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Morris Courses

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (IS)
Academic Affairs
M Academic Success, Office of
 
IS 1041 - Health Sciences Terminology
(2.0 cr; fall, summer, every year)
A self-study course that has been designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the terminology utilized in the health sciences. There are no formal class sessions. Students take four tests during the term.



IS 1043 - Experiencing Sustainability: Efforts to Build a Sustainable Community on the Northern Plains (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; S-N only, summer, every year)
An experiential course designed to provide an introduction to a broad perspective on building a sustainable community. Participants choose from a range of experiential options designed to make the connections between the environment, food, renewable energy, history, and culture. Experiences are supplemented with online material and evaluation. [Note: day field trips required]



IS 1051 - Introduction to College Learning Skills
(4.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Gateway Program or #; S-N or Aud, summer, every year)
Essential skills for success in higher education. Introduction to computing technology, writing, and math skills. Academic and social skills needed for transition from high school to college. [Note: counts toward the 60-cr general ed requirement]



IS 1061 - Mastering Skills for College Success
(2.0 cr; Prereq-#; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Practical assistance to develop efficient, effective learning/academic performance skills. Improve reading, memorization, test-taking, critical thinking; identify academic and career learning styles, motivation, life skills, and their relation to successful academic performance.



IS 1071 - Systematic Introduction to the Art and Science of Emergency Medical Care
(4.0 cr; Prereq-registration with the Stevens County Ambulance Services; arrangements must be made by contacting them at 320-589-7421; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Introduction to emergency medical care. Develops skills and knowledge to respond appropriately to a medical emergency. (The Stevens County Ambulance Service sets and requires an independent fee.)



IS 1091 - Ethical and Social Implications of Technology (E/CR)
(2.0 cr; fall, spring, every year)
Description of appropriate technological advances. Historical development related to technology and its development cycle. Discussion of the ethical and social implications of technology.



IS 1802 - Music, Education, and the Liberal Arts (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
What is a liberal arts education, and how does music fit into this idea? How does one succeed in such an environment? Explore the liberal arts approach and the role of music in education. This course also helps students to develop skills that are crucial to success in a liberal arts college environment.



IS 1803 - Dangerous Minds: Images of Education in Popular Culture (IC)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Are college students always drunk? Do faculty members routinely have affairs with students? Can marginalized students triumph over adversity in high school? Should a college education be free for anyone who wants to attend? Are sports overemphasized in schools? These are only a sampling of the questions the class will explore by putting a critical lens up to representations of education in popular culture. Through the use of books, film, television, and news stories, students determine if they are being properly represented in today's society or if college really is "Animal House."



IS 1804 - Community Engagement: From Volunteerism to Social Justice (IC)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Introduction through readings and discussion to multiple frameworks for community engagement, ranging from meeting individual people's and agency's needs through direct volunteerism to engaging in research and direct action intended to create systematic change. In the process of studying these frameworks, students are exposed to a variety of controversies in the service-learning field. Students are also introduced to Stevens County through field trips to community agencies. Students complete a community engagement project that reflects their academic and professional goals and meets community needs. Projects can range from volunteering directly at an agency to planning a fundraiser or educational event with a partner to completing a manageable community-based research project. [Note: requires off-site meeting times to be arranged]



IS 1806 - Bottom Dwellers in an Ocean of Air (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, odd academic years)
We live on the bottom of an ocean of a mix of gases and vapors which is kept in constant, chaotic motion by uneven heating and planetary rotation, thus evading our control. We, as humans, are often on the defense or in a role of passive adaptation with regard to weather. Are human beings victims or actors on the stage of global atmospheric dynamics? Striving to assemble an answer to this question, students in the course: (1) mine human history for cases in which significant interaction between human society and climate was found; (2) study individual events in which history and weather were intertwined; (3) learn about palaeoclimate research; and (4) pay particular attention on how this interaction between society and atmosphere is shaped in the modern world. The physical principles of weather and climate are introduced as needed for meaningful discussion.



IS 1807 - Drugged Society: Humanity's Long-term Relationship with Mind-altering Substances (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Mind-altering substances have been part of the human experience since before written history. This seminar/discussion-based course explores the many ways drugs and drug trade have impacted human societies and cultures. Examples of topics include the role of drug trade in European colonization, the connections between drugs and religion and spirituality, development of legal restrictions, the influence of drugs on arts and literature, and the like. This interdisciplinary course requires active classroom participation and the completion of a research project and presentation with both individual and group components.



