Catalog Home : Courses : Duluth Courses
 
Duluth Courses

Future effective dates indicate the first term the course may be available.

Find out when a particular course is offered using the Class Schedule.

Register for classes online.

 
HISTORY (HIST)
College of Liberal Arts
History
 
HIST 1027 - Introduction to Islam (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, summer, every year)
This course is an introduction to Islam delivered fully online through MOODLE. It starts with the history of the pre-Islamic Middle East, the life of the Prophet Muhammad; and the emergence of Islam. It follows the survey of the Qur'an and Traditions; the tenets of the faith, sectarian differences; gender and the family, and Islam's encounter with the Occident.



HIST 1207 - Dawn of Modern Europe (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.



HIST 1208 - Europe in the Modern Age (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Making of modern Europe; analysis of economic and technological revolution, collision of ideologies, imperialist expansion, revolutions, and wars.



HIST 1304 - US History Part I: 1607-1877 (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation. Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.



HIST 1305 - US History Part II: 1865-Present (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.



HIST 1400 - Modern World History from 1500 to present (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, summer, odd academic years)
This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day. This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East. This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations. Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.



HIST 2025 - Greece in History and Memory: The Mystery of the East and the Making of the West - Abroad
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Consent from the UMD International Education Office.; A-F or Aud, summer, odd academic years)
Taught on site in Greece. Examine the history of ancient Greece and how the image of Greece affected Western Europe through the Renaissance and Enlightenment.



HIST 2030 - China: An Ancient Civilization
(3.0 cr; =[FORS 2030]; Prereq-Admission to an approved study abroad program requires consent from the International Education Office.; A-F or Aud, summer, every year)
Taught on site in China. This course is an introduction to Chinese culture for students who are interested in but have little knowledge of ancient Chinese history. It will introduce Confusianism, Buddhism, Daoism, and other schools of thought. It will also introduce topics such as gender relations, Chinese medicine, food, and the martial arts. It will prepare students for other courses in Chinese history.



HIST 2095 - Special Topics in History (Various Titles to be Assigned)
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 8.0 cr]; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, offered periodically)
Special Topics in History to be assigned.



HIST 2325 - Muslim Societies (LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2525; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
This course will be delivered partially online through MOODLE. Muslim Societies is an introduction to the cultural and religious bases of the societies in which Islam is the predominant faith. It covers Islamic origins; the career of Muhammad; believes; observances; and religious and socio-political issues of the present day.



HIST 2345 - Science and Society: 1500 to Present (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2245; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Explores a series of creative moments in development of science and scientific methods within their broader social and cultural contexts.



HIST 2355 - United States Military History (LE CAT7)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Explore the history of the United States military from the colonial era to the present in the context of broader patterns of American history.



HIST 2357 - Women in American History (LE CAT7, LECD CAT07)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Roles and contributions of women in American life from colonial period to present.



HIST 2365 - Russia in the 20th Century (GLOBAL PER, LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 2265; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Revolutions of 1917, the Soviet period, collapse of the Soviet Union and evolution of Soviet successor states; 1900 to present.



HIST 2405 - History of Chinese Culture
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, summer, offered periodically)
This course examines the history of Chinese culture from the beginning of Chinese civilization, ca. 16th century BCE to the Republican period (1912 - 1949). Through a perspective of history, the course seeks to provide students with some basic knowledge of major Chinese cultures in a variety of fields, from philosophy, law, calligraphy, civil examination to gender, architect, art, medicine, and marital arts. It also intends to teach students the origin, development, and end of certain cultures or practices in the course of China's long history and their impacts on neighboring countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.



HIST 2410 - Modern China, Japan, Koreas, Vietnam and East Asia
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, summer, offered periodically)
This course is an introductory study to the history of major East Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. It intends to examine the political, cultural, legal, diplomatic, religious, military history in this region and the interactions among themselves. But, in the modern period, with the heavy influence of the West, the history of East Asia is no longer restricted in East Asia, it has become an integral part of the world history. Therefore, the course seeks to explore the western influence on East Asia and East Asian countries; responses to the West.



