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Morris Courses

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ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)
Division of Social Sciences
Division of Social Sciences - Adm
 
ANTH 1111 - Introductory Cultural Anthropology (SS)
(4.0 cr; fall, spring, every year)
Varieties and range of human behavior as revealed through the comparative study of cultures throughout the world. Concepts developed by anthropologists to explain both the unity and diversity of humankind.



ANTH 1812 - Human Societies: Past and Present, Fact and Fiction (IC)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Consider fictional representations of human societies in the fantasy, science fiction, and alternate history genres. Compare these to ethnographic and archaeological readings, exploring the diversity of human societies, all around the world, from our earliest human ancestors through the modern era, with particular focus on social/political structures, gender roles, religion, and ethnicity. Consider what factors most strongly affect the structure of human societies, how these are or are not reflected in fiction, and how fiction reflects the authors' beliefs of what constitute the fundamental aspects of humankind, human personalities, and human societies.



ANTH 1813 - Culture on TV: An Introduction to Anthropology (IC)
(2.0 cr; Prereq-new college student in their first semester of enrollment at UMM; fall, offered periodically)
Introduction to basic anthropological concepts using popular depictions of "culture" and anthropology in the media, specifically, in reality TV. Students watch clips or episodes of TV shows like "Cops," "Sister Wives," "Run's House," and "Deadliest Catch." These serve as a springboard to critical engagement with anthropological concerns and concepts like cultural relativism, ethics of research and entertainment, religion, gift exchange, sexuality, gender, marriage, and kinship.



ANTH 1993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
Individualized on- or off-campus research project or other learning activity not covered in the regular Anthropology curriculum. Topic determined by the student and instructor.



ANTH 2101 - Biological Anthropology (SCI-L)
(5.0 cr; A-F only, spring, every year)
What is human nature, and how did we get this way? The class covers evolutionary theory, modern human biodiversity, our primate relatives, and human evolution. Includes a 90-minute lab session.



ANTH 2103 - Archaeology (SS)
(4.0 cr; fall, every year)
Survey of prehistoric and early historic cultures from around the world. Covers the development of hunting and gathering societies, origins of agriculture, and growth of urbanization and state-level societies. (two 65-minute lectures, one 120-minute lab session)



ANTH 2121 - Reading Ethnography (SS)
(4.0 cr; fall, offered periodically)
This class surveys ethnography (a key genre of anthropology writing) including classical and contemporary works. We will consider issues about how research is conducted, how it is represented in writing, and ethics and consider the variety of ways in which anthropologists approach their work; some locations, topics, and approaches may be determined by student interests.



ANTH 2202 - Men and Masculinities (SS)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-some academic background or knowledge about gender and sexuality is recommended; fall, offered periodically)
Introduction to the field of men and masculinity. Examines cultural construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, media, and other social realms, with a focus on contemporary American, Chinese, Mexican, and Japanese societies. Highlights the multiple masculinities that exist, showing which are privileged and what effects this hierarchy of masculinities has. Topics include men's movements and networks, men's socialization, male sexuality and fertility, male aggression and violence, the idea of machismo, intimacy and friendship among males, fatherhood, men's experiences with sports and work, media representations of boys and men, and the social construction of masculinities in different historical and cultural contexts. Helps students understand how masculinity as a social concept affects their relationships with the people in their lives, approaching gender problems in a rational way, and developing cultural sensitivity toward masculinity issues.



ANTH 2204 - Anthropology of Education: Learning and Schooling in Ethnographic Perspective (SS)
(4.0 cr; spring, offered periodically)
Introduction to the central concepts and methods used by cultural anthropologists to study and understand educational processes. Exploration of approaches to diverse educational settings, including both formal and informal contexts. The seminar-style format of the course emphasizes critical thinking and encourages students to connect the readings and course topics to their own lives and experiences.



ANTH 2206 - Sex, Marriage, and Family (HDIV)
(4.0 cr; spring, offered periodically)
Introduction to classic anthropological theories of sexuality, kinship, and marriage. Consider how emotional and experiential aspects of sex, marriage, and family life--love and romance as well as conflict and control--are shaped by formal arrangements known as "social structure." Topics such as gift-exchange, cousin-marriage, patrilineal and matrilineal descent, incest, arranged marriage, and the concept of "blood" relations in North American families are addressed. Also explore recent anthropological work on such topics as transnational adoption, marriage migration, and new reproductive technologies.



ANTH 2993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
Individualized on- or off-campus research project or other learning activity not covered in the regular anthropology curriculum. Topic determined by the student and instructor.



ANTH 3204 - Culture, Food, and Agriculture (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; =[SOC 3204]; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #; spring, every year)
Same as Soc 3204. Examines the globalization of food systems utilizing a political ecology perspective to understand global and local dimensions of production, marketing, and consumption. Emphasis on connections between food production and national identity, relations of power, genetic engineering, environmental destruction, the politics of world hunger, and local efforts to achieve sustainability.