IS 1808 - Agents and Agency: Modeling Emergence in the Social Sciences (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Agent-based modeling is a computer-based technique for investigating how complex systems can emerge from the behaviors of the people (or other agents) that form the system. Agency is the ability to act according to one's own will, rather than following social and cultural rules of behavior. Can aspects of human societies "emerge" from many simple interactions between agents, constantly repeated? Or are human choices responsible for the structure and attributes of human societies? Is there really a difference, or are these two ways of looking at the same phenomenon? Explore the potential and pitfalls of agent-based modeling as a technique for understanding human societies, through a mixture of readings, discussion, and the hands-on development of small-scale computer models. No previous technical or programming experience necessary.



IS 1809 - Working It (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Explore the role of work in everyday life--how it shapes our identity, impacts our relationships, and brings us closer to (or further from) our hopes and dreams. Course activities focus on the development of skills that are crucial to success in a liberal arts college environment.



IS 1810 - Global Flashpoints (IC)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Focus on information literacy by engaging with a select range of unfolding world events. Students are mutually responsible for providing insight and context into these events. The course promotes global citizenship while teaching information literacy skills.



IS 1811 - Beyond Shushing: Libraries in the 21st Century (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Through readings, discussion, writing, and a service learning project, this class explores the role of libraries and literacy in the 21st century, focusing on the cultural, intellectual, and economic value of literacy. [Note: off campus meetings required]



IS 1812 - As We Beg, Borrow, and Steal: Sampling, Quoting, and Appropriation in the Digital Age (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Explore the history of borrowing, quoting, sampling, and appropriation in the creation of cultural artifacts such as visual arts, music, writing, film, and scientific research, as well as the impact of digital technologies on these trends today. Students create new artifacts using appropriation techniques to both illustrate and comment on these issues.



IS 1814 - Big Ideas in Science (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Explore big ideas in science, including the major theories that are the foundations of our current understanding of the universe. Delve into Atomic Theory, Plate Tectonics, Periodic Law, Evolution, and the Big Bang Theory.



IS 1815 - Out of Africa: The Peopling of Europe, Asia, and the Americas (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Genetic evidence indicates modern humans (Homo sapiens) had their origin in Africa. Explore the geologic and climatic influences on human migration to Europe, Asia, and ultimately the Americas. Discuss changes that resulted from this migration; the end of Neanderthal, new technologies, and the development of racial variations. Finally, discuss intelligence tests in light of the Out of Africa theory.



IS 1816 - Why We Eat What We Eat (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Explores the biological, historical, and cultural origins of eating patterns in the United States and the wider world and the health and environmental consequences of those eating patterns. Students document and reflect upon their own eating patterns and culinary traditions. Current controversies in food production and nutrition are examined. [Note: one evening meeting required]



IS 1993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum. Prereq-Approved directed study form.



IS 2001H - Honors: Traditions in Human Thought (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, every year)
A study of a selection of significant works from history, literature, philosophy, science, and religion across continents from the earliest writings to the present day. Critical reading, writing, and discussion in an interdisciplinary context are emphasized.



IS 2023 - London Arts Tour (FA)
(2.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; summer, offered periodically)
A 14-day arts and culture tour of London. Admission to major museums and theatres highlights the diversity of London's arts and cultural traditions. Includes tours of the city: Buckingham Palace, Westminster, St. Paul's Cathedral, Abbey Road, Carnaby Street, and Portobello Road. Provides tickets for a variety of theatrical performances: Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, the National Theatre, and the West End. Museum entry covers: the British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Hayward Gallery, Tate Modern, Victoria and Albert Museum, and Tate Britain.



