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Duluth Campus

Geographic Information Science B.A.

Geography, Urban, Environmental & Sustain Studies
College of Liberal Arts
  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Spring 2017
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 52 to 57
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
The core of the Geographic Information Science major is the study and use of geographic information systems (GIS). Central to this program are the theoretical and applied fundamentals of the collection, management, analysis, and representation of spatial data. The program builds on this core by exploring both traditional and novel methods for geo-visualization and by exploring applications of GIS to environmental, resource, and policy/management issues. Methods include teaching various remote sensing technologies used to collect and classify remotely sensed data, critically discussing the implications of geo-spatial technologies on individuals and society, and demonstrating how geo-spatial technologies are used effectively in urban and regional planning processes. Students also learn about GIS project management and research process, professional ethics, and presentation. The major blends well with other majors such as anthropology, biology, chemistry, computer science, criminology, engineering, environment and sustainability, geography, geology, history, mathematics, political science, sociology, statistics, and urban and regional studies. Students are encouraged to double major. Honors Requirements: Candidates must have a 3.00 overall GPA and a 3.30 in the major. An honors project must be completed in GEOG 4999. Students who wish to have such work considered for honors must complete a departmental form prior to the second semester of their senior year. Completed projects must be approved by the sponsoring faculty member and other members of the department.
Program Delivery
This program is available:
  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)
Admission Requirements
For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.
Required prerequisites
Introductory Requirement (1 cr)
Transfer students with 24 or more credits and current UMD students who change colleges to CLA are exempt from this requirement. New first-year students with 24 or more PSEO credits may request to be waived from this requirement.
UST 1000 - UMD Seminar (1.0-2.0 cr)
General Requirements
The Board of Regents, on recommendation of the faculty, grants degrees from the University of Minnesota. Requirements for an undergraduate degree from University of Minnesota Duluth include the following:
  1. Students must meet all course and credit requirements of the departments and colleges or schools in which they are enrolled including an advanced writing course. Students seeking two degrees must fulfill the requirements of both degrees. However, two degrees cannot be awarded for the same major.
  2. Students must complete all requirements of the Liberal Education Program.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 120 semester credits.
  4. At least 30 of the last 60 degree credits earned immediately before graduation must be awarded by UMD.
  5. Students must complete at least half of their courses at the 3xxx-level and higher at UMD. Study-abroad credits earned through courses taught by UM faculty and at institutions with which UMD has international exchange programs may be used to fulfill this requirement.
  6. If a minor is required, students must take at least three upper division credits in their minor field from UMD.
  7. The minimum cumulative UM GPA required for graduation will be 2.00 and will include only University of Minnesota coursework. A minimum UM GPA of 2.00 is required in each UMD undergraduate major and minor. No academic unit may impose higher grade point standards to graduate.
  8. Diploma, transcripts, and certification will be withheld until all financial obligations to the University have been met.
Program Requirements
1. A second field or study (either a minor or another major). 2. If students choose to double major in any of the following combinations GIS, GEOG, ES, or URS, they must follow the fall 2012 or later degree requirements for all programs. Following these requirements addresses the overlapping of courses across programs. 3. Students with the GIS major cannot pursue the GIS undergraduate certificate or the GEOG minor (starting fall 2016 for the latter).