HIST 2515 - Precolonial Africa (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7, LECD CAT07)
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, summer, every year)
Political, cultural, and socioeconomic developments in precolonial Africa to 1800. Emphasis on slave trade, Islamic revolution, and European commercial penetration.



HIST 3038 - History of Christianity: Origins to 1054
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3238; A-F or Aud, spring, every year)
Examination of the historical (social, cultural, intellectual, and political) development of the Christian religion from the first century to the schism of 1054, with particular consideration of Eastern Christianity.



HIST 3055 - The Ancient Near East
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3055 or CSt 3055; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
History of Ancient Near East from birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 3100 B.C.) to arrival of Alexander (330 B.C.). Review of the ancient cultures of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Persia, Syria, and Palestine.



HIST 3091 - Directed Readings in History
(1.0 - 4.0 cr [max 16.0 cr]; Prereq-instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
By arrangement in the department: individual study of material below the research level or formal study of history at an accredited institution abroad.



HIST 3095 - Special Topics: (Various Titles to be Assigned)
(3.0 cr [max 15.0 cr]; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, offered periodically)
Special topics in history.



HIST 3097 - Internship in History
(1.0 - 3.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-60 credits, instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Supervised opportunity to pursue local or regional history under auspices of local museums, historical societies, commemorative commissions. Written and oral presentation of completed project.



HIST 3099 - Practicum in Teaching History
(3.0 cr [max 6.0 cr]; Prereq-History major, completion of 20 credits of 2xxx and above history courses with GPS of 3.3, completion of 90 credits, instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Assisting in teaching a 1xxx- or 2xxx-level history course; experience preparing course materials, advising students in learning about the grading process; experience in lecturing and leading discussions, conferences with professor about teaching issues.



HIST 3107 - The World of Late Antiquity: From Constantine to Justinian
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3007 or HmCl 3007.; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
The world of late antiquity, 234 to 565 A.D. produced a number historic changes marked by a radical departure from the classical world of Greece and Rome. The most apparent is the rise of Christianity and its acceptance as a legitimate religion by Constantine the Great. His world was marked by a movement toward feudalism, an entrenched political order, and state controlled economic institutions. The last person who visually connected himself to ancient Rome was Justinian. For many his reign marks the end of the ancient world.



HIST 3121 - The Age of the Heroes: Homer and his World
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Minimum 30 credits; Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3021 or CSt 3021 or HIST 3021; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Organization and development of the Greek world from the fourth millennium B.C. to 700 B.C. Descriptive study of Minoan and Mycenaean worlds emphasizing critical evaluation of archaeological, mythological, and artistic significance of Homer.



HIST 3131 - The Roman Republic
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3031 or HIST 3031; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Republican Rome from origins through collapse in 44 B.C., with emphasis on cultural and political attributes, leading figures, and causes of its demise.



HIST 3133 - From Homer to Alexander: Archaic and Classical Greece
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3333 or HmCl 3333; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Early history of Greek world from Heroic Age to death of Alexander the Great, 850-323 B.C.



HIST 3141 - The Roman Empire: The Imperial Republic and Imperial Age to Marcus Aurelius
(3.0 cr; Prereq-Credit will not be granted if already received for HmCl 3041 or HIST 3041; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Outlines a four century period in which ancient Rome was an empire beginning after the Second Punic War of 201 B.C. Republican Rome struggled with external possessions and the wealth this provided for the ruling elite in their effort to dominate the state. The failed reform movement of the Gracchi brothers guaranteed that a polarized society would continue. This led to the Roman Revolution and the establishment of the imperial dynasties, the first of which was created by Julius Caesar and his successors and Julio-Claudians. The Pax Romana was a direct outcome of the seizure of power by Julius Caesar and for the next two full centuries Rome governed a world that was larger than the continental United States. The signs of mismanagement, social stagnation, and military pressure at the end of the 2nd century A.D. in the reign of the philosopher-king Marcus Aurelius eventually led to a crisis that was both political as well as economic.



