings of most of the University's colleges and departments, students design either a bachelor of arts (BA) or a bachelor of science (BS) degree incorporating a significant amount of coursework from at least two different colleges within the University system. Bachelor of science degrees are those that pertain to the physical or biological sciences, have significant quantitative or investigative tools/methods expectations, or have a pronounced applied/professional component (e.g., public health, education, business, social work). Most students design a degree drawing from two or three departmental areas from the University. Examples include sustainability studies, communication studies, and HECUA; or Carlson School of Management, manufacturing operations management, and applied economics. Health and Wellness is also a popular thematic option for students planning to complete professional school prerequisites toward careers in direct patient care. ICP is most appropriate for self-directed students whose educational backgrounds and career and intellectual interests require both a clear personal focus and a flexible interdisciplinary approach. Interested students should attend one of the weekly information sessions, in which academic advisers provide a detailed introduction to the program and help students begin the planning process. For more information on the Inter-College Program, visit www.cce.umn.edu/Inter-College-Program
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
Students must complete 50 credits before admission to the program.
Students are considered for admission based on a review of their application. The review includes factors such as GPA, grade trends, performance in coursework relevant to proposed areas of study, and demonstrated ability to meet curricular and developmental expectations of individualized undergraduate education. Students must have attended a program information session and an initial degree planning appointment with an advisor. Preferred benchmarks are 2.50 GPA and 50 semester credits completed. Students must develop a degree plan that includes * Academic and career goals. * Courses proposed for the program, from at least two colleges. * Approval of the plan from at least two faculty or departmental advisers.
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
General Requirements
All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).
Program Requirements
In applicable departmental areas, successful completion of the following courses will count toward the 50 credits: CHEM 2302, CSCI 2021, DHA 2463, FW 2001, PSY 2801.
ICP Oral Communication Requirement
ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results [WI] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking [CIV] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument [WI] (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication (3.0 cr)
or COMM 3605W - Persuasive Speaking and Speech Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or MGMT 3033W - Business Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Writing Intensive Requirement
Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. Students work with their advisor to select the appropriate course.
Inter-College Program Career Readiness Requirement
ABUS 3051 - Career Skills in the Professional Environment for Juniors and Seniors (2.0 cr)
or AHS 2400 - Writing a Personal Statement (1.0 cr)
or ICP 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation (1.0 cr)
or CFAN 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation (1.0 cr)
or CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship (1.0 cr)
or ID 3201 - Career Planning (2.0 cr)
or ID 3208 - Internship Reflection: Making Meaning of Your Experience (1.0 cr)
ICP Program Options
Two Area Cross-College Program
This plan combines courses from two area cross-college programs, such as Carlson School of Management and mass communications, or computer science and French.
Complete 21 approved credits of upper division coursework in one area of concentration.
Complete 21 approved credits of upper division coursework in a second area of concentration.
Complete 8 supporting upper division credits in approved coursework.
-OR-
Three Area Cross-College Program
This plan combines courses from three area cross-college programs, such as applied business, communication studies, and psychology, or public health, child psychology, and family social science.
Complete 20 approved credits of upper division coursework in one area of concentration.
Complete 15 approved credits of upper division coursework in a second area of concentration.
Complete 15 approved credits of upper division coursework in a third area of concentration.
-OR-
Thematic Cross-College Program
The thematic cross-college program, such as aging studies, integrates coursework from several departments--sociology, public health, family social science, and social work. Thematic programs are appropriate only when students' objectives are clearly focused on one topic that cannot be pursued in a two- or three-area program.
Complete 50 approved upper division credits with no more than 15 credits in any one department.
-OR-
Thematic Health and Wellness Program
The thematic health and wellness program integrates coursework from several departments for students with health-related interests. Students who select this option follow the requirements for the thematic health and wellness program subplan.
Program Sub-plans
A sub-plan is not required for this program.
Thematic Health and Wellness Program
Lower Division Health and Wellness Foundation Prerequisites
Biology
BIOL 1009 - General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)
Chemistry
Chemistry Option 1
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
or Chemistry Option 2
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture [PHYS] (3.0 cr)
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences (3.0 cr)
Nutrition
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition [TS] (3.0 cr)
Economics
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3.0 cr)
or ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics [SOCS, GP] (4.0 cr)
or ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4.0 cr)
Social Science
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures [SOCS, GP, WI] (4.0 cr)
or EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
or FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America [DSJ, SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World [SOCS, GP, WI] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology [SOCS] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology [SOCS, DSJ] (4.0 cr)
Upper Division Health & Wellness Core Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 29 upper division credits within the Core by choosing one course from each category. Courses are chosen in consultation with an advisor. Must earn grade of C- or better in all courses and maintain a minimum 2.00 GPA. To be competitive for graduate and professional programs in the health sciences, GPA should be 3.00 or higher.