Required Core (30-31 cr)
GEOG 1414 - Physical Geography [LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
or GEOL 1110 - Geology and Earth Systems [LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN] (4.0 cr)
GEOG 1202 - World Regional Geography [LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 1304 - Human Geography [LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI] (3.0 cr)
or GEOG 2305 - Geography of Cultural Diversity [CDIVERSITY] (3.0 cr)
And all of the following:
GEOG 2552 - Introduction to Maps and Geospatial Information [LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
GEOG 3532 - Map Design and Geographic Visualization (4.0 cr)
GIS 3580 - Earth Imagery (4.0 cr)
GIS 4585 - Applied Statistics in GIS (4.0 cr)
GIS 3597 - Internship in GIS (3.0-4.0 cr)
GEOG 4612 - Field Techniques (4.0 cr)
GIS 4909 - Professional Preparedness (1.0 cr)
Information Science Requirement (4-8 cr)
GIS 3563 - Geographic Information Science I: Theory and Analysis (4.0 cr)
GIS 3564 - Geographic Information Science II: Applied GIS (4.0 cr)
or Graduate Level Course (consent required)
GIS 4565 - Geographic Information Science Intensive: Theory, Analysis, and Applications (4.0 cr)
Electives (14 cr)
Take 2 courses for a minimum of 8 credits from GIS 3xxx-5xxx. Additional GIS 2xxx-5xxx courses will apply to the 'Other Electives' area. To fulfill this requirement take courses from the 'Other Electives' area to reach a minimum of 14 elective credits across both sub-requirements. Courses cannot satisfy more than one area within the major.
Take 2 or more course(s) totaling 8 or more credit(s) from the following:
· GIS 3591 - Independent Study in GIS (1.0-3.0 cr)
· GIS 4533 - Distributed Geographic Information Services: Mobile and Web Based Solutions (4.0 cr)
· GIS 4586 - Geoprocessing with Python (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5571 - Geographic Information Science in Urban Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5572 - Environmental Application of GIS (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5573 - GIScience in Regional Sustainability Applications (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5581 - Digital Image Processing and Analysis (4.0 cr)
· GIS 5591 - Independent Study in GIS (1.0-3.0 cr)
· Other Electives
Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:
· BIOL 5808 - Landscape Ecology: Theory and Application (3.0 cr)
· CUE 3101 - Introduction to Design Thinking and Conceptual Competencies (3.0 cr)
· ES 3100 - Sustainable Food Systems [SUSTAIN] (3.0 cr)
· ES 3500 - Ecological Economics (3.0 cr)
· FORS 3167 - GEOG 3167 Cultural Geography of Iceland (3.0 cr)
· FORS 3205 - GEOG 3205 Mapping in Belize (3.0 cr)
· FORS 3800 - COMM 3800/GEOG 3800 Grassroots Activism in India (4.0 cr)
· GIS 2xxx
· GIS 3xxx
· GIS 4xxx
· GIS 5xxx
· SSP 3004 - Tutor Practicum (1.0-2.0 cr)
· ART 1013 - 2-D Digital Design (3.0 cr)
or ART 1900 - Visual Literacy [LE CAT9, FINE ARTS] (3.0 cr)
· CS 1121 - Introduction to Programming in Visual BASIC.NET [LE CAT3, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
or CS 1141 - Introduction to Programming in C# (3.0 cr)
or CS 2121 - Introduction to Programming in Java [LE CAT3, LOGIC & QR] (3.0 cr)
· CS 3211 - Database System Concepts (4.0 cr)
or CS 4611 - Database Management Systems (4.0 cr)
Advanced Writing Requirement (3 cr)
WRIT 31xx - Adv Writing (3 cr)
 
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UST 1000 - UMD Seminar
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02403 - EHS 1000/UST 1000
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Facilitates the successful transition into college learning and student life at UMD. Credit will not be granted if already received for EHS 1000.
GEOG 1414 - Physical Geography (LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
The environment is highly dynamic and is continually modified by human and environmental processes. This course examines these processes to better understand how the Earth’s landscapes were formed and how they are currently being transformed. Specifically, students will understand the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment including Earth-sun relations, water resources, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils.
GEOL 1110 - Geology and Earth Systems (LE CAT4, NAT SCI, SUSTAIN)
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Comprehensive survey of Earth's composition, structure, and dynamics to develop an understanding of internal processes, plate tectonics, and surface processes as a framework for geological history and development of life.