HIST 3235 - History and Soccer: The Rise of the World's Game (HUMANITIES, LE CAT7, LEIP CAT07)
(3.0 cr; =[FORS 3006]; Prereq-course offered while abroad in England, instructor consent; S-N only, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Taught on site in England. Over the past two centuries "soccer" has developed from an informal and regionally variable pastime into the single most popular sport on earth. This phenomenon is incomprehensible without the specific social, cultural, and geographic considerations of nineteenth and twentieth century Britain and its colonies. The sport will be used as a lens through which to examine the social and cultural aspects of the Industrial Revolution and the British Empire, focusing on the central question: "How did historical forces facilitate the rise and spread of the 'World's Game?" Covers the techniques of historical methodology and source analysis, and the general narrative of the Industrial Revolution and British Empire (including colonial perspectives), as well as the internal history of the game itself.



HIST 3243 - Europe in Crisis in the 20th Century
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Causes, conduct, and consequences of World Wars I and II from European perspective. Offered during day school and in Individualized Learning Program.



HIST 3244 - History of Holocaust
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Anti-Semitic and extermination policies of the Hitler regime. Origins of that regime and its policies. European anti-Semitism and the Jewish experience in Europe. Conduct of perpetrators, victims, onlookers, resisters. Theological responses and Holocaust representations. Historiographic controversies.



HIST 3257 - Modern France
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
History of France from 1789 to present.



HIST 3264 - Imperial Russia
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Peter I to end of reign of Alexander III.



HIST 3310 - Colonial America: The American Revolution
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
This course studies the social and political values, ideas, and experiences of colonial and revolutionary America that underlay the eventual formation of the US Constitution. Particular attention is given to the different ways in which American settlers from varying social and ideological contexts reconceived their own past history/histories,



HIST 3315 - Religion in Colonial America
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, spring, every year)
Examines the history of religion, in all its forms, during the period of Colonial America and the American Revolution. Special attention is given to the role of religion in the social and political changes of the colonies.



HIST 3318 - Slavery, Lincoln and the Civil War
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
Examines the Civil War and its causes, slavery, and the career of Abraham Lincoln.



HIST 3320 - American Popular Culture, 1929 to the Present
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Examines the intersection of the American popular arts--especially film, music, the visual arts, and literature--with national and international politics and American public life from the Great Depression to the present.



HIST 3346 - History of Hollywood
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3246; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Study of American cinema in terms of how Hollywood functioned, what kind of films it produced, and why. Through the lens of Hollywood, the core issues of American life in the twentieth century will be examined.



HIST 3365 - American Culture and Globalization
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, every year)
The U.S. as an importer and exporter of cultural and social trends from the colonial period to the present. Global relationships among reform movements, migration, business and labor, intellectual ideas, and popular culture. Analysis of the American character.



HIST 3386 - The United States and the World since 1898
(3.0 cr; Prereq-students will receive credit if 3384 (only) or 3385 (only) were taken; credit will not be granted if already received for 3384 and 3385.; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Examines United States foreign relations--political, economic, social, and cultural--since 1898.



HIST 3396 - The Vietnam War
(3.0 cr; A-F only, spring, every year)
Examines the Vietnam war as a transformative event in both the United States and Vietnam. It will cover the decades-long history of the conflict, and will address its legacies in U.S. foreign relations, domestic politics and culture, and Vietnamese life.



HIST 3462 - History of Modern Japan
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
History of Japan since 1800: Commodore Perry's mission to Japan, Meiji Revolution, Japan's expansion in Asia, World War II, developments in the postwar era.



HIST 3463 - History of Modern China
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
China's history from the Opium War to the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution and Deng Xiaoping's capitalist reform.