IS 2024 - Linking the Global with the Local: Development in Nepal (IP)
(6.0 cr; summer, offered periodically)
Introduction to the study of international development as present in the country of Nepal. Throughout this course, students explore and discuss power relations and systems of inequality within the context of global, national, and local social development efforts. Specifically, the course explores the historical construction of terms such as "social development" and "sustainable development." Students gain insight into the impact of international and national development efforts on a macro-level (e.g., social institutions such as the United Nations and the Government of Nepal) and on a micro-level (e.g., local community development groups). Through these activities, students recognize the diversity of people's and communities' experiences and participation/activism in these efforts as shaped by gender, race, ethnicity, caste, social class, region, and religion. Students engage in critical thinking, writing, reflection, and dialogue through both written and oral assignments, as well as cooperative group work throughout the course.
Effective: Summer 2015


IS 2035 - Aging in Greece: Comparative Cultural Practices and Social Policy (IP)
(4.0 cr; spring, offered periodically)
International service-learning course in Athens and the island of Ikaria that explores cross-cultural differences between Greece and the United States in the meaning and experience of aging, as well as in the social and institutional supports for the aging population. Focus on the role of the community and public sector in promoting optimal aging. Students spend two hours per day in the classroom and 4-6 hours per day at a nursing home.



IS 2993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum. Prereq-Approved directed study form.



IS 3053 - Irish Texts and Contexts (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; summer, offered periodically)
This study abroad course explores the intimate relationship between Irish literature and the spaces in which it developed, from the geographical features that gave prehistoric Irish myths their shape to the large estates that produced poets like William Butler Yeats. The course involves three weeks of travel to many different locations throughout Ireland.



IS 3110 - Rural Community Field Project: Center for Small Towns (SS)
(1.0 - 6.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-#; S-N only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
An educational experience in a rural learning environment that focuses on rural issues of community life, demography, culture, environment, and policy. A collaborative effort between Center for Small Towns and a public rural entity provides a structured environment in which civic engagement objectives are achieved and grounded in a practical setting. Students gain a valuable understanding about the historical social structures of rural society and witness these structures firsthand. [Note: meets the SS general education requirement if taken for 2 or more cr]



IS 3111H - Honors: The End of the World as We've Known It: The Apocalypse Then and Now (SS)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
Exploration of the occasions and representations of apocalyptic views, focusing on the historical, political, and psychological implications. Antecedents and effects of end-of-the-world prophecies are explored through the use of popular culture (e.g. music, science fiction, other media), writings from across cultural and religious frames of reference, and various historical, political, and psychological resources.



IS 3203H - Honors: A Cross-Section of the Enlightenment (HIST)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
A cross-section of the cultural and intellectual history of the 18th century. Figures to be studied may include Descartes, Newton, Locke, Hume, Hobbes, Rousseau, Voltaire, Lavoisier, d'Holbach, and Blake.



IS 3204H - Honors: Ecological Health and the Sustainability of Common-Property Resources (ENVT)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Exploration of "sustainability" from the perspective of economics and ecology. Examples might include ocean fisheries, the rain forest, the introduction of alien species, and the global climate.



IS 3206H - Honors: Introduction to Game Theory (M/SR)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program, high school higher algebra or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Introduction to the formal theory of strategic interaction and to the intuitions behind the theory. Applications to a selection of problems in the natural and social sciences, such as biological evolution, tacit collusion in pricing, strategic behavior in international relations, and strategy in legislative voting. [Note: credit will not be granted if credit has been received for Econ 3014]



IS 3209H - Honors: Apocalypse Now? The Science and Policy of Preparing for a Catastrophe (ENVT)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Popular visions, policy response, and scientific underpinnings of potentially catastrophic societal problems past and present. Do we worry about the right things? How do scientists, politicians, and purveyors of popular culture assess which threats warrant attention? (two 50-min lect/disc plus multiple evening film screenings)



IS 3211H - Honors: Republic or Empire? The American 1890s (HIST)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
The 1890s are often seen as a cultural watershed for the United States. Depression, political movements, and a "splendid little war" against Spain and the Philippines represent only the surface of a decade which altered aspects of race, class, gender, and literary sensibility.



IS 3212H - Honors: Global Encounters and the Making of the Contemporary World, 1450 to the Present (HDIV)
(2.0 - 4.0 cr [max 4.0 cr]; Prereq-high school higher algebra, participation in Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
An exploration of the initial interaction among the indigenous people of Africa and the Americas with the people of Europe. Parallel immediate and long-term effects of these initial encounters are identified and discussed.



IS 3214H - Honors: Evolution and Culture of Human Aggression (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Exploration of aggression in medieval literature and culture and theorization about the adaptiveness of aggression. Group and individual aggression expressed by humans living under current conditions is explored from a cultural and evolutionary perspective.