GEOG 1202 - World Regional Geography (LE CAT8, LEIP CAT08, GLOBAL PER)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
World Regional Geography offers an overview of the different regions which comprise the world. This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture and politics. In terms of the weekly pacing of the course, we will focus on a different world region each week. However, in a more general sense, we will focus on the root causes of global problems, not the specifics of each world region. In this way, a central goal of this class is to challenge the notion that world regions exists in isolation from other spaces. Instead, we will analyze how regions develop and change based on how they manage their relationships with other spaces.
GEOG 1304 - Human Geography (LE CAT6, LECD CAT06, SOC SCI)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Human geography is a social science that examines the world, its people, and their communities, economies, politics, and interactions with the environment. This course introduces core concepts such as space, place, and scale, and applies them to understand human society. Topics from the spread of humans around the globe, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and racial and ethnic difference are explored.
GEOG 2305 - Geography of Cultural Diversity (CDIVERSITY)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring
This course utilizes social scientific approaches to cultural diversity in the United States to develop a critical understanding of the geography of our unequal society. We examine why humans spatially segregate themselves into racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, how meaning is constructed around these differences, and how the politics of difference are expressed geographically. Credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 2405
GEOG 2552 - Introduction to Maps and Geospatial Information (LE CAT2, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
This course starts with the definition of what a map is and considers maps as tools for communication. Students are led to explore the effects of scale, projection, cartographic symbolization and generalization on the mapping process and resulting digital databases. Students are introduced to spatial data models, types of spatial data and representation, and study alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS and Remote Sensing. The course includes hands-on map activities; map reading/interpretation, map use, and map production where students will use their laptops to create online web mapping services.
GEOG 3532 - Map Design and Geographic Visualization
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This class builds on GEOG 2552 to train students in the craft of map making and visualization of geographic data in general. Students learn how to create reference or thematic maps from statistical data, both for printing or online display. Students are also introduced to the creation of animated or interactive visualizations. (4 hrs lab) prereq: 2552 or instructor consent; Stat 1411 recommended.
GIS 3580 - Earth Imagery
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
his course is a selective overview of the methods used for imaging the Earth and its atmosphere. The objective is to expose students to the common methods of Earth imaging and provide them with hands-on experiences in exploring these rich datasets. This course introduces aerial photographs, satellite imaging (active and passive forms), and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). By the end of the course students will be able to comfortably analyze mulitspectral Earth imagery, handle a LiDAR point cloud, and create a variety of informative outputs from an image. prereq: 2552; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 3580
GIS 4585 - Applied Statistics in GIS
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course provides GIS students, or students in related fields or interested in spatial data analysis, with little to no previous statistical knowledge, with the basic skills needed to question and analyze data and reach valuable conclusions. Methods covered in this course are commonly used in various fields of social or environmental studies, in economy and management, in sciences and engineering: statistics are a linqua franca that is often a key element of interdisciplinary work. However, there will be an emphasis on the specificity of data that varies in space, and methods specific to spatial analysis will be introduced. The class focus more on application that on theory, through a game dynamic. We may use a variety of software, mostly ArcGIS, QGIS and MS Excel. prereq: 3563 and 3564 or 4565, STAT 1411 preferred; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 3585 or GIS 3585; no grad credit.
GIS 3597 - Internship in GIS
Credits: 3.0 -4.0 [max 8.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Scheduled assignments with direct supervision in public agencies or relevant private firms. prereq: GIS major with minimum 60 credits and instructor consent
GEOG 4612 - Field Techniques
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course trains students in field research methods including methods of observation, recording, analysis, and presentation of field data. The course includes a four day field research experience in Minnesota. prereq: Minimum 60 credits or grad student or instructor consent
GIS 4909 - Professional Preparedness
Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This course is intended for GIS seniors graduating in the spring or the following fall. This is a seminar/workshop course where a group of graduating students work together and under the guidance of their instructor to assess and self-reflect on where they stand as early career GIS professionals. Courses activities include tests, discussion, construction of portfolios and mock job interviews. The course grade is satisfactory/non-satisfactory, based on participation. pre-req: GIS major, minimum 90 credits, no grad credit
GIS 3563 - Geographic Information Science I: Theory and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
GIS 3563 emphasizes the concepts needed to use GIS effectively for acquiring, editing, querying, analyzing and visualizing spatial data. This course is an introduction to GIS and trains basic skills with industry standard GIS software in a wide variety of applications in both the natural and social sciences. The course covers basic data modeling, data manipulation, analytical methods and implications of geospatial technologies on society. prereq: credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 3564 or 4563 and 4564 or GIS4565.