Anatomy
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy (3.0 cr)
or KIN 3027 - Human Anatomy for Kinesiology Students (3.0 cr)
Physiology
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)
or KIN 3385 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
or PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology (4.0 cr)
or PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology (4.0 cr)
Terminology
PHAR 1002 - Medical Terminology (2.0 cr)
or PHAR 5201 - Applied Medical Terminology (2.0 cr)
Public Health
PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health (2.0 cr)
or PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health (4.0 cr)
Health and Fitness
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness [SOCS] (3.0 cr)
Nutrition
CSPH 5431 - Functional Nutrition: An Expanded View of Nutrition, Chronic Disease, and Optimal Health (2.0 cr)
or FSCN 3301 - Food Choices: Healing the Earth, Healing Ourselves (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health [GP] (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 4112 - Food Chemistry and Functional Foods (3.0 cr)
or FSCN 4612 - Advanced Human Nutrition (4.0 cr)
or FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition [SOCS, DSJ, WI] (3.0 cr)
or PUBH 3905 - Nutrition for Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (2.0 cr)
Statistics
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or NURS 3710 - Statistics for Clinical Practice and Research [MATH] (3.0 cr)
or PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or SOC 3811 - Social Statistics [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)
or STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)
Pathology
LAMP 4177 - Nature of Disease: Pathology for Allied Health Students (3.0 cr)
Management/Economics
Note: Some of these courses have a micro- or macroeconomics prerequisite.
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ABUS 4501 - Building a Small Business Start-up (3.0 cr)
or ABUS 4705 - Leadership and Management for the Professional Practice (3.0 cr)
or ABUS 4707 - Financial Management for the Professional Practice (3.0 cr)
or HSM 3521 - Health Care Delivery Systems (3.0 cr)
or HSM 4541 - Health Care Finance (3.0 cr)
or HSM 4561 - Health Care Administration and Management (3.0 cr)
or MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management (3.0 cr)
or MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4.0 cr)
or PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy (3.0 cr)
Ethics
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics (3.0 cr)
or BTHX 5300 - Foundations of Bioethics (3.0 cr)
or NURS 4402 - Taking Ethical Action in Health Care [CIV] (1.0 cr)
or PHAR 4200W - Drugs and the U.S. Healthcare System [CIV, WI] (3.0 cr)
or PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)
or PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics (4.0 cr)
Integrative Health
CSPH 1001 - Principles of Holistic Health and Healing (2.0 cr)
or CSPH 3001 - Introduction to Integrative Healing (3.0 cr)
or CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices (3.0 cr)
Communication Upper Division
ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations [WI] (3.0 cr)
or ICP 3101W - Inter-College Program Proposal Development [WI] (2.0 cr)
or KIN 5203 - Health Media, Consumerism, and Communication (2.0 cr)
or PHAR 3206 - Issues in Health Literacy and Communication (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods [WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3405W - Humanistic Healthcare and Communication [AH, WI] (3.0 cr)
or WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing [WI] (4.0 cr)
or WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet [TS, WI] (3.0 cr)
Upper Division Health and Wellness Emphases/Foci/Specialties
Complete at least 12 to 16 upper division credits in one departmental area such as addiction, business, communication, complementary medicine, life science, nutrition, public health, sexuality, social science, social work, or youth studies. Any relevant department, certificate, or minor can be considered. Courses are chosen in consultation with an advisor. Must earn grade of C- or better in all courses. Overall emphasis/focus/specialty GPA must be at least 2.00.
Upper Division Health and Wellness Supporting Coursework
To reach the 50 upper division credits required for the major, students may add courses within the emphasis or add related supporting courses. Courses are chosen in consultation with an advisor. Students must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses.
Honors UHP
This is an honors sub-plan.
Students admitted to the University Honors Program (UHP) must fulfill UHP requirements, in addition to degree program requirements. Honors courses used to fulfill degree program requirements will also fulfill UHP requirements. Current departmental honors course offerings are listed at: http://www.honors.umn.edu/academics/curriculum/dept_courses_current.html Honors students complete an honors thesis project in the final year, most often in conjunction with an honors thesis course, or with an honors directed studies, or honors directed research course. Students select honors courses and plan for a thesis project in consultation with their UHP advisor and their departmental faculty advisor.
 
More program views..
View college catalog(s):
· College of Continuing Education

View sample plan(s):
· Three Area Cross-College Program - Consult with ICP adviser to develop program
· Two Area Cross-College Program - Consult with ICP adviser to develop program
· Thematic Health and Wellness Program - Consult with ICP adviser

View checkpoint chart:
· Inter-College Program B.S.