IS 3215H - Honors: Sagas before the Fall: Culture, Climate, and Collapse in Medieval Iceland (ENVT)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Exploration of the literary and physical record of society in Viking-age Iceland from its settlement during the Medieval Warm Period, through centuries of environmental degradation and changing religion, to the onset of the Little Ice Age and the end of the Icelandic free state.



IS 3216H - Honors: Perspectives on Disability in Contemporary American Life (HDIV)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of disability studies, which favors a social rather than medical approach to understanding difference. History and struggle for civil rights, identity issues, contemporary controversies, and exploring the frontiers of one's own interest in disability by means of a service learning project.



IS 3217H - Honors: The Trial of Galileo (HIST)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
The dispute between Galileo and the Inquisition produced one of history's most notorious trials, an enduring symbol of the struggle between science and religion. Study of the complicated history behind the myth by re-enacting the trial and learning about the theology, science, and cultural politics of this tumultuous period.



IS 3234H - Honors: Intersections of Art and Science (FA)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
Explores the intersection of scientific discovery and aesthetic innovation, especially the ways in which scientists and artists have influenced one another's work. Examines the ways in which these different pursuits value notions of creativity.



IS 3235H - Honors: Politics and Film (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
Explores age-old questions of political science and philosophy--what is justice, what does citizenship mean, what is power, how do we relate to the "other"--through the lens of film. Examines American and foreign films and a variety of filmmakers to analyze effects of different cinematic and narrative techniques on our interpretations.



IS 3236H - Honors: Representations of Writers and Artists (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
An interdisciplinary approach is used in exploring the varied ways writers and artists are represented in books, television, film, and other media, comparing these representations with the lives and experiences of contemporary working writers and artists.



IS 3237H - Honors: The Power of Place: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Where We Live (ENVT)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; spring, offered periodically)
Goes beyond the image and myth of Lake Wobegon in examining the past and present of West Central Minnesota. An intensely interdisciplinary focus on environmental, social, political, and economic change and how modern global forces play out in this specific setting. Community leaders and experts play an active role in lecture and discussion.



IS 3238H - Honors: In Search of Nietzsche (IP)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
In this interdisciplinary course, read some books by and novels about Nietzsche in order to discover who this remarkable man was. Authors to be discussed: Nietzsche, D.H. Lawrence, Richard Wright, Milan Kundera, Nicholas Mosley, and Irvin D. Yalom.



IS 3239H - Honors: The Anatomy of Development and the "Common Good": Sardar Sarovar Dam in Gurjurat, India (SS)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; summer, offered periodically)
In the Global South, the unspoken basis of development projects is that they represent an attempt to serve the "common good." This assumption masks a torrent of disagreement and conflict about whose common good is served and how a particular project in question (e.g., dams, irrigation, introduction of new farming techniques) "develops" the nation.



IS 3240H - Honors: Proud Decade or Dark Age? The American 1950s (HIST)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Many old enough to remember the American 1950s look back on them with nostalgia. Some do not. This seminar studies several aspects of the decade: the Cold War at home and abroad, American society, literature, and popular culture. Student presentations focus on biographical research.



IS 3241H - Honors: Worldviews (SCI)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
The Copernican Revolution, culminating in Newton's System of the World, and modern cosmology beginning with the work of Einstein, Hubble, Friedmann, LemaƮtre, and Gamow, culminating in the contemporary theory of the universe's accelerated expansion.



IS 3242H - Honors: Two Cosmological Poets: Dante and Lucretius (IP)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Explore, compare, and contrast the cosmological poems "On the Nature of Things" (De Rerum Natura, DRN) of Titus Lucretius Carus (ca. 99-55 BCE) and "The Divine Comedy" (Commedia) of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321 CE). The two poets diverge on almost every aspect of cosmological outlook and notion of the moral life and right living.



IS 3243H - Honors: Dialogues and the Ancient World (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Examination of a number of literary dialogues from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods in order to better understand what the genre of dialogue is. Discussion of the issues raised by these dialogues to explore some of the key topics of antiquity and the Middle Ages and to see how these topics continue to affect modernity.



IS 3244H - Honors: Fascism, the Resistance, and Their Legacy in Contemporary Italy (IP)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Study of Italian Fascism and the Resistance and the continued significance these two phenomena have for contemporary Italian identity. Primary texts include historical documents together with works of literature and film. Students have the opportunity to research the topic of resistance to oppressive regimes in other national contexts.