GIS 3564 - Geographic Information Science II: Applied GIS
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
GIS 3564 follows 3563 and provides more hands-on skills with industry standard GIS software in a wide variety of applications in both the natural and social sciences. It covers more advanced analytical methods for both raster and vector data. Lastly, the course questions ethics regarding geospatial information and introduces the code of ethics for GIS professionals. prereq: 3563; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 3564 or 4563 and 4564 or GIS4565.
GIS 4565 - Geographic Information Science Intensive: Theory, Analysis, and Applications
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02453
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
This course is an intensive introduction to GIS, effectively condensing both GIS 3563 and GIS 3564 into one semester. It is intended for students with excellent computer skills, the capacity to handle a heavy workload but not enough time to take both courses. The course covers the concepts needed to use GIS effectively for manipulating, querying, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data. It will also equip students with basic and advanced skills with industry standard GIS software, through a wide variety of hands-on applications in both the natural and social sciences. Students will have to create, manage, and complete their own GIS application throughout the semester. pre-req: department consent This course is equivalent to GIS 3563 and GIS 3564 combined, but 3563 and 3564 carry no graduate credit.
GIS 3591 - Independent Study in GIS
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
For students interested in doing advanced work in selected fields of GIS. prereq: instructor consent
GIS 4533 - Distributed Geographic Information Services: Mobile and Web Based Solutions
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even Year
There are currently over 1 million GIS users world-wide producing nearly 15,000 maps daily. The vast majority of these users utilize the internet and mobile devices to collect, manage, process and store the geospatial data necessary to create and distribute these maps. As such, GIS is shifting from a system where the focus lies almost entirely on the data itself, to a gepgraphic inforamtion service where the focus lies on the distribution of spatial content to stakeholders and end users via the internet. The aim of this course is to expose students to the practical and theoretical applications of distributed geographic information services including web and mobile apps, virtual and physical servers, APIs, and scripting languages (Javascript, CSS, HTML5, SVG). Labs and a group semester project will focus on a distributed GIS for a stakeholder within the region. Software used will vary, but may include ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Pro, or open-source software. pre-req: GIS 3563 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for GIS 3533
GIS 4586 - Geoprocessing with Python
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year
Python has become the main scripting language used for geoprocessing. In this class, building on previous GIS experience, students learn how to automate geoprocessing workflows with Python and how to turn their code into tools and add-ins for the main commercial and open-source GIS software systems. prereq: 3563 and 3564 or 4565 preferred
GIS 5571 - Geographic Information Science in Urban Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This advanced course provides students with an opportunity to explore the many applications of geographic information systems in local government, transportation development, and sustainable community planning. Students learn how GIS can be used to effectively carry out urban and regional planning tasks and gain a basic understanding of GIS project planning and data management. Labs focus on land use planning, transportation development, green infrastructure, and population dynamics from across the globe, with a particular focus on the Duluth area. Software used will be ESRI ArcGIS. prereq: 3563 and 3564 or 4565 (preferred) or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 5571
GIS 5572 - Environmental Application of GIS
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Explore GIS applications to the environmental issues such as natural hazards, forest management, contaminated sites, soil erosion, habitat assessment, and regional planning. Prereq: 3563 or 4565 or grad student or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 5572.