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ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects of communication essential for being persuasive/influential. Organizing/presenting ideas effectively, strategies for audience analysis, choosing communication methods, making appropriate use of informal influence methods, handling dissent. Processes for intercultural communication. prereq: 45 cr completed
COMM 1101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (CIV)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00670
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Public communication processes, elements, and ethics. Criticism of and response to public discourse. Practice in individual speaking designed to encourage civic participation.
COMM 1313W - Analysis of Argument (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Strategies for analyzing, evaluating, generating arguments. Problems in listening/responding to argument.
COMM 3411 - Introduction to Small Group Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cooperative thinking in task-oriented groups. Planning, preparing for, and participating in small groups in private and public contexts.
COMM 3605W - Persuasive Speaking and Speech Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Performance/composition with critical inquiry into rhetoric theories. Writing, thinking, and speaking skills. prereq: 1101, soph
MGMT 3033W - Business Communication (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01482
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication skills for effective participation in contempory organizations. From basic principles to communication strategy. Communication technology. Cases, simulations of "real-world" situations. Student small groups meet with instructor three times for presentation coaching/feedback. Recitation times are arranged with instructor at start of semester. prereq: Fr composition, CSOM upper-div, at least 60 cr
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Visual communication, audience analysis, organizing presentation, presenting complex material. Emphasizes use of computers.
ABUS 3051 - Career Skills in the Professional Environment for Juniors and Seniors
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Career planning and job search processes appropriate to business and professional careers in corporate culture. Exploring career options: career centers, company research, and networking. Résumé and cover letter writing. Job interview preparation. Organizational culture and job satisfaction. Business etiquette. prereq: preferred 60 cr; junior or senior
AHS 2400 - Writing a Personal Statement
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Develop competitive personal statement. Designed for students applying to health professional program in coming year.
ICP 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: Soph or jr or sr or grad student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Self exploration, networking, industry research, job/internship search, resumes, cover letters, interviewing, salary negotiation, goal setting. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or grad student
CFAN 3201 - Career and Internship Preparation
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Self exploration, networking, industry research, job/internship search, resumes, cover letters, interviewing, salary negotiation, goal setting. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or grad student
CFAN 3096 - Making the Most of your Internship
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Enhance quality internship experience. Insight about self, world of work, individual learning styles. Communicate skills/learning. prereq: Secured internship, instr consent
ID 3201 - Career Planning
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For juniors and seniors. A practical introduction to integrating individual talents, values, interests, and experience with critical career search strategies. Emphasis on understanding the marketplace, internet research, strategic resume writing, networking, and interviewing.
ID 3208 - Internship Reflection: Making Meaning of Your Experience
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Allows students to examine, reflect on, and construct meaning from their internship experience through self assessment of personal and career needs and goals, examination of what it means to be a ?professional? and operate within professional environments, evaluation of performance and accomplishments, articulation of knowledge and skills via effective resume writing. prereq: dept consent
BIOL 1009 - General Biology (BIOL)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01525 - Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Major concepts of modern biology. Molecular structure of living things, energy recruitment/utilization, flow of genetic information through organisms/populations. Principles of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. Includes lab. prereq: high school chemistry
CHEM 1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01884 - Chem 1061/Chem 1071H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use. Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061
CHEM 1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01878 - Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061
CHEM 1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01885 - Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry. prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062
CHEM 1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01879 - Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes. prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062
CHEM 1015 - Introductory Chemistry: Lecture (PHYS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01088 - Chem 1011/Chem 1015
Prerequisites: [High school chemistry or equiv], two yrs high school math, not passed chem placement exam, Internet access; high school physics recommended; CHEM 1015 is a 3-credit, lecture-only course, with the lectures delivered online via Moodle, and exams taken in person on campus. Internet access is required. Students who will go on to take CHEM 1061/1065 should take CHEM 1015 only. Students who will NOT be continuing on to CHEM 1061/1065 and need to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement need take the 1-credit lab course CHEM 1017 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement unless the CHEM 1017 lab course is completed either concurrently or consecutively.
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Lectures online, exams on campus. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds. Problem solving.