HIST 3465 - Twentieth Century China Politics
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, spring, every year)
Examines Chinese history from the late Qing to the present with a particular attention on the Chinese political, legal, social, and diplomatic history. Teaches the various factors that gradually influenced the historical course of China, the important roles that the West and Japan played in shaping modern China, the causes and consequences of the numerous political movements in the early stage of the People's Republic of China, and China's recent massive reform efforts to prosperity.



HIST 3505 - Colloquium for Majors
(1.0 cr; Prereq-History or teaching social studies major/minor; S-N only, fall, spring, every year)
Lecture and discussion groups on a variety of topics.



HIST 3615 - Modern Africa
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3515; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Africa, 1800 to present. Colonial conquest and domination, African resistance, nationalism, and problems of independence.



HIST 3616 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century Africa
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3516; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Generational, class, and gender conflicts in the wake of European occupation, impact of colonial and neocolonial domination, and African responses to that occupation and to the world economy in the 20th century; selected films and literary sources.



HIST 3726 - Modern Middle East: 18th Century-Present
(4.0 cr; A-F or Aud, spring, every year)
This course delivered partially online through MOODLE focuses on Middle Eastern history from the eighteenth century to the present. Nineteenth-century reform informs the course's major theme; the rise of the nation state in the Modern Middle East. Geographically, the course covers the Arabic-speaking regions, Turkey, Iran, and Israel.



HIST 3728 - Her Story: Women, History and Islam
(3.0 cr; A-F or Aud, summer, every year)
This course focuses on women in the pre-Islamic and Islamic Middle East. It takes us swiftly through 1,500 years of history by emphasizing certain themes such as patriarchy and pre-Islamic women; Islam and the founding discourses on women and the family; high Islamic culture and women; and, finally, colonial and post-colonial discourse on and by women. The aim of this course is to trace both her story and the emergence of her voice in the historiography of the Middle East. At the conclusion of this course student should understand and be able to characterize the historical developments that influenced women's roles in society and in the historical record, past and present.



HIST 3825 - Islamic History from Muhammad to the Ottomans
(4.0 cr; Prereq-minimum 30 credits; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3725; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
This intermediate level class on Islamic history is offered partially online. It covers the periods from ca. 570 to 1600 C.E. It includes an examination of the political leadership of the Prophet; the development of the caliphate and Community; sectarian differences; the rise of the independent states; military and land tenure practices; social history; the influx of Turks, Mongol and Timurid invasions; and ends with the Ottoman and Safavid dynasties.



HIST 3939 - Europe in the Age of Renaissance and Reformation: 1348-1648
(3.0 cr; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3239; A-F or Aud, fall, every year)
Social, economic, political, and cultural development of Europe from the Black Death to the Thirty Years' War. Central themes include Renaissance humanism and art, Columbus and European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, and the era of religious wars.



HIST 3940 - Early Modern England: 1485-1689
(3.0 cr; =[HIST 3245]; Prereq-credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 3240; A-F or Aud, spring, offered periodically)
Early Modern English society and culture from the 15th to the 17th centuries.



HIST 4727 - Middle Eastern History Through Film (LEIP CAT07)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-30 credits, no grad credit; credit will not be granted if already received for HIST 4527; A-F only, spring, every year)
Explores topics in Middle Eastern history-religious, political, social, and cultural-from the rise of Islam to the present through film.



HIST 5094 - Directed Research
(4.0 cr [max 12.0 cr]; Prereq-instructor consent, maximum 4 credits may be applied to grad program; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, summer, every year)
Directed Research



HIST 5905 - History Seminar
(4.0 cr [max 8.0 cr]; Prereq-instructor consent; A-F or Aud, fall, spring, offered periodically)
Advanced study and individual research on a selected historical topic or theme; senior capstone course for history majors. (2.5 hrs lect, 1 hr student/faculty consultation)



 
Search.

Search Programs

Related links.

Admission and Application

One Stop
for tuition, course registration, financial aid, academic calendars, and more