GIS 5573 - GIScience in Regional Sustainability Applications
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the many applications of geographic information science in environmental and societal sustainability, renewable energy, and community planning. This course is based on the idea that in order to successfully transition toward sustainability, a better understanding of coupled human and natural systems in critical, and that because of the unique challenges and conflicts present within northern Minnesota between human and natural systems, it is an ideal location to attempt to mitigate these challenges through the use of Geographic Information Science. Labs focus on current topics relevant to the region including energy use calculations, food deserts, LEED certification, water pollution, and transit planning. Software used will be ESRI ArcGIS. Prereq: 3563 and 3564 or 4565 (preferred) or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 5573
GIS 5581 - Digital Image Processing and Analysis
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring
This advanced remote sensing course focuses on theories and applications of digital image processing and provides students with knowledge and skills of advance digital image processing and a variety of analyitical techniques. Topics include image display and visualization, methods for geometric and radiometric corrections, image enhancement, image classification, change detection, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). prereq: 3580 or instructor consent; credit will not be granted if already received for GEOG 4580 or GEOG 5581
GIS 5591 - Independent Study in GIS
Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer
Independent problems for postbaccalaureate students interested in doing additional work in selected fields in GIS. prereq: instructor consent
BIOL 5808 - Landscape Ecology: Theory and Application
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall
Key issues in landscape ecology including scale, measuring landscape patterns, mechanisms shaping landscapes, implications of landscape patterns on plant and animal populations, communities, and ecosystems, and implementing landscape principles for natural resource management. prereq: 2801, 2802 or WRS or IBS Grad student
CUE 3101 - Introduction to Design Thinking and Conceptual Competencies
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
This course introduces students to each step of the design thinking process and design thinker's toolkit. Design thinking is an iterative problem solving process of discovery, ideation, and experimentation that employs design-based techniques to gain insight and yield innovative solutions for virtually any type of organizational or business challenge. Students will know the six conceptual competencies important for creatively solving complex real-world challenges. Students will develop skills as ethnographers, visual thinkers, strategists, and storytellers through a hybrid of seminar discussions and collaborative projects. Students will directly apply what they have learned to cases in order to untangle the complexities of markets, organizations, communities, policies and to create real impact. pre-req: CUE major or instructor consent
ES 3100 - Sustainable Food Systems (SUSTAIN)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Historical and contemporary food systems within sustainability framework. Understands food within social, political, economic and environmental contexts. Looks at sustainable production, consumption and processing issues.
ES 3500 - Ecological Economics
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall
Examine the basic principles and assumptions of Micro and Macro Economics, and their relevance in our modern global economic system. Examine the environmental/social consequences of deviations from these assumptions, and alternative economic models/analyses and policies consistent with sustainable development. prereq: [ES or URS major] and [Econ 1022 or Econ 1023] or instructor consent
FORS 3167 - GEOG 3167 Cultural Geography of Iceland
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02252
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall, Spring & Summer
Taught in Iceland this course explores the changing cultural & political geography of Iceland and its relationship to the complex processes of globalization, regional politics and local economies. It examines the history of Iceland as a Viking settlement, a colony of Denmark, and an independent nation with a focus on the political and economic connection between Iceland and other places have influenced the country. Students will examine Iceland's position as part of the European Economic Community but not of the common currency or the European Union, contributed to the 2008 economic crisis and the responses to that crisis. Student will consider how geographic context, national culture and political economy impact the cultural geography of Iceland and is designed to give an intercultural experience with contemporary economic and political issues through a geographic perspective. Students will apply geographic theories of cultural difference, political economy, and resistance to develop an understanding of the multiple sites and scales of Icelandic identity, culture and politics. prereq: Admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Education Office.
FORS 3205 - GEOG 3205 Mapping in Belize
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02084 - GEOG 3205/FORS 3205
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Study abroad course; taught on site in Belize. Novice mappers to the geospatially proficient students will be exposed to a meaningful field experience and lab practicum where field data and satellite imagery will be combined to render valuable information about the Maya Gold landscape. Students will utilize Global Positioning System (GPS) and remote sensing techniques to create informative and cartographically derived outputs; a map. Through this international experience, students will be exposed to a unique cultural experience where they will learn what is important to Mayan culture by observing the dynamics of this landscape. Time spent in Belize will expose each student to the eclectic mingling of Mestizo, Mopan and Kekchi Maya, Garifuna, Creoles, Lebanese, East Indian and Chinese peoples. prereq: Admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Education Office.