CHEM 1017 - Introductory Chemistry: Laboratory (PHYS)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Prerequisites: [1015 or &1015], %; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Organic chemistry. Matter/energy, atoms, compounds, solutions, chemical reactions, mole/chemical calculations, gases, liquids, solids, chemical bonding, atomic/molecular structure, acids, bases, equilibria. Physical/chemical properties of hydrocarbons and organic compounds containing halogens, nitrogen, or oxygen. Problem solving. prereq: [1015 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1015], dept consent; credit will not be granted if credit received for: 1011; CHEM 1017 is a 1-credit lab-only course. This course is not intended for students who are planning to take CHEM 1061/1065. Intended only for students who need the course to fulfill the Physical Science/Lab requirement, and are taking CHEM 1015 either concurrently or consecutively. This course will NOT fulfill the Physical Science/Lab core requirement, unless CHEM 1015 is completed either concurrently or consecutively.; meets Lib Ed req of Physical Sciences)
BIOC 2011 - Biochemistry for the Agricultural and Health Sciences
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Survey of organic chemistry and biochemistry outlining structure and metabolism of biomolecules, metabolic regulation, principles of molecular biology. prereq: Chem 1015, Bio 1009
FSCN 1112 - Principles of Nutrition (TS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course explores fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, and food sources. We will learn about evaluating nutrition information and food safety, and investigate the role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment. Nutrition is both a science and social science. This class involves social aspects, but mainly concerns the biochemistry and physiology of how food is processed in the body. The chapters on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism especially built on biology and physiology. Course topics include: 1. essential nutrients (macro-and-micro-nutrients) needed from the diet; 2. major functions of nutrients and physiological changes with deficiency or excess; 3. digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients; 4. weight management; 5. scientific method and nutrition; 6. life cycle issues; 7. food safety issues 8. nutrition for sports Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry
APEC 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00019 - Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Economic behavior of consumers/firms in domestic/international markets. Demand, supply, competition. Efficiency, Invisible Hand. Monopoly, imperfect competition. Externalities, property rights. Economics of public policy in environment/health/safety. Public goods, tax policy.
APEC 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00323 - ApEc 1102ApEc 1102H/Econ 1102
Typically offered: Every Spring
Unemployment/inflation, measures of national income, macro models, fiscal policy/problems. Taxes and the national debt. Money/banking, monetary policy/problems. Poverty and income distribution. International trade and exchange rates. Economic growth/development. prereq: 1101 or Econ 1101
ECON 1101 - Principles of Microeconomics (SOCS, GP)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Econ 1101/1104/1111/ApEc 1101
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Microeconomic behavior of consumers, firms, and markets in domestic and world economy. Demand and supply. Competition and monopoly. Distribution of income. Economic interdependencies in the global economy. Effects of global linkages on individual decisions. prereq: knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ECON 1102 - Principles of Macroeconomics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00020 - ApEc 1102/Econ 1102/1105/1112
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aggregate consumption, saving, investment, and national income. Role of money, banking, and business cycles in domestic and world economy. International trade, growth, and development. U.S. economy and its role in the world economy. International interdependencies among nations. prereq: [1101 or equiv], knowledge of plane geometry and advanced algebra
ANTH 1003W - Understanding Cultures (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02508
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to social and cultural anthropology. Comparative study of societies and cultures around the world. Topics include adaptive strategies; economic processes; kinship, marriage, and gender; social stratification; politics and conflicts; religion and ritual; personality and culture.
EPSY 1281 - Psychological Science Applied (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
The course introduces students to applied psychology as a discipline and reviews fundamental principles of psychology through the lenses of applied and professional areas that are the foci of CEHD majors. Specifically, through the lenses of education, we review principles of learning, memory, development, intelligence, and interventions; through the lenses of health and wellness, we review personality, biological, social, and cognitive bases of normal and abnormal behavior, as well as treatments; and, through the lenses of business and organizations, we review principles of motivation, sensation perception, and social behavior. Thus, these psychological principles are considered theoretically, empirically, and through examples for application, with lab discussions and projects emphasizing education, business, health and wellness. The course serves as a foundation for future coursework in education, health sciences, and psychology, and is consistent with the APA’s public education effort to demonstrate how the science and application of psychology benefits society and improves lives.
FSOS 1101 - Intimate Relationships (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Couple dynamics. Overview of how to develop, maintain, and terminate an intimate relationship. Communication, conflict resolution, power, roles. Programs for marriage preparation, marriage enrichment, and marital therapy.
FSOS 1201 - Human Development in Families: Lifespan (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Human development in a family context. Life-course and human development theories. Individual/family development, mate selection, birth, life cycle. Physical, cognitive, language, social, social, and personality development. Historical, social, and cultural factors. How theory/research are applied to everyday lives.
FSOS 1211 - An Interdisciplinary Look at the Family in Multicultural America (DSJ, SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02469
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course is designed as an introduction to multicultural families using an ecological lens. The institution of the family is recognized globally as a basic unit of a society that produces, develops, socializes, and launches the next generation of its citizenry. This course will focus on families in contemporary America, a society that has grown increasingly diverse, and faces many complex challenges in today’s global environment. Using a human ecological lens allows us to examine families in their nested and interdependent environments--how individuals shape and are shaped by families, their human built environments, their socio-cultural environments, and their natural-physical environments.
GEOG 1301W - Our Globalizing World (SOCS, GP, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01971
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introduction to geographical understandings of globalization and of connections/differences between places.