IS 3245H - Honors: Archaeology Mythbusting (SS)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in the Honors program or #; spring, offered periodically)
This honors class explores the world of pseudoarchaeology and archaeological fraud, from Atlantis to aliens. Discuss why myths and pseudoscience are so prevalent in popular representations of the past, and whose interests are served by them. Students engage in scientific outreach through the media of their choice to spread the word about archaeological truth and fiction.



IS 3246H - Honors: Science, Poetry, and the Great War (SCI)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Theory of atoms and the rise of quantum theory in the years bracketing those of World War One, 1914-1918. The War as reflected in the lives of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Isaac Rosenberg, Robert Graves and others.



IS 3247H - Honors: Heroes of Ancient Greece and Rome (HUM)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-participation in Honors Program or #; fall, offered periodically)
Explore several types of heroes found in ancient Greek and Roman mythology and literature. Discuss such questions as: What makes a character a hero? What kinds of real-world issues did literary heroes help Greeks and Romans think about? Were they meant to be emulated? How might they be relevant to the modern world?



IS 3710 - Peer Tutoring in College
(1.0 cr [max 3.0 cr]; S-N only, fall, every year)
Tutor students in selected courses.



IS 3720 - Tutoring Writing Across the Disciplines
(1.0 - 2.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-Engl 1601 (or 1011) or equiv, soph standing, #, coreq Engl 3005 for students in their first sem at the Writing Room; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Tutor student writers at the Writing Room; meet regularly with other tutors for ongoing training in peer writing tutoring.



IS 3796 - Interdisciplinary Internship in the Helping Professions
(1.0 - 16.0 cr [max 32.0 cr]; S-N only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
One-semester educational experience providing field applications in the helping professions (social work, counseling, casework, child protection services, educational settings, human resource counseling, and the like) for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Psy 4102, approved internship form; Psy 4101 recommended.



IS 3800 - Practicum in Social Sciences
(1.0 - 2.0 cr [max 4.0 cr]; Prereq-#; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Supervised experience of selected learning activities such as discussion group leader, lab assistant, research assistant, or other teaching-related activities.



IS 3810 - Practicum in the Humanities
(1.0 - 2.0 cr [max 4.0 cr]; Prereq-#; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Supervised experience of selected learning activities such as discussion group leader, test review leader, research assistant, or other teaching-related activities.



IS 3893 - Prior Learning Directed Study
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
Individualized learning project combining prior learning with faculty-directed new learning, awarding academic credit for both. (When content is discipline-related, discipline designation will appear on transcript and credit may count toward appropriate general education requirement category.) Prereq-Approved directed study form.



IS 3896 - Prior Learning Internship
(1.0 - 16.0 cr [max 32.0 cr]; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
An educational experience in a work environment providing field application for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. The prior learning internship, such as in social service or business settings, occurred prior to the student's matriculation. The prior learning is documented and combined with faculty-directed new learning, with credit awarded for both. Prereq-Approved internship form.



IS 3991H - Honors Co-Curricular Independent Study
(1.0 - 2.0 cr [max 2.0 cr]; A-F only, fall, spring, every year)
Co-curricular honors credits may be earned by writing a paper that explores a co-curricular experience such as study abroad, off-campus internship, national student exchange, service-learning, or directed research. Students pursuing this option must seek pre-approval. Projects are directed and assessed by the Honors Director. Prereq-Approved co-curricular honors independent study form.



IS 3993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum. Prereq-Approved directed study form.



IS 3996 - Interdisciplinary Internship
(1.0 - 16.0 cr [max 32.0 cr]; S-N only, fall, spring, summer, every year)
One-semester educational experience in a work environment providing field applications for the student's theoretical classroom learning experiences. Prereq-Approved internship form.



IS 4993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
An on- or off-campus learning experience individually arranged between a student and a faculty member for academic credit in areas not covered in the regular curriculum. Prereq-Approved directed study form.



IS 4994H - Honors Capstone Project
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 8.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
A substantial scholarly or creative interdisciplinary work designed by the student working cooperatively with a project adviser. Upon completion, the project is defended before a panel of faculty from different disciplines. Successful completion of the honors capstone project is one of the requirements for graduating from UMM "with honors." Prereq-Approved Honors capstone project form, participation in Honors Program.



 
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