FORS 3800 - COMM 3800/GEOG 3800 Grassroots Activism in India
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: 02244 - FORS 3800/COMM 3800/GEOG 3800
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Summer
Taught in Bangalore, India where students will examine the process of social change in Bangalore and witness firsthand how disempowered groups such as tribal communities and religious minorities are advocating for their social and economic rights. Bangalore has grown tremendously in the last 10 years, as the city has become the center of India's technology economy; however, the benefits of this growth have not been equally distributed. Students will examine the causes of disenfranchisement (including gender, caste, and colonialism) as well as how city has changed as a result of globalization and the liberalization of the Indian economy. This course has three goals: (1) Students understand the notions of community employment as theorized by scholars such as Paulo Freire, M.K. Gandhi, R.J. Ambedkar, as well as more contemporary Indian thinkers; (2) Students visit and learn about the cultural and historical forces that have shaped India, and (3) Students interact firsthand with activists and disenfranchised communities involved in struggles for human rights/empowerment. prereq: Minimum 2.5 GPA, minimum 30 credits, instructor consent. Admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Education Office.
SSP 3004 - Tutor Practicum
Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Supervised practicum for students leading one-on-one and small group tutorials. Tutor responsibilities outlined in contract with instructor. prereq: 3003 or instructor consent
ART 1013 - 2-D Digital Design
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Two-dimensional studio and graphic design concepts using the computer as a creative tool. Laptop required; digital instruction presented only on the Mac platform. prereq: Art or art education major or pre GDM BFA or GDM BFA or pre MGD BBA or MGD BBA or GIS major or Journalism major or art minor or photography minor or arts in media minor or instructor consent. Laptop required; digital instruction presented only on the Mac platform.
ART 1900 - Visual Literacy (LE CAT9, FINE ARTS)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Various forms of visual expression--art, commercial imagery, typography, architecture, graffiti, etc.--as rhetoric. Introduction to variety of theories and/or modes of criticism, and consideration of their value for explanation of visual expression. prereq: Credit will not be granted if already received for 2900
CS 1121 - Introduction to Programming in Visual BASIC.NET (LE CAT3, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: 01394 - FMIS 2225/CS 1121
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring
Introduction to programming in the modern Visual BASIC language. Projects are developed in a .NET environment using the Visual Studio. Includes GUI interface development and expert-driven Windows programming. Major topics include variables, datatype, arithmetic expressions, control structures, arrays and database file processing. For students with no prior programming experience. prereq: 1 yr high school algebra or instructor consent
CS 1141 - Introduction to Programming in C#
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to programming in the C# (read as C sharp) programming language. C# is a simple, object-oriented programming language based on C++. This course will cover data representation, operators, expressions, control structures, arrays and programming with C#. Requires implementation of significant programming projects. prereq: 1 year high school algebra or instructor consent
CS 2121 - Introduction to Programming in Java (LE CAT3, LOGIC & QR)
Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring
Introduction to the Java language including data types, variables, operators and expressions, control structures and arrays. Design and implementation of graphical user interface Java applets for web-based applications. prereq: 3 yrs high school math, or instructor consent
CS 3211 - Database System Concepts
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall
Design and use of database management systems. Emphasis on the relational data model, SQL, integrity constraints, relational database design, file structures, indexing, query processing, and optimization. Oracle-based laboratory work. prereq: FMIS 3201 or FMIS 2201 or SBE 1101, 2511 or instructor consent, a grade of C- or better is required in all prerequisite courses
CS 4611 - Database Management Systems
Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall & Spring
Study of database management fundamentals focusing on the relational data model. Topics include database organization, file organization, query processing, concurrency control, recovery, data integrity, optimization and view implementation. prereq: 2511, 2521 or instructor consent; a grade of C- or better is required in all prerequisite courses