PSY 1001 - Introduction to Psychology (SOCS)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00518 - PSTL 1281/Psy 1001/Psy 1001H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scientific study of human behavior. Problems, methods, findings of modern psychology.
SOC 1001 - Introduction to Sociology (SOCS, DSJ)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00445 - Soc 1001/Soc 1011V/Soc 1012W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what sociologists call the "sociological imagination:" a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Through the course we will examine some of the central concepts and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. Throughout the course you will be asked to consider the ways in which society affects your life, and how you, in turn, affect society. prereq: Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F
ANAT 3001 - Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Fall
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002W or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph
ANAT 3601 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612], at least soph
ANAT 3611 - Principles of Human Anatomy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01225 - Anat 3001/Anat 3611/Anat 3601
Typically offered: Every Spring
Anatomical relationships. Function based upon form. Clinical applications. Gross (macroscopic) anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy). Neuroanatomy (nervous system), embryology (developmental anatomy). prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or equiv], at least soph; [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3602 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 3612] recommended
KIN 3027 - Human Anatomy for Kinesiology Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to human anatomy. Emphasizes musculoskeletal anatomy germane to athletic training, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor learning/development.
BIOL 3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Ways different animals solve similar physiological problems. prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]
KIN 3385 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Functional/integrative approach organized by level of description, from molecular genetics to dynamic movement/clinical conditions. Cellular mechanisms for major physiological functions. Exercise, fitness, health, growth. prereq: [[KIN 3027 or ANAT 3001 or ANAT 3601 or ANAT 3611], KIN major] or instr consent
PHSL 3051 - Human Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01828
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How major organ systems function (nerve, muscle, circulation, respiration, endocrine, renal, gastrointestinal, temperature regulation and energy metabolism). Three one-hour lectures, two-hour lab. prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 1 yr college biol], 1 yr college chem
PHSL 3061 - Principles of Physiology
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01354
Typically offered: Every Fall
Human physiology with emphasis on quantitative aspects. Organ systems (circulation, respiration, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, muscle, peripheral and central nervous systems), cellular transport processes, and scaling in biology. prereq: 1 year college chem and physics and math through integral calculus
PHAR 1002 - Medical Terminology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Interested in learning the difference between an antigen and an antibiotic? During this course, you will not only increase your medical vocabulary by more than 2,500 words in a self-paced manner, you will also learn to identify and articulately describe a wide variety of medical conditions and processes. Communication related to disease states, procedures, and diagnostics in healthcare can sometimes seem like another language. This course will help you recognize medical abbreviations, relate terms to procedures and diagnostics, and comprehend the meaning of medical terminology by using word elements. If you are interested in the healthcare fields or would like to understand more about your own medical care, we encourage you to learn more in this course. This is a completely online, self-paced course but runs on an accelerated 10-week schedule each Fall, Spring, and Summer term. For more information, contact phar1002@umn.edu or 612-624-7976.
PHAR 5201 - Applied Medical Terminology
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course will help students recognize medical abbreviations, relate terms to procedures and diagnostics, comprehend the meaning of medical terminology by using word elements, and apply medical terms in the context of patient care. Communication related to disease states, procedures, and diagnostics in healthcare can sometimes seem like another language. During this course, students will not only increase their medical vocabulary by more than 2500 words in a self-paced manner, they will also learn to identify and articulately describe a wide variety of medical conditions and processes. This is a completely online, self-paced course that runs on an accelerated 10-week schedule. Course information is sent to the U of M email addresses of registered students by the first day of classes each Fall, Spring, and Summer term. For more information, contact phar5201@umn.edu or 612-624-7976. prereq: basic knowledge of human anatomy/physiology
PUBH 3001 - Personal and Community Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02195
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamental principles of health conservation and disease prevention.
PUBH 3004 - Basic Concepts in Personal and Community Health
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01062 - PubH 3003/PubH 3004
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of communicable and degenerative diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, and alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
KIN 3001 - Lifetime Health and Wellness (SOCS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Overview of health/wellness. Physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, and financial health. Influence of societal changes on general health/wellness of diverse populations.
