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LINGUISTICS (LING)
College of Liberal Arts
Writing Studies
 
LING 1811 - Introduction to Linguistics (LOGIC & QR, LE CAT2)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Provides an introduction to a theoretical study of the nature of natural language, using examples primarily from present-day English. Students are expected to learn analytical skills to understand how human languages (and the human mind) work and how the sub-components (sounds, words, sentences and meaning) of natural languages are systematically organized.



LING 2506 - Language and Writing
(3.0 cr; Prereq-WRIT 1120; A-F or Aud, spring, every year)
Different from a traditional linguistic approach, language and its system will be examined with emphasis on writing, as opposed to speech. Based on the formal theoretical foundations of language and linguistics, three main topics are discussed in detail. First, worlds major writing systems and a short history of writing are introduced. Second, the English sentence structures are studied from a contemporary theoretical and historical linguistic perspective. Third, language use in writing is discussed in various genres.



LING 3101 - Introduction to Phonology
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1811 or instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Phonology is a grammar of sound for a language. The phonological component of a language is the system of rules, representations and principles that govern the patterning of sounds. To understand the general patterns of sounds, students are explected to analyze data across the language families pre-theoretically. This pre-theoretical analysis will be scientifically explained within modern phonological theories.



LING 3102 - Introduction to Syntax
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1811 or instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Deals with how sentences are structured. After discussing lexical categories (parts of speech) and phrasal structures from a scientific perspective, several different theories are introduced under the blanket name Generative Grammar. Based on Generative Grammar, students learn how to analyze English sentence structures to understand universal properties of natural language.



LING 3103 - Dimensions of Meaning
(3.0 cr; Prereq-1811; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
This course will provide an introduction to the study of what is said (semantics) and what is meant (pragmatics) in natural language. It will provide an introduction to set theory, first- and higher- order logic, and lexical semantics. It will also cover pragmatic topics such as presupposition, implicature, and speech act theory. Beyond these basic topics, the course will focus on specific sub-topics from time to time such as negation, reference, information structure, reported speech, genre, and so on.



LING 3591 - Independent Study in Linguistics
(1.0 - 3.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-1811 or instructor consent, department consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Directed reading and/or research.



LING 4103 - Morphology: Word Structures and Rules
(3.0 cr; =[LING 5103]; Prereq-1811, no grad credit; A-F or Aud, fall, odd academic years)
An introductory survey course on linguistic morphology that examines key concepts used to describe and explain the internal structures of words, and also deals with the central word formation processes across the typologically different languages. This theoretical knowledge acquired is then applied to the analysis of word formation in various discourse domains in present-day English and non-Indo-European languages.



LING 4195 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned)
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 4.0 cr]; =[01650]; Prereq-Minimum 60 credits, no grad credit; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Subdisciplines such as pragmatics, semantics, regional and social language variation, childhood language acquisition, second language learning, language change and linguistic reconstructions, cognitive linguistics, and history of linguistic inquiry.



LING 4400 - Sociolinguistics
(3.0 cr; =[LING 5400, LING 5195]; Prereq-1811 with a grade of C or instructor consent, no grad credit; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
The study of the uses and varieties of language as it is used in society by various groups. Among the topics to be examined are regional, social, and ethnic dialects.



LING 4852 - Teaching Assistantship in Linguistics
(1.0 - 3.0 cr [max 3.0 cr]; =[LING 5852]; Prereq-1811, 3101, 3102 or instructor consent, no grad credit; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Students gain practical experience in teaching-related activities for introductory linguistic courses. Students assist the instructor in administration of the class.



LING 5103 - Morphology: Word Structures and Rules
(3.0 cr; =[LING 4103]; Prereq-1811, Grad students; A-F or Aud, fall, odd academic years)
An introductory survey course on linguistic morphology that examines key concepts used to describe and explain the internal structures of words, and also deals with the central word formation processes across the typologically different languages. This theoretical knowledge acquired is then applied to the analysis of word formation in various discourse domains in present-day English and non-Indo-European languages.



LING 5195 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned)
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 4.0 cr]; =[LING 5400, LING 4400]; Prereq-Coll Grad or Grad student; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Subdisciplines such as pragmatics, semantics, regional and social language variation, sociolinguistics, childhood language acquisition, second language learning, language change and linguistic reconstructions, and history of linguistic inquiry.



LING 5400 - Sociolinguistics
(3.0 cr; =[LING 5195, LING 4400]; Prereq-Graduate standing or collegiate graduate student; A-F only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
The study of the uses and varieties of language as it is used in society by various groups. Among the topics to be examined are regional, social, and ethnic dialects. (Field project)



LING 5811 - Introduction to Modern English
(4.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for ENGL 5811.; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Modern theories of English grammar.



LING 5852 - Practicum in Teaching Linguistics
(3.0 cr; =[LING 4852]; Prereq-College Grad or Grad student; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Supervised teaching in introductory linguistics courses. Experience in preparation for and in conduct of classes, in consultations with students, and in testing.



LING 8591 - Independent Study in Linguistics
(1.0 - 3.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-department approval; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Directed reading and/or research.



 
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