ANTH 3206 - Ecological Anthropology (ENVT)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or 2101 or 2103; fall, every year)
Exploration of human ecology and the causes and effects of environmental change, using data from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on understanding the social and economic context of human adaptations to the environment. Examination of cultures worldwide and through time that have (or have failed to) live sustainably.



ANTH 3455 - North American Archaeology
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or 2103; fall, spring, offered periodically)
The archaeology of the societies located in the current United States and Canada prior to European colonization. Includes the earliest human colonization of North America (circa 12,000 years ago), early hunting and gathering societies, the development of agriculture, and the formation of complex chiefdoms. Emphasis on the diversity of cultures, languages, economies, and environments found throughout precontact North America.



ANTH 3502 - Latinos in the Midwest (SS)
(4.0 cr; spring, offered periodically)
Explore the history and experiences of Latinos in the Midwest United States. Starting from a historical perspective, the course examines issues including (im)migration, undocumented status, language, religion, race/ethnicity, media, and economy. A comparative framework emphasizes the unique context of migration into (rather than out of) rural communities as well as those far from a national border. Given the context of the local Morris community, the focus is particularly on rural Latino experiences.



ANTH 3601 - Social Justice and Human Rights in Latin America (IP)
(4.0 cr; =[SOC 3601]; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #; fall, every year)
Same as Soc 3601. Examination of social, economic, and political transformations in Latin America with an emphasis on social justice and human rights. Critical approaches to understand U.S.-Latin American relations, labor struggles, rebellions to define alternative development, indigenous resistance to encroachment on resources and ways of life, civil war and genocide, and efforts to create a more environmentally and socially sustainable development.



ANTH 3602 - Women in Latin America (IP)
(4.0 cr; =[SOC 3602]; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101 or #; spring, every year)
Same as Soc 3602. Study of the social, economic, and political positions of women in Latin American countries. Topics include class and ethnic differences, women in the labor force, and women's participation in political movements through the lens of feminist theory.



ANTH 3603 - Latin American Archaeology
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or 2103; fall, spring, offered periodically)
Latin America from the earliest human colonization to European contact. Includes societies from northern Mexico through Tierra del Fuego, as well as the Caribbean. Covers early hunting gathering societies, origins of agriculture, the rise of powerful states and empires, and their influence on later Colonial-period societies.



ANTH 3604 - Gender and Sexuality in Latin America (IP)
(4.0 cr; spring, offered periodically)
This course provides a survey of gender and sexuality in contemporary Latin America. Course readings will attend to the ways gender and sexuality intersect with factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, and religion. Topics will include women⿿s activism, public health, LGBTQ activism, tourism, and globalized labor.



ANTH 3701 - Forensic Anthropology (SCI-L)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-2101 or Biol 2102; fall, odd academic years)
Recovery, identification, and analysis of human skeletal remains, including investigation techniques, identification of age, sex, ancestry, and cause of death. Two 65-min lectures and one 2-hour lab weekly.



ANTH 3704 - Anthropological Genetics
(4.0 cr; Prereq-2101 or Biol 1111; A-F only, fall, offered periodically)
Genetic variation in Homo sapiens, links between genes and behavior, and environmental effects on gene expression. Inheritance, "race," and population genetics. Genetics as a data source in paleoanthropology, including DNA recovered from fossil hominins. Human genetic change since the development of agriculture. Basic bioinformatic methods.



ANTH 3993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
Individualized on- or off-campus research project or other learning activity not covered in the regular anthropology curriculum. Topic determined by the student and instructor.



ANTH 4411 - Seminar in Anthropological Methodology (E/CR)
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc; A-F only, fall, every year)
Exploration and evaluation of methods used in cultural anthropology; qualitative methods; research ethics; and design of qualitative research project.



ANTH 4501 - Archaeological Fieldschool (SS)
(4.0 cr [max 8.0 cr]; Prereq-#; summer, offered periodically)
Experience in archaeological fieldwork, including excavation, survey, artifact processing, and living under field conditions.



ANTH 4901 - Seminar in Anthropological Theory
(4.0 cr; Prereq-1111 or Soc 1101, 4 addtl cr in Anth or Soc; A-F only, spring, every year)
Examines the historical development of anthropological theory, influences that shaped historical and contemporary anthropological theories, and major debates regarding their interpretation.



ANTH 4993 - Directed Study
(1.0 - 5.0 cr [max 10.0 cr]; fall, spring, every year)
Individualized on- or off-campus research project or other learning activity not covered in the regular anthropology curriculum. Topic determined by the student and instructor.



 
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