CSPH 5431 - Functional Nutrition: An Expanded View of Nutrition, Chronic Disease, and Optimal Health
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Principles of nutrition related to metabolic function. Model attempts to reduce chronic disease by looking for underlying causes/triggers and to intervene to restore function and achieve optimal health. Emphasizes importance of nutrition as a component of self-care. prereq: [Jr or sr or grad student] in Health Sciences or instr consent
FSCN 3301 - Food Choices: Healing the Earth, Healing Ourselves
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01890
Typically offered: Every Spring
Link between our food/diet, agricultural practices, and health of planet. Food security. Cultural/personal context of food choices. Ways that food is produced, especially industrial monoculture. Food choices and the earth's bio diversity. Land use, water use, pollution, energy needs, climate change. Alternatives: organic/sustainable, fair trade. Economic policies/choices. Global tradeoffs. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student
FSCN 3612 - Life Cycle Nutrition
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Prerequisites: CHEM 1061/1065
Typically offered: Every Fall
Nutritional changes throughout lifecycle. Pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adulthood, aging. Topics relevant to lifecycle changes (e.g., body composition, immunity, sports nutrition). prereq: CHEM 1061/1065
FSCN 3614 - Nutrition Education and Counseling
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Effective communication skills are essential for all food and nutrition professionals whether working in clinical, community, management, or food service settings. This course is divided into two components: nutrition education and counseling. These two components will first teach the necessary knowledge and skills required of entry level dietitians such as educational theory and techniques, counseling theory and methods, interviewing techniques, and health literacy. You will also develop and practice these skills through application verbally in breakout sessions as well as written. The written component for the education section will include an interview paper; several informal activities in class all which will help develop and practice skills to complete the final project of developing a nutrition education lesson plan. The syllabus will focus on the nutrition education component. prereq: 1112
FSCN 3615 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health (GP)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Sociocultural aspects of regional/cultural diversity in food preferences and food behavior, food habits, demographics, lifestyles, food consumption, and expenditures. Effect of socioeconomic status, religious beliefs, age, and cultural meaning of foods on food choices.
FSCN 4112 - Food Chemistry and Functional Foods
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Most-important food constituents, their occurrence, structures, functional properties, and health benefits. Proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, water. Vitamins, minerals, enzymes, phytochemicals, food additives, contaminants. prereq: 3102, BIOC 3021
FSCN 4612 - Advanced Human Nutrition
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Advanced study of digestion/absorption of nutrients. Research techniques in nutrition, including human/epidemiological studies. Health promotion, disease prevention theories. prereq: 1112, [CHEM 1022 or CHEM 1062 and CHEM 1066], [BioC 3021 or PHSL 3051 or ANSC 3301 or BIOL 3211]
FSCN 4614W - Community Nutrition (SOCS, DSJ, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Nutrition risks associated with different age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. Community needs assessment. Program planning and evaluation. Programs developed to address the needs and interests of people at different stages of the life cycle, ethnic or cultural backgrounds, and literacy levels.
PUBH 3905 - Nutrition for Public Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00887 - PubH 3905/PubH 5905
Typically offered: Every Fall
Topics of contemporary interest. Concepts/facts about science of human nutrition discussed in relation to personal/community nutrition problems/concerns. Applied introductory course with labs. prereq: Jr or sr or instr consent
EPSY 3264 - Basic and Applied Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02317
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Introductory statistics. Emphasizes understanding/applying statistical concepts/procedures. Visual/quantitative methods for presenting/analyzing data, common descriptive indices for univariate/bivariate data. Inferential techniques.
NURS 3710 - Statistics for Clinical Practice and Research (MATH)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall
Numerical reasoning, measurement principles. Vital statistics, rates, data description. Probability. Hypothesis testing/confidence intervals for tests on means. Proportions, correlations, linear regression. prereq: [High school algebra or instr consent], students enrolled in School of Nursing must take A/F option
PSY 3801 - Introduction to Psychological Measurement and Data Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01316 - Psy 3801/Psy 3801H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Descriptive/basic inferential statistics used in psychology. Measures of central tendency, variability, t tests, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, confidence intervals, effect sizes. Psychological measurement. Graphical data presentation. Statistical software. prereq: High school algebra, [PSY 1001 or equiv]; intended for students who plan to major in psychology
SOC 3811 - Social Statistics (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02148 - Soc 3811/Soc 5811
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer
This course will introduce majors and non-majors to basic statistical measures and procedures that are used to describe and analyze quantitative data in sociological research. The topics include (1) frequency and percentage distributions, (2) central tendency and dispersion, (3) probability theory and statistical inference, (4) models of bivariate analysis, and (5) basics of multivariate analysis. Lectures on these topics will be given in class, and lab exercises are designed to help students learn statistical skills and software needed to analyze quantitative data provided in the class. prereq: Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Soc 5811 (Soc 5811 offered Fall terms only). Undergraduates with strong math background are encouraged to register for 5811 in lieu of 3811. Soc Majors/Minors must register A-F.
STAT 3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: (Select a set)
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.
STAT 3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements. prereq: Math 1272
LAMP 4177 - Nature of Disease: Pathology for Allied Health Students
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer
Human disease as alteration of normal structure/function of anatomy/physiology. Variety of lecturers cover their area of expertise. Grade based on five unit exams. Offered online in spring and summer. prereq: One anatomy course, one physiology course, or instr consent
ABUS 4022W - Management in Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Demands on today's managers, with a focus on small to medium-sized organizations. Techniques/ideas beyond traditional studies. Applying management theory at all levels. Managing in a global workplace. Organizational planning and decision making. Organizing resources. Leading/motivating people. Controlling/evaluating organizational activities. This writing intensive designated course will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to this discipline because clear, accurate, and professional communication is essential to organization management. The ability to write effectively in terms of specified audiences ensures, in the professional world, successful communication between team members as well as the success of the projects, companies, and employees they represent. prereq: 45 semester credits recommended
ABUS 4501 - Building a Small Business Start-up
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Basic marketing, finance, and leadership principles that apply to the formation of a small business enterprise. A variety of class discussions and independent reflective exercises will enable students to assess their resources and develop management, leadership, and business administration skills. The final project is collaborative: the creation of a business plan for a start-up. Prerequisites: None, although previous business experience or study will be helpful.
ABUS 4705 - Leadership and Management for the Professional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Foundation needed for successful leadership or management of a professional practice including recruitment, motivation, and compensation of employees, leadership of effective teams, choosing an appropriate organizational structure, understanding and leveraging diversity, developing a healthy culture, managing change, negotiations, and business ethics. Real-world examples to highlight successful and unsuccessful practices. Apply these principles to their own specific professional interests to become more effective leaders and managers. prereq: 45 semester cr
ABUS 4707 - Financial Management for the Professional Practice
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer
Foundation knowledge to understand financial principles and apply them to investment, organizational, and operational decisions in a professional practice. Case studies using Excel to model common scenarios in practice. prereq: 45 semester cr
HSM 3521 - Health Care Delivery Systems
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Health care (HC) delivery systems, health economics, third-party/public reimbursement, current trends in HC organizations/management/administration. Regulations, standards, quality assurance, accreditation, current ethical issues. Implications for HC providers/professionals, patients/families, communities, international health. prereq: 30 cr
HSM 4541 - Health Care Finance
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
General principles of financial management for health care industry. Operational knowledge of financial management theory, esp., how hospitals and their departments develop/balance operating/capital budget for business growth/development. Governmental policies, procedures, and ethical issues controlling the health care industry. prereq: Basic accounting knowledge, a course such as ACCT 2050, and knowledge of Microsoft Excel are strongly recommended. HSM pre-majors should wait for major status to take this course.
HSM 4561 - Health Care Administration and Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Background knowledge and skills in business and administrative aspects of health care. Applications of behavioral and organizational theory to health care settings. Organization models, reimbursement methodologies, information systems, staff scheduling, employee evaluation, accreditation agencies, productivity management, budget planning, group leadership.
MGMT 3001 - Fundamentals of Management
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects/characteristics of organizations, their members. Why people/groups feel/behave as they do. Processes/methods that improve behavior/attitudes/effectiveness of members. Member/manager skills. Guest speakers, group presentations, films.
MGMT 3010 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02347
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Fundamentals of entrepreneurship. Career paths, including new business start-ups, franchising, acquisitions (including family business succession), corporate venturing, and entre-preneurial services. Legal structures for new business formation. Aspects of business law/ethics.
PUBH 3801 - Health Economics and Policy
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ApEc 3801/PubH 3801
Typically offered: Every Spring
Economics of health care markets. Problems faced by consumers/health care services. Builds on principles of supply/demand for health, health care/insurance, and role of government. Theoretical/empirical models/applications. prereq: Course on microeconomics, course on basic statistics
BTHX 5100 - Introduction to Clinical Ethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Most frequent ethical problems faced by clinicians, patients/families, and ethics consultants. Forgoing life sustaining treatment, decisional capacity, informed consent, treatment refusals, death/dying, pediatric ethics, reproductive issues, research ethics, psychiatric illness. Real cases.
BTHX 5300 - Foundations of Bioethics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Overview of major contemporary frameworks used to approach ethical issues in bioethics. prereq: Grad student or instr consent
NURS 4402 - Taking Ethical Action in Health Care (CIV)
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Ethical dimensions/role obligations of health care professionals related to selected social issues with health consequences. prereq: Senior undergrad nursing student, [4104 or instr consent]
PHAR 4200W - Drugs and the U.S. Healthcare System (CIV, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01248
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Being an empowered patient is important when discussing ethics-driven issues within the U.S. healthcare system. This course will expose students to current controversial issues surrounding medications and national healthcare, and help students examine their own role as a participant in this system. Students will learn to draw comparisons between medication use systems around the world and analyze other controversies related to access, choice and quality of healthcare. During this course, students will understand how their choices, ethics and behavior affect societal decisions surrounding the availability of medications in the US and what their rights are as a citizen-participant during the healthcare debate. This is a completely online course with weekly due dates. Course information is sent to the University email addresses of registered students shortly before, and/or on, the first day of classes each Fall and Spring term. For more information, contact phar4200@umn.edu or 612-624-7976.
PHIL 3302W - Moral Problems of Contemporary Society (CIV, WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 00437
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
How do we determine what is right and wrong? How should we live our lives? What do we owe others? Moral/ethical thought applied to problems and public disputes (e.g., capital punishment, abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, same-sex marriage, environmental protection).
PHIL 3305 - Medical Ethics
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Moral problems confronting physicians, patients, and others concerned with medical treatment, research, and public health policy. Topics include abortion, living wills, euthanasia, genetic engineering, informed consent, proxy decision-making, and allocation of medical resources.
CSPH 1001 - Principles of Holistic Health and Healing
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Principles/measures of holistic health that promote health and well being. Theory, how holistic health is incorporated into health care delivery system. Application/integration of holistic health into daily personal life.
CSPH 3001 - Introduction to Integrative Healing
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Current US health care system/US cultural views of health/wellness. Various complementary/alternative medical systems/practices that might be integrated into current way of thinking about health/wellness/treatment of illness/disease. prereq: 60 credits or instr consent
CSPH 5101 - Introduction to Integrative Healing Practices
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Cultural contexts of healing traditions. Integrative therapies presented by practitioners, including traditional Chinese medicine, meditation, mind-body healing, spiritual practices, energy healing, naturopathy, herbalism, movement therapies, homeopathy, manual therapies, nutrition. prereq: Jr or sr or grad student; or instructor consent
ABUS 4023W - Communicating for Results (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Aspects of communication essential for being persuasive/influential. Organizing/presenting ideas effectively, strategies for audience analysis, choosing communication methods, making appropriate use of informal influence methods, handling dissent. Processes for intercultural communication. prereq: 45 cr completed
ABUS 4571W - Introduction to Grant Writing for Health Care and Nonprofit Organizations (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02359 - ABUS 4571/ABUS 4571W/HSM 4571
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Nonprofits and health care entities will continue to be challenged by limited resources and increased needs in communities they serve. This reality also results in an increased need for these groups to find additional financial support. This course will provide an understanding of ways to find, research, and write proposals for grants offered by government and private entities. As a writing intensive course, it will spend significant time focusing on the writing process. Writing is crucial to the field because the only way for a nonprofit to be awarded a grant is by submitting a written proposal. The strength of the proposal has a significant impact on the money that an organization will receive. Students will become familiar with various sections of the proposal by drafting, editing, and seeking feedback, and by revising a needs assessment, goal statement, budget justification, and statement of organizational purpose. By learning how to write well in the field, students will increase their chances of being employed by a nonprofit and securing funding for their organization.
ICP 3101W - Inter-College Program Proposal Development (WI)
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Prerequisites: ICP student or #
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Write proposal of study/formulate plan of courses through which to complete degree. prereq: ICP student or instr consent
KIN 5203 - Health Media, Consumerism, and Communication
Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
Effects of media, consumerism, technology, and health related issues. Students form/defend opinions on positive/negative aspects of how health information is disseminated and how individual health decisions are made.
PHAR 3206 - Issues in Health Literacy and Communication
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01988 - Phar 3206/Phar 5206
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Issues associated with health literacy. Dimensions associated with misunderstandings that occur in health-related communication.
WRIT 3029W - Business and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01353
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Practice writing for various professional purposes/audiences, using appropriate styles, tones, and organizational elements. Potential genres include proposals, reports, web content, email, executive summaries, job search portfolios. Attention to workplace collaboration and broader issues of professional literacy.
WRIT 3221W - Communication Modes and Methods (WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Theories and practices of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and scientific and technical communication. Lecture, discussion, simulations, small group work.
WRIT 3257 - Technical and Professional Presentations
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Oral presentation skills for technical or professional topics. Visual communication, audience analysis, organizing presentation, presenting complex material. Emphasizes use of computers.
WRIT 3405W - Humanistic Healthcare and Communication (AH, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring
Relationships in art between communication, humanism in healthcare, empathy.
WRIT 3562W - Technical and Professional Writing (WI)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01235 - Writ 3562V/Writ 3562W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Written/oral communication in professional settings, gathering research, analyzing audience, assessing/practicing multiple genres. Draft, test, revise present findings in oral presentation. prereq: [Jr or sr or instr consent], [1301 or 1401 or equiv]
WRIT 3577W - Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet (TS, WI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
How persuasive communication is tailored to the Internet; how Internet technologies enable/limit persuasion; how to adapt rhetorical theory to 21st century digital writing; ethical issues, including free speech, copyright, fair use, privacy; rhetorics of social networks. prereq: Soph or jr or sr or instr consent